Something Rotten With The Climate — January 2015 Comes in As Second Hottest

Hot off the heels of a new global temperature record in 2014, January of 2015 hasn’t missed a beat. Global warmth still rages, as bestirred as a Shakespearean prince outraged at loss and betrayal of a once-constant and steady father.

The month, as many, many months preceding, continued to display a reckless accumulation of heat.

*   *   *   *

According to NASA GISS, January was 0.75 C above the global 20th Century average, or about 0.95 C above 1880s levels. This departure is somewhat above previous second hottest year place-holders — 2002 and 2003 — which both showed an angry 0.71 C rise. It is, however, behind the record-holding January of 2007 which at 0.93 C above the 20th Century average remains the hottest month in the total global surface temperature measure. The first of many to make attempts on the 1 C departure level.

January 2015

(Global Temperature anomaly map as provided by NASA GISS.)

Spatial assessment of hot and cold anomalies showed much of the world with hotter than normal temperatures. In the Northern Hemisphere, cooler temperatures were primarily confined to the Northeastern US, Eastern and Northeastern Canada, and a region through Baffin Bay, Eastern Hudson Bay, and the adjacent Canadian Archipelago. In Austral zones, the heat sink of the Southern Ocean continued to display resilience as near-Antarctic regions also showed slightly cooler than normal departures.

But these were the sole significant zones showing cooler than normal weather. In contrast, a broad belt ranging from the tropics through the sub-tropics showed +0.5 to 2 C temperature departures. But the Northern Hemisphere again showed the most significant heat with Northwestern North America, Asia and Europe all showing extreme temperature anomalies in the range of 2 C to 8.1 C above average.

Arctic amplification also reared over the Beaufort Sea and through the Northern Polar zone with heat anomalies in excess of 2 to 4 degrees C above average and with numerous days in which the entire Arctic displayed +3.5 C or higher departures.

zonal anomalies

(GISS zonal temperature anomalies.)

Zonal anomalies also revealed this trend with a region from 50 to 60 North Latitude showing temperature departures in the range of +2.8 C across the entire Latitudinal belt. Meanwhile, the region of 80 to 90 North was under nearly as strong a departure of +2.5 C above 20th Century averages for that zone. By contrast, the only zonal region with below average temperatures was beyond the 60 degrees South Latitude Line and averaged a rather minor departure of about -0.4 C.

Conditions in Context

The second hottest January on record comes after a Century-long warming trend in which temperaures have risen by an average of about 0.85 C above 1880s levels and about 1.1 C above a low point that occurred around 1910.

Land Ocean Temperature Index

(Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index — GISS/NASA.)

This warming is about a 20 times faster pace than at the end of the last ice age. During that time, it took 10,000 years for the Earth to warm by about 4 degrees Celsius. Over a single Century, we have achieved the equivalent to 1/5 post ice age warming on top of 1880 levels. It is also worth noting that recent record warm years in 2014, 2010, and 2005 occurred absent the kind of very strong El Nino that occurred in 1998. Most notably, for 2014, no El Nino was declared at all.

Which shows that for the climate, there is something indeed rotten in Denmark — and everywhere else for that matter.

Links:

NASA’s Global Surface Temperature Analysis

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113 Comments

  1. Thank you, Robert…a fellow climate nerd and I start checking for the previous month’s global temp dates around the time the JMA releases their data. Then comes NASA and then the apparent “paper of record”, the NOAA a few days later. At .85C warming, It starts to feel as if we are waiting for the next “milestone birthday” (a la 18, 21, 30, 40, 65, years-old, etc.)….I suppose that would be 1C warming over pre-industrial. Aside from that, it seems certain that we are waiting for some kind of disruptive climate event that is magnitudes greater that what we have already seen. If Sao Paolo truly runs out of potable water…that could get a bit “interesting”. Of course, if the California drought continues and deepens, that’ll draw far more attention.

    Reply
    • São Paulo is back above 8 percent for its largest reservoir.. That said, rainy season is coming to a close in a few weeks.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  February 18, 2015

        Robert, I have seen these numbers and take them as mendacious. The source is Sabespo which is the state water company that has been deliberately lying to Sao Paulo for some time now as, for example, the numbers they gave out below indicate (I have links for each of these numbers but don’t want this to sit in moderation):
        May 15, 2014 – 8.2% – Reservoir level – 821.43 meters (4 ft above the gravity intake)
        Sept 20, 2014 – 8.2% – Reservoir level – 816.82 meters (12 ft below the gravity intake)
        Feb. 17, 2015 – 8.2% – Reservoir level – 813.00 meters (23 ft below the gravity intake)

        The actual number appears right now to be slightly less than 6% which is a recovery from a low in January that was a little less than 4%. Not clear how much is due to rain and how much due to rapidly decreased water pressure and rolling shut offs that they still deny. Either way the situation is not improving. Even the New York Times has noticed!

        http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/17/world/americas/drought-pushes-sao-paulo-brazil-toward-water-crisis.html?_r=1#

        Reply
      • Cheers Greg and thanks for the detail. I think it’s fair to say there’s some minor improvement from January, but nowhere near enough as yet. Thanks for the Times link.

        Reply
    • Thailand facing significant loss of rice crop due to drought.
      The irrigation department has warned that the country would suffer its worst drought in more than a decade this year.

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/02/18/us-thailand-water-idUSKBN0LM0KS20150218

      Reply
  2. Colorado Bob

     /  February 17, 2015

    Intense New England Hurricanes Much More Numerous 340 to 1800 Years Ago

    By: Jeff Masters , 6:43 PM GMT on February 17, 2015
    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2918#commenttop

    Reply
  3. Nice to see you back in the saddle, Robert.

    Reply
  4. Spike

     /  February 17, 2015

    “about 1.1 C above a low point that occurred around 1910”

    Hadn’t noted that 1910 nadir before – so that’s 1C exceeded over the last hundred years. Very sobering.

    Welcome back Robert – hope your batteries are fully recharged.

    Reply
    • Most scientists, unlike climate change deniers, don’t cherry pick. But if they did, they’d be saying 1.1 C warming…

      Reply
      • Agree can’t be gorging on forbidden fruit here! 😊

        However if someone had asked me straight up “how much has it warmed over the last 100 years?”, which I imagine some folk might, well I wouldn’t have got that correct.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  February 18, 2015

        Although, since that was a solar minimum and we’re in another one now, there would be _some_ rational for making a comparison between those two points.

        Reply
      • It’s worth mentioning in the proper context. I use 1880 as the non-cherry picked baseline which is the broader precedent. The 20th century average is, to my view, a moved goal post, as is the 1979-2000 average.

        Reply
  5. Colorado Bob

     /  February 17, 2015

    Audubon’s Birds and Climate Change Report

    314 Species on the Brink

    Shrinking and shifting ranges could imperil nearly half of U.S. birds within this century

    http://climate.audubon.org/

    Reply
    • This is disheartening and depressing to me. I have trouble writing these stories as I find them to be so terribly sad and invoking of stark loneliness. But there is outrage as well. One wonders how many birds those ‘bird killing wind farms’ would actually save? I mean a species can survive a stress to individuals, but it cannot survive the loss of habitat.

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  February 21, 2015

        Exactly right. Hunters, for example, kill ~100 million birds a year in the U.S., but that is seen as fine by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, because it is individuals being killed and not habitat being destroyed. Approx. 300,000 a year, or 1 for every 300 taken by hunters, die in collisions with wind turbines.

        Reply
  6. Hi, Robert.
    I add, that super resilient high we have been watching is still holding and is intrenched in the eastern Pacific (am looking for the most graphic example) — this as the jet stream looks bifurcated.

    Reply
    • It’s definitely enough to keep that California drought in effect. A couple of strong challenges to the ridge this winter, but time is now running out.

      Reply
  7. Colorado Bob

     /  February 17, 2015

    Northern Argentina floods kill at least six in Cordoba

    The river overflowed after 32cm (12.6in) fell in the space of 12 hours, trapping people in their cars.

    Link

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  February 18, 2015

      I’ve read similar stories about heavy precipitation in argentina quite a bit in recent years. One paper states:

      “There was a remarkable increase in precipitation over most of subtropical Argentina, especially since 1960.This has favoured agriculture yields and the extension of crop lands into semiarid regions, but this increase also came with more frequent heavy rainfalls and consequent flooding of rural and urban areas.”

      http://wires.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WiresArticle/wisId-WCC316.html

      Reply
  8. Mark from New England

     /  February 17, 2015

    Robert,

    Welcome back. We were about to send out a search party. Figured you may have decided to walk to Boston and gotten stuck in the 8 foot snow drifts 😉 I haven’t seen a winter this snowy and cold in central New England since 1995-96. I think this one is certainly colder.

    Speaking of which, The Boston Globe’s contrarian columnist, Jeff Jacoby, recently penned this op-ed in which he basically states that measuring global mean temperature is basically impossible and fraught with subjective biases. If you can help me point out some of his logical and/or scientific fallacies, I’ll write another letter to the Globe:

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2015/01/29/global-temperature-what-does-that-even-mean/YBuZQuXqAB5dJYznrRyVKI/story.html

    Thanks and welcome back!

    Reply
    • Robert In New Orleans

       /  February 17, 2015

      Mark, this all the proof you need to present to Mr. Jacoby as anything else is a waste of your time.

      http://s261.photobucket.com/user/colonelexe/media/global-warming-underwear.jpg.html

      His editorials like those of most conservatives, are celebrations of ignorance and should be treated as such.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  February 17, 2015

      Mark, he is borderline trolling with his editorials. His entire argument makes no sense. He claims to not know much about it, but he is OK with throwing out NASA’s statement about it being the hottest year. You don’t get to have it both ways. If he has data to prove NASA wrong, he needs to step up and show why, not just claim that there is vagaries and therefore the whole thing should be thrown out.
      But he is not trying to make a valid argument. The fact that the ocean absorbs over 93% of the energy imbalance of the planet means that arguing over air temps is like arguing about how hard it is raining while our ship is sinking. I think he knows that, he is smarter than he writes, but he is working for the Globe and right now he doesn’t care if you love him or hate him, just click on the page so the boss see’s the hits on it.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  February 18, 2015

        Griffin, thanks. Jacoby’s op-eds on climate change just keep getting more bizarre. I do think he does this in part to see what sort of reaction he gets – egg on the ‘liberal elites’. Now does he believe his own propaganda?

        Reply
    • With oil, coal, and gas prices all falling, with renewable energy adoption going up and up, I can sense a bit of desperation here. I mean, there’s only so many times you can throw the bulk of the global atmospheric, ocean, glacial, and climate sciences under the bus and not sound like a raving lunatic.

      Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 18, 2015

      No reason to try to persuade Mr. Jacoby, every reason to use his baloney as the stimulus for a letter to the editor.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  February 18, 2015

        Reply to Spike – that Roy Spencer is a piece of work. This quote from his rant shows he doesn’t know his political science all that well: …”Like the Nazis, they are anti-capitalist.”

        ANTI-capitalist? – the Nazi’s took capitalism to the extreme. They enjoyed the support of rich capitalists from around the world. But since they had the word ‘socialist’ in their name, they must have been leftists. Many on the right make this mistake.

        Reply
      • I find owning a home solar system, batteries, and an EV to be a shining example of the kind of individualism and independence from fetters that conservatives claim to celebrate. These guys fight the kind of independent spirit they claim to advance — supporting captive consumers and energy slaves everywhere. I think a good definition for them would be corporate Stalinistas — they push products that are harmful to life, health, and happiness. Products that are fostered on all forms of addition and removal of individual choice. That’s their freedom — freedom to give other people lung cancer, freedom to drown your cities and towns under climate change, freedom to murder species and possibly your children too.

        Reply
  9. Robert In New Orleans

     /  February 17, 2015

    Hola Roberto,

    Como Esta?

    Just a small suggestion for when you are absent during the future, please launch a new thread each week so that the comments (aka train of thought) don’t fly off the track.

    Mucho gracias.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 17, 2015

      Amen

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  February 17, 2015

        RS-
        I was worried you got hit by bus. You have great readership here now, I am amazed by the new names that pop up everyday.

        This is important work here, don’t let suffer.

        Reply
      • Sorry, guys. That post had 700+ comments which was pretty nuts.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  February 18, 2015

      I agree! Robert, I frequent this site for your original and accurate views on our current predicament. However, I also come here for the great links and knowledge provided the many great commenters. The combination of the two makes this a must-visit site. I agree that during long absences a blank post for new comments would be tremendously useful. Thanks for all you do!!

      Reply
    • wili

       /  February 18, 2015

      Yeah, by the end it was freezing my screen every time I tried to access it.

      Reply
  10. Griffin

     /  February 17, 2015

    So many clicks, so much anticipation, so much scrolling through endless comments that are out of sequence…. WOOOOHOOOO!!! It was all worth it!! Great to see you back Robert and I must say that you have the best group of the most devoted followers who persevered despite the technical difficulties of the last post.

    Reply
  11. Tom

     /  February 17, 2015

    Hey, welcome back Robert! You didn’t miss much – everything’s gotten considerably worse since your hiatus to research and present this gem.

    So now we have 2nd hottest January. February won’t be too far behind – record warmth out west and down south(west) will balance out record cold on the east coast. What do you think of the possibility that the “persistent ridge” that’s been giving CA fits for the last 4 years (i know, it’s been longer than that, but they didn’t have the huge, state-wide water shortage then) starts migrating across the country, slowly, like a decade or two over the bread-basket of the U.S. (CA to the far side of the Mississippi) before migrating to the east coast in 2030 or so.

    i see that the Atlantic Meridional Undercurrent is slowing:

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v438/n7068/abs/nature04385.html

    That’s going to have consequences.

    Reply
    • Tom, Feb is raging hot from everything I have looked at (GFS etc). It could easily be record warmest .80 or greater anomaly. I think the positive PDO and ENSO conditions have the biggest influence Dec-Feb giving 2015 a serious head start for warmest on record. Tamino had a great post on this a while ago. We will have to wait and see. If niño like conditions remain then it’s a near certainty.

      Reply
      • We have a somewhat warm Kelvin wave building as well. Those atmospheric temps for one day last week hit 1.2 C above 1880s. Pretty amazingly hot.

        Reply
    • Have you noted the high T anomalies off the NE coast? + 8-11 C for a month running. Cold air displaced by warm Atlantic meridional flow into that zone and there you have your 8 feet of snow in Boston. But those T anomalies look like the Gulf Stream in a train wreck.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  February 18, 2015

        Robert,

        It seems to me that this *new* winter “Jennifer Francis (trademark) Jetstream” will be a fairly regular feature of New England winters for many years. I’d like your opinion on whether this pattern of extreme cold and heavy snow will likely persist for a few years. It may have a bearing on how much money we sink into repairing / retrofitting our low-sloping back roof! Thanks! Mark

        Reply
      • That Mann is a sharp fellow.

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  February 21, 2015

          Indeed he is, and dedicated too. Too bad there are not 100 more like him.

      • Mark —

        I think the entire region surrounding Greenland and the North Atlantic will be very, very unstable. This means more storms of many kinds through fall, winter, and spring primarily. The tendency of the cold air core to displace near Greenland would also lead to some more severe winters for the NE at least through the next 5 decades.

        I wouldn’t bet on every winter being terrible. But considering the increased tendency for dipole anomalies, with the cold pole being shoved 1,500 miles or so south and east to near Greenland does lead to increased risk for very severe winter weather for the NE US, Eastern Canada, the Great Lakes Region, and France, England, Spain, Northwestern Africa, and Coastal Scandinavia.

        When we look at both the cold dipole now over the Eastern half of North America and that Gulf Stream train wreck showing SST anomalies that are basically off the charts, I’d be remiss not to note that this is a mild example of what is likely to come once sea ice decays further and Greenland melt really gets underway.

        Reply
        • climatehawk1

           /  February 21, 2015

          I’m reminded of the signs that appear on the Crawford Path, a trail that connects the peaks of New Hampshire’s Presidential Range, which has extremely severe weather and where an experienced woman hiker froze to death just a few days ago. They say, in effect, if you’re standing at this point and the weather looks worrisome, turn back NOW, because the worst is yet to come. It’s always a little chilling to read them, even on sunny days. (A few yards–literally–from the summit of Mt. Washington, btw, there is a cross marking the spot where two hikers died of exposure during a storm in July.)

      • Mark from New England

         /  February 18, 2015

        Robert,

        Thanks for your reply concerning severe winters for the US northeast, etc. I’ll plan accordingly.

        Reply
      • I see Mann tweeting that he’s so sick of winter in the NE he’s moving to Alaska.

        Reply
  12. Colorado Bob

     /  February 17, 2015

    RS –
    Get help from your readers. Ask them to post . Expand your world, be an editor . We’re here now, at least that is what I see.

    Reply
  13. Reblogged this on jpratt27.

    Reply
  14. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    I would remind everyone Dr. Jennifer Francis is right. This deep loop in the jet stream has been in place for weeks .
    It has been stuck for weeks, And it is exactly what she forecast.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 18, 2015

      And on the upstream of this they are moving the Iditarod, why ? The trail is rocks.

      Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  February 18, 2015

      I hear ya! Absolutely – from one on the cold side of the trough.

      Reply
    • Right, and that massive high pressure is still in place off of the NA west coast. The two seem to work in tandem most of the time. The West is way too warm.

      Reply
  15. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    Record breaking snow in Boston, but the Iditarod has the worst conditions ever.

    Reply
  16. james cole

     /  February 18, 2015

    The climate change deniers have launched another media offensive the last few months. Print media have run a number of carefully crafted denial stories alleging rigging and revision of measurements. My self I only read the headlines and first couple sentences, I refuse to read past that. But these are more claims that official numbers are being fudged to show global warming where there is none. We all know this is the fossil fuel lobby putting lawyers, writers and quasi science writers to cherry pick and to misrepresent real science. We need to expect this offensive to continue and pick up strength. Lies will be written and published by the right wing media and the bought and paid for media.
    On a more serious note, anyone care to comment on this written by Dmitry Orlov today:
    ” But the biggest surprise of the last few years has been the rate of arctic methane release. Perhaps you haven’t, but I’ve found it impossible to ignore all the scientists who have been ringing alarm bells on Arctic methane release. What they are calling the clathrate gun—which can release some 50 gigatons of methane in as little as a couple of decades—appears to have been fired in 2007 and now, just a few years later, the trend line in Arctic methane concentrations has become alarming. But we will need to wait for at least another two years to get an authoritative answer. Overall, the methane held in the clathrates is enough to exceed the global warming potential of all fossil fuels burned to date by a factor of between 4 and 40.”
    He seems to be reading the worst case scenario into the latest research on methane.

    Reply
  17. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    Every Mayan temple was covered for hundreds of years with a plaster made from limestone, made from the forest around them. You cook limestone to make lime. Lime makes plaster. Wood makes charcoal. Charcoal bakes limestone.

    In the beginning this cycle ain’t a big deal, but these kings when crazy A cyclone was just a foot note at the end.

    These people stuck sting ray barbs in their foreskins to get in touch with the Gods. And their queens did the same thing. You bled on a paper , then you lite it on fire. The smoke would take man’s message to the Gods.

    Only kings and queens did this. Everyone else cut down trees , and hauled rocks.

    Reply
  18. Jeremy Jackson’s Feb. 2015 talk at the US Naval War College is a good watch, and mostly about the human dilemmas involved.

    Evening Lecture | Jeremy Jackson: Sea Level Rise is Dangerous

    Reply
  19. Science panel: NYC faces dramatic, costly climate change

    Climate change is making New York City hotter, wetter and under worst-case scenarios could raise sea levels as much as six feet by the year 2100, a group of independent experts reported to City Hall.

    The New York City Panel on Climate Change Tuesday released its 2015 update on how Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration is working to keep communities resilient and bolster infrastructure in the face of climate change. The price tag of the city’s comprehensive resiliency plan — which is unfolding over many years — is about $20 billion, according to the mayor’s office. Much of it is already funded, including parts of the coastal protection efforts. Federal money is also helping foot the bill.

    The de Blasio administration eyes reducing New York City’s greenhouse gases by 80 percent by 2050. Scientists blame global emissions as a key contributor to warming of the planet.

    Mean temperatures are projected to increase by 4.1 degrees Fahrenheit to 5.7 degrees by the 2050s, and by 5.3 degrees to 8.8 degrees by the 2080s, the panel found. Experts warned that even fluctuations of a few degrees can have profound consequences for the region.

    http://www.newsday.com/news/new-york/science-panel-nyc-faces-dramatic-costly-climate-change-1.9948984

    Reply
  20. Stalagmite links rain reduction to industrial revolution

    Research shows the explosion of fossil fuel use to power the 19th-century industrial boom began the pattern of lower rainfall affecting the northern tropics

    Scientists have identified a human-induced cause of climate change. But this time it’s not carbon dioxide that’s the problem − it’s the factory and power station chimney pollutants that began to darken the skies during the industrial revolution.

    Analysis of stalagmite samples taken from a cave in Belize, Central America, has revealed that aerosol emissions have led to a reduction of rainfall in the northern tropics during the 20th century.

    http://www.eco-business.com/news/stalagmite-links-rain-reduction-industrial-revolution/

    Reply
  21. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    Off topic –
    Charley Rose is talking to an ex CIA guy tonight. Not once has he mentioned that the Saudi ‘s funded a virulent effort since Roosevelt to kill us. Our oil money all these years gave us ISIS. Now the genie is out of the bottle, and ISIS wants to kill the Saudi princes as well.

    As long as they pumped oil , we turned a blind eye to the Wahhabi bullshit they exported.

    Now, it may eat all of us.

    Solar power does not have 1,400 years of baggage.

    Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    NPR is asking about rail cars tonight ,
    It’s the roadbed fool . It’s the problem . Heavy trains, running over old old road beds , what could possibility go wrong ?

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 18, 2015

      By the way , West Virginia hates government, let them clean up this mess a lone. Let them clean up every mess that is coming their way a lone. They can sue North Dakota, that’s where the oil came from , they hate government as well, or they can sue CSX , but private corporations never do anything wrong.

      West Virginia hates government, let them clean up this mess a lone.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  February 18, 2015

        Yes, and if Oklahoma suffers its worst drought since the 1930s, well, they should just pray as Senator Inhofe recommends. No federal disaster assistance for them!

        Reply
    • That’s right. Most of American transportation infrastructure is crumbling as well — and we keep overloading it even as it crumbles.

      Reply
      • NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) has severely strained our Interstate highways. The I-5 corridor and US Hwy 101 along the US west coast between Mexico and Canada are toxic air pollution zones that local jurisdictions are powerless to combat because (I believe) of the terms of NAFTA — but, as mobile sources of pollution, only the US Congress can control. If a stationary and single source was the cause of so much toxic pollution — be sure it would be stopped immediately.
        That’s how our current public health and safety system operates. It’s a terrible and cruel system with the fossil fuel rabid Republican Party now in charge.

        Reply
  23. Look at the video by David Cowtan in

    https://theconversation.com/global-warming-trend-unaffected-by-fiddling-with-temperature-data-37700 (about 1/2 way down)

    Which goes into detail as to how you can do the calculations yourself on currently available climatic data ..

    Have fun!

    Reply
  24. Spike

     /  February 18, 2015

    There’s a very long but fascinating article by the new Greek Finance Minister in today’s Guardian, written when he was an academic, on the problems of neoliberal capitalism. He brings up climate change as the biggest failure of that system:

    “In his recent book Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste, the historian of economic thought, Philip Mirowski, has highlighted the neoliberals’ success in convincing a large array of people that markets are not just a useful means to an end but also an end in themselves. According to this view, while collective action and public institutions are never able to “get it right”, the unfettered operations of decentralised private interest are guaranteed to produce not only the right outcomes but also the right desires, character, ethos even. The best example of this form of neoliberal crassness is, of course, the debate on how to deal with climate change. Neoliberals have rushed in to argue that, if anything is to be done, it must take the form of creating a quasi-market for “bads” (eg an emissions trading scheme), since only markets “know” how to price goods and bads appropriately. To understand why such a quasi-market solution is bound to fail and, more importantly, where the motivation comes from for such “solutions”, one can do much worse than to become acquainted with the logic of capital accumulation that Marx outlined and the Polish economist Michal Kalecki adapted to a world ruled by networked oligopolies.”

    Echoes of Jim Hansen’s deep skepticism on trading market mechanisms as promoted by so many who wish to financialise the response into a profit generating trade.

    Reply
    • Note that BP has a recent report out that is re-pushing carbon trading as a ‘free market solution’ to climate change. Of course it is no solution, which is why BP is pushing it. Any real solution would mean the end of oil and loss of BP assets.

      Reply
  25. People keep forgetting about the delayed correlation between https://geovisualist.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/co2-emissions-growth-per-year.png and earth’s temperature. It pretty much means we’re already doomed to heat up, at least until peak CO2 emissions has been reached (which it has not) plus ~10 years. http://www.climatecentral.org/news/co2-emissions-peak-heat-18394

    Reply
  26. Kevin Jones

     /  February 18, 2015

    Bienvenue chez vous, Robert! Thank you dtlange for Jeremy Jackson. Best one hour, nine minutes and thirty-three seconds I have ‘wasted’ in some time!

    Reply
  27. climatehawk1

     /  February 18, 2015

    In second paragraph, I think you meant “display” instead of “displace.”

    Reply
  28. Kevin Jones

     /  February 18, 2015

    “displace” in the sense of ‘supersede’ works for me. Pedantry, not so much. (no offense intended)

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  February 18, 2015

      OK, well, only a modest amount of offense taken, then. I’m a writer too, and for me, it’s important for stuff to be correct, because it says I care about getting it right. If I’d been snotty about it, that would be pedantic, but I wasn’t. And “supersede” doesn’t really work in this instance. January didn’t supersede lots of heat …

      Reply
  29. Kevin Jones

     /  February 18, 2015

    Peace.

    Reply
  30. Kevin Jones

     /  February 18, 2015

    One thing I do with the GISS Global Land-Sea Temperature graph is look just at the coolest years (of my lifetime) 1950, 1964 and onward. Considering La Ninas, volcanos…. 11 year solar cycles…. aerosol parasols…thorough examination of the pathetic claims of manipulation of thermometers… Sure looks like a fantastically powerful forcing, to me, with fantastic consequences.

    Reply
  31. wili

     /  February 18, 2015

    A reminder that we’ve been warned for a long, long time–at least 50 years: https://www.skepticalscience.com/LBJ-climate-1965.html

    Reply
  32. I’m slowly (way too many photos) posting some atmospheric chemistry and toxic landscape illustrations to dtlange2.

    Nitrogen Deposition As Atmospheric Precipitation and It’s effects on Trees on the Portland State University Campus — Feb, 2015

    https://dtlange2.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/nitrogen-deposition-or-the-atmospheric-precipitation-and-the-trees-on-the-portland-state-university-campus-feb-2015/

    Reply
  33. The title of this news piece:

    More Arctic air on its way to the Cape Fear region

    As the Cape Fear region scraped away Tuesday morning’s storm, forecasters were already looking at a brief bout of snow today, followed by brutal cold into the weekend.

    Several public school systems, including Cumberland County, closed Tuesday and again today. Fort Bragg was closed Tuesday. Area colleges, hospitals and businesses also altered schedules Tuesday and again today due to anticipated slick traveling conditions.

    Fayetteville ended up with about 2/3 of an inch of frozen precipitation, mainly a combination of sleet and freezing rain. Downed trees, power outages – more than 25,000 in the region at one point Tuesday morning – and slick roads were the order of the day.

    http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/more-artic-air-on-its-way-to-the-cape-fear/article_aac9c1ef-a613-5244-bb57-3bd00c7744c5.html

    – But, the US/NA West, Southwest, and Northwest is way too warm. The continent is basically cleaved in half weather wise. It will likely sink, or swim, as such.

    Reply
  34. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    Rising Sea Levels Are Already Making Miami’s Floods Worse

    But the flooding is already happening in Florida. At the University of Miami’s Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Brian McNoldy and other researchers have been accumulating sea level data from Virginia Key (a small island just south of Miami Beach) since 1996. Over those nineteen years, sea levels around the Miami coast have already gone up 3.7 inches. In a post updated yesterday, McNoldy highlights three big problems that follow from those numbers—and they should worry all of us.
    http://www.wired.com/2015/02/rising-sea-levels-already-making-miamis-floods-worse/

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  February 18, 2015

      Reply
      • This is a very rapid pace. 8 feet per century… Subsidence likely plays a part, as does the Gulf Stream backing up. But it can’t count for all.

        If we start seeing similar acceleration in other locations, then we have a trend rather than just a disturbing outlier.

        Reply
  35. Colorado Bob

     /  February 18, 2015

    Study finds more evidence for link between wavy jet stream and extreme weather

    Rutgers University climate scientist Jennifer Francis and colleagues link that wavy jet stream to a warming Arctic, where climate changes near the top of the world are happening faster than in Earth’s middle latitudes.

    A new study from Francis and University of Wisconsin-Madison scientist Stephen Vavrus, published in IOPscience, backs up that theory, with evidence linking regional and seasonal conditions in the Arctic to deeper north-south jet stream waves which will lead to more extreme weather across the country.

    “The real story is how persistent the pattern has been. It’s been this way nearly continually since December 2013…Warm in the west, cold in the east,” Francis said. “We think with the warming Arctic these types of very wavy patterns, although probably not in the same locations, will happen more often in the future.”

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-02-evidence-link-wavy-jet-stream.html#jCp

    Reply
  36. Syd Bridges

     /  February 19, 2015

    Welcome back and thanks for the post, Robert. I’m expecting the March ’14 to Feb ’15 average to be “somewhat interesting.” Also the rest of 2015 too, and I’m wondering whether we will see two back-to-back record years. All this deep heat in the oceans reminds me of John Wyndham’s “The Kraken Awakes.” I do not know when it will happen, but I’m certain it will. I don’t suppose we’ll see “pseudocoelentroates” launched by sea tanks as in the novel, but the sea rise will happen. It also reminds me of J G Ballard’s “The Drowned World.” Both are much better fiction than the denialist rubbish, but they contain far more truth too.

    Reply
    • Have to agree, Syd. February, so far, has been ridiculously warm. I will have to take a look at the novels you mention. Not yet in my library.

      Every time I go back to visit my family down in Hampton Roads, the water seems higher. First Landing State Park is slowly flooding out. That was my boyhood playground…

      Reply
  37. Kevin Jones

     /  February 19, 2015

    Yes, Robert. Every time I go back to my childhood paradise of Admiral Peary’s Eagle Island, Casco Bay Maine, I find myself filled with self-doubt. Surely the tidal pools were not so splendid in their overflowing bio-diversity back in ’54-’55 as I tell myself I remember. Surely the shoreline wasn’t further out, low tide and high. Surely I am making up the remembrance of house sized rocks visible in their entirety through such clear water with their tops ten feet below the surface. And the wonderful diversity of sea birds. And the beyond words smell of that rich, wild place. And then I listen to Jeremy Jackson, at the US Navy War College of all places,(thanks again, dtlange) and realize I am not, because no one can be, making this stuff up. Except the poor lying bastards who dare not tell their kids the truth, because they don’t dare to tell themselves…..that they have spent their lives being wrong about everything.

    Reply
  38. Kevin Jones

     /  February 22, 2015

    wili: I read that report you directed us to from November, 1965. Thanks.

    Reply
  1. Something Rotten With The Climate — January 2015 Comes in As Second Hottest | GarryRogers Nature Conservation

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