Large Algae Bloom Still Ongoing As Toledo Officials Declare Water Safe to Drink

 

Algae bloom Lake Eerie

(Large algae bloom still visible in Lake Erie satellite shot on August 4, 2014. Image source: LANCE-MODIS.)

Warming, more toxic waters. It’s a problem directly driven by human-caused climate change. And for Toledo, Ohio, this weekend, it’s a reality that was starkly driven home as water services to half a million residents were suddenly shut off. There, in the waters of Lake Erie, a massive bloom of freshwater cyanobacteria pumped out enough poison to put human health at risk and force Ohio officials to declare a state of emergency.

Emerging Threat to Public Health

In Northern Ohio, water safety officials have been nervously testing Lake Erie supplies for many years now. Microbial blooms in western Lake Eerie were on the rise and the worry was that the new blooms may pose a future health threat as both climate change and agricultural run-off intensified.

By 2011, the wettest summer on record and warm waters in Lake Erie helped trigger a major outbreak of cyanobacteria blooms which ultimately resulted in more than 10 billion dollars in damage due to fouled waters, toxic beaches, and losses to the fishing and tourism industries of Lake Erie’s bordering states. Last year, a massive bloom caused some small northern Ohio towns to temporarily cut off water supplies. By last weekend, the entire water supply of Toledo, Ohio was under threat from the microbe-produced toxin called microcystin.

Water Poisoning by Microbes

Microcystin is a potent toxin produced by the small-celled, fresh water cyanobacteria. The substance is unsafe at levels greater than 1 part per billion in drinking water (according to the World Health Organization). Consumption of the toxin results in headaches, nausea and vomiting. Microcystin is directly toxic to the liver with exposure resulting in severe damage. It also results in damage to the digestive system and low levels of exposure have been linked in studies to various forms of abdominal cancer.

Since the toxin is a chemical that has already been produced by bacteria, usual sanitation methods, such as boiling water, are ineffective and may even help to concentrate the poison, making it more potent. So the toxin must be prevented from entering the water supply at the source — which can be difficult if much of the water source is contaminated, as is the case with Lake Erie.

A Threat Driven By Climate Change and Human Activity

As waters warm, they host larger and larger blooms of cyanobacteria harmful to animal life, including humans. The microbes thrive in warm, nutrient-rich water. And under climate change waters both warm even as runoff in certain regions increases due to more frequent bursts of heavy rainfall. This has especially been the case for the central and north central sections of the US, this year, which have suffered extensive and frequent downpours together with record hourly and daily rainfall totals in many areas.

The deluges flush nutrients down streams and into major bodies of water. The water, warmed by human-caused climate change, are already a haven for the cyanobacteria. So the blooms come to dominate surface waters. In addition, the runoff contains added nutrients due to large amounts of phosphorus and other agriculture-based fertilizers. It’s a combination that really gives these dangerous microbes a boost. Under such conditions, the massive resulting blooms can turn the surface lake water into green sludge.

Dead Zones, Anoxic Waters

Lake Erie algal blooms, August 2011

(Green cyanobacteria in Lake Erie during the large algae bloom of 2013. Image source: University of Michigan.)

Eventually, the cyanobacteria leech the surface waters of nutrients and begin to die out. As they do, they undergo decay which strips oxygen from the waters. Through this process, dangerous, anoxic dead zones radiate from areas previously dominated by large cyanobacteria blooms. The dead zone and toxin producing bacteria often result in large-scale fish kills and the wide-scale fouling of waters that can be so damaging to various industries. However, the dead zones themselves are havens for other toxic microbes — the hydrogen sulfide producing kind.

Water is Declared Safe — Information Still Unavailable to the Public

Today, water safety officials lifted the ban on water use for Toledo, claiming that water was now safe to use and drink after the water system was properly flushed. Officials apparently conducted six tests to confirm water supply safety but have not yet made results public. Personnel with the EPA unofficially stated that microcystin levels were at 3 parts per billion on the day the water was declared unsafe but that water was now safe for residents.

The declaration was met with widespread criticism due to the fact that data on water testing was not made publicly available, reducing confidence in the safety officials’ assertions and causing many residents to question their veracity. State and city water officials say they plan to post the data on their website, but have yet to confirm a time.

Meanwhile, the large cyanobacteria bloom is still ongoing. Experts expect the bloom to peak sometime in mid September and then begin to recede with the advent of fall and cooler weather. With more than a month and a half still to go, Lake Erie water troubles may just be starting to ramp up.

Links:

Toledo Water Ban Lifted, Results Kept Secret

Don’t Drink the Water

LANCE-MODIS

University of Michigan

Spring Rain, Foul Algae in Ailing Lake Eerie

Toxins in Water Lead to State of Emergency

 

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65 Comments

  1. eleggua

     /  August 4, 2014

    Likely you already saw this one:

    http://www.mercurynews.com/central-coast/ci_26265214/dead-anchovies-inundate-santa-cruz-harbor-leave-foul
    08/03/2014 06:37:29 AM PDT
    ‘Dead anchovies inundate Santa Cruz harbor, leave foul smell’

    The mass fish kill happened after a school of anchovies swarmed into the harbor where the already-limited oxygen supply simply ran out, harbor officials say. The die-off prompted the closure of the launch ramp while they mopped up the dead fish. By Friday, the odor of rotting fish punctuated the air over the harbor where the water was littered with scores of anchovies floating among the docks and into the rocks.
    ……
    While the anchovies are available by the thousands, they’re of no use for most fishermen, Bruno said. He picked one up from the water and pointed at a red mark on its belly, its stomach had burst, the first sign of decay.
    ……
    Haynes said the fish kill isn’t the largest on record, pointing to larger ones in the 60s, 70s and 80s, before the harbor was able to use aerators to pump oxygen into the water. But he noted it was likely the largest one since 1990.
    ……

    Three beaches remain under a no-swim advisory with an elevated level of bacteria reported at Main, Cowell and New Brighton beaches.

    Shellfish: The state Department of Public Health is advising people not to eat recreationally harvested bivalve shellfish, such as clams, mussels and whole scallops. There are dangerous levels of domoic acid toxin, which could cause amnesic shellfish poisoning and lead to illness or death.

    Beaches: Main, Cowell and New Brighton beaches have swim advisories issued because of elevated levels of bacteria, making it unsafe for to enter the water.

    Lakes: County officials issued an advisory for Kelly and Pinto lakes, which have a blue-green algae bloom. The algae produces toxins that could cause rashes, skin and eye irritation, allergic reactions, gastrointestinal issues, serious illness and death.

    Reply
  2. Record-setting algal bloom in Lake Erie caused by agricultural and meteorological trends consistent with expected future conditions

    In 2011, Lake Erie experienced the largest harmful algal bloom in its recorded history, with a peak intensity over three times greater than any previously observed bloom. Here we show that long-term trends in agricultural practices are consistent with increasing phosphorus loading to the western basin of the lake, and that these trends, coupled with meteorological conditions in spring 2011, produced record-breaking nutrient loads. An extended period of weak lake circulation then led to abnormally long residence times that incubated the bloom, and warm and quiescent conditions after bloom onset allowed algae to remain near the top of the water column and prevented flushing of nutrients from the system. We further find that all of these factors are consistent with expected future conditions. If a scientifically guided management plan to mitigate these impacts is not implemented, we can therefore expect this bloom to be a harbinger of future blooms in Lake Erie.

    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/03/28/1216006110.abstract

    Algal Blooms May Become the Norm in Lake Erie
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/algal-blooms-may-become-the-norm-in-lake-erie/

    Reply
  3. Reblogged this on The Secular Jurist and commented:
    Visions of Elizabeth Kolbert’s SIXTH EXTINCTION which everyone can now plainly see. Death by a thousand cuts…

    Reply
  4. It’s fascinating to read Barry Commoner’s shocking description of the ecological damage done to lake Erie in chapter 5 of ‘The Closing Circle’ . In it he explains how the ecosystem collapsed quite suddenly following a heat wave in September 1953, which stalled the over turning circulation causing low oxygen zones (made much worse by eutophication mainly due to phosphate in detergents) which wiped out huge numbers of aquatic insects such as mayflies, this then had major repercussions for species on higher trophic levels. The system never recovered.

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  August 4, 2014

      And the only thing keeping Lake Ontario from the same fate, at least near term, is that it is much deeper and I suspect better mixed lake.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2014/08/04/lake-erie-ontario-cyanobacteria/13596475/?from=global&sessionKey=&autologin=

        ‘Toledo’s water trouble not likely here’
        5:59 p.m. EDT August 4, 2014

        …Metzger, the (Monroe County Water Authority)’s chief engineer, was able to offer Noce a note of reassurance as he stood Sunday on the sandy shore of Lake Ontario, from which the authority draws its drinking water: Not a bit of blue-green algae in sight, and a Toledo scenario is very unlikely to happen in Monroe County.

        “You can never say never,” Metzger said. “But western Lake Erie and Lake Ontario where our water intakes are located are two very different lakes.”
        ….
        Both Lake Ontario and the sources of Rochester drinking water, Hemlock and Canadice lakes about 30 miles south of the city, have fewer nutrients to fuel cyanobacteria growth than western Lake Erie. They’re also deeper and thus colder.

        The eastern end of Lake Erie, where Buffalo is located, also is cleaner and deeper than the west end, Boyer said.

        (complete article linked above)

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Uh-oh.

        http://www.13wham.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/black-sludge-along-lake-ontario-14364.shtml
        ‘Black sludge along Lake Ontario’
        Wednesday, July 30 2014, 06:14 PM EDT
        “It was a black tar like sludge that smelled like rotten eggs,” she said. That sludge first washed up on her beach, along with garbage, seaweed and algae, last Thursday. “There was no rain, there was no wind, nothing, just big waves and brought up that black sludge so my question is where did it come from and is it dangerous.”

        More of the sludge washed up on shore this past Monday.

        The Monroe County Department of Public Health tells us they only test public beaches. They told Resnick to go by the status of the nearby public beaches to know if it’s okay to swim. But she says that’s not enough.

        “I don’t know what the answers are. I guess we just want some answers,” she said.

        We showed the pictures to an environmental scientist who tells us it looks like it could be something natural like algae that was decomposing somewhere else and was brought to shore by a change in weather.

        The Lake Ontario Waterkeeper out of Toronto, Canada said while they don’t know for sure they believe it is Cladophora algae. They explained the algae usually grows at the bottom of the lake and washes to shore when it dies. It also smells like rotten eggs. People are advised not to swim in area where there is a lot of dead algae because it can harbor bacteria.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Yikes. Thanks for that info. Reason for serious concern. That article hasn”t received much attention elsewhere; none that I can tell.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Cool beans. Looking forward to your cogent analysis.

        Reply
  5. Griffin

     /  August 4, 2014

    So, a very cold winter. Very heavy ice cover on the lakes, then followed by a summer that has been cooler than most recent one’s, and yet this algae blooms happily. This does not portend well for the future. This will only get worse.

    Reply
  6. Mark from New England

     /  August 4, 2014

    These cyanobacteria are nasty. I for one would not drink Toledo public water quite yet. But then again, I don’t live there.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 4, 2014

      ‘Holy Toledo’

      http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/The_Toledo_Water_Crisis

      Nowhere has the abandonment of reason and of science on the part of half of the American political system had such serious consequences as it has had on our attempts to craft national responses to our cascade of interconnected environmental problems, most of which have some basis in the Great Climate Change Hoax, which half of our political system believe is a scam to suck up that sweet grant money or, as Paul Ryan so brilliantly put it last week, to raise taxes. I don’t know but, maybe, if a half-million people still don’t have potable drinking water in a couple of weeks, we might take the whole thing a little more seriously than we have, and we might conclude that the planet’s getting genuinely pissed at us all…

      (complete piece at link above)

      Reply
      • Good for Esquire!

        Recently read about how Russia’s oil and gas fields will deplete in 20 years or so. And they’re still full bore for exploration in the Arctic. It’s a bad game to keep playing. I think we know how it ends.

        Reply
      • Apneaman

         /  August 5, 2014

        Those Republicans are so clever. Yep, the quickest and easiest way to wealth and power is to spend 8-10 years in post secondary education running up a massive student loan debt, then play that lottery known as the research grant game. Easiest way to get rich quick. Sounds reasonable.

        Reply
        • Water crisis in W VA due to coal deregulation, water crisis in Toledo due to climate change and mismanaged runoff, Water crisis in California due to climate change. I think it’s pretty fair to say we can blame failed republican policy and total and utter conservative blindness. I mean there are stupid political ideologies and then there are those that shoot themselves and everyone else that they can in the head.

    • Prokaryotes don’t mess around.

      Reply
  7. eleggua

     /  August 4, 2014

    Neat piece ^^^, though it’s not that the planet’s pissed at us as it’s we’re pissed at ourselves.
    Have been throughout ‘history’. It’s time to change that tune.

    Lovelock’s Gaia theory = we are a part of the planet, not distinct from it, not seperate from it.
    We’re just another functioning part of it. (Though perhaps a replaceable part.)

    Reply
  8. Too many people, too much heat, too many problems.

    Reply
    • They just don’t quit.

      Reply
      • Apneaman

         /  August 5, 2014

        If the same thing happens (and it’s possible) at one of the many tar sands tailings ponds, it will be epic. All plans are to keep expanding/raping up there. Not to worry, I’m sure my fearless leader Stephan Harper has it covered.

        Reply
        • I keep waiting to see one of those massive storm systems our atmosphere has tended to conjure up head on a collision course with Alberta.

          Bob and I agree on this one. Just a matter of fracking time. They need to shut that beast down.

      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Indeed. For so many reasons:
        http://gptarsandsresistance.org/protect-the-sacred-ii-man-camps/
        ‘Protect the Sacred II: Man Camps’

        …Also largely missed in the mainstream discourse around the Tar sands are communities such as the Beaver Lake Cree and Athabasca Chepewyan near the Tar Sands extraction complex in “Alberta”, and the Lakota, Dakota, Ponca, Osage, Omaha, Caddo, and many other native communities standing squarely in the way of the pipeline through the plains of the “United States”. Tar Sands extraction and transportation, taken in the larger context of North American industrial extraction, serve to further the colonization and attempted subjugation and assimilation of the indigenous people of Turtle Island. This continued colonization is still accompanied by violence and terror, including sexual violence and abuse. This sexual violence is directly correlated to the boom and bust cycle of industrial extraction and the communities it occurs in, and culturally correlated to the way of thinking that allows our culture to perpetuate violence against the earth.

        (entire pieced linked above)

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        A bit more from the above:

        “Now the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society must prepare for man camps that will be within 66 miles of the Rosebud Reservation. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe already faces the problem of predators preying on young native girls for sex trafficking. If the KXL pipeline is approved this exploitation will increase.”

        ” The Rosebud Sioux are not the only people at risk. There is a man camp planned to be within 10 miles of the Cheyenne River Reservation in “South Dakota,” an area that is 71% Native American and the fourth poorest county in the so-called United States. Poverty and limited resources leave the area at particular risk. In “Montana” a man camp will be 25 miles from the Fort Peck Reservation. In so-called Nebraska, man camps will be 50 miles from the Santee Reservation and 60 miles from the Yankton Reservation. The federal government has proven countless times that it does not care about Native Americans, which makes it easy for pipeliners to commit violence and prey on Native women with no repercussions. Government complicity in violence against women is a manifestation of continued colonization: dominant society violently repressing native populations by preying on those seen as most vulnerable.

        As anti-extraction activists trying to be good allies and in solidarity with indigenous peoples it is important for us to target man camps in our messaging, dialogue and actions. Native American Women advocating for survivors of sexual assaults on their reservations already have their hands full. As white settler allies, it is important for us to draw the connections and include in our dialogue the increased violence against women, specifically Native American women, that results from these extreme energy projects. If the Keystone XL pipeline is built, settler allies need to be on the front lines to confront the man camps.”

        Reply
        • Funny how this type of activity is usually associated with organized crime… Fossil fuel mafia complete with neo colonial type exploitation. It’s as if the whole privateer system has again been resurrected, but in this case centering around fossil fuel extraction.

          I think the destructive behavior just breeds more of the same.

          Good for those strong ladies!

      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Yes. They need and deserve support.

        http://www.hollywoodinterrupted.com/2012/04/24/fracked-up-hollywoodinterrupted-visits-americas-new-boomtown/
        ‘FRACKED UP!: Hollywood,Interrupted Visits America’s New Boomtown’
        24 April 2012
        Three hundred miles due north of Deadwood, South Dakota and roughly half as many years past its 1870s heyday, a new gold rush is threatening to give that storied spectacle of exuberant capitalism a run for its money.

        ““It’s like every other boom that’s happened since the Gold Rush,” says Sara. “It brings out the assholes of the earth.””

        (entire article linked above)

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        Photo essay:

        http://www.businessinsider.com/we-visited-the-wild-and-dangerous-town-at-the-heart-of-canadas-oil-sands-2012-8?op=1
        ‘Step Into The Dangerous City At The Heart Of The Alberta Oil Sands’
        Aug. 19, 2012

        from the comments:
        “Before: a pristine wilderness and prime native hunting ground for countless generations. Now: a permanently destroyed hellhole with completely contaminated water, soil, and air. Now more food for the former inhabitants, who were conned into giving up their land. More fossil fuel pollution for the planet. But that’s cool, it’s how the system works, right? As long as YOU get your high salary, who gives a crap what the consequences are? Free energy? Solar power? No way, I want my V10 and my hamburgers.”

        Reply
  9. eleggua

     /  August 5, 2014

    The tide is slowly but surely turning:

    http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/2014/08/05/Water-water-everywhere-The-fouling-of-Toledo-s-water-supply-is-an-environmental-game-changer/stories/201408050041
    ‘Water, water everywhere … The fouling of Toledo’s water supply is an environmental game changer’
    August 5, 2014 12:00 AM

    One thing I keep hearing from sources while covering Toledo’s algae-induced water crisis is this: It’s a game changer.

    It has instantly made the environment a key issue in Ohio’s 2014 gubernatorial race between Republican incumbent John Kasich and Democratic challenger Ed Fitzgerald.

    It will, no doubt, amplify the debate over whether the future of Lake Erie should be reconsidered by a conservative majority in the Ohio General Assembly which, to date, has been bending over backward to keep strict — but difficult-to-enforce — regulations from being imposed on the agricultural industry to control farm runoff, as opposed to more voluntary incentives.

    No longer will eyes roll when someone suggests a metro area of 500,000 people in the world’s most water-blessed region could suddenly find themselves scrambling for fresh drinking water because of pollution. The unthinkable has happened. And this event is a game changer for the Great Lakes region because it could happen again.

    “Maybe rattling the cage is a good thing,” Bill Strable, superintendent of pumping stations at Toledo’s Collins Park Water Treatment Plant told me. “You don’t realize how much we rely on water until you don’t have it.”

    Certainly we’re all about to learn some lessons from what happened in Toledo. It’s a game changer.

    (entire article linked above)

    Reply
    • Well, they can control farm runoff, and that will help matters. But without climate change mitigation, they’re just buying some time. The pattern will increasingly be drought or flood for the region so the general runoff issue intensifies even as the water warms.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        “But without climate change mitigation, they’re just buying some time. ”

        Definitely. The articles I linked are evidence that the tide of public opinion and concern is beginning to shift in the positive, proper direction.

        Reply
  10. eleggua

     /  August 5, 2014

    http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140805/METRO06/308050024/Lake-Erie-wake-up-call-buoys-conservationists
    ‘Lake Erie ‘wake-up call’ buoys conservationists’
    August 5, 2014 at 1:00 am


    “Personally, I think this is a wake-up call,” said Christine Mayer, a professor of environmental science who works at the University of Toledo’s Lake Erie Center. “This is a time when our decision-makers and our society need to evaluate whether it’s time to help move forward with regulation of the factors that contribute to the algal blooms.”

    (entire article linked above)

    Reply
  11. eleggua

     /  August 5, 2014

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/henry-henderson/toledos-troubles-vivid-ex_b_5649677.html
    ‘Toledo’s Troubles: Vivid Example of Why We Need to Act on Climate and Clean Water’
    08/04/2014 11:23 pm EDT

    There are very real decisions that need to be made NOW about policies and practices that will help avoid this sorry situation from increasing in Ohio, and becoming totally commonplace in America.

    Toledo’s troubles make it vividly clear that as a nation, we need to address water pollution and carbon emissions. Policies to achieve these goals are being proposed and advanced now, and the situation in Toledo shows how critical it is that we embrace them.

    (entire article linked above and below)

    Reply
  12. eleggua

     /  August 5, 2014

    http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/hhenderson/toledos_troubles_act_on_climat.html

    © Natural Resources Defense Council
    NRDC is the nation’s most effective environmental action group, combining the grassroots power of 1.4 million members and online activists with the courtroom clout and expertise of more than 350 lawyers, scientists and other professionals.

    The New York Times calls us “One of the nation’s most powerful environmental groups.” The National Journal says we’re “A credible and forceful advocate for stringent environmental protection.”

    Reply
  13. Bernard

     /  August 5, 2014

    Equally impressive algae bloom east of Vardo, Norway:

    http://1.usa.gov/1spIaEe

    Reply
  14. Spike

     /  August 5, 2014

    Water water everywhere, nor any drop to drink….

    Did anyone else see the Aarhus University report recently showing that the use of water by conventional power plants will drink up much of our potable water supply by 2040?

    http://blueandgreentomorrow.com/2014/07/30/investment-in-wind-and-solar-energy-needed-to-avoid-water-crisis-study-warns/

    And with fracking ??

    Reply
    • I love how they’re on the ball with this. The Toledo water scare looks to be one hell of a game changer.

      Reply
      • Larry

         /  August 5, 2014

        Oh ye of faith! If the insanely huge bloom in 2011 didn’t change anything, if Grand Lake St. Mary’s (a large inland lake in West Central Ohio) being 100% closed to human activity for 3 summers in a row didn’t change anything, if (fill in the blank) didn’t change anything, well, let’s just say I’m not holding my breath.

        We’ve (I live just a few miles south of Lake Erie in the county west of Cleveland) known about these blooms and cause(s) of them for decades. Farm runoff continues to get worse and worse in the western basin, and our Republican leaders (sic) continue to blame the Detroit water treatment plant. Admittedly it is a problem, but to say it pales in comparison to the western Ohio farm runoff is giving Detroit too much credit.

        The State just recently passed it’s “harshest” legislation to date, which entails certification for farmers who will be spreading fertilizers. Which will have a grand total of zero impact since they’ll still be able to spread as much as they want whenever they want.

        As long as the farm lobby has the party of our governor and both legislative chambers in its pockets, which isn’t going to change anytime soon, these blooms are going to continue to cause problems.

        Reply
  15. Mark from New England

     /  August 5, 2014

    Regarding the close up picture of the slimy green shoreline: when even the catfish die off, you know there’s not much oxygen in the water, as most catfish are pretty tolerant of low oxygen levels. Or could this catfish have died of the mycrocystin toxin directly?

    Reply
    • If the levels are high enough. They’re generally very hardy and can survive in pretty nasty water.

      Climate change does this to rivers, lakes and oceans on a mass scale. Eventually the waters vent toxins into the atmosphere. It was probably the primary killing mechanism during the Permian and throughout the other hothouse extinction events. Very nasty kind of die-off.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  August 5, 2014

        And for the short-term, that means many cold water fresh water species, like trout and salmon, will be hard-pressed over the coming decades. I imagine some southern and mid-western lakes may become even too warm for largemouth bass. If fishing organizations such as the Bass Anglers Sportsmen Society (BASS) took a more pro-active stance on climate warming, it could go a ways towards convincing conservatives that AGW is a real urgent threat.

        I remember getting “Fishing Facts” magazine growing up in the 70s, and it called the alarm on acid rain long before it caught on among the general public. Growing up a freshwater fisherman taught me a lot about nature, and the importance of respecting it.

        Now if only the hunters caught on… though many would have to choose between supporting the NRA or the NRDC😉 – Natural Resources Defense Council

        Reply
        • Good points.

          The thing about climate change denial that always got me was that there was this kind of clever stupidity. A sense behind it all from the deniers that even if climate change did occur, it somehow wouldn’t affect them. That they’d somehow be smart enough to play a kind of climate change dodge ball.

          Well, I hate break it, but there’s no dodging climate change. Eventually migration fails, eventually bunkers fail, and even if people do survive somewhere they are likely miserable wretches, the modern equivalent of cave dwellers with sad memories of a far better time when everything wasn’t reduced to constant struggle for base survival.

          So, yeah, if hunters and fishermen enjoy having a natural world that supports recreational hunting and fishing, then they might want to take a little time to consider what happens to their beloved pass-time if the scientists Fox News bashes so often actually turn up right.

          The more I think of it, it is a kind visceral betrayal to those who love the great outdoors, the freedom, the sense of rugged individualism, and the connection to nature it all implies.

          At this point, I think they’d be better off supporting NRDC🙂

      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        http://www.popscreen.com/v/8nn3Y/How-Climate-Change-Is-Affecting-Sport-Fishing
        ‘How Climate Change Is Affecting Sport Fishing’
        (short video, appx. 2min.)

        “…but now, fresh water fishing in the US is being threatened…”

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/public/2013/09/04/Report-says-climate-change-will-harm-fishing-industry.html
        ‘Report: U.S. fish won’t survive warmer water’
        September 5, 2013

        About half of the habitat that supports fish in Ohio and nationwide no longer will do so by the end of the century because of rising water temperatures and more-extreme storms caused by climate change, according to a new report.

        The National Wildlife Federation released the report yesterday as part of the advocacy group’s push for stronger government action to cut pollutants linked to climate change and for stronger conservation measures for waterways nationwide.

        The report describes a grim future for fish.

        In Ohio, species will be unable to live in increasingly warmer streams and in a growing oxygen-depleted dead zone in Lake Erie.

        In Ohio, an estimated 1.16 million people who fished in 2011 spent more than $1 billion on the sport, according to the report. Most of that estimate comes from Lake Erie’s charter-boat industry.

        (entire article linked above)

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014


        ‘Climate Change effects on Sport Fishing Tourism’
        “Climate Change’s impact on the Sport Fishing Tourism Industry in British Columbia Canada.”

        Good piece. The goofy opening bit doesn’t reflect the seriousness of the entire piece. Stick with it; worthwhile.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 5, 2014

        “The more I think of it, it is a kind visceral betrayal to those who love the great outdoors, the freedom, the sense of rugged individualism, and the connection to nature it all implies.’

        The kids that made that ^^^ video understand that.

        Reply
  16. Loni

     /  August 5, 2014

    I’m not sure how many of you remember our great Salmon die off during the Bush administration. The only reason I mention Bush is because it was by a directive from Cheney that gave Klamath water to the farmers instead of letting it flow to cool the river water. If I remember right, it was upwards of 100,000 salmon rotting along the Klamath. That event may eventually end up with the removal of several old defunct dams that are doing more harm than good, but it is taking forever for the process to unfold. Our reaction times to these events must simply improve. We need to fast-track our reaction time, or these “game changing” events will simply pile up along with the paper work addressing their resolution.

    Reply
  17. Cyanobacteria is just one piece of the puzzle. This keeps happening here in Kansas with increasing frequency: http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/15/health/brain-eating-amoeba/

    Reply
    • Yeah, there are a whole host of ugly water bugs warming is in the process of setting loose.

      Reply
    • Apneaman

       /  August 5, 2014

      The latest (preventable) victim of climate change. Behold your handy work Koch Bros, Anthony Watts, et al.

      Reply
  1. The Keystone Pipeline, Arctic Methane Eruptions, and Why Human Fossil Fuel Burning Must Swiftly Halt | robertscribbler

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