Denying The Neverending Heatwave: NASA, NOAA, JMA Show 2014 Broke New Records; But Will Republicans Ever Listen to Science?

If you are younger than 29 years old, you haven’t lived in a month that was cooler than the 20th century average. — Dr. Marshall Shepherd, former President of the American Meteorological Society

*   *   *   *   *

Strong global temperature records typically show up in all the major climate monitors. And, despite no El Nino providing an added kick to atmospheric heating, that’s exactly what happened in 2014.

Respectively Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA), NASA and NOAA all showed 2014 as the hottest year in the global climate record. And the departures were all quite strong with JMA showing +0.63 C, NASA showing +0.68 C, and NOAA showing +0.69 C above the 20th Century average — all measures that put the world now in the range of +0.9 C warming since the 1880s.

Not only was this year the hottest on record for the global climate. It was one in many progressively hotter years and decades. The result being that if you were born in 1986, you haven’t experienced one month that has been cooler than the 20th Century average.

Decadal and Yearly Warming NOAA

(Decadal and yearly warming since 1880 as recorded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It’s a brutal warming trend that has propelled us, in just 1 Century, into a time hotter than any in at least 5,000 years and probably 150,000 years. Continued warming at this pace will put us hotter than at any time in 1 million years before mid century and that is without any of the predicted acceleration due to amplifying feedbacks such as Arctic carbon release, loss of Arctic albedo due to snow and ice melt and greening, and loss of the oceans as a global carbon sink. Image source: NOAA and Climate Progress.)

It’s a set of validated evidence that is so obvious as to be incontrovertible.

And yet the climate games and silliness still occur with regularity in the public sphere. In the most recent republican witching hour congressional approval of the Keystone XL pipeline — a piece of infrastructure that will shackle the US to climate-wrecking carbon emissions for decades to come — Bernie Sanders submitted an amendment asking republicans to record their climate change denial for the public record. A denial a majority of republicans, including most major party heads, now attest to, despite what the science is obviously saying.

In an interview with the Guardian, Sanders noted:

“The bottom line is that I think as a nation that we walk down a very dangerous road when the majority party in the United States Congress is prepared to reject science. I think it is important for Republicans to tell their constituents, to tell the American people, and to tell the world whether they agree with the science or not.”

More notably, Senator Jim Inhofe, who currently sits as chairman of the environment and public works committee has publicly claimed that he believes climate change is a hoax. But what Inhofe doesn’t elaborate is why scientists who spend their lives in service to the public, and not to special interests, like the oil, gas and coal companies Inhofe often goes to bat for in Congress, would perpetrate such a hoax. Because if it is a hoax it is broad and all-encompassing — including every major atmospheric sciences body in the world today. In other words, if Inhofe believes NASA put a man on the moon, then why doesn’t he believe the same scientific body on the issue of climate change?

Climate Scientist Michael Mann gave his own very clear take of the new record today on Facebook. Mann noted that the current new record, especially when viewed in context of the fact that we currently see no El Nino but still hit annual heat records, can put to rest the recent false assertions that atmospheric warming has paused.

As ever, Mann provides a very clear assessment:

Based on the collective reports, it is therefore fair to declare 2014 the warmest year on record. This is significant for a number of reasons. Unlike past record years, 2014 broke the record without the “assist” of a large El Niño event. There was only the weakest semblance of an El Niño and tropical Pacific warmth contributed only moderately to the record 2014 global temperatures.

Viewed in context, the record temperatures underscore the undeniable fact that we are witnessing, before our eyes, the effects of human-caused climate change. It is exceptionally unlikely that we would be seeing a record year, during a record warm decade, during a multidecadal period of warmth that appears to be unrivaled over at least the past millennium, were it not for the rising levels of planet-warming gases produced by fossil fuel burning.

The record temperatures *should* put to rest the absurd notion of a “pause” (what I refer to as the “Faux Pause” in Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/earth-will-cross-the-climate-danger-threshold-by-2036/) in global warming.

There is a solid body of research now showing that any apparent slow-down of warming during the past decade was likely due to natural short-term factors (like small changes in solar output and volcanic activity) and internal fluctuations related to e.g. the El Nino phenomenon. The record 2014 temperatures underscore the fact that global warming and associated climate changes continue unabated as we continue to raise the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Mann was joined by lead NASA GISS scientist Gavin Schmidt who pointed out the inexorable global warming of ‘decades and decades.’ Schmidt noted that individual years rankings can be slung about through the forces of chaotic weather. But the trend, Schmidt asserted, was undeniable.

Dr. Schmidt’s research has been critical in understanding the role of both CO2 as the primary governing gas impacting global heating as well as the amplifying heat of additional greenhouse gasses. In the late 1990s and early 2000s Dr. Schmidt provided critical evidence highlighting the atmospheric warming impact of methane, for example.

NASA and Dr Schmidt provide their own brief on the issue which can be viewed here:

Dr. Jennifer Francis of Rutgers, who is now engaged in cutting edge research on the issue of changes in the Jet Stream due to polar amplification, joins the litany of influential scientists in speaking out on the new record. Of the impact of the 2014 high heat mark she plainly states: “Any wisps of doubt that human activities are at fault are now gone with the wind.”

NOAA’s own global analysis this year comes with a near-endless list of record flood and drought events ongoing throughout 2014. I highly suggest you read the report. The language is dry, but the list of record events is staggering, even to someone like myself who is treated to these events on a daily basis. They’re exactly the kind of outlier events that are the upshot of meridional patterns, polar amplification, and the meandering Jet Streams identified by Dr. Francis. A list of extreme instances that propelled 2014 into another record-breaking year for natural disasters, according to Munich Re:

Natural Disater List Munich Re

(List of natural disasters in number of instances per year as reported by Munich Re. Image source: Climate Progress.)

The evidence is there. All of it. For any thinking person. The public-serving, and often conservative in their assessments, scientists keep making their warnings again and again like a collective modern Jeremiah. And yet we have one political party whose leaders simply refuse to listen to either facts or even the most basic reason.

So in the face of such blantant and obvious denial of reality by the very people who are supposed to be responsibly leading our country, one must seriously consider the notion of running them out of office. Of stopping their legislative malpractice before it results in ever more serious trouble for us all. And not just for all the sakes of the scientists and those who believe them, but for the sake of the climate change deniers too.

Leave a comment

765 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  January 17, 2015

    Running them out of office sounds like a terrific idea.

    Reply
    • We have quite a lot of ammo for 2016…

      Reply
    • Burgundy

       /  January 17, 2015

      Oh! I think it needs to go further than that. The psychopathic and increasingly insane leader of the Western World (aka. the USA) needs to be run out of office too. It is difficult to see us achieving anything useful whilst we’re being lead into a world war by mad men (and this is happening under the Democrats).

      We need at the very least a peaceful multi-polar world, rid of financial parasites, warmongers and psychopaths, so we can concentrate on confronting climate change. If our global house is in chaos and disorder there is no way we’re going to be able to fix the roof before the storm arrives.

      I sincerely hope the American people can make the changes necessary, but as the insanity has become ingrained in the very institutions of State, I’m not hopeful. I think the future will more likely bring fourth a Nero or Caligula than an enlightened leader to turn the rotting ship around. Looking at the line-up of World Leaders in Paris for the Je Suis Charlie event doesn’t exactly inspire confidence either. Their crime sheets appear to be lengthening by the day.

      I believe our only hope is that individuals will see through the illusion of propaganda and turn their back on the System, robbing it of its legitimacy and influence. Then begin the long process of rebuilding our World from the bottom up based on common sense… well one can dream.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  January 17, 2015

        Very well said Burgundy!

        Reply
      • lesliegraham1

         /  January 18, 2015

        “leader of the Western World (aka. the USA)”
        No offence old chap but I don’t think anyone outside of the USA sees the USA as “leader of the Western World” anymore and havn’t done for at least two decades or more.
        More like a deranged imbecile who is holding everyone else back.

        Reply
      • Burgundy

         /  January 18, 2015

        The US is the leader of the Western World, but not due to being suitable or right for the roll. But because it uses its military, financial and political might to keep the allied nations in line. If you don’t toe the line you get a series of escalating punishments, starting with negative propaganda, then financial and economic losses, then political snubbing and eventually violence and revolution (for those that really won’t get back in line). For those politicians that do the US’s bidding there is reward (Tony Blair for example), for those that resist there is loss of office and ignominy (François Hollande of France possibly?). For example France is currently having a make-over to improve its attitude, Germany is walking a fine line and needs to be careful or it too will be punished.

        My point being that Western nations cannot stray to far from the party line or they will suffer. So what we see is this rolling climate change denialism through the client countries, emanating from the US, which is clearly reflected in the politics of the client states. Essentially Western Governments are now staffed with “yes men” and “safe hands” that do what they’re told, even if it is against the wishes or well-being of the people. For example look at the grovelling Prime Minister of the UK on his recent Washington visit, I’m surprised Obama didn’t pat him on the head and say “good boy, now sit”.

        If the US doesn’t change its attitude towards climate change, neither will its client countries. The problem is that in the US the lunatics have taken over the asylum and some have taken to wearing blue and some red, but they’re still lunatics. See the problem?

        Reply
        • Taking down climate change denial in the US would have far-reaching effect. However, the matter is more an issue of corporate strong arming of governments both here and abroad. We saw this quite clearly in 2008 where climate policies began to gain traction in the US. Even minor ones like raising CAFE standards, raising lightbulb and building efficiency standards, and promoting renewables through government policy resulted in major attack and marketing campaigns on the part of fossil fuel interest groups. What one could well consider is that fossil fuel interests are a kind of global parliament all their own, with an origin primarily from the Western Right. This makes sense, as the monied and many neo-con interests traditionally exercised global power through the manipulation of fossil fuel resources, primarily oil. Taking that piece out of the global political exchange would likely vastly alter the global power structure. And that is definitely making some conservatives and traditional foreign policy types here rather worried.

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 18, 2015

          “Amid its bullish assessment of the nation’s ongoing boom in shale oil and gas, the leading fossil fuel trade group clearly and unequivocally acknowledged the threat of global warming, and highlighted — at some length — the steady rise of solar power as an encouraging sign.”

          http://www.forbes.com/sites/tomzeller/2015/01/18/the-end-of-the-partisan-divide-over-climate-change/

        • If the fossil fuel companies start switching wholesale to renewables, I’ll celebrate. A line item in an API report is very minor progress in an institution that basically couldn’t get any worse. The actions of API’s constituents will determine whether or not this is pure and simple greenwash. As of now, BAU is still ongoing as the major oil companies have no plan in place not to extract and burn their stated reserves, and no plan to halt exploration.

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 18, 2015

          Oh, not arguing, just an FYI on the specific item at hand. It’s actually pretty astonishing to see API mentioning climate change, though.

        • Another item of note —

          Utilities appear to be spreading misinformation RE their total transmission costs in order to inflate fees for grid connected solar users. The total net cost of grid transmission (not including power plants) is 1-4 percent.

          http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cost_of_electricity_by_source

          Do you have additional information on this issue. I want to be forearmed for the next wave of traditional power source misinformation.

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 18, 2015

          No, not right offhand. At the American Wind Energy Association, we generally used a figure of “less than 10%” to defend against the criticism that wind would require billions of dollars worth of new transmission lines. New transmission lines for wind actually pay for themselves pretty quickly through fuel savings. If there is specific info you need, I can ask around.

          Re API, one more thing to note: its switchover to talking about climate change comes at a time when major media outlets (e.g., NYT) STILL carry occasional articles on the fossil fuel industries that don’t mention climate.

        • I’ve got someone over at clean technica claiming that grid transmission costs are 60-70 percent of total. This is an order of magnitude higher than any report I’ve seen showing levelized transmission costs. I think the angle is meant to deflate interest is grid tied solar and appears to be very bad information.

          In using grid tied power, it appears to me that wind + solar are an excellent compliment — actually smoothing transmission more as we’ve seen in South Australia. I honestly wish more grid utilities would take the view of the SA power/grid services provider… However there appears to be a rather substantial influence now defending the traditional model.

          How does the next year or two look for wind?

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 18, 2015

          Agreed, 60-70% definitely wrong. I’ll see what I can dig up on that. Here’s something on South Australia that bolsters your view: http://reneweconomy.com.au/2014/wind-power-is-more-reliable-than-gas-and-much-cheaper-too-86953

          Re wind energy’s outlook, here’s a good summary: http://www.compositesworld.com/articles/the-markets-renewable-energy-2015. It points to the Global Wind Energy Council’s annual outlook document, which is very credible. Regarding the next year or two, we are in for a major dip in new installations in the U.S. due to Congress’s failure to renew the wind energy production tax credit (PTC) incentive, but I’d expect installations elsewhere to continue. The case for wind, with no carbon and steadily falling costs, is very strong at this point. Any country with a halfway decent wind resource is probably looking at it.

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 18, 2015

          The following page says (U.S.) transmission costs average 7% of a customer’s utility bill: http://www.modernizethegrid.com/media-room/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Transmission-Rhetoric-vs-Reality.pdf. The stat is footnoted to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA does not present this info so simply–if you go to this page, you will see instructions on how to find it: http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=947&t=3. Looks like a bit more than 10% to me, and I’m not sure of the reason for the discrepancy. But in any event, clearly not 60-70%.

        • Thanks so much! Huge help.

          Negative meme generation is a pretty big problem and I like to bust them up when I can.

          RE wind generation, the rate of build out did appear to be rising over the past couple of years after the last PTC cancellation. 3.9 GW, right? Hope to see more than that this year.

        • climatehawk1

           /  January 19, 2015

          It’s complicated. The next-to-last extension of the incentive, granted January 1, 2013, was for all projects on which construction was underway by the end of 2013. So, many projects were begun during 2013. This should cause a jump in installed capacity for 2014–according to AWEA’s third-quarter 2014 report, 13.6 GW of new capacity was under construction. Then Congress extended the credit again, but not until December and for only three weeks, to the end of 2014. Even so, construction did start on a few new projects.

          So, we should see a substantial jump in 2014 (13.6 GW is enough to generate the equivalent of the needs of about 3.5 million average homes, or about 1% of U.S. electricity) and then a drop in 2015. We’ll know more when the fourth-quarter report is released (supposed to be before the end of January). Market reports available here: http://www.awea.org/Resources/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=875&navItemNumber=621

        • Thanks CH. Congress appears to be using the PTC as a lever to control wind access. My opinion is that one way around this limitation, for wind, is to work with cities and states more directly as well as to push for more distributed wind technology. I know California has a FIT type program, but what about coastal cities concerned about SLR?

          For the central US, farm micro grids with wind and solar might also be a good option.

          With cost of wind able to compete with coal and gas directly, even without the PTC, I’d think there’d be opportunities. I understand that the PTC is directly profitable, but perhaps it is best to view this as an unpredictable windfall and to forge ahead regardless, taking advantage of the good times, but continuing to capitalize strategically through the bad?

      • Burgundy

         /  January 18, 2015

        Yes, unfortunately the corporations are major actors too. It will be interesting to see how the plunging oil price plays out in the fossil fuel industry. A low price should cause a considerable amount of oil to be left in the ground. A deflationary depression which seems to be taking hold globally will also cause the low oil price to become increasingly unaffordable. Thus leaving the oil locked in.

        One way or another I think we’re in for a rough ride. Negative feedbacks will probably feel worse than positive feedbacks in terms of climate change. Its going to get very complicated.

        Reply
      • james cole

         /  January 20, 2015

        Sadly, as an American, I agree 100% with what you said. It is provable that today’s American political leaders are psychopathic and increasingly insane. No doubt that idea will light a fire storm of patriotic complaint. The official line of the USA as the great savior still holds a grip over most people. Media does a fine job of maintaining a series of lies to reinforce our “good guy” image.
        Look at congress, listen to them speak. They are mentally ill by any rational standard, yet we accept them our leaders. Congress reflects the voters who elect them. Thus I proclaim the situation on climate hopeless.

        Reply
      • Burgundy

         /  January 21, 2015

        It’s Official: If You Question Authority, You Are Mentally Ill
        http://www.acting-man.com/?p=35319

        I think any rational person can conclude we’re living in a world that is extremely sick. How long before those that don’t believe the sanctioned narrative are branded as mentally ill? When will accepting climate change is occurring become a treatable illness? Seems to me that when the propaganda becomes unbelievable then extreme measures need to be applied to convince people that the unbelievable is in fact believable.

        I share your feeling that the situation on the climate is hopeless.

        Reply
    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 18, 2015

      The only problem is replacing them with a person with the same motivations, funding and desires. Tough to find someone who is not a bought and paid for whore.

      Reply
  2. Greg

     /  January 17, 2015

    Robert,
    Well said. Of note: James Hansen published today on these 2014 temp data, along with context, along with Gavin Schmidt, et al. posted on his Columbia.edu website. He noted that the Easter third of the U.S. and Canada have the paradoxical distinction of having the coldest relative to average year for any inhabited place on Earth. He cites Sarah Purkey and Greg Johnson to describe our current daily Earth net energy imbalance, captured by greenhouse gasses, as our running of 44 (1000 watt) hair driers 24/7 for every human on Earth.

    Reply
  3. iconickevin

     /  January 17, 2015

    Due to the concerted efforts of the climate change deniers and their quisling employees in high places we have now run out of time to turn around the sinking ship. We could seek a safe haven to prepare for the armageddon coming but the psychopaths in power have decided on full steam ahead an damn the rocks than the cliff that any sane person can see.
    Prepare for near term human extinction, it is under way.

    Reply
  4. We the people do elect the deniers. But as a pundit famously said (so I heard) “if you think these guys are bad, you should see their constituents”. Not sure what it’ll take to change, but starting with people turning off the FAKE news channel would help!

    Reply
    • I hear you Jim! A wise person once called it the American hologram.

      But on the issue of climate change, we have the majority, despite an endless misinformation campaign.

      Reply
    • Just checked. CBSNews.com has it as it’s lead story. FOXNews? “EPA emails scrubbed”. I throw the “journalistic malfeasance” flag on FOX.

      Reply
      • Journalistic malfeasance endangering the public interest. It’s as if the fossil companies have their very own station to constantly stream company PR for them. Imagine if the tobacco companies had that kind of outlet. We’d all be mandated to smoke cigarettes! There’d be lung cancer deniers and doctor email scrubbings. For Faux, it’s ‘truth’ squads running through the EPA email looking for yet one more reason for a witch hunt.

        Reply
      • How surprised would you be if I told you Shell stations run Fox News on the little TVs sitting over the pumps?

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  February 7, 2015

          Not at all surprised, but you can give feedback on this. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper, and send Shell a copy. Encourage others to do the same. Manchester, NH, Airport used to air Fox. I wrote them a very nasty letter. Don’t know what impact it had, but they don’t anymore.

  5. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 17, 2015

    This leads me to wonder, what do we have in store when the next significant El Nino occurs? The biggie in the late 90’s caused a lot of damage globally. Floods, monsoon failure, crop losses globally, droughts were all side effects on a significant scale.

    So now that we are peeking above that temperature delta, does it super charge an El Nino? Does it have such an large signal footprint that El Nino becomes an insignificant bit of noise?

    We’ll find out, nobody knows as this is new territory for the human race. Interesting times indeed.

    Reply
    • I’d think that it raises the launching pad for El Niño when it does occur. This year, we had El Niño like effects in certain regions, despite no El Niño. In any case, it’s rather clear we’ve bent the warming trend a bit beyond the El Niño cycle as the upward temperature curve seems less dependent on El Niño itself. It’s too early to tell if this is impacting El Niño cycling. But we do have rather odd distributions of warm water, especially in the North Pacific.

      Reply
      • Burgundy

         /  January 17, 2015

        Has climate change killed El Niño or at least subsumed it?

        Reply
      • james cole

         /  January 20, 2015

        robert, Do you know why an El Nino seems to be so long in finally coming? Is it a Pacific cycle that prevents this vast heat source from breaking through into a major El Nino?

        Reply
  6. Colorado Bob

     /  January 17, 2015

    Flooding kills more than 176, displaces over 200K in Malawi

    BLANTYRE, Malawi — Flooding in Malawi has killed more than 176 people, displaced at least 200,000 others, left homes and schools submerged in water and roads washed away by the deluge in the southern African country, the vice president said Friday.

    Downriver in neighboring Mozambique, floodwaters have left at least 38 dead, according to Mozambican news agency AIM, displaced tens of thousands and damaged the main road linking the north and south of the country.

    http://www.pennlive.com/nation-world/2015/01/flooding_kills_more_than_176_d.html

    Reply
  7. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 17, 2015
    Reply
    • james cole

       /  January 17, 2015

      Andy, when most people think of global warming, their minds turn to atmospheric temperature. Simply “it’s hot out today.” Even people with enough scientific knowledge to know better, often fall into this trap of viewing global warming as the temperature of the air on any given day. But the physics of earth’s systems clearly indicate that the oceans is where the real heat store in taking place. So it stands to reason that the first wide scale total collapse of natural systems should show up in the oceans. And we know just how the oceans make earth habitable. We simply can’t survive collapse of some of the oceans basic systems, currents and life forms.
      The “deniers” have had a field day with the slow down in air temperature rise in the recent past. When you point out to them that most global warming takes place in the oceans, it simply kills the table talk or cocktail chat, nobody likes being informed of facts, when their comfortable world is so much nicer to inhabit.
      Like that old SciFi movie “Soylent Green”, the air temperature was uncomfortable, but the ocean changes were the global extinction level event! The seas are so utterly important to the global warming event we are caught up in.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 17, 2015

        The measurement of heat storage is based on fresh water . It is called “specific heat”. It is given a value of one. Almost everything in nature is fraction of one. The only things that make a phase change carrying a higher number than water. Some salts, and paraffin.

        Reply
      • Thing is, atmospheric warming didn’t slow down. It just caught up to the outlier event that was 1998. To have a slow down, we’d have to see the decade of 2011 to 2020 advance at less than 0.15 C.

        Reply
      • Andy in San Diego

         /  January 17, 2015

        James,
        I think the deniers deride the ocean trapping heat issue with significant glee (I’ve seen it in their comments on news bits).

        Their rationale they use is:

        1) Since we (humans) are not in the ocean, we can’t feel it, thus it’s not real.
        2) The evil scientists that have been working on this undetectable conspiracy (since ~1850) have changed their schtick because the plucky band of benevolent oil executives and lobbyists figured out the “air temp” scam.
        3) The ocean is not a steaming froth, thus it has not warmed, and my cousin earl put his foot in the ocean last summer and said it was cold.

        Perusing sites and looking for data on snow cover anomalies this morning I saw a site (a blog). At first I thought it was a collation of data (graphs from NOAA, NASA etc…). But upon close inspection it was a cherry picking denial site. So I spent some time there just to grasp the talking point. You may not be aware of this (nor I), but in the southern hemispheres winter the ice extent expands! This bloody site was making posts every week about how Antarctic Ice was expanding, proving global warming wrong (we’ll ignore the whole winter thing, or fresh water intrusion thing). Every week was a news flash of major significance that the extent got larger. I won’t bore you with the bit on the pending “global cooling” rubbish, but it was typical rubbish based on illogical rubbish.

        It is too easy to ignore the thermal loading of water -vs- land, ocean coverage -vs- land coverage etc… when it does not fit ones predetermined outcome.

        One of the tenets of denialist I’ve seen is to ignore anything outside of the shred of “logic” thread that may provide their desired result, thus making it an absolute 100% truth. It is the non-scientific method.

        When given other inputs, “what about…”, “did you consider..”, “in your math you missed ..”, they go apeshit, ad hominum and use personal vitrol to protect their frail thread of illogic.

        I find it bloody fascinating to observe as a human behavior. I find it bloody sad that they will defend the indefensible to the death (they would make Joe Goebbels proud, just keep repeating the lie it will become truth through repetition).

        Reply
      • RWood

         /  February 10, 2015

        A question if anyone finds this: Guy McPherson indicates that land temps will rise to greater degrees than sea temps. Is this so? Does land gain this increase more slowly but steadily? Any links appreciated.

        Reply
    • I’m all for establishing these ocean conservation zones, but if we don’t stop fossil fuel burning soon, the mass extinction comes on quite rapidly regardless. Over fishing is a huge threat. But the net effect of climate change from now to mid century is enormous, especially with regards to acidification. Creeping anoxia and expanding dead zones (now 9 percent of the world ocean) provide the anvil to this hammer. The anoxia is both temperature driven and human effluent driven. Even taking out the effluent, you still have a significant problem without rapid ghg drawdowns.

      Running BAU through end century gets us to 1000 ppm + CO2. For just acidity, that is the kind of blow the oceans have never seen in one century. The acidity impacts are starting now and really ramp up. So what you’re looking at is mass extinction risk even by the 2030s or 2040s. The only way out of that is cessation of FF burning.

      Reply
    • Alas, in the face of oceanic change we are rather like the Titanic, and it is doubtful that we can change course a single degree, let alone turn around.

      Reply
  8. Colorado Bob

     /  January 17, 2015

    A pound of sea water carry’s 4 times the amount of heat that a pound of air can hold.

    And a pound of sea water is a rather small unit .

    Reply
    • And that is quite a lot of energy to evaporate water, shove weather systems about and push along some serious geophysical changes.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  January 17, 2015

        0.6 watts/meter squared. As Hansen puts it: 400,000 Hiroshima bombs per day, 365 days/year…

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 17, 2015

        It’s phase changes we don’t understand . When ice melts . When that happens Heat from long ago is plugged back in to system.

        Reply
        • The ice actually stores ancient cold — hence a degree of inertia. In melting, it sets off a number of initially negative as well as positive feedbacks. The primary negative feedbacks — the fresh water wedge and the ice berg cooling effect play havoc with weather this century. Latent heat plays a part as the ocean quietly gathers energy — leveling a severe blow to ice sheets and pumping out a major heat trapper — water vapor.

          But the inertia of the oceans themselves are a saving grace for our planet. We’d have already warmed by scores of degrees without them and the ice sheets.

    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 17, 2015

      Wow, didn’t know that Bob. That is a pretty giant piece of small info.

      Reply
  9. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 17, 2015

    Nebraska senators seek to capitalize on Nebraska wind energy with tax breaks, less regulation

    http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/story/c0f37747d0e94145864cb7f784675090/NE–Renewable-Energy-Nebraska/

    Reply
  10. My analysis of the congressional vote counts on Keystone XL indicate Republicans are at least 11 votes shy of a two-thirds majority in the House necessary to override a presidential veto – assuming that occurs. The Senate takes up the bill next week.

    In regards to running Republicans out of office, I’m afraid we missed our chance. Voter turnout in the 2014 elections was a dangerously low 36% nationally – the lowest percentage in a midterm since 1942 when the world was gripped in war. The cause of this decline is attributed primarily to young and progressive folks disillusioned with the political process in general, and disappointed specifically with the Democratic Party – which, by the way, is suffering through an internal ideological rift that could damage its chances for 2016.

    Reply
    • The national election is a different animal entirely and we have two years worth of republicans showing everyone how ridiculous they can be, not to mention the primary…

      Reply
      • That’s a hopeful perspective, although it doesn’t address the decline in voter turnout (particularly at the local level), the growing internal divisions within the Democratic Party, and the political acumen of the GOP. See:

        http://www.electproject.org/national-1789-present

        http://www.latimes.com/local/cityhall/la-me-city-voting-20150116-story.html

        https://thesecularjurist.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/republicans-plan-to-exploit-democratic-party-divide-on-economic-populism/

        Reply
        • The growing decline in voter turnout is directly due to GOP voter suppression. In the midterm this dynamic amplifies. In the general, well, the emperor has no clothes. In any case, election stats always skew to the last election. In 2012, everyone was talking about demographics. I think both optimism and pessimism are exaggerated.

          In any case, regardless of party divisions, the electorate is populist. If we want to win, we should recognize this.

        • Voter suppression certainly had an impact, and that’s why Republicans did it. However, it doesn’t account for all of the decline. Voter disillusionment and apathy are well-documented trends. I recall on election night last November that Dems were very concerned about Charlie Crist’s chances in Florida immediately after the polls closed. They reported seeing few young people casting ballots.

          You’re absolutely right, the electorate is becoming more populist, but – as I previously stated – the Democratic establishment is resisting that realization.

        • Why are voters disillusioned? The return of corporatist influence and a general backsliding. The cure for that is to speak out against the backsliding. Democrats that don’t realize this will lead to a loss. The republicans know this and are playing to apathy. They have ringers everywhere claiming both parties are the same. Thing is, if people believe this, they win. Which is why we must not accept the apathetic nonsense and why it is imperative we adopt a leader like Warren. No compromise, hold the republicans accountable, and start the campaign now by highlighting each irresponsible and corporatist act by republicans in a Congress. Also, provide very clear history as to deregulations role in causing the Great Recession. The republicans have been partially successful in confusing the public over this. We need historical clarity. Another reason Warren is the perfect leader. But we need a multiplication of Great Recession history pieces together with proof as to how the recovery brought the US back from the flames, putting us in one of the strongest economic positions compared to many other countries which are now struggling. We should highlight republican recklessness in pandering to the banksters again and trying to force legislation that risk similar corporate fraud again.

        • Yes, all that is true. It also reveals the complexity of the problem. There are so many factors contributing to voter disillusionment/apathy as to preclude simple or quick solutions. This disaffection took decades to develop, and it could take decades to reverse.

          What I can relate from experience is this: People living year after year in or near poverty, having few educational and occupational opportunities, become numb to most things outside their daily existence. When this economic disenfranchisement coincides with rising inequality (as now), people become socially excluded and isolated. This can trigger a host of negative reactions and behaviors, few of which are conducive to civic engagement. Voting becomes a meaningless activity even though such a person might intellectually recognize its larger importance.

          Such folks typically do see Republicans as their political nemesis; however, they do not see many Democrats as their political champion. The “lesser of two evils” argument usually won’t convince them otherwise. Generally, no argument does.

          IMO, this is a sociological phenomenon which poses an existential threat to democracy in America. It cannot be fully appreciated academically. It must be experienced personally and emotionally. Unfortunately, the political class seems incapable of making this vital connection – probably because it is too far removed from it.

          True leaders such as Warren do get it. Whether they can make enough of a difference is problematic given the resistance of an entrenched system. Time will tell.

        • In any case, the Republican Party is mostly corporatist. So any attempt at exploitation will be rather easy to reveal as hypocrisy. I’m actually looking forward to this fight, especially if we get Warren.

        • I sincerely hope 2016 plays out that way.

        • http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/01/cfpb-house-financial-services-subpoena-power

          This is the republicans’ weak underbelly. Don’t dare to let them try to turn it into a strength. We drag the corporatists along toward Warren. Not the other way around. Otherwise, we end up with another financial collapse due to republicans and corporatists again allowing fraud and an over abundance of risk into the system.

        • That’s exactly why I have been pressuring Democrats (to drag the corporatists along), so that we nip this issue in the bud before it blossoms into a huge problem in 2016.

  11. Ouse M.D.

     /  January 17, 2015

    Best thing about these science denier morons is- as Neil deGrasse Tyson put it:
    “They keep using GPS whilst driving, using microwave to heat up their meals – and still talking on their smartphones/ cellphones to their friends and relatives: “I don’t beleive in science”
    That just nails it.

    Reply
  12. Ouse M.D.

     /  January 17, 2015

    In other news

    and just to shine my national pride:

    http://www.un.org/press/en/2015/sga1538.doc.htm

    Reply
  13. I have read a lot of commentary about 2014 heat records but have to say Jeff M take on it is really insightful and worth a read. I have a lot to say but too busy in my life right now….kids…..

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2896

    Reply
    • anthropocene

       /  January 19, 2015

      Figure 3 is really interesting (It is most probably the best argument against a global warming pause). Anybody got any thoughts on the difference in slope between the “neutral” trend line and the El Nino and La Nina trend lines. Inferring anything from the graph gets complicated with what you take as the reference frame and what are relative values and what is absolute. 1) Is the difference in slope statistically significant? Does it imply that El Nino years are getting warmer compared to neutral years? Is that because El Ninos are getting stronger or are neutral years getting cooler or (more likely) more La Nina-like?

      Reply
  14. Mark from New England

     /  January 17, 2015

    Robert – Great article. This one article demolishes the deniers arguments very succinctly. It also will make a great attachment to any letter to our so-called ‘representatives’ on AGW and the need for a rapid transition away from FFs. It’s great to have you turning out all these excellent articles every few days! I appreciate your efforts.

    Reply
    • Hello all,

      I think the issue is not climate deniers vs. climate scientists. They both represent about 2% of global population, or even less. I think the problem is more with 99% of population, who ignore the climate problem (and every other global problem).

      Yes, top climate deniers (call them money chasers) are probably slowing down the progress towards legislation to reduce carbon emissions (in USA only, anyway), but hey, Chinese, Canadians, Australians, Indians, Brazilians… and in fact, almost ALL of the humanity creeps towards ecological disaster on a massive scale every single day, faster and faster, without even thinking, what is wrong with US.

      Look, I work at the Global Change Research Centre in the Czech Republic as a post doc researcher – what do you think, how many more of my colleagues read Robert’s blog (or any other climate change blog)? You guessed it – I am the only one!. They all use (sometimes) big cars to drive every day to work, to feed their families, to have vacations in distant countries, they have mortgages to pay down, they watch TV. We don’t have one solar panel on our energy intensive NEW building, that needs to be cooled down 24h/365d and heated at the same time. The only difference is, my colleagues are mostly scientists and well, their carbon footprint is higher than 90 % of Czech people, which is already unsustainable an requiring 3 planets (if everyone wanted to live like we do in Czechia).

      I even stopped to talk with them about climate change, because I sound like a broken record (or an intrusive alarmist, in worse case). I hope this explains a bit why I think the (core) problem is not Republicans vs. Democrats, but rather humans who care vs. humans who don’t

      best,

      Alex

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  January 17, 2015

        Alex, well put. At least the per capital emissions of most Europeans are less than half of the average US citizen. More people will end up caring, but perhaps only when it’s gotten much worse.

        Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  January 17, 2015

        Thanks for the perspective, Alexander. That is truly strange. My kids don’t pay much attention to me, but they at least drive high-mpg autos, keep their energy use low, etc. I wonder why your colleagues are working so hard on being oblivious.

        Reply
      • The D vs R issue in this country impacts policy — which from the R side vastly slows, halts or reverses broad enablers for society to transition away from harmful activities. Your co-workers behave as they do because it is easier and more socially accepted. If better behavior was encouraged and bad action discouraged, I bet the situation would not be the same. However, it is important for those who know what is happening to act as leaders and to do all they can to reduce harmful consumption. It is difficult, otherwise, for those in doubt to take them seriously. We need to set an example and encourage others to do the same. To be the change we work for at the broader level.

        With regards to Rs, there is still this meme which I believe is incorrect, that they are the anti-dictator party. Perhaps this was true many years ago. But the authoritarian element has shifted to favor the business interests who have become more and more dictatorial over the years. In my view, authoritarianism is the purveyor of any brand of absolutist ideology whose self-justifying elements are both internally inconsistent with reality and externally oppressive of others.

        They often say, that because we wish to use responsible government to help people and animals, to protect the vital systems of the Earth that sustain us, that we are the communists. Instead, we work for just laws, just governments, that hold those who inflict harm to account and which provide freedom from harm for individuals. I would say instead, that because they now use laws to block access to things like renewable energy, to make it more difficult for people to access public transport or use bikes for transport, to make it harder to consume less, and to enforce dependence on toxic and dangerous fuels, to reduce the ability to make the right choice in every way and to reward those who make the harmful choice, And to promote the most vicious propaganda to support these bad choices that are now ruining our future, I would say that this makes them the Stalinists. Corporate Stalinists, but Stalinists no less.

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  January 17, 2015

          Agreed. Now that I think of it, one thing we used to do when the kids were small, on vacations to the beach, was to while away time picking up trash. It was kind of amazing how much there was and how easy it was to accumulate a pile (including the plastic bags needed to carry it). They still like to do that …

        • Our community used to provide a small incentive for people to pick up trash and aluminum cans around the beaches. As kids, we’d save the nickels and dimes we earned for movies, books, or games. But I think the service to the community was invaluable. Sometimes all people need is a little nudge.

      • Climatehawk,

        well, I cannot respond for them, but I would say that they probably think climate change is not THAT serious problem, worth of bigger effort than to wait for carbon tax, or new/cheaper technologies. They certainly don’t care about their respective carbon footprints. They care about the money.

        Robert,

        “If better behavior was encouraged and bad action discouraged, I bet the situation would not be the same.”

        I agree. As of now, people with enough low carbon footprint are at the edge of society (mostly). I use (mostly) bike to go to work. I don’t have mortgage, but that is probably possible since I don’t have children and neither stable girlfriend (I am 34 y/o) and I am renting a (very cheap) room of my colleague, with 17 °C temp. in winter. I have no TV. I am saving money, thus contributing to “deflation”, thing that scares most economists. So to conclude, I do (almost) everything I can to attract attention to global problems, I try to behave accordingly. However, overtime, I became sort of “human skeptic.” That said, I don’t think I will change anyone else’s behavior significantly for the better. Certainly, I did change.

        Best,

        Alex

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  January 17, 2015

          Alex,
          I think it is more a case of them not feeling they can have any significant impact (we live in a state whose Congressional delegation is very liberal). They actually don’t seem to care much about money at all.

    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 18, 2015

      It may demolish their position, but will they realize it?

      Reply
  15. I’m flabbergasted to learn that 9% of the world’s oceans are now anoxic and expanding dead zones. That’s a couple of orders of magnitude worse than what I had previously understood (already worrisome). I just did a search to learn more about this but couldn’t find any single clear assessment. Could someone provide links to good current info on this? All the info/maps I found just talked about US dead zones, with a few spots worldwide.

    Reply
  16. Tom

     /  January 17, 2015

    Philip: combine that with continuing high levels of nuclear radiation from Fukushima, growing plastic gyres, ongoing warming of the polar ice and methane and hydrogen sulfide pluming from all over the place [boreal forests, former permafrost areas, the Arctic, Antarctic, Atlantic (off the coast of NJ) and Pacific (northwest coast)] and you begin to see what’s in store for humanity.

    a reminder to those who think any kind of political solution is possible:

    Spirits In The Material World (The Police)

    There is no political solution
    To our troubled evolution
    Have no faith in constitution
    There is no bloody revolution

    We are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world

    Our so-called leaders speak
    With words, they try to jail you
    They subjugate the meek
    But it’s the rhetoric of failure

    We are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world
    Are spirits in the material world

    Where does the answer lie?
    Living from day to day
    If it’s something we can’t buy
    There must be another way
    [refrain]

    Reply
  17. There is also this nice video from VOX, which I haven’t seen here, check it:

    Reply
  18. Re: previous post containing:
    Planet In Distress
    / January 16, 2015

    Revelation 11:18 God will reward his servants and will “destroy those who destroy the earth.” See also Isaiah 51:6.
    robertscribbler
    / January 16, 2015

    If you wish to be a prophet, then spread this message far and wide. That to keep safe the Earth is to serve The Lord. And that to be counted among its destroyers is to be an enemy of Christ.

    – If codified biblical dictums are to be part of the dialogue here at RS then I will withdraw from RS.
    My time is valuable to me. I await a ‘yay’ or ‘nay’ on the issue.

    DT Lange

    Reply
    • DT: I was responding to a scriptural reference by providing the text referenced. However, in the future I will refrain from Bible-linked posts. While linking the accelerating decline of earth’s systems to (surprisingly clear) Bible prophecy is my special area of study and writing, I am well aware it is not the purpose of this blog and will not try to intrude my studies on the discussions here.

      Best,

      Scott

      Reply
      • Message warmly received.
        Thank you.
        Good to know your area of study, too.
        DT

        Reply
      • messtime

         /  January 18, 2015

        Scott . . .

        eh, your bible linked posts are no problem to me. I doubt your posts will ever dominate the blog . . . People who do not like your posts can always skip over them . . . You add interesting information which is not presented by a lot of bible believing people.

        Reply
    • DT, I was aware of PnD’s work from a previous discussion and was replying in kind. My main point is that many use religion as an excuse not to respond, or worse, to obliviate the science. My understanding is that the Christian faith does not absolve responsibility for harm. Hence my reference. This is not a religious blog. But due to what I consider a misuse of religion, by some, it is a topic that comes up now and then.

      Reply
  19. Warmest year on record, yet we here in the US have the world’s coldest weather of anybody, even the Antarctic! I tell ya, this will only convince more and more Americans to switch over to the Denialist camp. So long as the USA is the Leader of the Free World (TM), nothing constructive can be done, not even peak fossil fuels on purpose!! What’s it going to have to be to take? I say, THIS is going to have to be: the countries of Europe kicking the USA out of NATO, and inviting the Russians in… after they’ve disposed of their present neoliberal/neocon politicians and replace them with populist politicians on the left, right, and in the center.

    Reply
    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 17, 2015

      YUp,

      It’s that classic logic….

      “I looked out my front door and the street was flat, thus the world is not round”.

      Reply
  20. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 17, 2015

    Sistema Cantareira down to 6.0%

    They are now in dead pool bigtime (that was at ~10.8%).

    60.1 mm rainfall so far in Jan (17th). This puts them on track to receive 109mm for the month at the current trend (~3.53mm/day). Normal is ~271mm. If the current trend continues, they’ll receive ~40% of median rainfall for January.

    They are currently below January 2014 total for the 17th (60.1mm -vs- 74.8mm) although the difference is insignificant.

    Going through past years, normal January rainfall increased the total by ~9.1% in Sistema Cantareira ( I used 294mm in 2009).

    In 2009 between usage (~0.1% / day), that increase would equate to ~12.2% for 294mm rainfall (depletion factored in). This works out to 24mm gave a net increase for the month of ~1.0%.

    In Dec 2014, 25 mm resulted in ~0.1% gain.

    In the past, with normal rainfall the ground does not possess a net deficit of moisture which needs to be overcome in the watershed in order to add to the supply. Now, with dry, cracked ground there is is deficit that must be overcome before rainfall contributes to the system.

    Dry season starts in April. In order to reach 30% capacity they will need to overcome the soil deficit (not sure how much, lets call it 15 cm, 1/2ft). Then we calculate in 24mm =1.0%. This then requires 24% @ 24mm = 576mm.

    Adding in the amount to overcome soil deficit, that watershed requires roughly 726mm (~72 cm, or ~2 ft) of rain in the next 75 days (10 mm/day).

    Reply
    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 17, 2015

      Another way to look at the situation:

      Jan 17, 2014. Sistema Cantareira was at 24%.
      July 17, 2014. Sistema Cantareira was at 17.7% (6% drop from Jan 17th)

      Jan 17, 2015. Sistema Cantareira is at 6.0%

      If all of the remaining 6% was usable, it would hit 0% roughly jul 17, 2015 if the same accrual / burn rate in 2014 applies.

      But of the 6.0% left, not all is usable.

      Really the big question is at what level (%) does the water stop. If we know that, then we can estimate the date the taps go dry fairly decently.

      My estimate is mid/late March (without that value, so it is very rough).

      Reply
      • And the current burn rate is faster than last year’s average.

        Reply
      • The Cantareira system has a third possible “Dead volume” in Paiva Castro reservatory in Mairiporã. After that one goes dry, it´s the end of all possible water coming out of the system. Governor Alckmin is talking about using water from the Billings, which is a reservoir as big as Cantareira, but currently deeply polluted and used for generating hidreletric energy. I´d wager it will be used, but they will have trouble to install water captation fast enough (neverming treating it decently, most of the pollutants in that body of water are slow in poisoning and hard to detect in normal testing: heavy metals, dioxins and organoclorates) .

        I doubt that the taps will run dry before April around here (I´m from Brasil, and actually live 4km from Paiva Castro´s reservoir), as until March, rain should keep the system more or less stable (emphasis on less). In April, the rains go away. And temperatures will still be high (and so water comsumption). If systems can be rigged fast enough, taps will not go dry (this year), but the water coming from them will probably be poisonous. If systems can not be rigged, we´ll see if Itu´s situation can work in a 11million inhabitants city.

        I´m actually preparing myself to see civil uprising (like the protests that happened in June 2013 here, but probably a little worst) in may or june.

        I´m calling “taps going dry” as the situation that happened in Itu. Whole neighborhoods are already experiencing 12 hours of water – 3 to 5 days without – right now, and the few parts of town that aren´t having that yet (mostly lower parts of the town, who still have water day in day out… I don´t known anyone that still has their water going “normally” in São Paulo anymore). I´d wager that if everything goes right, that situation will last at least until the rainy season in November… or more, as the dry reservoirs will need a lot of water to replenish.

        Eletric rationing is also probable around here. Our energy minister is “trusting in god” (http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/mercado/2015/01/1577927-deus-e-brasileiro-e-deve-trazer-mais-chuva-diz-ministro-de-energia.shtml ) >_< , but says that if the reservoirs go to a level lower than 10% there will be eletric rationing. Experts in the grid call for rationing right now, saying that if the reservoirs reach 10% we´re going to see our eletric grid collapse.

        Reply
    • Ouch. That reservoir is in rapid decline. 5.8 by Monday at this rate. Thanks for the update.

      Reply
      • Andy in San Diego

         /  January 18, 2015

        No matter what (barring a complete fluke, very low chance) the number don’t lie. They simply won’t make it to next rainy season.

        Reply
      • Doug

         /  January 18, 2015

        Are they likely to literally run out of water, where 20 million people, or whatever the figure is, have no more water? There’s no other sources?

        Reply
        • The loss of a large reservoir like that is going to have an impact. My bet, though, is that São Paulo will draw from the regional source to refill, then battle it out in the courts. The point here is that water rationing is about to jump from 6-9 million to 9-20 million. Without a return to rains or a major shift in how the region uses and conserves water, it’s a downward spiral. The water there is still somewhat abundant when you compare with other regions. This area just doesn’t conserve very much. They’re used to water riches. So this is very jarring.

      • Andy in San Diego

         /  January 18, 2015

        Doug,

        The short answer is yes.

        The long answer has lots of evaluations, conditions and trappings.

        Basically, the primary, large reserve is at 6% capacity. It feed 9 million people. At the current rate of use / replenishment it will hit 0% by April.

        Reply
    • And eletric rationing (disguised as “programmed black outs”) is beggining, which was to be expected as our eletricity down here in Brasil is almost all hidreletric. It´s scary to think about how things are going to be in May…

      Reply
  21. Colorado Bob

     /  January 17, 2015

    OSO — If the slope that collapsed during the deadly Oso mudslide had been slightly drier, it probably wouldn’t have caused anywhere near as much damage.A new report published Jan. 8, written by U.S. Geological Survey scientists, says the amount of water in the soil is what gave the slide its power and violence.
    http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20150113/NEWS01/150119701

    Reply
    • There’s a kind of tipping point for these things. The increase in extreme rainfall makes both landslides and sinkholes more likely by a good margin.

      Reply
      • Griffin

         /  January 18, 2015

        Interesting comment Robert. By chance I just finished reading “Waking the Giant” by Bill McGuire. It was a fascinating look into just how climate change does have geological impacts beyond what may be readily apparent. I had no idea of how sensitive the earths crust is to changes in water levels, beyond what we would expect from the changes brought by movement of ice sheets. Landslides were covered as well and your comment is spot on!http://www.amazon.com/Waking-Giant-changing-earthquakes-volcanoes/dp/0199678758

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  January 18, 2015

        He sure does cover slope collapse Robert. It was eye-opening to learn of the size of the subterranean collapses that have taken place in the Hawaiian island chain. If we were to ever see an event that moved a mass of material that is the size of Long Island 1 Kilometer thick across an area the size of Vermont, the resulting wave action would have impacts that are beyond the scope of imagination! Then there is the worry about the destabilization of the methane hydrates in subterranean collapses. Much has been discussed on that topic, but I had never considered that changes in sea level might be enough to upset the apple cart in some areas. The point of the book was that when looking through the eyes of a geologist, the changes that we are imparting upon the natural world are happening with lightning speed and the consequences of these changes may be felt in ways that were previously considered to be low risk.

        Reply
        • That’s why I keep using the term geophysical changes… Once things get moving, well, they all pretty much get moving and then it takes quite some time to return to stability.

    • Thanks.
      Will share with others.
      DT PDX

      Reply
  22. Robert,
    Great post. Thanks so much for posting the new Munich Re chart – I had not seen it yet and will now update the several areas where I use that chart.

    –Scott

    Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  January 17, 2015

    Biggest reservoir for Brazil’s largest city is running dry

    Halfway through the rainy season, the key reservoir for the hemisphere’s largest city holds just 6 percent of its capacity, and experts warned Friday that Sao Paulo authorities must take urgent steps to prevent the worst drought in more than 80 years from drying it out.

    The system of reservoirs and rivers that provide water to millions in this city have received less rainfall than hoped during the first weeks of the wet season, raising fears they won’t be replenished as hoped. Rainfall during the first two weeks of January totaled just 2.9 inches (7.1 centimeters), well below the historic average for the month of 10.7 inches (27.1 centimeters).

    The biggest problem is in the Cantareira water system, which is the largest of six reservoirs that provide water to some 6 million of the 20 million people living in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo city. Cantareira is now down to 6 percent of its capacity of 264 billion gallons (1 trillion liters), the water utility Sabesp said on its website.

    Of the remaining five systems, Alto Tiete is at 11 percent of capacity, Rio Claro 25 percent, Alto Cotia 30 percent, Guarapiranga 40 percent and Rio Grande 70 percent.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  January 18, 2015

      CB,
      “On January 15, 2015, there remained 61.57 hm3 of water that could be withdrawn by pumps. Sabesp says this represents 6.2% of the working volume. How is this accounted for? It divides the remaining (61 hm3) by the volume of the reservoir before the incorporation of the dead volume (974 hm3) and obtains a value of 0.062. Ready: 6.2%. But the total volume of the reservoir, with the incorporation of dead volume, is of 1,257 hm3, not 974 hm3. If you restate the accounts using 1,257 hm3 will get 4.89%….There are two explanations for this behavior. The first is that Sabesp engineers are not able to use mathematics to represent realistically the availability of water. The second is that the company decided to use a mathematical trick to minimize the crisis. I prefer the former. It is hard to imagine that a listed company on the stock exchange has deceived customers and investors.”
      original in portuguese:
      http://jornalggn.com.br/noticia/os-engenheiros-da-sabesp-nao-passariam-no-pisa-por-fernando-reinach

      Reply
      • Sabesp´s major investor is the government, and our governor is trying his best to deny the seriousness of the crisis. I´d bet on the second option.

        Reply
  24. Colorado Bob

     /  January 17, 2015

    GO FIGURE: Figuring the odds of Earth’s global hot streak

    The global heat streak of the 21st century can be explained with statistics that defy astronomical odds.

    The Associated Press consulted with statisticians to calculate the odds of this hot streak happening at random. Here are some statistics and the odds they calculated, with the caveat that high temperatures tend to persist so that can skew odds a bit:

    The three hottest years on record—2014, 2010 and 2005—have occurred in the last 10 years. The odds of that happening randomly are 3,341 to 1, calculated John Grego of the University of South Carolina. Kai Zhu of Stanford University, Robert Lund of Clemson University and David Peterson, a retired Duke statistician, agreed.

    Nine of the 10 hottest years on record have occurred in the 21st century. The odds of that being random are 650 million to 1, the statisticians said.

    Thirteen of the 15 the hottest years on record have occurred in the last 15 years. The odds of that being random are more than 41 trillion to 1, the statisticians said.

    All 15 years from 2000 on have been among the top 20 warmest years on record. They said the odds of that are 1.5 quadrillion to 1. A quadrillion is a million billion.

    And then there’s the fact that the last 358 months in a row have been warmer than the 20th-century average, according to NOAA. The odds of that being random are so high—a number with more than 100 zeros behind it—that there is no name for that figure, Grego said.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
    • Andy in San Diego

       /  January 17, 2015

      “They said the odds of that are 1.5 quadrillion to 1. A quadrillion is a million billion.”

      So Heritage Foundation would say there is a chance of it being a fluke, thus it is a fluke. Then all of our heads explode as we try to reconcile their statement.

      Reply
    • Doug

       /  January 18, 2015

      I feel like going to the Casino.

      Reply
  25. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 18, 2015

    Continental US Spring Drought Outlook

    Reply
  26. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 18, 2015

    An interesting piece on the stability of methane hydrates. Pressure -vs- temp etc… It gives a nice background on the mechanics of hydrates in relation to their environment.

    Having been over 1km underground in a mine (building mine disaster, rescue recovery systems a few years ago) I can attest to the temperature increase as one goes deeper (remember to setup / register your brass tag properly!).

    http://www.killerinourmidst.com/methane%20and%20MHs2.html

    Reply
    • Griffin

       /  January 18, 2015

      This is a very good read and thank you sharing this Andy. “The general heating of the hydrate, as by changing ocean currents, or at the end of ice ages, can release much larger quantities, and more rapidly. The temperature changes do not have to be great: a few degrees warming will do.” The article then goes on to discuss the Beaufort Sea as an example of a vulnerable area. While reading it hit me that we were just discussing the recent findings from NASA that revealed an energy imbalance of 50w/sqm across the Beaufort as a result of the loss of sea ice cover in the last decade. That’s an incredible amount of heat being absorbed by the waters in that area….

      Reply
      • To this point, we haven’t yet seen observations of a methane release hot spot in the Beaufort. Definitely an area of concern, though.

        Reply
  27. Vic

     /  January 18, 2015

    I’m not a religious person, yet I’ve been anxiously awaiting pope Francis’ address to the people of Tacloban in the Philippines.
    I had high hopes after recently reading the following articles that were anticipating an important climate change related announcement.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/12/28/3607083/pope-francis-climate-secret-weapon-next-year/

    http://reneweconomy.com.au/2014/how-pope-francis-could-tip-the-balance-against-fossil-fuels-63601

    I’ve just read now how the pope’s address was cut short due to extreme weather, but not before he uttered the following…

    “Some of you have lost part of your families. All I can do is keep silent. And I walk with you all with my silent heart,”

    http://abc.net.au/news/2015-01-18/millions-gather-for-pope-in-stormy-philippines/6023786

    Things that make you go Hmmm…

    Reply
    • It’s heart wrenching. All these people who have so much love for this Pope, who continuously takes up the cause of the poor, they came only to see him driven away by yet one more storm.

      As for the silence … I hope he doesn’t keep silent. We need him speaking out as he has.

      Reply
      • Vic

         /  January 18, 2015

        Yes, a deafening silence if ever there was.
        About 6 months ago my partner and I donated some money to a group called the 50/50/50 project – a small charity that was rebuilding around Tacloban after super typhoon Haiyan went through. They said $1000 was enough to build a complete shack with a floor, walls, roof, a door and windows.

        https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/125176791@N04/14355668832/

        I have no idea whether the little shack we helped to build survived the category 3 typhoon Hagupit that slammed the area a few weeks ago.

        Reply
      • I have a religious colleague, a girl. She flew to visit Pope from Czech Republic to Rio de Janeiro. A lot of carbon emitted. Was it worth? (I think not)

        Alex

        Reply
  28. Malawi faces ‘unprecedented’ flood disaster

    “The waters may be receding and the rainfall subsiding but Malawi is only now coming to terms with the “unprecendented” floods that hit the southern half of the country last week.”

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2015/01/malawi-faces-unprecedented-flood-disaster-201511774238313771.html

    Reply
  29. – Interesting bits from NY Times Opinion page re oxygen.

    Is a Climate Disaster Inevitable?
    By ADAM FRANKJAN. 17, 2015

    OUR galaxy, the Milky Way, is home to almost 300 billion stars, and over the last decade, astronomers have made a startling discovery — almost all those stars have planets. …

    … The oxygen you are breathing right now was not part of our original atmosphere. It was the so-called Great Oxidation Event, two billion years after the formation of the planet, that drove Earth’s atmospheric content of oxygen up by a factor of 10,000. What cosmic force could so drastically change an entire planet’s atmosphere? Nothing more than the respiratory excretions of anaerobic bacteria then dominating our world. The one gas we most need to survive originated as deadly pollution to our planet’s then-leading species: a simple bacterium.

    The Great Oxidation Event alone shows that when life (intelligent or otherwise) becomes highly successful, it can dramatically change its host planet. And what is true here is likely to be true on other planets as well.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/18/opinion/sunday/is-a-climate-disaster-inevitable.html?_r=0

    Reply
    • Am I supposed to think a ‘Great Hypoxia Event’ is unfolding at this time?

      Reply
    • OK, got to it on a different device.

      In all honesty, I’m not too certain how helpful these abstractions are. They tend to objectify what is a highly dangerous and personal crisis to anyone now being ground under by it. We don’t know what other advanced life does in the face of such trouble, because we have no example. But we have enough evidence of irresponsible action by human beings to know that we are behaving very poorly in the face of this crisis. A plain fact is that a very small portion of global resources are now aimed at dealing with climate change. How can we hint at this crisis being inevitable when so many of us simply aren’t trying?

      The net effect is to de-emphasize the importance of what is happening and to absolve the guilty parties of responsibility. Such talk of so called ‘natural law’ typically does. A kind of academic fatalism that is intellectually deplorable.

      Reply
      • I’m just glad the importance of available oxygen was mentioned.
        Any hard climate talk has to be surrounded by ephemera just to get printed in the NYT.
        It also mad me think about the enormous amount of O that is used in the actual combustion of the fossil fuels.
        If there is no O — there is zero, or incomplete combustion.
        Part of the reason I left the high altitude Southwest was the pervading odor of raw gasoline from many vehicles — and the black soot collected on/near tailpipes and gas tank access flaps, etc.
        The combustion process depletes available O. Yes?

        Cheers etc.
        DT

        Reply
        • Cheers, DT. Abstraction can get on my nerves. But these are good points.

          Well, you’re right to mention the O issue. We have very slow but steadily falling atmospheric oxygen levels due to the burning. And, yes, the oceans are going to be the first to see major oxygen crisis.

          Major mechanisms —

          1. Heat reducing oxygen content in solution.
          2. Ocean methane release reducing oxygen through oxidation.
          3. Large ocean die-offs reducing oxygen through decay oxidation.
          4. Increasing instances of heavy rainfall resulting in greater nutrient run-off fueling dead zones.
          5. Inundation of high nutrient coastal zones fueling dead zones.

          There are probably more. But these are the biggies.

  30. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 18, 2015

    Sistema Cantareira – 5.9%

    Alto Tiete is dropping at 0.1 to 0.2 per day now. It is at 10.5%. Alto Tiete is the main supply for the wealthy part of Sao Paolo.

    Reply
  31. RWood

     /  January 18, 2015

    Again, “more significantly than previously thought” —
    http://climatestate.com/2015/01/18/siberian-arctic-permafrost-decay-and-methane-escape/

    Reply
  32. Greg

     /  January 19, 2015

    Not a single word in Sao Paulo’s leading newspapers about the drought or water scarcity (scroll to bottom of today’s post) Denial should have been one of the ten commandants:

    http://peakoil.com/forums/s-america-s-largest-city-on-verge-of-collapse-t70392-480.html#p1230458

    Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  January 19, 2015

    California drought could end with storms known as atmospheric rivers

    Powerful storms known as atmospheric rivers, ribbons of water vapor that extend for thousands of miles, pulling moisture from the tropics and delivering it to the West Coast, have broken 40% of California droughts since 1950, recent research shows.

    “These atmospheric rivers — their absence or their presence — really determine whether California is in drought or not and whether floods are going to occur,” said F. Martin Ralph, a research meteorologist who directs the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

    The storms, which flow like massive rivers in the sky, can carry 15 times as much water as the Mississippi and deliver up to half of the state’s annual precipitation between December and February, scientists say. Though atmospheric rivers are unlikely to end California’s drought this year, if they bring enough rain to erase the state’s huge precipitation deficit, they could wreak havoc by unleashing floods and landslides.

    Scientists using a new type of satellite data discovered atmospheric rivers in the 1990s, and studies since then have revealed the phenomenon’s strong influence on California’s water supply and extreme weather.

    Link

    Reply
  34. Svante Törnquist

     /  January 19, 2015

    Suddenly it struck me while looking at the temperature curves.
    Just look at the land temperatures in relation to the ocean temperatures. During the last three decades the land temperatures are increasingly diverting from the ocean temperatures. This is very obvious if you look at the last 15 years. To me this is a very strong indication that the warming is starting to accelerate. The oceans doesen’t cope with the pace at all anymore. How long can the masses of water hold back the increase in heat stress? Is there a threshold here that if released will push the warming into a rapid acceleration? In that case, is that threshold the point of no return? We will probably don´t know the answer to these questions until it´s too late.

    Reply
    • In the past, atmospheric warming has increased step-wise. During the more rapid warming phase, the ocean surface was dumping more heat back into the atmosphere. During the slow-downs, or pauses, the ocean was up taking more heat from the atmosphere. The last long term atmospheric warming pause was 1945 to 1975 approx. We appear to be in a phase of ocean heat uptake since 1998, but the pace of atmospheric warming has yet to show appreciable decline on the decadal scale. If this is the case, the next switch of ocean to atmosphere heat transfer would arguably result in a more rapid pace of warming. Perhaps as fast as 0.35 to 0.5 C per decade.

      Reply
  35. Small temperature rise could devastate wheat yields, say scientists

    “An international consortium of scientists have been testing wheat crops in laboratory and field trials in many areas of the world in changing climate conditions and discovered that yields drop on average by six percent for every one degree Celsius rise in temperature.

    This represents 42 million tonnes of wheat lost − about a quarter of the current global wheat trade − for every degree. This would create serious shortages and cause price hikes of the kind that have previously caused food riots in developing countries after only one bad harvest.”

    See more at: http://www.rtcc.org/2015/01/19/small-temperature-rise-could-devastate-wheat-yields-say-scientists/#sthash.wKf9fGRe.dpuf

    Reply
  36. Researchers say N.W.T. permafrost is thawing at a dramatic rate –
    Hydrologist says parts of N.W.T. losing about 1 metre of frost per year

    “Hydrologist Dr. Bill Quinton of Wilfrid Laurier University studied an area around Fort Simpson, N.W.T. He says in the 1940s, permafrost used to cover 70 per cent of that study area, now it’s around half.

    That’s a 28 per cent decrease in 70 years.

    “The N.W.T. is one of the places in the world that is warming up at the highest rate, so the eyes of the world are upon us,” says Quinton. ”

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/researchers-say-n-w-t-permafrost-is-thawing-at-a-dramatic-rate-1.2900813

    Reply
    • Welcome to the summers of burning ground…

      Reply
    • ? Getting warm in the NWT — impossible. Prime Minister of Canada
      Stephen Harper would never allow his citizenry to be in danger — honest.
      Proof?

      Reply
      • 0.70 C atmospheric anomaly today. +1 C vs 20th Century average. +1.2 C vs 1880s…

        Polar amplification has backed off a little in NH with ‘just’ a +1.5 C anomaly vs 1979 to 2000…

        Reply
  37. climatehawk1

     /  January 19, 2015

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-ropeik/the-danger-the-planet-fac_b_6489400.html

    “Did those changes impact your life in any meaningful way? Did you wake up in the morning on any day last year worried about the global nitrogen cycle, or historic global temperature records, or deforestation in Indonesia? Probably not. And that, in a nutshell, is the problem that has all but guaranteed the serious crash for Life on Earth as We Know It.”

    Reply
    • Global media does not adequately cover climate change. How many people know there is mass migration due to rising seas in Pakistan? How many people know that 60 million people face water shortages in SE Brazil due to climate change? How many people know that Miami is installing pumps to fight the rising seas? How many people know that 10 percent of the world ocean is now low oxygen due to climate change? How many people know large sections of West Antarctic glaciers are in irreversible collapse? How many people know that the US SW is experiencing its worst drought in 1200 years?

      If people knew they paid higher food prices due to climate change, or that half of global wheat exports are at risk now if the world warms by another degree Celsius, or that their children’s future is at serious risk, then we would have much stronger policies for dealing with climate change.

      Of course, if we don’t responsibly identify the crisis, then how can we effectively respond?

      The article is one of many looking at climate change in the abstract, from the point of view of a helpless and oddly detached bystander… It’s kind of the same psychosis that seems to afflict people when they hear a cry for help and do not respond. This is the value we should all have — when we see someone in trouble, then help. Same with what’s happening with climate change. Do everything we can to help.

      Reply
  38. Colorado Bob

     /  January 19, 2015

    Scientists Drill through 2,400 Feet of Antarctic Ice for Climate Clues

    Scientists have drilled into one of the most isolated depths in all of the world’s oceans: a hidden shore of Antarctica that sits under 740 meters of ice, hundreds of kilometers in from the sea edge of a major Antarctic ice shelf.,…………………………………… The Whillans Ice Stream and a handful of major glaciers on either side of it are considered relatively resistant to these ocean-driven effects. In 2007, for example, a team of researchers using ice-penetrating radar reported finding a wedge of sediment 30 meters thick at the grounding zone of the Whillans Ice Stream. This sandy heap actually causes the oozing ice to slow, pile up and thicken slightly behind it—providing a buffer that may stabilize the ice sheet in the face of those warm currents. That’s the theory, at least, but no one had ever looked directly at a grounding zone until this week. The team’s first glimpse already calls into question our long-held assumptions about the long-term stability of these glaciers.

    Link

    Reply
    • This is disturbing to me. The RIS is being floated off its grounding line.

      Reply
      • Griffin

         /  January 19, 2015

        “insert appropriate expletive here” 300 Kilometers back? I don’t know much about glaciers but that seems like an awfully long distance to find 30M of seawater.

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 19, 2015

        Griffin –
        Welcome to Antarctic.

        The twice a day “ice quakes” there, that last 30 min. is damn amazing as well. That means the tides lift all that ice with a new pulse of heat every 12 hours, and because it’s ice, and not air, it acts like a bellows.

        All in all , this a hell of an article.

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  January 19, 2015

        Please let us know if you learn more about this situation Robert. This seems like this may be another watershed event that changes the face of SLR projections yet again!

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 19, 2015

        One other thing, they saw rocks on the sea floor , that means the ice shelf is shedding it’s glacial till . Rocks that are embedded in the glacier. Only glacier streams in retreat drop rocks. Ones in advance eat them .

        Reply
      • Jacob

         /  January 21, 2015

        I’ve noticed some disturbing cracks on the Ross Ice Shelf near Ross Island in images on the Polar View website. Of course I’ve been seeing it since at least 2007, so perhaps such gigantic cracks are normal, or perhaps they’ve been there for a long time, but to my eye it doesn’t look good for the future. Anyone else here who might be paying attention to that as well?

        Reply
    • Griffin

       /  January 19, 2015

      I agree CB ! Thank you for posting this. This will have my head spinning for quite some time! I simply cannot believe the distances involved, amazing.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 19, 2015

        The NWT permafrost story above it are in the same file. It’s like an old Hollywood movie clip , as we watch the steam engine start, at first it’s just wheel barely moves as engine roars in pulses. 5 seconds later, the “Super Chief” is making 70 mph.

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  January 20, 2015

        I noticed that the NWT article did not mention the feedback from the release of carbon stores in the permafrost. In this sense, they only related part of the problem that arises from the melting.

        Reply
        • That’s the way most science works — focusing in on one provable/observable issue at a time. You have to sift through quite a lot to get the known pieces.

      • Griffin

         /  January 20, 2015

        And yes, the “Super Chief” is really picking up steam in a lot of areas considering the previous speed of the train was underestimated in regards to sea level rise as well!

        Reply
  39. Jay M

     /  January 19, 2015

    The meme of 44 hair dryers per person 24/7 as the global heat imbalance really sticks in my head for some reason. I live in a flat with another person. Hypothetically, I assume that the circuit breakers won’t flip when I turn on the hair dryers. Getting a bunch of plug strips and scrounging 88 1000W hair dryers at thrift stores, I begin the warming experiment, turning them all on.
    Somehow, I imagine the building burning down before long. (I will be watching from outside because it became a bit hot in the flat).

    Reply
  40. Mark from New England

     /  January 19, 2015

    A provocative article from The Guardian:

    ‘It is profitable to let the world go to hell’

    http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/jan/19/davos-climate-action-democracy-failure-jorgen-randers

    It’s going to take more than voting to turn this around. Perhaps an occupation of Koch Industries headquarters, FOX news and the headquarters of the world’s major oil and coal companies? Perhaps spurned on by a foretaste of the climate to come through a strong El Nino?

    Reply
    • I would be all for a mass occupation of those entities + ALEC, Heartland, AEI, CATO…

      That said, we should also be doing all we can to undercut investor confidence in these activities. In the current economic situation all fossil fuel profits are at risk due to stronger and stronger challenges from renewables together with waning confidence in the fossil fuel industry due to its overtly destructive nature.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  January 19, 2015

        Good ideas. As Utah Philips said: “The Earth is not dying, it is being killed. And the people who are killing it have names and addresses.”

        Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  January 19, 2015

        Yes, reasons for us to ‘double-down’ and not give up!

        In the past, I had the feeling we’ll (humankind) just make it by the skin of our teeth, as the saying goes – and by ‘making it’ I mean stopping short of setting of a catastrophic runaway warming in excess of 5 – 6 C. Even then, it’ll be bad, very bad for many, but maybe it’s what civilization needs to go through to shed consumerist capitalism and learn to live more simply.

        Of course, I concede that I could very well be wrong. but for sake of posterity and all the millions of species we share the Earth with, I hope you’re right in that the tide against destruction may soon turn around. Our planet deserves the fullest possible response from those who know what’s at stake.

        Reply
        • There’s too much uncertainty to give a definitive answer on the future. But I think it’s pretty clear we’re in a big mess that’s going to get a lot worse before it gets better. There is some reason to hope for defeating fossil fuel interests whic currently stand in the way of most positive action. However, even if that happens, there’s still quite a lot of work to be done. I’d say I’m more active than positive. But there are certain things that just must be done, regardless of doubtful outcomes.

      • climatehawk1

         /  January 19, 2015

        Agreed. I end tweets with the hashtag #divest whenever possible and try to tweet about anything relating to investment risk of fossil fuels, divestment actions, etc. It’s the one handle the public has that can really work, IMHO.

        Reply
      • You have to go after their mouthpieces on Madison Ave., or wherever.

        Reply
    • mikkel

       /  January 19, 2015

      I wish that climate change activists would stop framing things in terms of “sacrifice” and “short term loss” instead of highlighting abundance and connection.

      People who start dieting or exercising because they are willing to “put up” with short term pain for some abstract long term goal like living longer tend to stop quickly. Those that make it into a habit do it because they understand that — after an adjustment period — you feel better all around on a daily basis and that long term health is just a natural consequence of stringing together short term health.

      It’s been shown that generally people don’t *want* to aimlessly consume, it’s just that society creates a lot of anxiety and consumption is a palliative. The choices are being presented as “keep doing what you’re doing” vs “keep in the same environment, but now have less money for an abstraction aim” so it’s of course obvious which will win out.

      There needs to be consistent emphasis on the positive aspects that transitioning brings on a daily level, including the ability to have less anxiety and more security.

      Here is an article from a psychotherapist about how the general public is actually very engaged with environmental issues psychically, but how that turns into consumption and apathy as a defense mechanism.

      http://aeon.co/magazine/psychology/rosemary-randall-climate-change-psychoanalysis/

      Reply
  41. I have now added ‘forensic’ to my title of Investigative and Forensic Naturalist.

    Here’s a very short I vid I made. It’s from 2011, and about 18 months after I alerted all to the serious buildup of black soot and traffic dust in Santa Barbara.
    It’s about atmospheric chemistry testing in Santa Barbara, CA USA, 2011.

    TRAFFIC DUST AND AEROSOL SOLVENTS: A CITIZEN’S INQUIRY
    Generally speaking, changes in my surroundings often reflect the condition and contents of the lower atmosphere.
    Often, it is the horizontal surfaces which are subject to aerosol fallout while the vertical surfaces are pretty mush unaffected. An example is the round green colored ‘utility’ box and post.
    All that was introduced to this setting were a couple of human fingers wetted with a swipe of human saliva which with a little friction caused a chemical solvent to manifest itself.
    Note too that the paints used in these situations are usually those of a very sturdy and long lasting type often guaranteed by the manufacturer. But that would be under ‘normal’ conditions. Also, I have many other examples of the same but on other surfaces and other paints. The only common denominator is the aerosol fallout mostly from petroleum based pollutants. I add that most ‘paints’ and solvents are also petroleum based.
    Again, I must ask: am I a gas, a solid, or a liquid?
    The yellow painted fire hydrant speaks for itself.
    Some of my speaking is muddled but I blame my production crew — me.🙂
    Take a look, and see if you agree with what I depict.
    DT

    Reply
  42. Colorado Bob

     /  January 19, 2015

    Melting glaciers set to release more organic carbon as temperatures climb

    Melting ice may affect more than sea levels, according to new research. As the earth warms, more of the carbon locked up in glaciers and ice sheets will be released into surrounding rivers and oceans.

    This means that, as well as pushing up sea levels, melting ice could have unknown impacts on marine life.

    Carbon release to increase by half

    Glaciers and ice sheets cover around 11 per cent of Earth’s land surface and hold around 70 per cent of its freshwater. These giant stores of ice also hold organic carbon. Carbon accumulates in new snow and ice, and is released as the glacier melts.

    A new study, published today in Nature Geoscience, finds the release of this carbon will speed up as the Earth warms due to climate change.

    http://www.carbonbrief.org/blog/2015/01/melting-glaciers-set-to-release-more-organic-carbon-as-temperatures-climb/

    Reply
  43. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    The Mona Loa readings are going to take off.

    The “old time carbon” is driving these new numbers. And the fact we a Ford F-150 every 26 seconds.

    Reply
    • ‘And the fact we a Ford F-150 every 26 seconds.’ = another dangerous psychopath blessed by the US Congress at the wheel.

      Reply
  44. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    Brazil orders rolling blackouts as demand spikes in record heat

    SAO PAULO- Rolling blackouts swept across parts of Brazil on Monday as the grid operator ordered select power cuts to avoid a larger crisis, drawing attention to a fragile electric system that is buckling under the strains of record-breaking heat and dryness.

    http://www.jpost.com/Breaking-News/Brazil-orders-rolling-blackouts-as-demand-spikes-in-record-heat-388282

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 20, 2015

      Rousseff’s new economic team, which took office at the start of her second term this month, has said utilities will be able to raise power rates this year. A government source told Reuters on Friday that rates could rise as much as 60 percent this year

      Link

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 20, 2015

        There are 60 million people in southeastern Brazil.

        This entire idea of “adaption” is under way there. Everyone here needs to learn to read Portuguese, because their system is crashing in heat and drought, with a government that was blind to their fate.

        Reply
        • This could really be a study in ineffective crisis response. It’s not like they didn’t have months and months to respond.

    • climatehawk1

       /  January 20, 2015

      Thanks, tweet scheduled.

      Reply
    • Thanks for keeping us abreast, CB.
      There are some incredible tragedies unfolding in Brazil.

      Reply
    • Extra heat, loss of hydro is a huge problem.

      Reply
  45. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    It is rainy season in SAO PAULO- They are drinking from a mud hole, and have been at it for months.

    One more month left to turn this around, just like California.

    Reply
  46. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    It ain’t raining were they need it

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 20, 2015

      Today’s sat pass –

      Reply
      • For those who aren’t too familiar with sat analysis, the grey-white reflections are dry lake and river beds… This is a huge crisis and western media is basically pretending it’s not happening. If this goes any further with no peep, it will be comparable with holocaust denial. You can’t just have 60 million people go into full on water loss and not say anything.

        Reply
      • Are the red spots fires?

        Reply
  47. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    As the dry season comes , 60 million people are at risk. Pay attention what they do we will do .

    Reply
  48. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    Yemen –
    May fall to the Muslim Terror. Let them have it . no nation on Earth has less water.

    Reply
  49. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    Yemen –
    What are they going to do , when we destroy every drop of water they have ?

    Yemen is the most water poor nation on the planet.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 20, 2015

      Yemen is the most water poor nation on the planet.

      That should take about 15 mins. if we attack their water.

      Reply
      • OK. Let’s not go demonizing everyone who lives in Yemen…

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  January 20, 2015

        OK. Let’s not go demonizing everyone who lives in Yemen…

        Let’s not understand who hates our guts in Yemen. We’ve been killing them for years .

        My point , they are out of water,

        Reply
        • Yes. We’ve been using drones to conduct raids on Al Qaeda in Yemen. Some of the attacks were indiscriminate. Would you love someone flying armed drones over your home every night?

          So yes, let’s not hate the Yemeni. And maybe understand a bit of the reason why some of them may be angry with us.

          In any case, if they are short on water, perhaps it would be somewhat better to consider their plight. They really aren’t too much different from the rest of us. Human beings. Flawed all.

      • wili

         /  January 20, 2015

        It might be interesting to do a full-blown comparison of Yemen and California. Both have more than quadrupled their population in the last few decades in an essentially desert/dry mediterranean climate, both have squandered much of the water resources they do have on wasteful agricultural commodities, and both are now facing possibly existential water crises. Of course, CA has the great advantages of much wealth (however mal-distributed) and the protection of the world’s only military super-power, while Yemen is relatively poor and has been the object of that superpower’s attacks.

        Reply
        • California also has a great advantage in that it is now husbanding much more water due to renewables adoption, low meat consumption for the US, and steadily ratcheting water efficiency and unconventional access policy.

  50. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    robertscribbler

    Many of us are nasty, mean , selfish , greedy , and short sighted .

    Reply
  51. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    “They really aren’t too much different from the rest of us. Human beings. Flawed all.”

    And yet we will bomb the shit out of them , and never understand why they hate us.

    Reply
  52. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    RS –

    I love you as a great thinker. Many thanks for letting me punch you in the eye. This is why you ever greater fans.

    Reply
  53. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    have

    Reply
  54. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    The Beach Boys – Wendy (Backing Track & Vocal Recording Session 1964)

    Reply
  55. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    There is entire mass of this ………………..

    Reply
  56. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    Beach Boys The Lost Concert (1964)
    MrCanalegal
    Beach Boys The Lost Concert (1964)

    Reply
  57. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 20, 2015

    Quite a heat blob over Greenland

    Reply
  58. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    ‘Well she got her daddy’s car, and cruised to the hamberger stand ”

    That as our pattern for over 60 years.

    Reply
  59. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    The Beach Boys told us everything was OK, the Beach Boys lied .

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 20, 2015

      In the future, we will not be having :”All summer long” .

      Reply
  60. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    The Beach boys – All summer long (HQ)

    Reply
  61. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    America’s out look as been the Beach Boys for over 60 years. Only now is that changing.

    But he wrote ;

    “Sittin’ in my car out side your house”

    No one can write that. Ever again .

    Reply
  62. Colorado Bob

     /  January 20, 2015

    America is still stuck in the in the 60’s . After 50 years. Just watch a truck ad. It’s all about pissing on a rock. That’s America, if we just piss on one bigger rock.

    Reply
  63. In the news today, the Norwegian government just opened up for the 23. round of test drilling – this time in the Barents sea. The environmental organisations, including the governmental ones that advises on the arctic sea (polar institute) area have all been rather clear that its a big mistake to start drilling in this area. An interesting thing is that the government redefined what was called the “ice border” – ironically one that is moving as we are warming the planet by burning fossil fuel. Our supposedly environment minister has been called the second energy minister instead lately.

    http://www.nrk.no/nordnytt/dagens-naeringsliv_-apner-nye-omrader-i-barentshavet-1.12161185

    You’d have to google translate these though if you cant read Norwegian.🙂

    Reply
    • Oil at these prices, climate impacts ramping up and they’re still looking to drill in the Barents? These guys are nuts. Very sorry to see this…

      Reply
    • GasFrac. A Canadian fracking company just filed for bankruptcy today. In Texas, the Permian basin is seeing companies not paying well servicing fees… Rig count already down by about 20 percent there. We’ve got former oil execs predicting 5 dollar gasoline after a price whiplash.

      Reply
      • Oh yeah, every aspect of those extraction systems are corrupt to some extent. They always have been from DAY ONE of the fossil fuel frenzy.

        Reply
    • US oil rig count is now down to 1366, which is now less than for the same period last year. Oil rigs peaked in October at 1676. We’re probably looking at 850 by April with these prices.

      In the current price range most unconventional oil in the US and Canada is unprofitable or barely break-even. Iraq is increasing production of its low cost oil. OPEC still holding firm. Everyone’s going into the red on fears of losing market share. It’s a price war that’s steadily taking down our unconventional fuels industry while making everyone that’s got skin in this poorer.

      On the demand side, despite cheer leading in the press and some talk-talk about SUV sales, global calls for crude are still weak.

      Reply
  64. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 20, 2015
    Reply
  65. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 20, 2015
    Reply
  66. A new study predicts that the effects of deforestation on the global climate will be much stronger than expected.

    http://www.dw.de/rainforests-are-the-planets-sweat-glands/a-18139003

    Reply
    • We knew this. Anyone paying attention knew this. Since ancient times, deforestation in equatorial regions has been enough to create wastelands. In the case of Brazil, we have the double impact of rapid deforestation and human warming. What we are witnessing is a fast motion transformation generated by these forces.

      Reply
  67. wili

     /  January 20, 2015

    Tamino just added his two cents to the hottest-year discussion: https://tamino.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/its-the-trend-stupid-3/

    “It’s the Trend, Stupid”

    ” The reaction of the “pausemaniacs” to the record hottest year has mostly been protest. Breakin’ some temperature record just don’t mean a gosh-darn thing worth payin’ no attention to. It only broke the record by a little bit. And besides, it ain’t the individual years, record hot or not, that count, it’s the pause that counts — a record hottest year don’t end the pause!

    Methinks they do protest too much. Perhaps they fear that a record year really does threaten their beloved “pause.” But that’s not the real threat at all, it’s the fact that the data have followed the global-warming-continues-without-slowing-down pattern just about as closely as one could have expected, because all the while they’ve been bellowing about the pause that never was.

    But the record year does do this: it makes it harder to sell the whole “pause” idea…”

    Reply
  68. Dangerously in denial on climate change

    … In recent weeks, West Virginia has snatched national headlines for its attempts to doctor school science standards to discredit climate change. The sixth-grade science curriculum, for example, was amended so that, rather than having students “clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century,” they would examine causes behind the rise “and fall” in global temperatures.

    -Still on the OPINION page!

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/catherine-rampell-dangerously-in-denial-on-climate-change/2015/01/19/20796658-a01c-11e4-b146-577832eafcb4_story.html

    Reply
  69. wili

     /  January 20, 2015

    Cantareira now down to 5.6%, and it’s dropping at .2% per day, double the earlier rate, due to high mid-summer temperatures. https://tamino.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/its-the-trend-stupid-3/

    Reply
  70. Neil Gundel

     /  January 20, 2015

    You don’t give Inhofe enough (dis)credit. He actually wrote a whole book about climate change entitled “The Greatest Hoax: How the Global Warming Conspiracy Threatens Your Future.”

    I suspect he does provide some weak rationale for why scientists would be doing such a thing, but I’m sure it’s not worth the paper it’s written on.

    Reply
  71. Steve

     /  January 20, 2015

    Nice graph showing temperature increases over last 135 years. Comments made about it
    are expectedly stupid though. https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/135-years-global-warming-one-terrifying-animation-161538777.html

    Reply
  72. 0121 State of the Union Address
    Surrounding the POTUS tonight will be to a fossil fuel industry controlled Senate and Congress.
    There will a spectacle of fascist preening and show of force by the Republicans — count on it.
    The actual speech my, or may not, be of substance but the backdrop will be pointed.
    If you watch it — view it like the Secret Service would. Scan the crowd etc. See who the R has for guests in the gallery etc. (Psycho-gun nut etc.Ted Nugent was there recently.) Who is there — and why them.
    It will be SHOW TIME for the Right and curtains for the climate we hold dearly.
    For something from history, and before Fox News, see this from yesteryear.

    Reply
  73. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 21, 2015

    Accumulated annual volume changes of ice caps and glaciers in the American Arctic (red), the Russian Arctic (green), the Eurasian Arctic (blue), and the entire Arctic (purple).

    Reply
  74. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 21, 2015

    Contribution of mountain and subpolar glaciers to sea level. Shown are sea level change (mm/year, red) and sea level rise (mm, blue).

    Reply
  75. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 21, 2015

    Time period when roads are open for travel on the Alaska North Slope, since 1970. I’ve been looking for something that indicates how long ice roads are open as it is a good indicator. To gauge conditions, holes were drilled to check thickness, now it is ice penetrating radar.

    Reply
  76. Here’s some good bits from Sam Carana 01/19 at Arctic News re the speed and location of our beloved jet stream:

    A link to one image: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-OanFl47dE3I/VL7vJ0L8PPI/AAAAAAAAPlA/HvDG5k4CzXs/s1600/Jan-9.2015.jpg

    (A reply will link to full piece.)

    … The image on the right shows that the jet streams on the Northern Hemisphere reached speeds as high as 410 km/s (255 mile per second) on January 9, 2015. Also note the jet stream crossing the Arctic Ocean, rather than staying between 50 and 60 degrees latitude, where the polar jet streams used to be.

    The image below shows winds on January 11, 2015, at several altitudes, i.e. at 10 hPa | ~26,500 m (16.5 mile), high in stratosphere, polar vortex (left, at 250 hPa | ~10,500 m (6.5 mile), jet stream (center), and at 700 hPa | ~3,500 m (2.2 mile), high in planetary boundary layer….

    Reply
  77. wili

     /  January 21, 2015

    “faced” not “faces”

    Reply
  78. – Am I to think that the sound of war drums will get louder with a Republican controlled Senate and Congress? (War being a frenzy of violence and fossil fuel. Both of which are embraced by this same US Congress. Is this some sort of political coup by the Speaker?)

    National Security
    House speaker invites Israeli leader to address Congress over Iran threats

    Boehner said he hoped Netanyahu would speak on the “grave threats radical Islam and Iran pose to our security and way of life.”

    Netanyahu’s scheduled appearance would mark his third address before a joint meeting of Congress — the most recent in May 2011.

    Obama wants to let the negotiations with Tehran play out before any new sanctions are considered. Obama has vowed to veto any sanctions bill.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/house-speaker-invites-israeli-leader-to-address-congress-over-iran-threats/2015/01/21/83cf6d3a-a178-11e4-903f-9f2faf7cd9fe_story.html

    – I don’t like it.

    Reply
  79. – Am I to think that the sound of war drums will get louder with a Republican controlled Senate and Congress? (War being a frenzy of violence and fossil fuel. Both of which are embraced by this same US Congress. Is this some sort of political coup by the Speaker?)

    National Security
    House speaker invites Israeli leader to address Congress over Iran threats

    Boehner said he hoped Netanyahu would speak on the “grave threats radical Islam and Iran pose to our security and way of life.”

    Netanyahu’s scheduled appearance would mark his third address before a joint meeting of Congress — the most recent in May 2011.

    Obama wants to let the negotiations with Tehran play out before any new sanctions are considered. Obama has vowed to veto any sanctions bill.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/house-speaker-invites-israeli-leader-to-address-congress-over-iran-threats/2015/01/21/83cf6d3a-a178-11e4-903f-9f2faf7cd9fe_story.html

    – I don’t like it.

    Reply
    • Robert.
      ? I posted this a second time trying to get it to show up at the bottom of the page. Everything I do now goes higher up (earlier position) in the chain.
      ?

      Reply
  80. Oklahoma Wildfires Close Interstate 35, Prompt Evacuations

    At least 13 wildfires broke out across central and eastern Oklahoma Sunday, forcing a major interstate to close and prompting a local fire chief to request the evacuation of a small town northeast of Oklahoma City.

    One of the fires forced the Oklahoma Highway Patrol to close a 13-mile stretch of Interstate 35 in both directions between Guthrie and Mulhall, about 30 to 40 miles north of Oklahoma City, Sunday afternoon. OHP said grass fires were “crossing the interstate” in that portion of Logan County in a message posted to Twitter around 3:30 p.m. CST.

    Reply
  81. TransCanada, the company proposing to build the controversial $8 billion Keystone XL pipeline, filed court documents Tuesday in nine Nebraska counties to start eminent domain proceedings and get the 12 percent of easements it still needs here.

    On the same day, Omaha Sen. Ernie Chambers filed legislation (LB473) that would wrest the power to take land from the Canadian pipeline company.

    “The pipeline is like King Kong, and the people and farms are like ants and grasshoppers,” Chambers said. “If they get in the way, they will be crushed with no redress.”

    TransCanada started the condemnation process two days before a deadline to do so or lose eminent domain powers given to it by former Gov. Dave Heineman when he approved the pipeline route in Nebraska two years ago.

    The company’s attorneys filed just under 90 actions involving landowners, said Andrew Craig, TransCanada’s Omaha-based land manager for Keystone projects.

    http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/chadron/regional/transcanada-begins-condemnation-proceedings/article_51074ad8-a17f-11e4-8ae3-43d8e4bd0a7c.html

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 21, 2015

      Old African proverb –
      ” When elephants fight, only the grass suffers. “

      Reply
  82. Colorado Bob

     /  January 21, 2015

    Blackouts Roll Through Large Swath of Brazil
    Power Outages Come Amid Sweltering Summer and Low Reservoir Levels at Hydroelectric Dams

    SÃO PAULO—Power blackouts rolled through São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and at least eight other Brazilian states on Monday, stoking fears that the nation’s severe drought has entered a damaging new phase.

    A spike in energy use, coupled with transmission troubles, forced Brazil’s national grid operator, ONS, to order utilities to cut electricity to parts of the heavily populated Southeast. The region is suffering through sweltering summer temperatures and low reservoir levels at hydroelectric dams. Power was also cut in the nation’s capital of Brasília.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/blackouts-roll-through-large-swath-of-brazil-1421709716

    Reply
  83. Colorado Bob

     /  January 21, 2015

    Floods Kill at Least 260 in Malawi, Mozambique, and Madagascar

    In what is likely to be one of 2015’s deadliest natural disasters, two weeks of heavy rains have hit the southeastern African nations of Malawi, Mozambique, and Madagascar, triggering rampaging floods that have killed at least 260 people and left 260,000 homeless, said Bloomberg News today. Hardest hit was Malawi, where 176 people are dead or missing and 200,000 homeless. According to EM-DAT, the international disaster database, only one other flood disaster has killed more people in Malawi: the floods of March 10, 1991, with a death toll of 472. That flood was also the most expensive weather-related natural disaster in their history, with damages estimated at $24 million (1991 dollars.) The floods of 2015 may be ten times more expensive: last week, Malawi requested humanitarian assistance of $430 million for recovery efforts. Many areas remain cut off, with aid workers struggling to provide food to the hardest-hit southern portion of the country. The heaviest rains in Malawi came on January 13, when Chileka, Malawi measured 6.57″ (167 mm) of rain in 24 hours. The tropical disturbance that spawned these heavy rains moved over Mozambique on January 14, triggering flooding that killed at least 71 people there. The next day, the disturbance moved over the Mozambique Channel between Mozambique and Madagascar, becoming Tropical Storm Chedza, which hit Madagascar on January 16, killing 13 people on the island. Ocean temperatures were up to 0.6°C (1.0°F) above average in the Mozambique Channel, which contributed to the high rainfall rates observed with Chedza and its precursor disturbance.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2898

    Reply
  84. For year I’ve been trying bring attention to toxic traffic dust. Here’s a sample of some of its contents:

    EPA, auto industry agree to cut copper in brake pads

    Washington — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the automotive industry and the states signed an agreement Tuesday to dramatically reduce the use of copper in motor vehicle brake pads — a move that will reduce pollution in U.S. streams, rivers and lakes.

    The deal also calls for cutting the amount of mercury, lead, cadmium, asbestiform fibers and chromium-6 salts in vehicle brake pads. Runoff from the materials can harm fish, amphibians and plants…

    detroitnews.com/story/business/autos/2015/01/21/epa-auto-industry-copper-brake-pads

    https://dtlange2.wordpress.com/2014/06/05/a-graphic-look-at-severe-traffic-dust-in-california-usa/

    Reply
    • Fossil fuels are burned for forward motion — brake pads are shredded to slow you fools down. Sensible? No way.
      Where does it all go? Into the community.

      Reply
  85. Colorado Bob

     /  January 21, 2015

    The flight data recorders from Air Asia 8501 shows that the jet was climbing at 3 times the rate that is safe . – about 6,000 feet a minute –

    Does anyone here think that these men in control of that aircraft would pull the nose up as it entered a thunderstorm that reached over 60,000 ft. ?

    I wonder that the SST of the Java Sea was that day ?

    It’s like the ice storm this week in the Northeast, one does not get ice unless it’s near freezing . Ice storms are balance of heat and cold through the air column . It’s the middle of January , it should be snowing Penn. not making an ice storm.

    Reply
  86. Colorado Bob

     /  January 21, 2015

    By the way an ice storm tip –

    Watch the back wheels of other cars, if there is rooster tail of water coming off them you are OK. When that sign goes away, pull over. The ice storm has begun, and you cannot out drive it.

    This is always a matter of just 2 degrees . It’s still rain on your windshield , but it’s ice on the road surface. This happens in seconds.

    And no one can drive on ice.

    Reply
  87. Colorado Bob

     /  January 22, 2015

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 22, 2015

      These are the groupers we used to catch .

      “The hoax is that there are some people so arrogant that they are so powerful they think they can change the climate. Man can’t change climate.”

      We have raped the oceans . But we can never rape the air.

      Reply
  88. Colorado Bob

     /  January 22, 2015

    Brazil , just 2 years ago they were leaders, now they can’t buy a drink.

    Welcome to the future ,

    Blackouts Roll Through Large Swath of Brazil.
    Power Outages Come Amid Sweltering Summer and Low Reservoir Levels at Hydroelectric Dams.
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/blackouts-roll-through-large-swath-of-brazil-1421709716
    Reply · Like · Unfollow Post · 2 s

    Reply
  89. Colorado Bob

     /  January 22, 2015

    One can not be a “powerhouse” if one saws down every tree.

    Reply
  90. “Politicians, economists and industry leaders in Davos have been voicing their worries over the impact of lower prices.

    Total and BHP Billiton both said on Wednesday that they would cut back on shale oil projects.

    People’s Bank of China governor Zhou Xiaochuan said low oil prices could slow down China’s development of renewable energy projects.

    He said: “We worry a little bit that the price signal may give disincentive for new energy types to develop and could reduce investment in new non-fossil energy,”

    But he added that lower prices would be good for the economy and job creation, because China was dependent on imported oil and gas.”
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30913321

    Reply
  91. “The falling oil price has forced the world’s biggest mining company, BHP Billiton, to cut its US shale oil operation by 40%.

    It is reducing the number of rigs from 26 to 16 by the end of the June.

    However, BHP said it expected increased productivity to boost output by some 50% over the period.”
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30913317

    Reply
  92. Shockingly honest interview with Eric Rignot…

    Reply
  93. — The Nazis wanted only to enslave half the planet and murder a few million innocents — for a thousand years (The Thousand Year Reich). These Republicans are on a course to kill everyone — forever.

    POLITICO Pro
    Republicans outfox Democrats on climate votes

    The GOP accepts the notion of climate change – but not the way Democrats wanted them to.

    Senate Republicans head-faked Democrats on climate change Wednesday, agreeing in a floor vote that the planet’s climate was changing, but blocking language that would have blamed human activity.

    In a complicated maneuver that was the first politically perilous test for Senate Republicans, the new majority party split up the votes that Democrats had hoped would force the GOP into an awkward roll call on whether they believed in the science behind climate change — just hours after President Barack Obama slammed Republicans in his State of the Union address for dodging the issue.

    But Republicans made an eleventh-hour change in strategy on two Democratic attempts to divide them — with Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe, their most vocal denier of humans’ effect on the climate, joining a leading liberal in a symbolic vote on whether global warming is “real and not a hoax.”

    “There is archeological evidence of that, there’s Biblical evidence of” the climate changing, Inhofe, the chairman of the Environment and Public Works panel, said on the floor before signing onto a proposal from Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) that stopped short of linking climate change to human activities, such as burning of fuels like coal and oil.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2015/01/senate-climate-change-vote-114463.html

    Reply
    • – And the Democrats are letting them get away with it.

      Reply
      • Jacob

         /  January 22, 2015

        Feel free to correct me if I’m mistaken on this point, but it feels like these parties are merely two heads on one monster working in concert to screw all of us. The Dems talk a nice game and make just enough of an effort to make one say they are the better party, but do either of these parties/or their puppet masters have humanity’s best interests at heart. The evidence says no.

        Reply
      • Brian

         /  January 22, 2015

        So, true. People forget that it was the Clinton admin that overturned Glass-Steagall.

        The problem is that you cannot conduct a political campaign without massive funding from corporate interests. Dems able to put on a slightly more progressive public face while acting for the interests of corporate oligarchs who fund the political process in the US. Obama is just posturing now to enhance his legacy when the real time to act would have been when the Republicans didn’t control both houses.

        Complete political paralysis – a very sad situation for the rest of the planet.

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  January 23, 2015

          Still voting Democratic here, but only until I die. They are our only serious hope. If you don’t like them, join and make them better. Or just work on overturning Citizens United, great idea and vital to the future of our democracy.

  94. Ouse M.D.

     /  January 22, 2015

    http://thebulletin.org/timeline

    It’s 3 minutes to midnight….

    Reply
  95. RWood

     /  January 23, 2015

    Discussion by a left media group on 1) current startling reports and 2) how media (in England/Great Britain) appear to respond. Analysis of (1) would be appreciated.
    http://dissidentvoice.org/2015/01/death-by-a-thousand-cuts-earth-enters-the-danger-zone/#more-57098

    Reply
    • RWood

       /  January 23, 2015

      Hmmm, comment dived into a previous thread. Intended for last position.

      Reply
  96. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 23, 2015

    Google Translated from globo.com (Portugese)
    ========================================

    Dam Jaguari-Jacareí reservation in the city of Bragança Paulista, in São Paulo, nesto Sunday (18/01/2015) (Photo: Luis Moura / Estadão Content)

    Reply
  97. Kevin Jones

     /  January 23, 2015

    Well, folks. Back from a refreshing 10 day 150 mile walk through New Hampshire. Dixville Notch to Concord with the NH Rebellion. And trying to catch up, all I have to say about ‘dumb’ Arabs is to paraphrase Kurt Vonnegut: They invented a number that stands for nothing. Try doing long division with Roman Numerals! (They also taught the world that with a wing in the water and a wing in the air, a boat could actually sail upwind. Sheer brilliance.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  January 23, 2015

      …meant the above to follow with malice towards none remarks below….

      Reply
  98. Greg

     /  January 23, 2015

    Colbert’s take on the messaging of the GOP on the science of climate change:

    Reply
  99. Greg

     /  January 23, 2015

    Colbert’s take on the messaging of the GOP regarding climate change:

    Reply
  100. Colorado Bob

     /  January 23, 2015

    Mystery of Greenland’s Disappearing Lakes

    Scientists are baffled after two lakes in Greenland were mysteriously drained of billions of gallons of water.

    One lake was so large that a mile-wide crater was left behind after it was drained in the span of a few weeks. Another sub-glacial lake has been filled and emptied twice in the last two years.

    The findings were published separately for each lake in the journals “Nature” and “The Cryosphere.”
    Ian Howat, a professor at Ohio State University, who studied the lake that left behind a mile-wide crater, said the findings of the study were “catastrophic.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/mystery-greenlands-disappearing-lakes/story?id=28407359

    Reply
  101. Colorado Bob

     /  January 23, 2015

    Surprise Lake Sheds Light on Underbelly of Greenland’s Ice
    Scientists have been surprised to find water pooling beneath the ice

    ‘What the heck is that?’
    As happens so often in science, Mike Willis wasn’t actually looking for what he ended up discovering. The glaciologist was combing through satellite and GPS data to see what small, local effects could be clouding satellite measurements of larger changes in Earth’s gravity from ice loss.

    What he did not expect to find was a hole twice the size of Central Park in a small ice cap in the northern reaches of Greenland.

    “What the heck is that?” he thought when he saw it.

    Link

    Reply
  102. Griffin

     /  January 23, 2015

    Powerful photographic evidence of glacial retreat in New Zealand.
    http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11390803&ref=NZH_Tw

    Reply
  103. – pdf 22 pages

    United States Department of Agriculture Weekly Water and Climate
    UpdateThursday ,January 22, 2015

    http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/support/drought/dmrpt-20150122.pdf

    Reply
  104. – Aviation has been geo-engineering our skies for decades — the miserable degenerates.
    The last time we had clear mostly uncontaminated skies were in those few days after 9/11 when civil and commercial aviation was grounded.

    Aircraft are one of the fastest-growing carbon emissions sources, on track to triple by 2050 without regulations.

    Washington, D.C. —

    Six national environmental organizations yesterday called on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to move quickly to set emission standards to curb greenhouse gas pollution from the nation’s aircraft fleet.

    In letters to the EPA and the FAA, the Center for Biological Diversity, Earthjustice, Friends of the Earth, the National Resources Defense Council, Environmental Defense Fund and the Sierra Club asked for strong standards that reduce aircraft emissions as quickly as possible. The letters urge the EPA to act under the Clean Air Act “with the goal of proposing final standards no later than the end of 2015.”

    http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2015/obama-administration-urged-to-fast-track-airplane-carbon-cuts

    Reply
  105. Has the El Niño phenomenon changed? I ask this question as a layperson and deeply worried resident of SoCal. Is it possible that the warming of the western pacific is reducing the temperature gradient between the eastern pacific and the west, thereby weakening the El Niño just as the warming arctic weakens the jet stream? Could the warming Atlantic be strengthening the trade winds, blocking the westerly wind bursts? Is there any published research on this hypothesis?

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 24, 2015

      Climate change expected to bring more extreme La Ninas

      About 15 years back, a particularly brutal La Nina caused severe drought the American southwest, widespread flooding in China that displaced 20 million people, and landslides in Venezuela that killed upwards of 50,000.

      A new study concludes that extreme La Nina events like this will become twice as likely in the future due to climate change.

      http://www.cbsnews.com/news/climate-change-expected-to-bring-more-extreme-la-ninas/

      Reply
  106. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    Arctic ice cap slides into the ocean
    Date:
    January 23, 2015
    Source:
    University of Leeds
    Summary:
    Satellite images have revealed that a remote Arctic ice cap has thinned by more than 50 metres since 2012 — about one sixth of its original thickness — and that it is now flowing 25 times faster. The findings show that over the last two decades, ice loss from the south-east region of Austfonna, located in the Svalbard archipelago, has increased significantly. In this time, ice flow has accelerated to speeds of several kilometres per year, and ice thinning has spread more than 50km inland — to within 10km of the summit.

    Link

    Reply
  107. Countdown to catastrophe: Doomsday Clock moved closer to midnight

    (Reuters) – Rising threats from climate change and nuclear arsenals prompted the scientists who maintain the Doomsday Clock, a symbolic countdown to global catastrophe, to move it two minutes closer to midnight on Thursday, its first shift in three years.

    The Doomsday Clock, devised by the Chicago-based Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, now stands at three minutes to midnight, or doomsday.

    It has been adjusted 18 times since its creation in 1947. It has been set as close as two minutes to midnight, in 1953 when the United States tested a hydrogen bomb, and as far as 17 minutes from midnight, in 1991 as the Cold War expired.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/22/us-usa-doomsdayclock-idUSKBN0KV2JX20150122

    Reply
  108. Wow, comments seem to show up in odd out of sequence places?

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 24, 2015

      Strange, I’ve encountered no difficulty with comments in strange or out-of-sequence places. In case it is not clear, the software works like this–if you are, say, the fourth person to reply to another comment, your reply will be placed below the other comments (and will appear to be in reply to the third reply).

      Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 24, 2015

      Also, I think it helps that I ask to get new comments via e-mail, and respond to many of them by clicking on the Reply button that is provided. That places the response where it should go.

      Reply
  109. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    This chart shows just how dry San Francisco’s Januaries have been

    A chart released by the National Weather Service on Friday underscores just how dry San Francisco has been over the last few years.

    The chart shows San Francisco has suffered through several dry Januaries in a row, while only four Januaries in the past 15 years can be categorized as wetter than normal.

    Link

    Reply
  110. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    South-east Queensland dries off after record drenching and flash floods

    Some areas of the Gold Coast have received more than 350mm of rain over the past few days, the most since Tropical Cyclone Oswald swept through southern Queensland and northern NSW in January 2013.

    More than a month’s worth of rain fell yesterday alone, causing flash flooding, chaos on the roads and leading to flights being diverted.

    Read more at Link

    Reply
  111. entropicman

     /  January 24, 2015

    Dtlange, humortra

    Each mm of sea level rise is a volume increase of 360 cubic kilometres.

    If the 1550 cubic kilometre has lost one sixth of its volume in two years it has released 258 cubic kilometres of water. This is equivalent to a sea level rise of 0.7mm in two years, 0.35 mm/year.

    Since the 30-year average is 3.2mm/year overall, Austfonna alone has inreased t2013/2014 sea level riae

    Reply
  112. Kevin Jones

     /  January 24, 2015

    The great BBC seems to think there’s a problem with water supply in Brazil. How ‘Breaking News!’ of them….

    Reply
  113. Kevin Jones

     /  January 24, 2015

    Comments continue out of sequence….. 1/24/15 6:48 a.m. EST

    Reply
  114. entropicman

     /  January 24, 2015

    Austfonna has lost 1/6 of its depth. If that is 1/6of its volumevolume, it has lost 258 cubic kilometres out of 1550.

    A 1mm increase in sea level is a volume increase of 360 cubic kilometres. Austfonna has contributed 258 cubic km in two years. That would be an increase of 1.7mm or 0.35mm/year.

    The long term rate is currently 3.2mm/ year. Austfonna alone has increased that by 10%.

    Reply
  115. Humortra, dtlange

    If the Austfonna has lost 1/6 of its volume that is a melt of 258 cubic kilometre out of the original 1550 cubic kilometres.

    As a rule of thumb, 360 cubic kilometres increases sea level by 1mm. Austfonna melt has increased sea level by 258/360=0.7mm in two years; 0.35mm/year.

    The long term rate is 3.2mm/year at present. One small island in Svalbard has increased the rate of sea level rise by 10%.

    Reply
  116. Devastating monsoon flooding from Sri Lanka to northwest Australia

    “According to news reports from the region, landslides on the island of Java killed at least 56 people. Floods in Sri Lanka displaced over 46,000 people. Floods in Malaysia displaced over 200,000 people and left 21 dead, resulting in Malaysia government officials declaring the flooding the worst in decades. Rains in the Aceh province of Indonesia have displaced more than 120,000 people. It was amidst these thunderstorms that Air Asia Flight 8501 tragically crashed into the Java Sea, killing 162 people. ”

    http://www.climate.gov/news-features/event-tracker/devastating-monsoon-flooding-sri-lanka-northwest-australia

    Reply
  117. State of emergency declared as Baikal falls to lowest level in 60 years

    “Mr Donskoy said: ‘There was a meeting of emergency situations commission and the decision was made to introduce the state of emergency. The shallow water was caused by climate, as the summer of 2014 was extremely dry. I came to the Russian Government with a suggestion to introduce state of emergency in both the Republic of Buryatia and Irkutsk region’.”

    http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/features/f0050-state-of-emergency-declared-as-baikal-falls-to-lowest-level-in-60-years/

    Reply
  118. Spike

     /  January 24, 2015

    well well the BBC has woken up to what’s happening in Brazil, and it’s the most read news item! I’m surprised frankly, but perhaps a sign the public mood is changing here.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-30962813

    Reply
  119. Kevin Jones

     /  January 24, 2015

    Just noticed, Andy, 30F Watson Lake Yukon (55min. ago)

    Reply
  120. Legal/Regulatory | World Economic Forum in Davos

    Leaders in Davos Urge Quick Action to Alter the Effects of Climate Change

    DAVOS, Switzerland – On the heels of data showing that last year was the hottest on earth since record keeping began, business leaders, politicians and scientists at the World Economic Forum redoubled their calls to combat climate change.

    In panels and private discussions, executives and legislators were comparing notes on the growing economic cost of changing weather patterns, and debating what practical steps could be taken in the near term.

    http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2015/01/23/leaders-in-davos-urge-quick-action-to-alter-the-effects-of-climate-change/?_r=0

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 24, 2015

      This has been the subject of a denier meme on Twitter, listing the many private jets that flew to Davos, supposedly for climate change discussions, and charging massive hypocrisy. Just FYI.

      Reply
  121. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    Brazil extreme drought sees Rio’s main hydroelectric plant switched off

    A major Rio hydroelectric power plant was switched off after water levels slipped below an operational minimum following severe drought, Brazil’s national grid told AFP on Thursday.

    Water levels are also dwindling at three other plants that serve a region home to 16 million people, but an ONS spokesman denied there was any immediate threat to energy supplies.

    “The hydroelectric plant was switched off Wednesday as there was no longer enough water to keep its turbines turning,” the spokesman said of the shutdown at the largest of the four sites.

    The government urged citizens to limit their water use in view of the extreme situation.

    Rio is laboring under weeks of scant rainfall as stifling temperatures approach 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit).

    Link

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 24, 2015

      Tweet scheduled.

      Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  January 25, 2015

      Will the 2016 Rio summer Olympics be the first cancelled due to AGW (if the drought holds)? Scant water and electricity just when demand for both will be peaking like never before. If we’re seeing events like this now, what’s it going to be like under a 2 – 3 C rise in ave. global temperatures?

      Reply
  122. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    California Drought Worsening During Height of Rainy Season

    The Western U.S. winter rainy season has reached its halfway point, and there is only bad news to report for drought-beleaguered California. November through March marks the period when California receives its heaviest rains and snows, thanks to the wintertime path of the jet stream, which dips to the south and brings wet Pacific low pressure systems to the state. The rainy season started out promisingly, with several December storms bringing precipitation amounts close to average for the month over much of the state. Troublingly, though, record-warm ocean temperatures off of the coast meant that the December storms were unusually warm. This resulted in snow falling only at very high elevations, keeping the critical Sierra snow pack much lower than usual. The jet stream pattern shifted during January 2015, bringing disastrously dry conditions to the state. January usually brings 4.19″ of rain to San Francisco, but no rain at all has fallen in January 2015 in the city–or over much of Central California. The dryness has been accompanied by near-record warmth at higher elevations in the Sierras, with temperatures at Blue Canyon and South Lake Tahoe averaging nearly 8°F above average for the month of January. As a result, the snowpack in the Sierras–a critical reservoir of water that is used throughout the rest of the year–is abysmally low, running about 30% of normal for this time of year. California’s eight largest reservoirs are 33% – 86% below their historical average, and the portion of the state covered by the highest level of drought expanded in mid-January–a very ominous occurrence for the height of the rainy season.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2901#commenttop

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  January 25, 2015

      I’m afraid Robert will write quite a few stories on mega wildfires this coming summer.

      Reply
  123. I have waited for almost 40 years for action on fossil fuel driven climate change. To me it was apparent back in the late 1970s that the science was strong enough for action. I was in great shock when I was informed 10 years ago that govt. scientific organizations were in disarray over the findings that climate change was irreversible. Now ten years later, I hold little hope for civilization. Indeed, for all his pretty words on climate change in the State of the Union, no new action was proposed to meet this threat. Even those that profess to understand that climate change is occurring are in “happy denial” on the impacts. Adaptation measures (ie life saving measures) must be immediately instituted in order for the human species to survive.

    Reply
  124. Colorado Bob

     /  January 24, 2015

    Mysterious deaths of Hundreds of San Francisco Bay Birds

    The strange gray slime matter seems to look like unclean, rubber cement. The experts have assured that this substance is not fish oil, petroleum nor is it synthetic rubber. This substance wraps up the feathers of these beautiful birds which hamper their capacity of insulating themselves. Sooner or later these birds surrender to hypothermia and then freeze up to death. So far more than five hundred of these species have come into contact with this lethal matter. The latest count showed around 322 sea birds being put into care under the supervision of International Bird Rescue (IBR) inclusive of surf scoters, horned grebes and buffleheads with around 145 dead ones which has been gathered from the sea shores.
    Link

    Reply
  125. California Drought Worsening During Height of Rainy Season

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2901

    Reply
  126. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 24, 2015

    Drought sees Rio’s main hydro plant turned off

    Water levels are also dwindling at three other plants that serve a region home to 16 million people

    http://www.haveeru.com.mv/world/58627

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 25, 2015

      The Amazon Is Burning

      A stunning data visualization from InfoAmazonia shows where forest fires have occurred in the Amazon rain forest between January 2012 and December 2014 using satellite data collected by NASA.

      While the full visualization shows a complete timelapse over the past two years, the clip below shows fires in January and February of 2014. The small red and yellow dots popping up show where fires cropped up during this time, with the red dots representing any fires hotter than 116 degrees Fahrenheit and the yellow dots representing particularly high-intensity fires. The static orange and yellow patches on the map show how frequently fires occur — the brighter the yellow, the more frequent the fires.

      Read more: Link

      Reply
  127. Colorado Bob

     /  January 25, 2015

    In São Paulo they are in the streets , with tear gas and rubber bullets. Why ? They raised the transit fares. (85 % of Brazil’s electric power is hydro) This long hot summer in São Paulo is real lesson on how a boiling social stew can get going when people in power have the brain power of pet store of gerbils.

    Compared to the Senator from Oklahoma , these people are lizard brained gerbils.

    Google: nat. gas imports into Brazil.
    They have come into the market, like Japan did. Given what has happened the past year in Brazil, they will have tens of millions of people with no power, and no water next year at this time.

    I find all of this rather stunning because just a few years ago, these guys were drilling off their Atlantic coast in 10,000 ft. of water through 7,000 ft. of salt to reach some of the largest oil deposits we’ve ever seen. They were the world leaders in deep sea drilling , and really hot oil . The oil coming up from some of these wells was nearly 700F degrees but the oil bubble pops all that goes away. And the oil bubble has popped ever since Col. Drake drilled the first well .

    The Saudi’s lost their king, but they are still after their market share. It used to cost them a $1.50 to load a 42 gallon barrel of oil on a tanker. And it was light sweet crude, that makes more gasoline, much less asphalt.

    That’s why I gassed my car for $1.61 this week. The Saudi’s are after those Brazilians , and those jack-asses in the tar sands, and our frackers.

    I haven’t done math lately , but oil from Iraq , and the Saudi’s can’t be more than 10 dollars a barrel, to get on the boat.
    They just open a valve and it comes out of the ground. They don’t “pump it” , it flows out of the ground.

    Compare that to drilling 600 miles off the East Coast of Brazil in 18,000 feet of water and salt. It’s nearly 700F degrees, it’s full of the nastiest carbon by products nature can make. They eat steel . So every foot of steel costs ever more.

    When I was on the “overthrust belt” some of those first deep gas wells ate the entire lower drill string. The oil industry invented a new phrase – “Hostile Drilling” .

    That was very long time along.

    Reply
    • The manifestations in the street on this last month in São Paulo weren´t all that big. They are pratically a routine since June 2013. Then there were huge uprisings of people.

      The “fever” died, or better, boiled down since that time. There are at least one or two manifestations big enough to stop Av. Paulista (our main street) each week since them, but the huge numbers of people gathering dispersed, as many are disgusted with the violence that some manifestors (called black blocks) showed, and are still showing. At least 71 buses were burned in manifestations in 2014, and in some cases, people were killed inside them (http://g1.globo.com/ma/maranhao/noticia/2014/01/morre-menina-de-seis-anos-queimada-em-ataques-onibus-em-sao-luis.html – sorry, I can´t find a news piece in English), not to mention vandalism to banks, stores and buildings, and the reporter that was killed by a black block using fireworks.

      As things are getting worse, and people have no water for days, I expect those manifestations to get bigger again. But they still are mostly lukewarm, and as long as they keep being violent (June 2013 was huge because people responded to the violence of the police. When manifestants started being violent, the moviment waned), there´s a strong detterent for people to join.

      Reply
  128. Colorado Bob

     /  January 25, 2015

    In Brazil climate change has come home to roost.

    Those people are deep trouble. There are millions of them.

    It’s not going to pretty what comes next.

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  January 25, 2015

      Yes, it’s beyond tragic. If this coming horror doesn’t wake up deniers then nothing will.

      Reply
  129. Colorado Bob

     /  January 25, 2015

    This is going to be the hardest world any of us have ever seen.

    There are nearly 20 million nearing a point with out water.

    What does one do when they have no water ?

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 25, 2015

      Its been near 104 F in Brazil for weeks. Your bill for cutting your trees has come due.

      Reply
  130. Colorado Bob

     /  January 25, 2015

    One more time –

    If one doubts climate change, there over 16 million people in the worst drought they have on record. In São Paulo . The largest city in South America.

    It’s their rainy season , if it gets no rain . They are drinking mud. If it does not rain, 20 million people will be on the move.

    Everyone get their head around that ? Because it has not rained.

    Reply
  131. Some of the Banksters may lose a few billion more in their junk fossil portfolios. Looks like those damn hippies had a point.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/banksandfinance/11367125/Oil-collapse-could-trigger-billions-in-bank-losses.html

    Reply
  132. “…the American public is not divided evenly between those who accept climate change and those who don’t. Rather, there is a range of views that can be captured in six categories—what the Yale Project and its partner, the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, call “Global Warming’s Six Americas.” According to their research, about 66 percent of Americans think global warming is happening. Only 16 percent of Americans say it is not happening, according to an October 2014 national survey.”

    http://climatechangepsychology.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/what-do-americans-think-about-global.html

    Reply
  133. American Youth Sue Politicians To Force Action On Climate Change

    …Teenagers Kelsey Juliana and Olivia Chernaik have filed a lawsuit against Democratic Oregon governor John Kitzhaber and the entire state government of Oregon, alleging that they are not doing enough to address the threats of climate change…

    http://www.desmogblog.com/2015/01/24/american-youth-sue-politicians-force-action-climate-change

    Reply
  134. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 26, 2015

    Lethbridge Alberta forecast for Tuesday, 17C to 21C depending on the weather site.

    17C = ~63F
    21C = ~70F

    Reply
  135. That’s good Andy… He shoots… he scores… wait a minute… Don Cherry is putting on a wetsuit, plaid of course… he’s going to dive to find the puck before we can have a face-off…

    Reply
  136. ALL THESE RANDOM ORDER OF COMMENTS… ?!

    Reply
  137. Vic

     /  January 26, 2015

    At 538,000 square kilometers, east Antarctica’s Totten glacier is twice the size of Victoria and holds enough water to raise sea levels by six meters. New research has indicated for the first time that the glacier is melting from below.

    “We used to think the glaciers in east Antarctica were unlikely to be affected by the ocean because they were a long way away from the warm ocean waters,”

    http://abc.net.au/news/2015-01-26/sea-water-melting-totten-glacier-in-antarctica-from-below/6047076

    Reply
  138. Andy in San Diego

    The South African government are well aware. They have just declared six of their nine provinces disaster areas so that they can provide emergency aid.

    http://www.irinnews.org/report/48149/south-africa-drought-emergency-in-six-provinces-affects-4-million

    Reply
  139. Errrr…..

    Warm ocean melting East Antarctica’s largest glacier

    “The largest glacier in East Antarctica, containing ice equivalent to a six-metre (20-foot) rise in global sea levels, is melting due to warm ocean water, Australian scientists said on Monday.

    http://phys.org/news/2015-01-ocean-east-antarctica-largest-glacier.html

    Reply
  140. Colorado Bob

     /  January 26, 2015

    Climate change skeptic accused of violating disclosure rules

    WASHINGTON — A climate-change skeptic at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who has relied on grants from fossil-fuel energy interests apparently failed to disclose financial conflicts of interest in a newly released paper, according to a complaint by a climate watchdog group.

    The paper by Harvard-Smithsonian scientist Willie Soon and three other climate-change skeptics contends the United Nations panel that tracks global warming uses a flawed methodology to estimate global temperature change. Soon and his co-authors claim to have a simpler, more accurate model that shows the threat of global warming to be exaggerated.

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/nation/2015/01/26/harvard-smithsonian-climate-change-skeptic-accused-violating-academic-disclosure-agreement/Y1uMQ8yuLpYCjOHGckRArO/story.html

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 26, 2015

      In a letter to Science Bulletin, Davies points to the more than $1 million Soon has received from companies and interests supporting studies critical of climate change.

      Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 26, 2015

      Ha, I saw that already, and will be tweeting about it. Mr. Soon is quite the acrobat–a “Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics” expert who has no other affiliation with Harvard, and whose climate pronouncements are disavowed by Smithsonian (which pays his salary). Who could possibly doubt the word of such an eminent, trustworthy individual?

      Reply
  141. Colorado Bob

     /  January 26, 2015

    It may be the middle of winter but sun, shorts and Slurpees were the order of the day for many people in southern Alberta Sunday.

    Environment Canada initially predicted a high of 13 C but the mercury was pushing 17 C in Calgary by 3 p.m. MT.

    The warm weather broke record temperatures — as the highest on record was set back in 2007 at 13.1 C.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/jan-25-calgary-weather-reaches-record-high-temperature-1.2931243

    Reply
  142. climatehawk1

     /  January 26, 2015

    Fascinating look back at New York City’s Great Blizzard of 1888: http://www.vox.com/2015/1/26/7917707/new-york-1888-blizzard

    Reply
  143. Colorado Bob

     /  January 26, 2015

    Climate Change Is Making Blizzards Like The One Hitting New England Much Worse, Scientists Say

    I asked Dr. Trenberth to comment on the role climate change has on this latest storm, which is forecast to set records. He explained:

    The number 1 cause of this is that it is winter. In winter it is cold over the continent. But it is warm over the oceans and the contrast between the cold continent and the warm Gulf Stream and surrounding waters is increasing. At present sea surface temperatures are more the 2F above normal over huge expanses (1000 miles) off the east coast and water vapor in the atmosphere is about 10% higher as a result. About half of this can be attributed to climate change.

    Link

    Reply
  144. Colorado Bob

     /  January 26, 2015

    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – Across much of Northern and Central California there has been little if any rain this month, and monthly totals will wind up at or near long-term records.

    As of Monday, San Francisco had no rainfall for the entire month. If this trend continues, it would beat the record low of 0.06 inches set last January. In January 2013, 0.49 inches of rain fell on San Francisco.

    The past three Januaries in San Francisco are among the five driest on record. This has brought the average for the past ten years down to 3.03 inches, dramatically lower than the 30-year normal of 4.55 inches.

    San Francisco’s Driest January On Record Likely, No Rain So Far In 2015

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 26, 2015

      JUNEAU — January is becoming something of rainy affair in Alaska’s capital.

      The amount of moisture set a record for the month of January, when 11.29 inches of precipitation fell at the city’s airport, the Juneau Empire reported. That broke the previous record of 10.16 inches, set just last year.

      Juneau typically receives 5.35 inches of precipitation, defined as a mixture of rain and melted snow, during a normal January, the National Climatic Data Center said.

      Link

      Reply
      • And, what of the berms etc holding millions of gallons of Canadian Tar Sands toxic sludge? How long will they hold? the mind boggles…

        Reply
  145. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 27, 2015

    Kevin & Apneaman,

    Memories! I used to watch Tiger Williams play when he was on the Canucks when the arena was at the PNE (not sure if it still there), cheap seats back then. Fondly remember watching Lafleur, Howe, Dryden, Hull, Rocket Richard, Orr and all the greats in black -n- white with Howie Meeker yelling on Saturday Nights.

    Although nothing beat the summit series final game. The fate of the free world rested on that one!

    I agree with you guys on the Vegas thing. When I heard “NHL” and “Florida” in the same sentence it was a huge WTF!

    Reply
  146. Antarctica’s Totten Glacier, twice the size of Victoria, ‘melting from below’

    “The glacier holds enough water to raise the sea level by six metres and scientists said it had been thinning over the past 15 years.

    “We used to think the glaciers in east Antarctica were unlikely to be affected by the ocean because they were a long way away from the warm ocean waters,” he said.

    “The fact that it’s changing is something new, we used to think that the glaciers in east Antarctic were very stable and unlikely to change.”

    But he said it was too soon to tell if the glacier was melting as a result of a changing global climate.”

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-26/sea-water-melting-totten-glacier-in-antarctica-from-below/6047076

    Reply
  147. COMMENT 13:10 HRS PST

    The Climate Science Behind New England’s Historic Blizzard

    ‘I asked Dr. Trenberth to comment on the role climate change has on this latest storm, which is forecast to set records. He explained:

    The number 1 cause of this is that it is winter. In winter it is cold over the continent. But it is warm over the oceans and the contrast between the cold continent and the warm Gulf Stream and surrounding waters is increasing. At present sea surface temperatures are more the 2F above normal over huge expanses (1000 miles) off the east coast and water vapor in the atmosphere is about 10% higher as a result. About half of this can be attributed to climate change.’

    Reply
  148. Griffin

     /  January 27, 2015

    Getting close to 500 comments on this thread so if you have scrolled down this far, you deserve a good laugh. Enjoy some Brit humor courtesy of Katherine Hayhoe on Twitter.

    Reply
  149. Colorado Bob

     /  January 27, 2015

    Can Koch Brothers Lock In Fatal Climate Delay For $889 Million In 2016 Election?

    Remember this item , the next time you hear that climate scientists are only in it for the grant money.

    Reply
  150. Colorado Bob

     /  January 27, 2015

    At Newly Discovered Water Temple, Maya Offered Sacrifices to End Drought

    Nestled in a quiet forest in Belize, a deep aquamarine pool holds ruins from a time when the ancient Maya turned to a “drought cult,” archaeologists suggest, and hurried sacrifices to a water god to try to stave off the fall of their civilization.

    Link

    Reply
  151. 0127 1920 HRS PST

    SACRAMENTO, Calif.

    State water officials say they may dam parts of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in an emergency measure to protect freshwater used by millions of Californians.

    The Department of Water Resources said Monday that if the drought persists they may build temporary rocky barriers blocking three channels on the Delta.

    They say the dams would decrease the amount of water released from upstream reservoirs to keep saltwater from creeping inland from the San Francisco Bay, contaminating the Delta.

    Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/article8203548.html#storylink=cpy

    Reply
  152. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    Brazil’s drought brings water supply to near zero capacity at hydroelectric facilities

    According to the federal government, hydroelectric power facilities in the country’s southeastern region that supply power to close to 20 million people in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo (MRSP) are being deactivated. A list of the deactivated facilities is not immediately available, but Brazil normally receives about 70% of its electricity from hydroelectric plants, according to energy officials.

    The Billings Reservoir, in MRSP, supplies the 889-MW Henry Borden hydroelectric facility as part of the Cantareira water system. Local media outlets report Billings Reservoir is nearly dry.

    Greater Sao Paulo, according to the World Bank, is the most important industrial producer of the country. Sao Paulo City, the world’s ninth-largest city according to available 2012 census data, is located on the southeastern end of the Alto-Tiete River Basin. The city relies heavily on the Cantareia water system for hydroelectric energy to power industry, sanitation and drinking water.

    http://www.hydroworld.com/articles/2015/01/brazil-s-drought-brings-water-supply-to-near-zero-capacity-at-hydroelectric-facilities.html

    Reply
  153. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    California drought: Measuring Sierra snowpack is a lot more complex than it looks

    As California caps what may be its driest January on record, Frank Gehrke will lead a bevy of surveyors on Thursday to a predetermined spot on Echo Summit in an exercise that has become a monthly downer in the documentation of the state’s historic drought………………….What won’t amaze Gehrke this year is the predictability of Thursday’s results. This year, the Sierra snowpack — which usually provides 30 percent of California’s water — is critically low, less than 30 percent of normal for this time of year, the snow sensors show. December’s storms began filling up reservoirs, but they were too warm to turn rain into an abundance of snow.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_27413525/california-drought-measuring-sierra-snowpack-is-lot-more

    Reply
  154. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    Smothered oceans: Extreme oxygen loss in oceans accompanied past global climate change

    Seafloor sediment cores reveal abrupt, extensive loss of oxygen in the ocean when ice sheets melted roughly 10,000-17,000 years ago, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The findings provide insight into similar changes observed in the ocean today.

    In the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers analyzed marine sediment cores from different world regions to document the extent to which low oxygen zones in the ocean have expanded in the past, due to climate change.

    From the subarctic Pacific to the Chilean margins, they found evidence of extreme oxygen loss stretching from the upper ocean to about 3,000 meters deep. In some oceanic regions, such loss took place over a time period of 100 years or less.

    “This is a global story that knits these regions together and shows that when you warm the planet rapidly, whole ocean basins can lose oxygen very abruptly and very extensively,” said lead author Sarah Moffitt, a postdoctoral scholar with the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory and formerly a Ph.D. student with the Graduate Group in Ecology.

    UC Davis press release

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 29, 2015

      Paleoceanographic Insights on Recent Oxygen Minimum Zone Expansion: Lessons for Modern Oceanography

      Abstract

      Climate-driven Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) expansions in the geologic record provide an opportunity to characterize the spatial and temporal scales of OMZ change. Here we investigate OMZ expansion through the global-scale warming event of the most recent deglaciation (18-11 ka), an event with clear relevance to understanding modern anthropogenic climate change. Deglacial marine sediment records were compiled to quantify the vertical extent, intensity, surface area and volume impingements of hypoxic waters upon continental margins. By integrating sediment records (183-2,309 meters below sea level; mbsl) containing one or more geochemical, sedimentary or microfossil oxygenation proxies integrated with analyses of eustatic sea level rise, we reconstruct the timing, depth and intensity of seafloor hypoxia. The maximum vertical OMZ extent during the deglaciation was variable by region: Subarctic Pacific (~600-2,900 mbsl), California Current (~330-1,500 mbsl), Mexico Margin (~330-830 mbsl), and the Humboldt Current and Equatorial Pacific (~110-3,100 mbsl). The timing of OMZ expansion is regionally coherent but not globally synchronous. Subarctic Pacific and California Current continental margins exhibit tight correlation to the oscillations of Northern Hemisphere deglacial events (Termination IA, Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas and Termination IB). Southern regions (Mexico Margin and the Equatorial Pacific and Humboldt Current) exhibit hypoxia expansion prior to Termination IA (~14.7 ka), and no regional oxygenation oscillations. Our analyses provide new evidence for the geographically and vertically extensive expansion of OMZs, and the extreme compression of upper-ocean oxygenated ecosystems during the geologically recent deglaciation.

      http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0115246

      Reply
  155. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    Iceland rises as its glaciers melt from climate change

    “What we’re observing is a climatically induced change in Earth’s surface,” Bennett said.

    He added there is geological evidence that during the past deglaciation roughly 12,000 years ago, volcanic activity in some regions of Iceland increased thirtyfold.

    Link

    Reply
  156. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    Drought may force Brazil’s biggest city to cut back water service to 2 days a week
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/29/world/americas/brazil-drastic-water-rationing-may-be-put-in-place-in-sao-paulo.html?_r=0
    The adaption in Brazil begs endless questions-
    If this comes to pass, one wonders what happens when a really big fire gets going. Along with the idea of not flushing a toilet for 5 days. And no power to run refrigeration. The list is endless. I hope the people of California are taking notes.

    Reply
  157. Colorado Bob

     /  January 29, 2015

    Global warming won’t mean more storms: Big storms to get bigger, small storms to shrink, experts predict
    Date:

    January 29, 2015
    Source:
    University of Toronto
    Summary:
    Atmospheric physicists predict that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.

    Link

    Reply
  158. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    A year ago, California experienced its third-driest January in records dating to 1895. Fast forward a year later and we are seeing a repeat of record or near-record dry conditions in parts of the state.

    In San Francisco, no rain has fallen at the downtown observation station or the airport this January. With no rain in the forecast to close the month, it appears that San Francisco will see its first January without rainfall since records began downtown in 1850. This comes on the heels of last January, which went down as the driest on record for the city.

    Sacramento is also on track to see its driest January on record with one-hundreth of an inch of rain so far. Last January was the third driest on record for the the state capital.

    The typically wet northwest California coast is also running well below average. Just 1.36 inches of rain has fallen in Eureka compared to a January average of 6.50 inches. January should finish as the fourth driest on record for the city.

    http://www.wunderground.com/news/california-record-dry-january-san-francisco-sierra-snowpack

    Reply
  159. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    New Zealand –

    Dry January records lowest rainfall since 1879

    Record low rainfall across the region during January saw Karori Reservoir record the lowest rainfall since 1879 and Wainuiomata Reservoir lowest since 1890.

    Karori received only 3.8mm of rain during January compared to the average of 81mm, while at Wainuiomata Reservoir the monthly total of 1.5mm is even more extreme and is less than two percent of the average rainfall of 106mm.

    Rainfall and river flow records collected by the Greater Wellington Regional Council are showing the effect of the recent warm and dry weather conditions on river flows and rainfall across the entire region. All rain gauges operated by GWRC in Wellington, Lower Hutt, Upper Hutt and Wainuiomata have received less than six percent of average January rainfall amounts.

    The exceptionally dry start to the 2015 year has added to the already dry conditions that prevailed throughout October, November and December when rainfall was well below average for most parts of the region.

    Link

    Reply
  160. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    Snowpack In California “Dismally Meager”

    While December storms brought some hope that California’s drought would ease, January’s second snow survey shattered it.

    “Unfortunately it seems like it’s a trend in the last three or four years, that’s January’s just been a dud,” says Dave Rizzardo, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources. Statewide, California only has a quarter of the water in the snowpack that would be normal for this date. January is usually the wettest month – but in some parts of the state, it’s shaping up to be the driest January on record.

    “In a nutshell, rainfall has been better in the northern state, but that didn’t translate to snowpack, we’re pretty much across the board we’re in dire circumstances,” says Rizzardo.

    Link

    Reply
  161. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    A new Bloomberg article about Brazil –

    Rio to Sao Paulo Plan for Water Cutoffs After Downplaying Crisis

    (Bloomberg) — After public officials and utilities downplayed for months the chance Brazil’s three most-populous states will face water rationing, plans to severely limit water use are in the works as reservoirs fall to record lows. …………………..The three states account for 40 percent of Brazil’s population and 53 percent of the gross domestic product. Threats of water shortages come as the federal government is also grappling with plunging commodities prices, fiscal cuts to stave off a credit-rating downgrade and a corruption probe at the state-run oil company. As recently as Jan. 15, Sao Paulo Governor Geraldo Alckmin promised water rationing wouldn’t happen.
    “There has been a lack of transparency at every level of government,” said Juliana Serillo, economist at macroeconomics consultancy MB Associados. If states had been more willing to implement water-saving measures before, “the situation now wouldn’t be so extreme.”

    Link

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 30, 2015

      Thanks, tweet scheduled. NYT ran a very short clip on the Brazil drought yesterday, on same page as a much larger story about the finding of a 50,000-year-old skull and what it tells us (very little, IMHO) about the mixing of early humans at that time. I love science, but the two should have been reversed.

      Reply
  162. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    “If the rain persists in not falling into the Cantareira reservoir system, the solution would be for very heavy rationing,” said Paulo Massato, director of the state water company Sabesp.

    Sabesp runs the Cantareira system, which supplies nearly half of the Sao Paulo metropolitan area, South America’s largest city with some 20 million people.

    “The rationing would see two days with water and then five without,” he said late Tuesday.

    Massato said it was the only way to avoid a total cut in water supplies, which have been depleted by months of severe drought that have sent water levels to their lowest levels in living memory.

    Unless it rains soon, supplies could run out altogether by March.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-01-sao-paulo-severe-rationing.html#jCp

    We’ve been watching this set of moving goalposts for nearly a year. But that March goal post very well may be the last one.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  January 30, 2015

      The wet season in January has produced 43 % of the long term average. But given that the rains failed last season , and the ground is so baked over such a large area. That number may not mean much any more. The adaption in Brazil begs endless questions-
      If this comes to pass, one wonders what happens when a really big fire gets going. Along with the idea of not flushing a toilet for 5 days. And no power to run refrigeration. The list is endless. I hope the people of California are taking notes.

      Reply
  163. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    What are the odds of this ?
    Southeast Brazil is locked in the driest period in 84 years of records .
    The north island of New Zealand has seen the driest January since 1879.
    Downtown San Francisco has just seen the driest January since 1850.

    All of which are setting next to oceans. We’re not talking Tibet here.

    Strange days.

    Reply
  164. Colorado Bob

     /  January 30, 2015

    My first real understanding political of action was the Buddhist Monks burning themselves in Vietnam. ( The last of the French Rome Church were after them like they flies )
    Back then , TV showed them on fire. Then I began to pay attention to blacks being clubbed and dragged off to jail.

    The action you call for will need even more effort than these 2 grime examples. But now, we just need a cleaver world wide metaphor to achieve the same thing.
    Something like a young girl in slum in San Paulo holding up her cup , and saying, ” I have no water “. The grape framer in Napa Valley saying . ” I have no water “.
    The a Syrian refugee in a camp in Jordan holding up a dirty plastic bottle saying , ” I have no water. “.
    A woman in Wyoming with methane in her ground water saying , ” I have no water. “.

    Everyone in Yemen standing up and saying , ” We have no water.”

    I am old and beat up , so I can’t help much , but those Monks in Vietnam changed the course of the 20h Century. They shocked American because they laid down their lives weekly . And back then we all saw it. And they had a clear message .

    The ISS crazies understand the same thing.

    The ISS crazies have one small problem , ” I have no water. “.

    You can’t build a new world order , if your subjects say , ” I have no water. “.

    And that phrase set off the fire in Middle East 4 years ago . Less and less water.

    Remember when people were shot dead at wells in Great Movies . “The well is everything, he is nothing “.

    And the Turks are drying up everything down stream of the great rivers. With the largest damn project they have ever seen.

    ” I have no water. “.

    Yet Iraq and Syria burns in flames with less , and less water, while their neighbors scramble to take and hold every drop left.

    The Turks believe this water fire won’t cross their border. , they are fools.

    Remember ,”Water Fire” .
    This is people killing other people just for fresh water.

    Reply
  165. Ouse M.D.

     /  January 30, 2015

    Is it only the new interface- colors, or is the arctic jetstream really collapsing?

    Reply
  166. – And when the water level decreases, its toxicity and the temperature increases. All biota will be negatively impacted.

    ‘It’s still a little too early to tell for sure, but the news on the California wild salmon front is not good. A combination of low water levels in streams because of the drought and high summer temperatures resulted in a massive die-off of young salmon in Northern California.

    This week the California Department of Fish and Game, in cooperation with its federal counterparts, will begin releasing young hatchery trout into tributaries of the Sacramento River. That’s something that happens almost every year, but this time the number of young salmon being released is three times the average.

    More than 600,000 Chinook salmon fry are being released below Keswick Dam on the Sacramento River after biologists say warm water killed 95% of the existing salmon eggs this summer.

    http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-dd-california-salmon-drought-2014-20150129-story.html

    Reply
  167. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015

    Wildfires: Get ready for another bad summer across the NWT

    Last summer’s forest fire season was considered the worst the territory has experienced.

    Almost 400 separate fires scorched 3.5 million hectares of land and caused considerable disruption, ranging from the destruction of homes to road closures and smoke-related breathing difficulties.

    The NWT’s department of environment and natural resources spent $55 million fighting that year’s fires, eight times the amount it had initially budgeted.

    This year, the department is bracing for more of the same.

    Janice Ziemann, forest officer for the North Slave region, says the territory is trapped in a drought which only exceptional levels of rain and snowfall can end.

    “We’re set in a long-term drought,” Ziemann told Moose FM. “Last summer we got very little rain and we had a really quick spring last year, so we had a lot of snow evaporate into the air – it didn’t get into the ground, so the ground was a lot drier.

    “If we don’t get a lot more snow, and we have another cold spring where the snow evaporates and there’s not a whole lot of precipitation, then we’re likely going to have another bad season.”

    The last two winters have been the two driest on record in the NWT.

    http://www.myyellowknifenow.com/1953/wildfires-get-ready-another-bad-summer-across-nwt/

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  January 31, 2015

      Thanks, tweet scheduled. Recently passed 15,000 followers on Twitter, BTW. Probably only a third or so are actually interested in climate, but still.

      Reply
  168. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015

    How B.C.’s ski resorts are coping with global warming’s threat to their existence

    In the past decade, B.C.’s South Coast has gotten a glimpse of warm and wet ski seasons that experts say could be the norm in 35 years if worst-case emissions scenarios hold true. This season, a moderate El Nino system has soaked skiers and kept snowpacks very low on Vancouver’s three North Shore mountains and the much-higher slopes of Whistler Blackcomb. Ski areas further inland near the Rockies have more snow, but many still have bases below their historic averages for this time of year.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/how-bcs-ski-resorts-are-coping-with-global-warming/article22731538/

    “When it doesn’t snow and it just rains all winter, well then it doesn’t matter what kind of snow-making equipment you have – it’s over.”

    Reply
  169. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015

    Have warming seas caused skyrocketing sea slug populations?

    Hopkin’s Rose nudibranchs are ideal for tracking relatively rapid changes in ocean conditions. The showstopping slugs are fast-growing, live for about one year, and tend to spend their adult lives in a small patch of the ocean floor. Like previous population explosions of Okenia rosacea, the current nudibranch bloom includes species typically found farther south, including the bright purple and orange Spanish Shawl, Flabellina iodinea, and the California Sea Hare, Aplysia californica.

    Though researchers believe the recent nudibranch population explosion might signal another major climate shift from cold to warm, it is simply too early to call. If a major ocean climate shift is in fact underway, Academy Research Associate Dr. Jeff Goddard believes there is a good chance the next El Niño will pack a punch on par with the 1983 and 1998 California events. As with any strong El Niño event, Californians should expect to see many species from Southern California appear farther north.

    http://www.sciencecodex.com/scientists_investigate_link_between_skyrocketing_sea_slug_populations_and_warming_seas-149865

    Reply
  170. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015


    Drought woes spread to another Brazilian state

    Espirito Santo has become the fourth state in southeastern Brazil to declare a drought alert amid a crisis that is threatening the supply of water to homes, factories and farms, media outlets said Friday. …………………………. Some farming areas in southern Espirito Santo have seen production fall by up to 50 percent as a consequence of the drought, state Agriculture Secretary Luciano Henriques said.

    Link

    Reply
  171. Andy in San Diego

     /  January 31, 2015

    Loss of glaciers causing Iceland to rebound at ~ 1.4″ per year.

    (btw, here’s to hoping Robert posts a new subject, as this response page is a tad long, slow to load and misbehaving…..).

    http://qz.com/336517/iceland-is-melting-so-fast-its-literally-popping-off-the-planet/

    Reply
    • One might suggest to Robert that he appoint one or more co-bloggers that could at the least post “talk among yourselves” threads weekly when one of his periodic hiatuses occurs.

      Reply
  172. Ouse M.D.

     /  January 31, 2015

    And this was 2006- China growing at 7- 10%/ year- doubling in only 7- 10 years…
    Good God, what a mess we’ve mad of this wonderful living planet

    Reply
  173. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015

    Homes swept away like matchsticks, vast plains turned to mud, fields of precious crops drowned. An aerial view from a helicopter, rain hammering on its roof after delivering food aid, reveals the full devastation wreaked by Malawi’s worst floods for half a century.

    Villagers here speak of climbing up anthills or trees and waiting for three days without food or water, drenched in rain and fearing attack by crocodiles. Families describe how they have lost everything. Rescue workers tell of seeing children swept to their deaths and picking up floating backpacks only to discover corpses attached. Nearly three weeks on, the death toll remains unclear and not everyone is accounted for. ………………………………………… Estimates of the death toll from the torrential rains vary from 79 to more than 200. At least 174,000 people have been displaced and 638,000 affected, according to the UN, with livestock and possessions swept away, subsistence crops lost and water sources contaminated. ………………………………. Among the survivors is Elen Zinoidha, a 67-year-old great-grandmother from the village of Masanduko, south of the commercial capital, Blantyre. When the relentless downpour began nearly three weeks weeks ago, she saw water creeping towards her home. She and a neighbour ran to an anthill and climbed to the top, an estimated 7ft in height, where they were part of a group of five adults and five children. They spent the next three days there in the rain, sitting upright because there was no space to lie down, barely able to sleep and with nothing to eat or drink.

    “There was a dog seeking refuge on the edge of the anthill,” recalled Zinoidha. “A crocodile caught the dog, so that brought fear over whether we’d survive. When a crocodile is hungry it could climb up the anthill and grab one of us. We were overtaken by this fear so we didn’t feel hunger or thirst for three days. We were just praying to God for mercy and support.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2015/jan/30/malawi-floods-grim-legacy-death-destruction-devastation

    Reply
  174. Colorado Bob

     /  January 31, 2015

    Running on renewable energy, Burlington, Vermont powers green movement forward

    Burlington recently announced that it now produces or gets more power than its citizens use. And it’s all coming from renewable sources of energy like wind and solar and hydroelectric.

    Link

    Reply
  175. Colorado Bob

     /  February 1, 2015

    RS –
    These weeks of no posts I understand, but you got this ball rolling , so at least post an ,
    ” Open Thread ”

    I understand you are a writer and have to chase the muse, but just post new threads man. Not every post has to be the deepest thinking we have ever seen.

    Or are you crazy as me ?

    I live under the fruits on head injures, chemical imbalances , bad genes, and being born in double Virgo.

    RS –
    You have real garden here , to see you not tend it , worries me.

    Reply
  176. Colorado Bob

     /  February 1, 2015

    As young man I packed my ears with Sears speakers with this album I bought at Sears. There were no head phones I could buy.

    Jefferson Airplane – Surrealistic pillow FULL ALBUM

    It was 1967 , you have no idea how great that year was , and i am over 65 years. Nothing has ever touched it. Nothing . Dig up Stevens Jobs and he will agree. It changed him , as well .

    Reply
  177. “China gained an additional 17 million new cars in 2014, taking ownership to a record 154 million – according to its Ministry of Public Security.
    Cars have now replaced motorcycles as the main means of transport, it added, comprising 58.6% of all motor vehicles – up from 43.9% five years ago.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-31065433

    Reply
  178. Adding a date to your posts would be helpful. Thanks.

    Reply
  179. Mark from New England

     /  February 2, 2015

    I sent the following email to the Boston Globe’s resident right-wing columnist, Jeff Jacoby, who penned an editorial in this Sunday’s paper stating there has been such a pause in warming that it casts doubt on the entire warming ‘theory’.

    Jeff, Instead of looking for any flimsy already debunked ‘evidence’ that casts serious doubt on human-enhanced global warming, you should learn from one of the masters of translating the most recent findings in climate science and making it understandable to the intelligent layman; Robert Scribbler: (links provided)

    There has been no real pause in warming, and even if there were, such short variations would still occur in a warming climate. Never mind the models – look at reality the last few years; a summer arctic ice cap with less than half the volume of ice it had in 1980; vast wildfires in the Canadian and Russian boreal forests, methane bubbling out of the East Siberian Sea, record-breaking rainstorms and flooding in Europe, the California drought, the even worse drought and impending water crisis in southern Brazil, the Australian heat waves, the record-breaking typhoons last year – I could go on and on and on.

    Global warming is just getting warmed up. We’ve only yet seen a 1 C increase globally, and we’re likely to hit 4 C this century because deniers like you have cast such doubt upon the waters. At 4 C the pressures may be such that complex civilization collapses. There is no such thing as global warming extremism.

    Denial doesn’t change the absolute physical fact that C02 is a strong greenhouse gas, and one that the Earth system is very sensitive to. During the ice ages, CO2 was at 180 ppm, and civilization arose in the stable climate made possible with 280 ppm. Only 100 ppm is the difference between a mile of ice over your head and being able to drive to the office in Boston. Now we’ve gone 120 ppm in the other direction at 400 ppm and rising at 2 ppm per year. You don’t think this will affect the climate? Good God, think man.

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 3, 2015

      Would be good to write a short letter (within guidelines) to the Globe itself, or at least cc on your letter to the columnist.

      Reply
  180. Ouse M.D.

     /  February 2, 2015

    Abrupt climate change is here- It’s simply a time travel- on climatic scale:
    as GHG levels are at 3 million yrs BP, we are going to experience that kind of 4th dimension slide in only decades.
    Te end result is a Mass Extinction far worse than the Permian.
    Our only chance would be to dismantle all nuclear weapons and decomission all nuclear power plants- in that case humanity would “only” need to survive a permian- like ME.

    Reply
  181. RWood

     /  February 3, 2015

    not to say that California isn’t in a terrible grip, but the article refers to WSJ, and this one puts a warning on accepting their “news”
    http://www.desmogblog.com/2015/02/02/lomborg-sings-wsj-s-same-old-climate-change-song-don-t-worry-be-happy

    Reply
  182. Colorado Bob

     /  February 3, 2015

    Drought-Hit Pakistan Turns to Solar Water Treatment
    Worsening drought has led to over 80 percent of water resources in Pakistan’s southern Tharparker district becoming unfit for people to drink, a new study says

    MITHI, Pakistan, Feb 2 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Worsening drought has led to over 80 percent of water resources in Pakistan’s southern Tharparker district becoming unfit for people to drink, a new study says.

    That has led to plans by the Sindh provincial government to invest 5.4 billion Pakistani rupees ($53 million) in installing 750 solar-powered reverse osmosis water purification plants across the sprawling desert district, to help get safe drinking water to the region’s over 1.5 million people.

    All of the facilities are expected to be set up and working by June this year, the government said.
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/drought-hit-pakistan-turns-to-solar-water-treatment1/

    Reply
  183. Colorado Bob

     /  February 3, 2015

    A truly amazing picture :

    Here, a fake falcon flaps its wings to keep away waterfowl that would die if they landed in this tailings pond in the oil sands of Alberta, Canada.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/02/150202-climate-science-public-opinion-evidence-global-warming/

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  February 9, 2015

      So this is where all the recent posts have ended up!

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 4, 2015

      todaysguestis

      Thanks for finding this story of just how bad this has been . I have looking for it , it is far worst than we can dream of, a million people are in trouble . And it’s going to rain next week.

      todaysguestis
      When these items pop up on the web from really far away places, “Hell has come to Breakfast”. And nobody has had breakfast for days. And no breakfast is coming for weeks.

      Thanks once again.

      Reply
  184. Colorado Bob

     /  February 4, 2015

    Norway ain’t the same thing if it’s carpeted with Greeks, Italians, Liberians, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, Eritrea, Burundi and Chad, and guy’s from New Jersey.

    According to the index, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden and Finland are best equipped to deal with the pressures of climate change……………….

    Reply
  185. Unpublished Canadian gov’t report reveals too little is known about tar sands petroleum impact

    The Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans has produced several versions of a draft report on the environmental hazards of oil and bitumen pipelines. But none of them has been published. That’s ticked off some political leaders and environmental advocates. “We are being sold a bill of goods by this government,” New Democrat environment critic Megan Leslie said Monday

    The unpublished 61-page draft report focuses most of its attention on what’s not known about bitumen’s properties. There’s quite a lot that’s not: no peer-reviewed reports on possible toxic biological effects; little on how bitumen or dilbut behaves in water; no studies on how the different concentrations of metals in bitumen behave compared with those in conventional oil; little known on how condensate used to dilute bitumen for transport behaves in a body of water; no studies on the specific ways bitumen interact with living organisms; not enough research on airborne toxicity associated with the tar sands; few studies about the impacts of hydrocarbon spills into the Great Lakes; not enough research on the interaction of bitumen, the environment and dispersants (chemicals that break up oil spills); and little known about behavior of bitumen in the icy, dark waters of the Canadian Arctic.

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/02/04/1362273/-Unpublished-Canadian-gov-t-report-says-far-too-little-known-about-impacts-of-tar-sands-petroleum?detail=facebook

    Reply
  186. Mark from New England

     /  February 5, 2015

    Kevin, Thanks. I’ll post a longer description of my correspondence with science-impaired columnist Jeff Jacoby once Robert posts a new article. A few of my recent longer posts have gone missing… Hope it’s going well in Keene. I haven’t seen this much snow in decades…

    Reply
  187. Global warming
    The end and beginning of the Arctic
    It has become clear that the Arctic as we know is coming to an end. In its place a new and very different kind of Arctic is beginning to emerge

    In the winter of 2013-14, hundreds of milk-white birds with luminous yellow eyes and wingspans of up to two metres descended on beaches, farmers’ fields, city parks and airport runways throughout southern Canada and the United States.

    Traditionally, snowy owls spend most of their time in the Arctic and subarctic regions. But every four years or so when populations of lemmings – among the owls’ favorite foods – cycle downward, a small number of young, inexperienced birds that are less adept than their elders at hunting will fly farther south than they might normally rather than starve to death. No one, however, had seen an irruption as big and as far-reaching as this one, which was the second major such event in North America in three years.

    By the first week of December, the big birds were spotted from North Dakota to Maine and from Newfoundland to Bermuda. At one point, owls collided with five planes at Kennedy, LaGuardia and Newark airports.

    Snowy owl irruptions are not in themselves a sure sign that something extraordinary is happening in an Arctic world that is warming nearly twice as fast as the global rate. But given the rapid-fire fashion in which similar, unexpected events have been unfolding throughout the circumpolar region, it’s clear that the Arctic we know is coming to an end, and that a new and very different Arctic is taking over.

    http://arcticjournal.com/opinion/1305/end-and-beginning-arctic

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 5, 2015

      Thanks for posting (Arctic story). Tweet scheduled.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 6, 2015

      I read this earlier today , as an op-ed goes this one is really well written.

      Reply
  188. Colorado Bob

     /  February 6, 2015

    The flood of the half-century — and you probably haven’t heard about it.

    Even for a country used to flooding, this has been something beyond pretty much anyone’s experience.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-02-05/flood-half-century-and-you-probably-havent-heard-about-it

    Reply
  189. Colorado Bob

     /  February 6, 2015

    In January 2015, several bouts of heavy rain triggered widespread flooding in southern Africa. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the EO-1 satellite captured this image of flooding along the Shire River in Malawi and Mozambique on January 26, 2015. See this gallery for more satellite imagery of flooding in southern Africa.

    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=85192

    Reply
  190. Colorado Bob

     /  February 6, 2015

    A certain irony at work in the world.

    Deforestation causing São Paulo drought.

    Brazil possesses 12 per cent of the world’s freshwater, and yet São Paulo – the biggest and richest city in South America – is suffering from severe drought with deforestation getting the blame.

    Water rationing. Power cuts. Crop slumps. The past twelve months has seen Brazil being hit harder and harder by the effects of drought, as first São Paulo, then other regions of the country, struggle to cope with dwindling supplies of water but an immense demand. Local reservoirs are running at historic lows, such as the Cantareira system – which supplies water to over a quarter of the 20 million São Paulo residents and is currently down to only five per cent of its 264 billion gallon capacity. A ‘five-days-off, two-days-on’ rationing system is currently being proposed as a solution to prevent the reservoir running completely dry.

    http://geographical.co.uk/places/cities/item/761-deforestation-behind-sao-paulo-drought

    Reply
  191. Colorado Bob

     /  February 6, 2015

    Obama is making push to fix our infrastructure, which is always followed by ” roads, bridges, and airports “. But reading about the ongoing disaster in Brazil, and methane readings out of Boston it’s our under ground infrastructure that is really sick. It’s like the oceans, we don’t live in the oceans, we don’t live underground . Out of sight, out of mind.

    I read an article today about Yemen , and their water, no one in the modern world as done a poorer job than them . They make the Brazilians look like rocket doctors. In Yemen, they pump from their water table and it is falling 6 feet year, into a leaky infrastructure , that bleeds the treated water back into ground.

    Which set me to thinking , all our entire underground infrastructure was built long ago, and at a time when we could afford to have leaking pipes.

    Pretzel Logic says :

    ” Those days are gone forever, over along time ago, ……………………… Oh yeah ” .

    Reply
  192. Colorado Bob

     /  February 6, 2015

    Remains of former town re-emerge in Brazil’s drought
    The ruins of a sunken town which had remained underwater since 1969 have re-emerged

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/brazil/11394271/Remains-of-former-town-re-emerge-in-Brazils-drought.html

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 6, 2015

      In Brazil here’s what they are doing, they’re dropping your water pressure for 18 hours a day. Washing clothes must be a nightmare.

      These people are on the cutting edge of climate change . The world should be paying attention , to how they deal with it.

      And no Big American media wants to touch this story with a ten foot straw.

      Reply
  193. Robert In New Orleans

     /  February 6, 2015

    Chikungunya in Florida, but don’t mention any relationship to global warming😉

    http://www.nola.com/health/index.ssf/2015/02/chikungunya_sickening_tourists.html

    Reply
  194. Ken Barrows

     /  February 6, 2015

    Looking at climatereanalyzer.org, I see that the Southern Hemisphere is more above the 1979-2000 average than the Northern Hemisphere while the Arctic is actually below that average. I hadn’t seen that in a year of looking at that data. Any explanations?

    Reply
  195. Colorado Bob

     /  February 7, 2015

    Drought Drives Up Brazil’s Supermarket Produce Prices

    SÃO PAULO—Brazil’s drought is hitting the produce aisles of São Paulo supermarkets, where higher prices are crimping consumers’ wallets and fueling already-high inflation.

    Brazil’s consumer prices rose in January at the fastest monthly pace in 12 years and pushed the 12-month inflation rate to 7.14%, the government said on Friday. Food prices were the biggest contributor to the monthly increase.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/drought-drives-up-brazils-supermarket-produce-prices-1423245993

    Reply
  196. Colorado Bob

     /  February 7, 2015

    Climate change drove Australia’s record hot year, report finds

    Australia’s hottest year on record would not have happened without climate change, according to a new report.

    The country experienced its hottest day, month, season and calendar year in 2013, registering a mean temperature 1.2C above the 1961-90 average.

    The Climate Council says recent studies show those heat events would have occurred only once every 12,300 years without greenhouse gas emissions from human activities.

    “In fact, we can say the 2013 record year was virtually impossible without climate change; it wouldn’t have happened,” Will Steffen, the author of Quantifying the Strong Influence of Climate Change on Extreme Heat in Australia, told AAP.

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/climate-change-drove-australias-record-hot-year-report-finds-20150207-138imk.html

    Reply
  197. Colorado Bob

     /  February 7, 2015

    Record-low snowpacks this winter
    Thursday’s balmy high of 63 is the second temperature record to fall so far this year

    Koeberle, of the federal conservation service, said that of the 110 snow gauges in Oregon that have been operating 25 years or more, more than 40 are near or at record lows. About 10 of those gauges in Western Oregon are showing zero snowpack for the first time ever, she said.

    http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/32740546-75/story.csp

    Reply
  198. Colorado Bob

     /  February 8, 2015

    A call to cull homes threatened by the sea
    As flood losses grow, so does sentiment to pay homeowners to move on

    Scituate is the front line in New England’s expensive, losing battle against the sea. The coastal town, with few offshore barriers to curb a storm’s fury, accounts for nearly 40 percent of Massachusetts homes and businesses that are so flood-prone the federal government calls them “severe repetitive loss” properties.

    Nearly all of these estimated 150 properties in the town of 18,000 have received at least four payments from the federal flood insurance program over the years, meaning federal taxpayers have helped foot some of the reconstruction bills. Though property owners pay for flood insurance, the program is in the red and relies on billions from the federal government to stay afloat.

    And the flood risk is getting worse as sea levels gradually rise. For decades, Boston averaged one or two sea water floods per year, based on the city’s tide gauge, and three floods annually in the 2000s. This decade, Boston is averaging around nine days of flooding a year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/02/08/coastal-flooding-worsens-calls-take-vulnerable-homes-out-harm-way/DAYejBqkIvP74NPW2yRRYN/story.html

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  February 9, 2015

      Yes, that’s a good article. In just two decades, I’ve seen incredible erosion of the sea cliffs (made of sand) at the Cape Cod National Seashore on the outer Cape. The park rangers recently had to remove the Marconi display where the first transatlantic radio message was sent from in 1901.

      Reply
  199. Mark from New England

     /  February 9, 2015

    Will someone send out a search party for Robert? It’s been so long since he posted this article that it’s raining in California.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 10, 2015

      He does have a habit of going “dark”, and these periods have been growing longer. But this is rather long. Writers write, and when they do, all else falls away. I got 49 cents that says he’s working on a book.

      It is his cocktail party , funny how we all show-up to see if there is any new wine on the table.

      Reply
  200. Colorado Bob

     /  February 10, 2015

    Potosí is a city and the capital of the department of Potosí in Bolivia. It is one of the highest cities in the world by elevation at a nominal 4,090 metres (13,420 ft)[2] For centuries, it was the location of the Spanish colonial mint.

    Humans polluted the air long before Industrial Revolution, study finds

    Chemical analysis of Peruvian ice cores show evidence of human-induced air pollution from nearly 500 years ago.

    A team led by Paolo Gabrielli of the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center at the Ohio State University has found evidence of human-induced air pollution that predates the Industrial Revolution by over 200 years, according to a new study published in PNAS.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2015/0209/Humans-polluted-the-air-long-before-Industrial-Revolution-study-finds

    Reply
  201. For all the talk about climate and temperatures the bid action is in the oceans where 93% of the heat is absorbed. My video explains the threats, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMJpqxFaMqk

    Reply
  202. Tom

     /  February 10, 2015

    http://www.vox.com/2015/2/10/8012935/hubble-smile-galaxy

    The Hubble telescope found a smiley face in space. The science behind it is even cooler.

    bud-um tssshhh

    Reply
  203. The news is not entirely bad. Cantareira bottomed out at 5.0% on February 1st and is now up to 6.4%.

    Reply
  204. Ken Barrows

     /  February 11, 2015

    I have looked at Climate Reanalyzer for a year or so and today is the warmest day (land) yet: .76 degrees C above the 1979-2000 average.

    http://cci-reanalyzer.org/DailySummary/

    Reply
  205. New BBC 3 part series Planet Oil – Our addiction to crude –

    Reply
  206. Mark from New England

     /  February 12, 2015

    Jeff Jacoby’s (Boston Globe right-wing columnist) latest screed in praise of fossil fuels:

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2015/02/11/valentine-for-fossil-fuels/mgL6T6XdM0z5lSSFoQuCuL/story.html

    Feel free to suggest talking points. I will craft a LTTE to the Globe on this one! Thanks.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 12, 2015

      ” To cite just one of the book’s many examples, drought — historically the foremost climate-related killer — has ceased to be a major cause of death. Worldwide, the death toll from drought “has gone down by 99.98 percent in the last 80 years for many energy-related reasons,” notes Epstein. ”

      A. Brazil
      B. Syria
      C. Australia
      D. California
      E. Texas

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 12, 2015

      If Jeff Jacoby is going to call Bill Mc Kibben an ” extremist” , does this mean we can call him a fossil headed stooge ?

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  February 12, 2015

        Sounds OK. A brief caution, though, now that libel suits are being thrown around in this arena: any more specific language (e.g., “paid by [fossil fuels, Kochs, etc.]”) should be avoided or accompanied by disclaimer (“in my opinion”). “Fossil-headed stooge” is vague enough to be fine, as well as various insulting terms like “crank” or “wacko”.

        Reply
  207. Colorado Bob

     /  February 12, 2015

    Brazilians hoard water, prepare for possible drastic rationing
    (Reuters) – Brazilians are hoarding water in their apartments, drilling homemade wells and taking other emergency measures to prepare for forced rationing that appears likely and could leave taps dry for up to five days a week because of a drought.

    In São Paulo, the country’s largest city with a metropolitan area of 20 million people, the main reservoir is at just 6 percent of capacity with the peak of the rainy season now past.

    Other cities in Brazil’s heavily populated southeast such as Rio de Janeiro face less dire shortages but could also see rationing.

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/02/11/us-brazil-drought-idUKKBN0LF1YP20150211

    Reply
  208. Colorado Bob

     /  February 12, 2015

    Carbon release from ocean helped end the Ice Age
    Date:
    February 11, 2015
    Source:
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    Summary:
    A release of carbon dioxide from the deep ocean helped bring an end to the last Ice Age, according to new research. The study shows that carbon stored in an isolated reservoir deep in the Southern Ocean re-connected with the atmosphere, driving a rise in atmospheric CO2 and an increase in global temperatures. The finding gives scientists an insight into how the ocean affects the carbon cycle and climate change.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150211132019.htm

    Reply
  209. Colorado Bob

     /  February 12, 2015

    Monster hurricanes struck U.S. Northeast during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

    February 11, 2015

    Intense hurricanes possibly more powerful than any storms New England has experienced in recorded history frequently pounded the region during the first millennium, from the peak of the Roman Empire to the height of the Middle Ages, according to results of a new study.

    The finding could have implications for understanding the intensity and frequency of hurricanes the U.S. Northeast may experience in the future.

    http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=134130&org=NSF&from=news

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 12, 2015

      Thanks, tweet scheduled (on monster storm article).

      Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  February 13, 2015

      And I thought 3 blizzards in one month was bad. If you like snow, come ye to New England. If only we could send some to California!

      Reply
  210. Ken Barrows

     /  February 12, 2015

    At Climate Reanalyzer, today is 0.85 degrees C above the 1979-2000 average. Just saying.

    Reply
  211. Mark from New England

     /  February 13, 2015

    My reply to Jeff Jacoby regarding his “Valentine for Fossil Fuels”. I just sent this to the Boston Globe. It’s less than 200 words, so I hope they print it!:

    Jeff Jacoby is correct to note in “A Valentine for Fossil Fuels” (Boston Globe, Feb. 12) that coal, gas and especially oil have enabled tremendous economic and population growth in the 20th century, and have brought untold benefits to humankind. But he errs when he assumes that burning more and more of the black gold will yield the same benefits they have in the past. He solely considers the short-term economic benefits of fossil fuels without considering their tremendously harmful long-term impacts. He refers to a book by Alex Epstein in which he states that “never have human beings been as protected from climate-related danger as they are right now”. Really? Does he forget the thousands of deaths in Europe from their 2003 heat wave, the thousands dead and displaced in the Philippines from multiple super Typhoons? Mr. Jacoby and Mr. Epstein should pay attention to what happens in Sao Paolo, Brazil, when that metropolis runs out of drinking water later this year. Humanity must learn to wean itself from the very fossil fuels that have enabled its rise; otherwise it risks its own demise.

    Reply
  212. Apneaman

     /  February 14, 2015

    (Audio) Historic Drought In Brazil Sparks Fear Of Civil Unrest

    http://www.mintpressnews.com/historic-drought-in-brazil-sparks-fear-of-civil-unrest/202043/

    Reply
  213. Miss your voice, Robert. Will you really go an entire month without posting?

    Reply
  214. Ouse M.D.

     /  February 15, 2015

    Is that normal that the arctic jetstream is roaring that south over the Eastern Hemisphere?

    http://postimg.org/image/r7jqvyvdx/

    Reply
  215. Colorado Bob

     /  February 15, 2015

    A really good piece in SA from :
    Future Arctic: Field Notes from a World on the Edge,
    by Edward Struzik. Copyright © 2015, Island Press.

    A Stormy Arctic Is the New Normal [Excerpt]
    The Arctic is changing fast

    In the summer of 2000, Canadian national park warden Angus Simpson and his colleagues were camped along the north coast of the Yukon Territory near the Alaskan border, conducting a survey of archeological sites along the coast. The sea was dead calm at the time. But they could see in the inky blue sky over the Beaufort Seas the telltale signs of a storm advancing. An hour or so after they turned in that night, the first big gust of wind blew in, completely flattening their tent and forcing them to take refuge in the cubbyhole of their boat.
    It was just the beginning of a summer storm that some people in the western Arctic of Alaska, Yukon and Northwest Territories remember as the worst they had seen before the Great Cyclone of 2012 ripped through the region. At the height of this gale in 2000, dozens of Inuvialuit people camped on low-lying land along the Arctic coast had to be airlifted out by helicopter. The park wardens, exposed on the same stretch of low lying tundra, were forced to make a harrowing trip through 12-foot high waves to get to the safety of a ranger station that was located on Herschel Island a few miles away.
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-stormy-arctic-is-the-new-normal-excerpt/

    Reply
  216. Colorado Bob

     /  February 15, 2015

    Yet another animal in trouble on the California coast-

    Sea lions desperate for nourishment dying off in alarming numbers on California coast

    Each day, crates with sick sea lions arrive here and at four other locations from San Luis Obispo to Fort Bragg in what’s alarmingly become a third year of massive sea lion pup die-offs. And if the trend continues, marine biologists warn, it could deplete an entire generation of California sea lions.

    One desperate and hungry pup was found Wednesday beside busy Skyline Boulevard in San Francisco, more than 1,000 feet from the ocean.

    Scientists say changes in the California Current have pushed fish farther from the sea lion rookeries in the Channel Islands, where the pups are born around June. And the diminishing number of sardines and anchovies have forced nursing mothers to switch to rockfish and squid. These changes are believed to have contributed to a lower quality of milk and higher number of malnourished pups.

    Link

    Reply
  217. Colorado Bob

     /  February 15, 2015

    Irony 101 –

    Huge snows in New England , but they moved the Iditarod starting point.

    Similar conditions forced the race’s restart to move from Willow to Fairbanks in 2003, bypassing the Alaska Range but keeping it roughly the same distance. The move to Fairbanks was considered in snow-starved 2014, too, and after the board’s decision kept mushers on the traditional southern route, the bruised and beaten up dog drivers criticized officials for not avoiding what some of them described as a catastrophe. …………………………… Trail Committee board member Rick Swenson, the winningest Iditarod musher with five first-place finishes, said the Dalzell Gorge coming out of Rainy Pass in the Alaska Range was passable when the board made its decision in 2014 — a week closer to the race than this year — but that it was too dangerous based on the look he got at it Tuesday. The troublesome areas had half as much snow as in 2014, and the bad spots were twice as long, Swenson said.

    Swenson and other board members, including Nome musher Aaron Burmeister, flew in a fixed-wing plane Tuesday to a landing strip in the area and flew in a helicopter to hover over the boulders Burmeister said mushers and sleds bounced off of last year. There would be no bouncing in 2015, he said.

    “This year, you can’t go through a rock,” Burmeister said. “There’s boulders and rocks that we’ve never seen there in 20-some years that are littering all the gorge, places that you’d never even see a rock because you’re going over feet of snow going through there. This year, you’re looking at bare ground.”

    Link

    Reply
  218. Colorado Bob

     /  February 15, 2015

    More irony –

    BAD SNOW YEAR: Snowpack in Olympic Mountains is at record low — and authorities are worried about water woes this summer

    Although the Olympic Mountains have had plenty of rain this winter, snow is at a record low.

    The Olympic Mountain snowpack had melted down by Saturday to 3 percent of average — the lowest in the state — possibly endangering the area’s summer water supply and river flows for salmon runs.

    The snowpack at Hurricane Ridge was measured Saturday at a mere 7.9 percent of average — 7 inches at the measurement station.

    That location’s annual average is 88 inches of snow on the ground on Feb. 15, according to data from the Northwest Avalanche Center in Seattle.

    The previous record-low snowpack for Feb. 15 was 17 inches in 2005, said Kenny Kramer, director of the avalanche center.

    The Dungeness weather station south of Sequim had no snow Thursday. Ordinarily, it would have about 15 inches in mid-February.

    “There are going to be some water shortages,” said Scott Pattee, water supply specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Mount Vernon.

    Link

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 15, 2015

      Thanks, tweet scheduled on Olympic Mountains snowpack.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 15, 2015

      Not really a drought per se , they have been getting storms , the kicker is the snow line has been mostly above 8,000 feet all winter. And the tallest mountain in the range is Mount Olympus’ 7,979 feet,

      This has been the case from California up into B.C. all season long. Very little snow has fallen below 8,000 feet. If a mountain is water tower, we’re watching the ones on the west coast shrink.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 15, 2015

      That’s craziest drought picture I have ever seen.

      On behalf of everyone here , thank- you for following this story. When I was stronger I did the same thing. I bit down on subject I knew was important , and just followed it. I followed extreme rain events 5 years ago for a year. Like a duck on a June Bug. I have a picture of kangaroo perched on a pile of reeds in an ocean of flood waters.

      Images matter more than words . Words matter, but images move people to change very fast. I am thinking of the lessons from Vietnam , the little girl running down the road after the naplam attack, the man getting his brains blow out in downtown Saigon.

      Back then , this stuff come over Nightly News,

      Images matter more than words .

      Reply
  219. Colorado Bob

     /  February 15, 2015

    January 17, 2015

    RS –
    We all hope you are well. And your love ones as well . Throw us a bone. One does not build a following , and then go dark, unless your “Forrest Gump”.

    And you ain’t “Forrest Gump”.

    Your friend Colorado Bob .

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  February 16, 2015

      CB, I’ll second that. It’s now been one month since Robert penned his last article.

      Robert, when you do finally chime in, a few words on our recent New England snow-pocalypse would be great. There are 40 inches on the ground where I live according to this map. I’m looking at you crazy jet stream!

      Reply
  220. Nasa climate study warns of unprecedented North American drought

    We need to cut carbon pollution to avoid North American mega-droughts

    California is in the midst of its worst drought in over 1,200 years, exacerbated by record hot temperatures. A new study led by Benjamin Cook at Nasa GISS examines how drought intensity in North America will change in a hotter world, and finds that things will only get worse.

    Global warming intensifies drought in several ways. In increases evaporation from soil and reservoirs. In increases water demand. It makes precipitation fall more as rain and less as snow, which is problematic for regions like California that rely on snowpack melt to refill reservoirs throughout the year. It also makes the snowpack melt earlier in the year. The record heat has intensified the current California drought by about 36%, and the planet will only continue to get hotter.

    The study finds that drought intensity will increase, but could be manageable if we follow a path that involves slowing global warming by cutting carbon pollution.

    However, decades-long mega-droughts in North America could be much worse than those experienced during medieval times, which led to the decline of native populations, if we continue on our current business-as-usual path.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2015/feb/16/nasa-climate-study-warns-unprecedented-north-american-drought

    Reply
  221. What’s interesting is that as recently as a few weeks ago, that deep thinker of investing, Warren Buffett, claimed in response to a shareholder resolution for Berkshire Hathaway, that their indirect investments saw no increases in claims due to human-caused climate change.

    Now, this is in contradiction with much on-the-ground evidence. So, (1) is the “signal” that BH’s subsidiaries see so noisy or lagged or both that they do not see the effect? Or (2) is the Sage of Omaha being disingenuous? Or (3) are the data he sees so inconsistent with his personal beliefs and theory of the world that he discounts them?

    I’d say that in any of the cases cited, Berkshire Hathaway is a remnant of a vision of the world which Nature is shortly going to blow away, and, accordingly, is not a good bet to invest in.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: