Ocean Acidification: We are Looking at the Complete Loss of Tropical Coral Reefs By 2050 to 2100

“Ecosystems that have thrived and developed over millions of years are being smashed down by human activities in just a few decades. It is a very sad state of affairs that hopefully we can turn around before it is too late.” — Ken Caldeira of Stanford University.

***

One trillion dollars. That’s the economic impact a new UN study found resulting from the world’s oceans becoming 170 percent more acidic by 2100 under an inexorable and ongoing human carbon emission.

It’s a rapidly ramping acidity that is being driven by an ever-rising level of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere. An emission that is already setting the stage for a first wave of mass extinction in the world ocean — starting now and hitting high gear once global CO2 levels reach about 500 parts per million (this year, global CO2 levels topped off at 401 parts per million and under current and planned emissions are likely to hit 500 ppm within about 30 years).

At issue is the vulnerability of coral reefs and many other species with calcareous skeletons and shells to rapid acidification. In the deep geological past, we’ve seen mass extinctions in many of these species due to rapid rises in ocean acidity. Events such as the Permian and PETM extinctions all showed terrible losses of species due to ocean acidification alone.

But the pace at which humans are increasing ocean acidification has never been seen before in the geological record. So the blow that is coming to many of the animals we rely on is worse than anything witnessed in Earth’s deep past.

Ocean Acification Through 2050

(Ocean acidification and related impacts to coral reefs through 2050 [500 ppm CO2]. Bands in the marginal and extremely marginal range represent acidity levels in which reefs struggle to survive. Image source: Threat to Coral Reefs From Ocean Acidification.)

Recent studies have provided numerous highlights to the extraordinary risks posed to coral reefs over the coming decades. One study, published in 2011, called into question the reefs’ ability to survive even through to the 2050 timeframe. A sudden loss that would be both staggering and unconscionable.

The reefs themselves are home to more than a million species — all of whom provide untold and priceless benefits to the Earth and to human beings alike. The reefs also provide broad support for worldwide fishing and tourism industries. Without the reefs both a critical life support and a key support to human civilization simply dissolves.

It’s callous to put a price on such an egregious loss. But behind the massive 1 trillion dollars in economic damages we can glimpse a world that has also lost a great portion of its beauty and vitality. Imagine a world barren and bereft of the living jeweled belt of coral reefs. Imagine desertified oceans, leeched of life as a result. Such a loss is unconscionable. Like witnessing a holocaust of wonder.

A stark example of the terrible life, wealth and beauty destruction engine that is human-driven climate change.

But that’s what we can look for as ocean PH levels spiral from 8.1 during the 1880s to 8.0 now to 7.9 by or before 2100.

The study did not assess the added damage also ongoing throughout the world due to rapid ocean warming, resulting in widespread coral bleaching. A major instance of which is now ongoing in Hawaii due to dangerous ocean temperatures in excess of 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

In order to prevent a rise of global CO2 levels to 500 parts per million, we must begin rapidly shutting down global fossil fuel infrastructure. This includes all emitting infrastructure — coal, oil, or natural gas. Shutting down coal plants is a good start, but building gas plants to replace them still results in an easy overshoot of the 500 ppm level.

Links:

An Updated Synthesis of the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biodiversity

Acid Damage to Coral Reefs To Cost 1 Trillion Dollars

Threat to Coral Reefs From Ocean Acidification

The World’s Coral Reefs Could be Gone by 2050

Severe Coral Bleaching Near Hawaii

(Hat Tip to Colorado Bob)

Leave a comment

92 Comments

  1. Thank you for this post. Your contribution to these issues is invaluable. I reblogged it.

    Reply
  2. RWood,
    I promised digging up a link on Brazils atmospheric river(s) on that other thread.
    In Brazil it is called the “Sky River”. Here is a piece on the deforestation impact on it. A single tree contributes 1000 litres/day to this moisture. As the trees go, so does the sky river. Southern Brazil feels the impact (ie: Sao Paolo).

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/15/drought-bites-as-amazons-flying-rivers-dry-up

    Reply
  3. Oxford’s weather since 1767 shows that the university city has just had its second driest September on record – following close on its wettest January.

    http://www.climatenewsnetwork.net/2014/10/oxford-is-rewriting-ancient-weather-record-books/

    Reply
  4. Mark Ó Dochartaigh

     /  October 10, 2014

    It looks like the waters in the Antarctic which are the home to the Antarctic krill, perhaps the animal with the greatest biomass on the planet and with an amazing role in carbon sequestration via the biological pump (one of the largest biofeedback mechanisms), are at risk of becoming too acidic for krill to hatch and for adult krill to maintain their exoskeleton.

    Reply
  5. Intensified Arctic warming under greenhouse warming by vegetation–atmosphere–sea ice interaction

    http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/9/9/094007/

    Reply
  6. A trillion dollars of harm? Hardly noticeable, unfortunately, in the grand scheme of things. MIT folks published a study with an estimate of $1240 trillion in adaptation costs by year 2100. I can’t even count that high. Literally. I won’t live long enough by several orders of magnitude.

    It almost doesn’t matter how much money we spend to build our new energy system; it will still likely have the highest ROI of any large project in the history of the world.

    Reply
    • It also shows that oil, gas, and coal are now the greatest wealth destruction engines in the history of industry or economics.

      Would like to see that MIT study.

      Reply
  7. Colorado Bob

     /  October 10, 2014

    Genoa, Italy and Nimes, France Swamped By Flash Flooding; One Dead
    The recent flooding can be blamed on a stagnant weather pattern.

    A southward dip in the jet stream, with its attendant upper-level lows has been stuck over Scotland, Ireland, and the eastern Atlantic Ocean off the Iberian Peninsula for several days.

    This has allowed ample moisture to flow northward into Spain, Portugal, France and Italy, southern Germany, eastward even into the Baltics and western Russia.

    Moisture values in the atmosphere in these areas were two to four standard deviations above the mid-October average.

    http://www.weather.com/news/update/genoa-italy-nimes-france-flood-20141010

    Reply
  8. — Climate Prep USA:

    Most states are still failing to prepare for the impacts of climate change, and there has been mixed progress among states with concrete plans, according to a first-of-its-kind compilation of data released Thursday by the Georgetown Climate Center.

    Map image:
    (Link with clickable info to follow.)

    Reply
  9. http://www.pnas.org/content/110/25/10095.full

    Now, I’m not saying it’s a good idea to run a bunch of nuclear ships across the ocean to do electrolysis and pump them full of bicarbonate, but I think we might have to run a bunch of nuclear ships across the ocean to do electrolysis and pump them full of bicarbonate.

    Reply
    • To fully mitigate annual CO2 emission, you’re talking about a 1 trillion dollar per year expense (from this proposed plan and assuming no underestimation of costs). By comparison, we could fully transition the global economy to renewable energy sources within one decade or less under a similar crash investment.

      I think this is an interesting plan and one that may be a helpful part of a plan to get the net human emission to zero, but the first and most practical goal is to remove the fossil fuel emission altogether.

      Reply
  10. JPL

     /  October 10, 2014

    The Seattle Times did a great, in-depth report on ocean acidification about a year ago.

    Well worth a read:
    http://apps.seattletimes.com/reports/sea-change/2013/sep/11/pacific-ocean-perilous-turn-overview/

    There is a ‘Discuss’ section where they archived a live chat that took place with the author and some experts. The main question from those that participated seemed to be, ‘what can I do about this? I’m only one person?’ That really is the question, isn’t it.

    John

    Reply
    • Individually, you can go vegan, use as much renewable energy as possible, reduce energy consumption, vote for politicians who acknowledge the climate crisis and push sustainability policies, and take part in climate action campaigns.

      Our most effective efforts will be group efforts/policy based. But we can add to that tide by acting decisively as individuals.

      Reply
  11. Jay M

     /  October 11, 2014

    Chemical imbalances run through the atmosphere, oceans, forest growth, ozone depredation and nitrification. Building tribes based upon a segment of the biosphere that is being impacted by a polluting industry is appropriate, while realizing the grand scale of the problem requires universal cooperation.

    Reply
    • I’m encouraged to see individuals putting themselves on the line in order to blockade pipelines and coal shipments. We will probably also need a broad action of this kind against the massive economic structures that are enforcing a terrible devastation.

      Reply
  12. So much of what happens and what will happen depend on peoples priorities.

    To put their priorities into context, I can quickly point to my daughters high school. It is a microcosm of the priories that our society has decided are important.

    During the past summer, the school needed to plunk down portable trailers, and were given money to install electricity, cooling and heating. Electricity was installed, however the balance was “re purposed” for a higher calling. A new scoreboard on the giant football field is certainly a higher priority, as is a fireworks show for the football team, and a helicopter dropping sky divers for the “big game”.

    With the heat waves we’ve been getting hit with, those trailers have gotten over 95F and hit into the low 100’s.

    Reply
    • Yes, Andy in San Diego. That is a terrible set of priorities, and much too common in America. The parents, the school board, and the greater community have lost touch with their primary responsibility to ensure a safe and viable future for the children.
      How can these people be reached and be made to understand this core value?
      Has anyone publicly made an issue of this?
      Take care, DT

      Reply
      • Ps Re Our children and public safety. I made up this ‘values’ (business) card a few years ago because I was enraged by the allowable air pollution in Santa Barbara and the state of California. The message was aimed at the State, and at parents. On any list of those hurt most, or first, by air pollution — it is children, the elderly, and the sick. The economy gets equal billing, see below.

        “California Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Resources Board (ARB)
        implements the Air Quality Management Program in California. ARB’s
        mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological
        resources through the effective and efficient reduction of air pollutants, while
        recognizing and considering the effects on the economy of the State.”

        My values card: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Hdwk-W5Y8zM/UUVS4Mc4hII/AAAAAAAABtk/Izt34FG7_hg/s1600/smog+lisa+children+35+cal+smog+good3x5+c.jpg

        Reply
    • That money could be going to solar panels for the school instead. Skydivers?

      Reply
  13. Sao Paolo Brazil.

    6 million people, the reservoir is at 5% capacity.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-29581069

    Reply
    • Bill H.

       /  October 11, 2014

      Thanks, Andy, for drawing attention to this dreadful situation.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  October 11, 2014

      Another 6 weeks till the rainy season begins. …………………… If it comes on time.

      Reply
    • Been tracking this one as well. In the long range forecast, there’s about 91 mm of rain predicted. About average for October. If it materializes, it will give that reservoir a little more life. If not, it’s gone and Sao Paolo will need to look for other sources.

      Reply
    • Henri

       /  October 11, 2014

      Seeing all those car carcasses exposed by the dropping water level makes me think once again we humans as a species deserve every last drop nature is going to dish out in response to our actions.

      Reply
  14. We can’t pump all that carbon into the atmosphere without something eventually happening.

    We may disagree about exactly what will happen (heating Vs cooling), but for sure, something is going to happen.

    And if we don’t know exactly how bad this “something” is going to be, doesn’t it make sense to stop pumping all that carbon into our air?

    It’s a bit like kicking a dog. You know it’s going to do something in response to your unwelcome kicking, but you have absolutely no idea what it will be. So why do it.

    Politicians and those controlling the mega wealth are the only ones who can implement appropriate action, but they won’t. Their agendas and other interests lure them away from listening to advice from the experts.

    This cartoon looks at that aspect . . . .

    http://cartoonmick.wordpress.com/editorial-political/#jp-carousel-775

    Cheers
    Mick

    Reply
    • Tom

       /  October 11, 2014

      Hey cartoonmick – it looks like what is happening is both heating and cooling extremes along with drought and flooding extremes, storm extremes, volcano and earthquake upticks, disease (of plants, animals and marine life) extremes, etc. It’s becoming increasingly clear that we’re on our way out and may be taking most of the life on the planet with us.

      Reply
      • As long as the ice sheets remain, we’ll have some rather strong weather variability/instability, but in the context of overall warming.

        Reply
    • The last time the Earth was at 481 ppm CO2 it was 3-4 C hotter than today. All science points to Greenhouse gasses resulting in warming over time and in a net heating of the Earth. As the ice sheets go down due to this added heat, some localized cooling at the surface may result. But this is in the context of both an overall warming of the atmosphere and the oceans.

      Reply
  15. Apneaman

     /  October 11, 2014

    Russian Scientists Excluded From Presenting Important Research As NASA Goddard Director Tries To Discredit Observational Scientific Research

    http://envisionation.co.uk/index.php/blogs/99-russian-scientists-excluded-from-presenting-important-research-as-nasa-goddard-director-tries-to-discredit-observational-scientific-research

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  October 11, 2014

      What the hell is wrong with Dr Gavin Schmidt ??????????????

      Reply
      • See no Arctic methane monster, hear no Arctic methane monster, smell no Arctic methane monster.

        Can we play scientific three blind mice in the Arctic? Or, in other words — let’s just pay attention to the models and pretend the observational science doesn’t exist?

        Reply
    • This is turning into a real sh$#storm…

      Is it the first rule of established climate science that we don’t talk about Arctic methane, observe Arctic methane, or include research on Arctic methane? Kind of like weather forecasters pulling Cat 5 storms off the S&S scale and pretending they don’t exist.

      Reply
  16. June Roullard

     /  October 11, 2014

    Since I discovered this blog several months ago, it has become my favorite, one I visit daily, though I have never commented before. Here is a link to a Guardian story about a new study showing that pollution is adding to the effects of ocean acidification on the in-shore parts of the Great Barrier Reef. Truly sad.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/10/great-barrier-reef-a-massive-chemistry-experiment-gone-wrong

    Your dedication and knowledge are greatly appreciated.

    June R in Maine

    Reply
  17. Kevin Jones

     /  October 11, 2014

    I regard David Archer’s The Long Thaw as a great companion to James Hansen’s Storms of My Grandchildren. I do not hear either (in those books) downplaying arctic methane at all. Gavin Schmidt, Hansen’s replacement at GISS has long been a source of concern i.e. Too reticent……by far. Just my take. Perhaps we should call it: Get-Real Cliimate.

    Reply
    • If we look at some of the stuff coming out, for example exponential warming predictions showing a runaway within 10-30 years, I could understand the reticence. And a well deserved reticence without a huge preponderance of evidence.

      But if we look at the concerns raised by S&S, they are simply saying — we see far more release here than we expected, we see near shore release that seems to indicate a good portion of this release is recent, and we are very concerned about a large release considering the amount of warming we are seeing over so short a period of time.

      Some scientists disagree and are skeptical for probably some good reasons.

      But what we shouldn’t do in this situation is just try to shut the science down. Let the observations come in let the scientific process continue. Let’s investigate and find out what’s going on.

      We have CARVE (which recently found far more uncertainty in the models than is comfortable), we have a good number of methane sea bed studies that also show more destabilization than expected, and we have S&S sounding a bit of an alarm for concern.

      Let the observers present.

      I don’t see Schmidt or Archer as Reticent on the broader science of climate change. In fact, they are out there on the cutting edge of most of the issues we’re confronting now. I’ve run into scientists who view them as ‘alarmist’ — a charge with which I entirely disagree. But on this issue of methane, which I’m sure many established scientists find discomforting to say the least, we would be best to keep an open discourse and an active observation. Let the science prove them wrong if they are wrong. But given what we’ve seen so far, which would heighten concerns and not lower them, the notion of censoring scientific observation is a very bad idea.

      Reply
  18. Gerald Spezio

     /  October 11, 2014

    Let’s not forget how prescient Natalia Shakhova is in her video from the European Geophysical meeting in Vienna 2012.

    Methane Hydrates – Extended Interview Extracts With Natalia Shakhova

    Reply
  19. Kevin Jones

     /  October 11, 2014

    Thanks for your comment above, Robert. Could not have said it better. (didn’t even try…:) )

    Reply
  20. An expanded area of warm air over Greenland Oct. 11, 2014.
    (Compare to Oct. 9 image in Roberts Greenland post on Oct. 9.)

    Reply
  21. Gerald Spezio

     /  October 11, 2014

    Shakhova & Semiletov are, unquestionably, the foremost researchers in Arctic methane.
    Their demonstrated track record is empirical science at its very best.
    Their basic predictions have been overwhemingly confirmed.
    Banning then is NOT reticence – it is unadulterated ostrichism & the lowest form of careerism.
    It is madness.

    Reply
  22. Gerald Spezio

     /  October 11, 2014

    How large are the methane plumes in the glaring Laptev Sea brown death visual above?
    What has happened to the 150 km methane plumes observed by CARVE in 2013?
    Why is this life or death info being withheld & by whom?
    Inquiring proles want to know.

    Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    More rain and floods to hit southern France as Gard recovers from 36-hour storms

    The Météo France weather service heavy rain and flooding on Saturday night and Sunday in the Gard, Lozère, Hérault and Ardèche departments, as residents of the Gard cleared up the damage from 36 hours of violent storms…………………… Up to 150mm of rain fell around Alès overnight.

    http://www.english.rfi.fr/visiting-france/20141011-more-rain-and-floods-hit-southern-france-gard-recovers-36-hour-storms

    Reply
    • Europe’s been getting hammered in various places this week. Extreme weather in Italy, France and Norway just to name a few. The amplified Atlantic storm track just delivered a shot across the bow for later this fall and winter…

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  October 11, 2014

      Flooding and heavy rain continue to devastate southern France

      http://bcove.me/3bqbnvty

      Reply
  24. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    Bluefin tuna being caught in more northern Atlantic Ocean waters
    Fishermen have caught the giant fish over the past several weeks between Greenland and Iceland
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/bluefin-tuna-being-caught-in-more-northern-atlantic-ocean-waters-1.2779654

    Reply
    • Extension of subsurface warm waters. Rather strong surface warming as well…

      Reply
      • The University of British Columbia, Canada is involved in the following news piece.

        Global warming ‘will drive fish towards poles’

        Climate change will cause mass extinction of marine life in tropical oceans over the next 35 years, experts are warning.

        They say global warming will also spark an invasion of alien species into polar waters.

        Research by scientists at Canada’s University of British Columbia (UBC) shows rising ocean temperatures will cause large numbers of fish and other species to disappear from seas around the equator and rapidly be driven towards the poles.

        In the worst-case scenario, where the Earth’s oceans heat up by 3C by 2100, fish could move away from their current ­habitats at a rate of 16 miles every ten years.

        Under the least severe warming, with just a 1C rise, they say populations would move just over nine miles every decade. This is consistent with changes that have been observed in the past few decades, researchers said.

        The UBC study identified zones in the tropics – between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn – as being at high risk of local fish extinctions.

        http://www.scotsman.com/news/environment/global-warming-will-drive-fish-towards-poles-1-3569922

        Reply
  25. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    China Facing Mosquito-Borne Dengue Fever Epidemic

    Unusually warm weather and frequent rain has contributed to a mosquito population in Guangdong five times as high as normal, fanning the outbreak, health officials said. According to the WHO, climate change will likely lead to a global surge in mosquito-borne diseases, including malaria and dengue.

    http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-10-08/china-faces-dengue-fever

    Reply
    • … and a surge in insecticide applications.

      Reply
      • Dengue is brutal. That’s one of the diseases that can really show added impacts from climate change. But they all get worse as the world warms.

        Lots of conjecture over Ebola, but the climate effects on that disease are secondary.

        Reply
  26. Kevin Jones

     /  October 11, 2014

    Re: the Nature of the Beast(s): “People don’t understand the concept of exponential growth. Exponential growth in the context of three weeks means: If I know that X needs to be done, and I work my butt off and get it done in three weeks, it’s now half as good as it needs to be.” CDC Director Tom Friedan ( Quoted in the Washington Post two days ago)

    Reply
    • What would you rather have? Quality or quantity? For the global system, we should be looking at the best quality economies we can establish. And that includes zero carbon economies with the lowest externalities possible.

      Reply
  27. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    Sao Paulo Facing Water Shutoffs If Sabesp Withdrawals Cut

    Sao Paulo residents may be left without water for hours each day if Sabesp, the largest water company in Latin America, accedes to demands from regulators to reduce withdrawals from its biggest reservoir, a former company executive said.

    Cantareira, the four-lake complex that supplies half of South America’s biggest metropolis, has been drained of 95 percent of its water capacity amid Brazil’s worst drought in eight decades. The National Water Agency, or ANA, said last week that Sabesp won’t be allowed to use the last of the water unless the state-run utility can prove it has a plan to manage reservoir supplies better.

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-10-10/sao-paulo-facing-water-shutoffs-if-sabesp-withdrawals-cut

    Reply
  28. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    Reply
  29. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    Reply
    • Climate Reanalyzer shows the (hothouse?) atmospheric moisture girdling the globe. You can see the concentrations involved in the two above mentioned storms.
      Idle curiosity — (a snapshot) I wonder which north and south latitudes are the boundaries of the H2o for the entire globe.

      Reply
      • The moisture engine is and will remain in the tropics. But as warming advances, we will see a more uniform distribution, with much more moisture loading at the poles than we observe now. Already, we see some of the moisture invasion of the Arctic — born upon warm winds that advance through weaknesses in the polar jet.

        The cyclones themselves are heat and moisture machines…

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  October 12, 2014

        Heat seeks a condenser.

        Reply
  30. Colorado Bob

     /  October 11, 2014

    Bangalore urban registers record rainfall

    In the last one week, 154 per cent more rainfall was recorded from October 5 to 11, measuring an average of 122.3 mm of rainfall as against the normal average of 48.1 mm in Bangalore Urban district, including the City.

    From October 1 to 11, there has been 61 per cent additional rainfall, recording an average of 127.1 mm rainfall as against the normal average of 78.8 mm.

    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/435521/bangalore-urban-registers-record-rainfall.html

    Reply
  31. Colorado Bob

     /  October 12, 2014

    dtlange –

    In the southern hemisphere. there is very little land. Never forget that. It’s all ocean.

    Reply
  32. Colorado Bob

     /  October 12, 2014

    The Houston Chronicle |-

    India lashed by big cyclone; typhoon hits Japan.

    http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/India-braces-for-big-cyclone-typhoon-hits-Japan-5817522.php

    Deny, rinse repeat . Deny, rinse repeat .Deny, rinse repeat .Deny, rinse repeat .

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  October 12, 2014

      . The India Meteorological Department described Cyclone Hudhud as a “very severe” storm that could pack winds of 195 kilometers (120 miles) per hour and cause torrential rains when it makes landfall near the port city of Visakhapatnam around noon Sunday.

      HYDERABAD, India (AP) — Heavy rains and gusts ripped through a large swath of India’s eastern seaboard, uprooting trees and snapping power cables as a powerful cyclone swept through the Bay of Bengal and slammed into the southern city of Visakhapatnam, one of two storms pounding Asia on Sunday.

      http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/India-braces-for-big-cyclone-typhoon-hits-Japan-5817522.php

      Good luck with that , be glad you aren’t in southern France.

      Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  October 12, 2014

    Heat seeks a condenser. Never forget that law , ever.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  October 12, 2014

      Heat is always looking for a place to ruin where cool has a party under way.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  October 12, 2014

        This law , is not up for debate. Even if the WSJ, or Forbes lies about it. It does not care about one rabbits fuzzy butt , The simple rule is heat seeks cold. And these days , a lot of heat is chasing an ever shrinking pool of cold.

        Reply
      • The heat will carry quite a bit more moisture around the globe. Where there are cool, unstable pockets, meeting the hotter, moist flows, you’re looking at deluge. Ask France.

        Reply
  34. danabanana

     /  October 13, 2014

    @ColoradoBob
    “China Facing Mosquito-Borne Dengue Fever Epidemic”

    I’ve recently been to Spain’s east coast and was greeted by the Asian Tiger mosquito. As far as I know, this species got first spotted in Spain in 2004 in Catalonia and has since spread southwards along the coast to Alicante as well as some adjancent inland areas. It is claimed that they (or rather their eggs) hitched rides in shipments of used tires and Lucky Bamboo and even though their hunting range is no further than 200-500 metres from the location where they hatched, this mosquito has managed in 8 years to conquer most of the Eastern coast of Iberia.

    My concern regarding the article you posted is that Spain has a fairly large population of chinese citizens that go back and forth to china. Also many industries send Europeans to china on regular trips to oversee manufacture of products,.. etc It would only take the Asian Tiger mozzy to bite someone arriving with Dengue Fever (or any other of the 25+ diseases that this mosquito is vector for) to say Barcelona for it to become a carrier and pass it on. Since it can bite multiple times and from dawn till dusk, the risk increases.

    I understand that the Asian Tiger has already been recently linked to some outbreaks of tropical diseases in France and also the West Nile virus in NYC(?) so as the Earth warms we can expect it to further expand its territory and further outbreaks of tropical diseases.

    Here’s the little fella. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aedes_albopictus

    Reply
  35. Tom

     /  October 13, 2014

    There goes the wine business . . .

    Reply
  1. Ocean Acidification: The Complete Loss of Tropical Coral Reefs By 2050 to 2100 | GarryRogers Nature Conservation
  2. Ocean Acidification: We are Looking at the Complete Loss of Tropical Coral Reefs By 2050 to 2100 | Gaia Gazette
  3. Climate Change is Bleaching the Great Barrier Reef Out of Existence | robertscribbler

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