Warm Storms Rage Through Barents as Arctic Sea Ice Enters 13th Day of Record Low Extent

On March 4, amidst a building polar heat amplification and a strong, thousands mile long, south to north wind and storm flow across the North Atlantic and into the Arctic, sea ice extent coverage for the northern polar region plunged to new record lows.

imageimage

(26 foot wave heights [left frame] and 50-60 mph sustained southerly winds [right frame] in conjunction with warm storm near the ice edge at Svalbard on March 15, 2015. Storms of this kind have been raging up through the Barents delivering powerful, warm southerly winds and immense swells to the ice edge region for at least the past half month. This strong melt pressure and warm air delivery has contributed to record low sea ice extent totals continuing for the past 13 days running. Image source: Earth Nullschool. Data source: GFS.)

Human-forced heat continued to build throughout the Arctic as warm and intensely windy storms churned northward through the Barents, bringing with them powerful swells ranging from 15 to, at times, 40 feet in height. As these great swells ground away at the ice edge, temperatures hit daily anomalies greater than 4 C above the 1979-2000 average on Sunday, March 8 for the entire Arctic region. The next day, sea ice extent, according to NSIDC, plummeted to 14,273,000 square kilometers. A value 303,000 square kilometers, or an area about the size of Arizona, smaller than the previous record low value for the date set in 2006.

Ever since March 4, the Arctic has remained in new record low territory — a period that has now lasted 13 days. Though anomalous warmth has faded somewhat — dropping today to a range of 2.65 degrees Celsius above the 1979-2000 average — sea ice has only bounced back slightly. On March 15, the NSIDC extent measure had inched up to 14,333,000 square kilometers, still about 235,000 square kilometers below the previous record low for the date.

chart(3)

(Arctic sea ice extent as measured by NSIDC drops below previous record low values on March 4 of 2015 [bottom dark blue line] and has remained at record low levels ever since. For reference, previous record low years for March dates include 2006 [pink line], 2007 [light blue line], and 2011 [orange line]. The top dark blue line [1979] indicates how much sea ice extent has been lost during March over the past 36 years. Image source: NSIDC.)

Over the next week, however, these new record lows are more likely to continue to fade as warm Arctic surface temperature anomalies drop to around 1-2 C above average, the Arctic Oscillation shifts toward neutral or slightly negative, and the warm storm track through the Barents is interrupted by cold winds pushing south toward Scandinavia from the pole. Although mid-week warming forecast for Alaska and Baffin Bay may retard any potential rebound somewhat.

For the past two years, Arctic sea ice has experienced a bit of a rebound during the March through early April time-frame. This has appeared to coincide with a restrengthening of the polar Jet Stream as mid latitudes have warmed which, in turn, has weakened meridional patterns transporting heat into the Arctic during winter time. Low angle sunlight entering the Arctic at this time of year has also not yet gained enough momentum to significantly push the ice to melt. So we still have about a 2-3 week window for potential bounce-back before sunlight builds and begins to apply its steady heat forcing to the greatly diminished ice.

AO index forecast

(Arctic Oscillation [AO] index forecast shows dip toward slightly negative or neutral AO status by end week after a rather extreme high in early March, with a return to mildly positive AO values by end month. Positive AO enhances edge melt of sea ice by encouraging storm formation at the ice edge and warm air invasions over the central ice. Image source: NOAA/CPC.)

That said, the ice is quite frail now, even with potential volume rebounds to mid 2000s levels. So even the slight addition of solar insolation may be enough to keep ice coverage values depressed in the neutral or moderately positive Arctic Oscillation regime that is predicted through the end of March. Extent measures maintaining near record lows along the 2006, 2007 and 2011 tracks, or just below, would establish a very low launching pad for a melt season that, lately, has tended to include precipitous declines in ice during the summer months.

The ongoing record low extent status, despite a return to weather patterns that are more favorable for rebound or maintenance, therefore, should be closely monitored.

Links:

NSIDC

NOAA/CPC

Earth Nullschool

GFS

Climate Reanalyzer

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210 Comments

  1. Study: Past warming increased snowfall on Antarctica, affecting global sea level

    “The scientists found that the ice core results agreed with projections from three dozen computer models used to calculate future changes in snowfall. The end result, Clark said, is that projected increasing snowfall will still have a limiting effect on sea level rise, but that impact will be some 20 percent less than previously expected.”

    http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2015/mar/study-past-warming-increased-snowfall-antarctica-affecting-global-sea-level

    Reply
  2. Mark from New England

     /  March 16, 2015

    Weird coincidence: the present location and path of these storms up the North Atlantic and Barents Sea closely corresponds to the path of totality of this Friday’s equinox solar eclipse.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 16, 2015

      Yes. Glad you noted it, Mark. I’d pointed out something to that effect a couple of days ago.
      Interesting how the path of totality encircles Greenland.

      Also, the eclipse terminates in a bullseye at the North Pole.

      Coincidence? No accidents.

      Thank you for another cogent analysis and synthesis of the facts, Robert.

      Reply
  3. Mark from New England

     /  March 16, 2015

    Of course, this is a casual, not causal, relationship!

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 16, 2015

      Meaningful coincidence.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  March 16, 2015

        Yes, I suspect the fabric of Reality goes beyond what we can perceive with our 5 senses – something poking in from beyond the 4-D space-time?

        Reply
        • Warming Arctic and a positive oscillation does tend to put storms on this track. Can’t really comment on the other stuff😉

      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Robert, you’re going to have fun on Thursday. Really looking forward to the show. I know you guys are going to hit it off.

        Mark, as to your question, I’ll quote Rudy Rucker, mathematician and science fiction author:
        “LIfe is a fractal in Hilbert Space.” And leave it at that…for the moment. 😉

        Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  March 17, 2015

        Robert and Eleggua,

        I’m reading a philosophy book by Bernard Kastrup on how ‘Mind’ or Awareness is the underlying fabric of reality. Excellent food for thought and contemplation, though not directly related to the subject of this blog! Thanks for indulging the occasional pointing out of interesting synchronicities. I’ll have to look up Rudy Rucker and Hilbert Space.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        You’re welcome, Mark. Is that Kastrup book you’re reading titled “Why Materialism Is Baloney”? Is it indexed?

        Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  March 17, 2015

        Eleggua, Yes, that’s the book. It’s indexed and has plenty of footnotes and citations. Bad title, though, for a very thought provoking book. OK – now back to climate science…

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Thanks. Will give it a look; would like to see who he cites. I kind of like the title; playful not stuffy.

        Reply
    • Christina in Honolulu

       /  March 16, 2015

      Agreed! Let’s be careful to keep our analytical thinking caps on.

      Reply
  4. Mblanc

     /  March 16, 2015

    A good blog dealing with artic sea ice, which is linked from RealClimate

    http://neven1.typepad.com/

    suffice to say, Nevan’s on the case!

    Reply
  5. eleggua

     /  March 16, 2015

    Rare footage of volcanic lighting Published on Mar 16, 2015

    A VOLCANO explodes into life as it sprays burning hot ash high into the air – followed by a deafening shockwave. Shot by filmmaker Marc Szeglat, 47, this incredible footage shows the highly active Sakurajima volcano on the Japanese island of Kyushu. The German videographer was able to capture the rare phenomenon of volcanic lightning, as well as an explosive shockwave which rippled through the sky. Sakurajima, translated as Cherry Island, has been erupting on a regular basis since 1955 and is a constant danger to the nearby city of Kagoshima, which has a population of over 600,000.

    Reply
  6. Mark from New England

     /  March 16, 2015

    It’s currently 89 F in Lincoln, Nebraska! Holy *&^%! – and going down to 38 tonight.

    http://www.weather.com/weather/today/l/USNE0283:1:US

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  March 17, 2015

      Tragic and for what a short-term end.

      Reply
    • This is indicative of the greatest tragedy of our time, wiping out the majesty and complexity that tens of millions of years of evolution produced for the convenience and “profit” of a single generation. The potential collapse of humanity is indeed regrettable, but the mass extinction we are currently enacting is the ultimate tragedy and beyond devestating. Never again in the entire life of the known universe will these beautiful flora and fauna exist. “Extinction is forever” falls short of capturing the immensity of the crime being committed.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  March 17, 2015

        Very well said Ryan. Humans won’t appreciate Nature until it’s gone – or nearly gone.

        Reply
      • Aldous

         /  March 17, 2015

        The Modern Human Society

        We take energy and resources and turn them into $. We turn $ into feelings (feelings in the sense that neurotransmitters are released because as we acquire more $ we acquire more status and respect. Basically, “wanting” is better that “having”.) At the end of this process is waste.

        Energy + Resources –> $ –> Feelings –> Waste.

        Bleak, but appropriate, I think.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        “Humans won’t appreciate Nature until it’s gone – or nearly gone.”

        Not all humans. It seems here that the ‘job’ of those of us that do appreciate nature and our part in it is to spread that appreciation – that love, as much as possible, in every direction possible.

        Reply
  7. Andy in San Diego

     /  March 17, 2015

    This rag is right wingish, but from time to time they post something on climate change that is interesting.

    NOTE: I don’t subscribe or seek FP out, but if they come up in a search and have something that has interesting information I’ll read it. If that offends anyone, please point me to the same article elsewhere.

    Hydropower and the Challenge of Climate Change
    ========================================

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2015/03/16/hydropower-and-the-challenge-of-climate-change/

    Reply
    • FP has been more willing to post on climate change recently. It may be a sign that some of the business community is starting to wake up.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        The Economist, too.

        Reply
      • I have a concern they will be predisposed toward geo-engineering first rather than rapid carbon emissions reductions.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Well-founded concern, Robert. A couple of relevent pieces from The Economist:
        Geo-engineering and climate change – Stopping a scorcher – The controversy over manipulating climate change Nov 23rd 2013
        http://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21590347-controversy-over-manipulating-climate-change-stopping-scorcher
        EVERYONE knows what must be done about climate change, but no one is doing anything about it….

        Both Clive Hamilton, an Australian philosopher, and David Keith, a Canadian physicist, agree that the physics and the engineering of such a global dimming are plausible. Both also agree that it would be a bitterly contentious move, politically tortuous and possibly even self-defeating in the long run. There, though, the agreement ends.Mr Hamilton believes geo- engineering is a bad idea: politically unworkable, hubristic and ethically dubious. Mr Keith argues that it may be a good idea: morally attractive, workable and affordable. Applied with caution, it may buy time to build a low-carbon civilisation….

        Both these books emphasise just how seriously the idea of deliberately altering the climate is being considered, both in scientific journals and among some governments. Mr Hamilton is an effective critic of a breathtaking idea.
        But Mr Keith is a better guide for the undecided.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Geoengineering the climate – Into the great wide open – Scientific studies of techniques for deliberately modifying the climate are getting ready to move out of the laboratory Dec 13th 2014
        http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21635983-scientific-studies-techniques-deliberately-modifying-climate-are
        …Dr (David) Keith is one of the administrators of the Fund for Innovative Climate and Energy Research, through which Bill Gates and some of his former Microsoft colleagues finance research on geoengineering projects and other things. The fund has supported work by Dr Gadian and Dr Neukermans, among others, as well as by Dr Keith himself. But its position is not to fund field tests of cloud-brightening, stratospheric hazing or anything like them. Other sources of philanthropic money may be available, and the cloud-brighteners may well look into them. Dr Keith and his colleagues, though, want their stratospheric experiments to be funded mostly by the government. “I think we have the best chance to have a healthy dialogue if experiments are publicly approved,” says Dr Keith….

        geoengineering experiments in the atmosphere could go ahead fruitfully, bringing with them new knowledge, new regulatory frameworks and new disagreements—and no obvious risk of lock-in.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Sanity from USA Today:

        Geoengineering won’t solve climate change: Our view The Editorial Board, February 15, 2015
        http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/02/15/climate-change-solar-geoengineering-greenhouse-gases-editorials-debates/23465849/
        …some scientists, economists and politicians have begun to discuss a Plan B….
        Variously known as solar geoengineering, radiation management or albedo modification,Plan B involves spraying particles into the atmosphere that would reflect sunlight and cool the Earth’s surface. Particle injection would be cheaper than emissions reduction and, like a volcanic eruption such as Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991, could produce relatively rapid results.
        Voila! Problem solved.

        Um, not so fast….

        As for injecting particles into the atmosphere to cool the planet, the scientists recommended more research to determine whether such ideas could be viable someday. That’s fine, as long as policymakers treat particle injection as a last-ditch scheme that is less Plan B than it is Plan Z.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        Sanity from The Guardian:

        We need regenerative farming, not geoengineering 9 March 2015
        http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/mar/09/we-need-regenerative-farming-not-geoengineering
        Geoengineering has been back in the news recently after the US National Research Council endorsed a proposal to envelop the planet in a layer of sulphate aerosols to reduce solar radiation and cool the atmosphere.

        The proposal has been widely criticised for possible unintended consequences, such as ozone depletion, ocean acidification and reduced rainfall in the tropics. Perhaps even more troubling, geoengineering is a technological fix that leaves the economic and industrial system causing climate change untouched….

        Reply
      • Andrew Dodds

         /  March 18, 2015

        The big danger of geoengineering (via Aerosol injection) is that it needs global agreement and continuous input. Which is a problem. If it negatively affects a large country then it’s unlikely to stay; and in the unlikely event that it carried on for a couple of decades (and therefore no one bothered to cut CO2 emissions) and THEN broke down, you suddenly get a few decade’s worth of impacts in one go.

        Reply
  8. stuart thrupp

     /  March 17, 2015

    Just wondering if the break up of the sea ice is allowing heat from underneath the ice is heating up the atmospheric temperatures.

    Reply
    • The fresh water that tends to go along with sea ice can tend to put a cap on that heat. But it is not anywhere near as effective as meters thick ice.

      Reply
  9. Detong

     /  March 17, 2015

    Please clearly date the posts to your page at the top. Otherwise, I really appreciate your posts!

    Reply
  10. Colorado Bob

     /  March 17, 2015

    In Russia, a drying lake threatens an ‘era of water wars’

    ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – In Russia’s Siberian south, near the border of Mongolia, the world’s largest freshwater lake is shrinking.

    The surrounding communities depend on Lake Baikal, which contains about one-fifth of the earth’s unfrozen freshwater reserves, for their power, water and livelihoods.

    But in the past four months the lake’s water level has dropped so low that experts are calling it a crisis – one they warn could lead to conflicts in Russia over water.

    The lake is now at its lowest level in over 30 years and experts predict it will keep dropping until melting mountain snow and spring rains begin to recharge the lake around late April or mid-May.

    The problem, scientists and environmentalists say, is a combination of climate change and growing use of hydropower.

    Read more at http://newsdaily.com/2015/03/in-russia-a-drying-lake-threatens-an-era-of-water-wars/#QsBI0Usr1bUKVF0E.99

    Reply
    • This is a resounding theme everywhere… Solar+wind+less industrial meat farms would go quite a ways to helping…

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  March 17, 2015

        Yes. Worth noting that the Kochs and their minions are still industriously (industrially? :)) attacking any effort to extend the federal tax incentive for wind power. They also understand its importance.

        Reply
  11. Colorado Bob

     /  March 17, 2015

    Denver Records Earliest 80 Degree Temperature In 143 Year Climate Record

    http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/03/16/denver-records-earliest-80-degree-temperature-in-143-year-climate-record/

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 17, 2015

      Warm, dry spring and early summer predicted New Ulm, MN; March 10, 2015
      http://www.nujournal.com/page/content.detail/id/561875/Warm–dry-spring-and-early-summer-predicted.html?nav=5009
      Even though spring is still 10 days away on the calendar, it felt like spring was in the air Monday afternoon as the outside air temperature climbed into the high 50s and remaining snow piles all but vanished.
      New Ulm hit a new record high of 58 degree, just one degree over the previous record set in 1977….

      The National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Prediction Center forecast for April, May and June 2015 called for above average temperatures in most of Minnesota, eastern North and South Dakota, northern and central Iowa, Wisconsin and the northern half of Illinois.

      The U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday, March 5 listed abnormally dry conditions for all of Minnesota, eastern and central North and South Dakota and south central Wisconsin. The Palmer U.S. Drought Index listed a moderate drought for south-central and northwestern Minnesota Monday.

      Reply
      • james cole

         /  March 17, 2015

        North Eastern Minnesota is already starting to look dry. The snow was not heavy this winter and is all gone from the woods early. We had a touch of rain on Monday, but overall the rains are not coming and forecasts are dry going forward. The forests are setting up for wild fires, unless the patter changes. Drought could easily take hold after such sparse snowfall.
        Long term, we no longer have regular rain, not like we used to. Rain events were pretty much one out of every five days. Mild moderate rains, followed by 3-6 dry days. This patter is LONG GONE! In the 90’s and 00’s, we get rain once a month or once every two months, and it usually is a downpour event. Then weeks or months of dry days. The new normal is extended dry spells broken by major rain events. On wilderness canoe trips, the rule was rain one day and dry for two, then repeat. You could live by that cycle. In the last 20 years, mostly we just assume there will be no rain, and if there is, it will be a tropical downpour! The day long drizzle events, that were normal here, these never occur anymore.

        Reply
    • Where are you in Colorado, Bob? My brother lives in Denver and I’m going to visit on Wed. We spoke last night and he told me to pack shorts. He said the city was really warm, and even the mountains were pretty warm. This is partially a snowboard trip, and the mountains will still be cool at night, but the heat in Denver has me packing summer clothes. And here in Connecticut we are cheering when the forecast calls for 40s, and I’m doing my running in pants and sweatshirts.

      Reply
  12. Colorado Bob

     /  March 17, 2015

    Record heat destroys annual California poppy bloom

    The weekend’s unseasonable record heat has prematurely “cooked” the color right out of the annual bloom of California poppies in the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, which is normally covered in orange blossoms right about now.

    “We’re astonished to find that our big bloom of desert-adapted, ruggedly persistent poppies has been all but cooked away by the unseasonable heat we’ve had over the last week,” the reserve posted in a Bloom Status dated March 15.

    Until this past weekend — when temperatures in the reserve soared into the mid-eighties — the early bloom was considered the densest poppy crop seen in a decade.

    http://www.scpr.org/news/2015/03/16/50396/record-heat-destroys-annual-california-poppy-bloom/

    Reply
  13. rustj2015

     /  March 17, 2015

    And even God can’t stop a runaway train…reprise…
    http://boingboing.net/2015/03/16/nasa-study-reveals-new-threat.html

    Reply
    • I think I’m going to have to try to make it two articles tomorrow.

      Reply
      • Thank you for all your time and effort dedicated to this site, Robert. Truly. You do a fantastic job every time, and you have been cranking out a wide variety of quality coverage with impressive frequency. You as one man are better than the entire environmental dept of most papers/mainstream media I can think of.

        Reply
      • Promise to keep doing my best for you guys!

        Reply
  14. Greg

     /  March 17, 2015

    The New York Times does a piece on Al gore:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/17/science/the-new-optimism-of-al-gore.html?_r=0

    What I don’t get is that he, as the article confirms, has read and knows well, every bit of literature out there from the science community and can debate it ad nauseum, yet he is an optimist, certainly no idiot, and still working his butt off to educate everyone who will lead on the subject. He knows that renewables can’t do it alone. Why is he such an optimist? This is a central question that isn’t answered by this article. Does anyone know? The answer is central to me. While he is such a polarizing political figure on the topic of climate change he is also such a central figure for motivating and influencing outcomes.

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  March 17, 2015

      Right, he is a “polarizing figure” because the NYT has to provide some balance, however goofy, and because he’s the one politician who stood up and said, hey, this is really serious and we need to deal with it and not screw around. (I gather the jackasses who’ve been attacking him ever since are not polarizing, just him.)

      Reply
      • Have to agree here, climate hawk. Why was he polarizing? Because jackasses decided not to listen to science and base common sense.

        Reply
    • Why is he optimist? Because human beings are optimistic by nature!😉

      Alex

      Reply
    • He’s optimistic because he knows we can switch to renewables, thereby taking down about 80 percent of the human emission, change land use, change agriculture, and work on methods that directly draw carbon out of the air to end up as net carbon negative. I think that he is also optimistic because he has to be.

      Reply
    • wili

       /  March 17, 2015

      “Pessimism of the spirit; optimism of the will.”
      ― Antonio Gramsci

      Reply
  15. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Spring gets set to sizzle as temperatures rise in time for Easter Mon, Mar 2, 2015
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/561278/Spring-set-sizzle-Easter-weather-forecast-summer
    Temperatures are predicted to start rising significantly at the beginning of next month with much of the country in for weeks of sunshine.
    The long-range forecasts of an above-average 70F (21C) temperature for Easter – in early April – have sparked hopes of a long hot summer….

    The cheery early summer outlook means Britain could be in for a much-needed scorcher after last year’s lacklustre performance.

    “Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.”

    Reply
    • anthropocene

       /  March 17, 2015

      Please don’t post anything from the Express “newspaper”. You posted above a sign saying “Keep calm and stay grounded”. The Express is often not grounded (in reality). It is a very right wing newspaper which is (in)famous for continuously posting headlines about future weather from long range forecasts (usually ‘cold arctic blast set to hit the UK’). These are posted as fact with no reference to the probabilities assigned to the forecast. I suspect that the theory is that if it comes to pass then they can say “You heard it here first”. If it is hopelessly wrong then “What do the weather forecasters know”. Unfortunately many of the Express readers (mainly elderly) will conflate meteorology and climate change forecasting and so science in general is besmirched.

      Reply
      • Mblanc

         /  March 18, 2015

        Its true, its almost as if the Express has a default weather forecast shock front page, which it sometimes ditches for stories about immigrants, social security ‘scroungers’ and other nonsense.

        Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 17, 2015

      Thanks for the pointers. Never read the Express; poking around a bit, see that it’s a tabloid in the style of The Mirror. Poking around a bit, see that the basic info presented in that piece is consistent with other venues’ presentation, however it all sources from “Jim Dale” at “British Weather Services”. Cannot find much on “British Weather Services”.
      Are you familiiar with “British Weather Services”? It appears to be a one-man band: Jim Dale.
      Is he credible? Here’s the site:
      http://www.britishweatherservices.co.uk/

      Did you note my comment below the outtakes from the article? That’s an editorial on the slant of the content. 😉

      Would appreciate more evaulation on “British Weather Services”.
      Thanks again.

      Reply
      • Anthropocene

         /  March 17, 2015

        Don’t know much about them apart from what can be read from the website. There was a (brief) discussion on ‘private’ weather companies on this blog some months ago. I am deeply suspicious of anything they say: Both because they are likely to exaggerate anything they say in order to get column inches and therefore (free) publicity and also they have a inbuilt interest in hyping the impact of the weather. Interestingly one of their USPs seems to be that they think that companies under-estimate the impact that weather events have on their business and presumably that if businesses have advanced notice of those events it could be a competitive advantage. I wonder whether they think the same about climate change?

        Reply
  16. Ouse M.D.

     /  March 17, 2015

    Northern hemisphere temp anomalis pushing steadily well above 1 Celsius…

    Reply
  17. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Hybrid Pervoskite Research Sheds New Light On Cost Effective Solar Power Mar 17 2015
    http://www.piercepioneer.com/hybrid-pervoskite-research-sheds-new-light-on-cost-effective-solar-power/38994
    Researchers are presently working on a project to discover the secrets of crystalline materials known as hybrid perovskites. The hope is that by uncovering these secrets, engineers can develop more affordable and more efficient solar power.

    And it has only taken the last five years to develop hybrid perovskite solar cells that have the same power conversion efficiencies as other materials—except that those materials may have taken more than 10 years to develop….

    Reply
  18. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Climate change to result in tasteless, poor-quality food March 16, 2015
    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-climate-result-tasteless-poor-quality-food.html
    Tasteless carrots, bad pizza dough and poor quality steak are some of the impacts we can expect from Australia’s changing climate, according to the new scientific report released today to mark the launch of this year’s Earth Hour.

    From wheat, seafood and dairy products to poultry, meat, grains, and fruit and vegetables, the effects of global warming on a list of fifty-five household food items has been compiled for the very first time.

    “It’s definitely a wake up call when you hear that the toast and raspberry jam you have for breakfast, for example, might not be as readily available in 50 years time,” said Associate Professor Richard Eckard from the University of Melbourne….

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  March 17, 2015

      Love the jam quote. Yeah, if the earth collapsing around you doesn’t make an impression, just wait till you look for the jam.

      Reply
  19. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Arctic-melt Will Land us Amidst Long Summer Heat Waves March 16, 2015
    http://www.smnweekly.com/arctic-melt-will-land-us-amidst-long-summer-heat-waves/21990/
    Scientists from Germany have proven that the United States and Europe are going to have longer heat waves in 2015 that the summer winds that carry cool breeze have weakened because of climate changes. Scientists from the Climate Impact Research Potsdam Institute have revealed in a study that is published on March 12 that the Arctic warming obviously disrupts the air stream that substantially decrease the summer storms….

    “Unabated climate change will probably further weaken summer circulation patterns which could thus aggravate the risk of heat waves. Remarkably, climate simulations for the next decades, the CMIP5, show the same link that we found in observations. So the warm temperature extremes we’ve experienced in recent years might be just a beginning,” said co-author Jascha Lehmann.

    “From whichever angle we look at the heat extremes, the evidence we find points in the same direction. The heat extremes do not just increase because we’re warming the planet, but because climate change disturbs airstreams that are important for shaping our weather. The reduced day-to-day variability that we observed makes weather more persistent, resulting in heat extremes on monthly timescales. So the risk of high-impact heat waves is likely to increase,” said Coumou.

    Reply
    • I think this represents another point in the Dr Francis column.

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  March 17, 2015

        Yep. FWIW, I believe this is an example of robot-written news copy, which seems frequent on SMN Weekly. Not to say it’s not accurate, I just enjoy detecting what I think is the hand of AI for the likely-short time while that’s possible.

        Reply
      • Ouse M.D.

         /  March 17, 2015

        All acknowledgements to Dr Jennifer Francis!
        I don’t know if she touched on the issue but the increased waviness of the jetstream works in the direction of reaching a temperature equlibrium in the Northern Hemisphere.
        In other words: to uniformize the whole NH temperatures.
        That’s why we are hitting above 1 C right now….

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 17, 2015

        “All acknowledgements to Dr Jennifer Francis!”

        Arctic Melt Leads to Heat Waves Says Study 11.12.2013
        http://www.reportingclimatescience.com/news-stories/article/arctic-melt-leads-to-heat-waves-says-study.html
        Professor Tang Qiuhong’s group from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with Research Professor Jennifer A. Francis of Rutgers University, combined satellite observations of snow cover and Arctic sea-ice extent with atmospheric reanalysis data to demonstrate the linkages between summer weather patterns in mid-latitudes and cryosphere loss.

        Reply
      • It’s the strong meridional patterns and blocking highs that tend to form in the ridge structures. You get under one of those during summer and look out, it’s going to be hot as blazes. Advancing arms of the Walker Cell destabilizing and ripping the Polar Cell apart.

        Reply
  20. joni

     /  March 17, 2015

    Plans To Explore For Oil Offshore Worry East Coast Residents

    http://www.npr.org/2015/03/12/392383373/plans-to-explore-for-oil-offshore-worry-east-coast-residents

    “As the Obama administration opens the door to offshore drilling, the oil industry is promising more jobs and less reliance on foreign oil. Some people who live along the Eastern Seaboard are saying, “no thanks.”

    Coastal towns and cities in several states are formally opposing offshore drilling and oil exploration.

    Tybee Island, Ga., is a short drive across the marsh from the historic city of Savannah. The island is dotted with hotels and tiny vacation cottages for tourists — and for about 3,000 people, it’s home.

    Wolff worries about a federal proposal to open up areas at least 50 miles off the coast of Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia to oil and gas development. Federal regulators say drilling wouldn’t happen for several years at least, but many companies want to start surveying for oil now.

    Wolff says an offshore oil boom could threaten marine animals — and the island’s thriving tourism industry.

    “We make a lot of money and a lot of folks on Tybee support their families by doing dolphin tours; I don’t want to take a chance on hurting that for anybody,” he says.

    Earlier this year, Wolff sponsored a resolution opposing both offshore drilling and seismic air guns. That’s a technique that blasts sound waves into the ocean every 15 seconds or so, to search for oil and gas deposits.”

    Reply
  21. Kevin Jones

     /  March 17, 2015

    If March comes in at +.6C , which it certainly will, it will be 8 straight months to do so. Old record (tie) 1998 and past seven. ( i.e.coolest month at least +.6C.)

    Reply
    • March has been very warm thus far.

      Reply
      • bassman

         /  March 18, 2015

        Everything I have looked at suggests a .74 anomaly or higher. Ocean temps may be getting warmer as we speak.

        Reply
      • bassman

         /  March 18, 2015

        I should add that the Met office had 2015 coming in 3rd for ocean surface temps in March (behind the el nino fueled March of 1998 and 2010). NOAA should show something similar for March 2015. If the atmosphere responds to this el Nino in late march as many on the arctic sea ice blog seem to think will happen based on wind/cloud and other forecasts suggest, then 2015 is going to be an impressive year for records. I feel like a broken record saying this as I feel we have been waiting on this el nino for over a year now.

        Ocean surface temps will likely soar into the summer and fall breaking the records from 2014 and cementing 2015 as a much warmer year than 2014 if the nino forms.

        Reply
  22. Kevin Jones

     /  March 17, 2015

    Sorry. GISS LOTI data.

    Reply
  23. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Record-Breaking Heat; 90-Degree Heat Reported in Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas Mar 17 2015
    http://www.weather.com/forecast/national/news/spring-fever-warm-up-midwest-march2015

    Reply
  24. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    “Actual high temperatures on Monday March 16, 2015. Note the 80s and 90s in the Plains states.”

    Reply
    • Andy in San Diego

       /  March 18, 2015

      That cranks up the melt / run-off. This leaves less time for absorption in the soil from any snow or latent moisture.

      Reply
  25. I suppose that all of that heat means more evaporation from water ways and plants which will inject even more moisture into an already saturated (heat/moisture) atmosphere.
    Then the ground level dust will become particulate and will cycle into the atmosphere as well.
    Etc.

    Reply
  26. eleggua

     /  March 17, 2015

    Eclipse 2015: take part in the world’s biggest eclipse weather experiment
    University of Reading 04 March 2015
    http://www.reading.ac.uk/news-and-events/releases/PR625064.aspx
    Scientists at the University of Reading are turning the skies of Britain into a giant weather experiment as the country experiences a rare solar eclipse later this month – but they need your help.

    The British Isles will be plunged into twighlight-like partial darkness at around 9.30am on Friday, 20 March 2015 as the country experiences a solar eclipse for the first time since 1999.

    Meteorologists are planning the biggest eclipse weather experiment ever attempted. Now they are recruiting an army of citizen scientists across the UK to observe weather conditions such as clouds, wind and temperature.

    Anyone, including children, can take part – even if, on the day, it is cloudy or raining. All the observations from across the UK will be combined with other data to provide the most detailed picture of the effects of an eclipse on the weather ever assembled. This will help scientists gain crucial insights into how our atmosphere, and our weather, works.

    Organisers are particularly keen to get the help of school pupils, who will be able to learn first-hand about science by participating in a world-leading weather experiment.

    The eclipse is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to conduct the experiment, as there will not be another partial eclipse in the UK until 2026.

    It will be possible to take part using simple instruments, or even just with observations made without any instruments at all. However, organisers are reminding participants never to look directly at the sun at any time, even for a second, as direct sunlight can permanently damage your eyes….

    Reply
  27. Mark from New England

     /  March 17, 2015

    Good article by Joe Romm here on the decrease in arctic summer sea ice, jet stream changes and the persistent drought in California:

    “Climatologist Who Predicted California Drought 10 Years Ago Says It May Soon Be ‘Even More Dire” –

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/03/07/3370481/california-drought/

    If someone beat me to this, sorry bout’ that.

    Reply
    • Griffin

       /  March 17, 2015

      Amazing and frightening that an article from last year can look and feel like it was written today. Shows how bad the situation out west really is.

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  March 17, 2015

        I didn’t initially notice the 2014 date! Somehow I hit the link to the article while looking for news. Yes, you’re right – it reads like it was written THIS March.

        Reply
  28. james cole

     /  March 17, 2015

    ” The budgets of both the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense have landed themselves in the crosshairs of Republican budget slicers, but not for reasons you might expect: The GOP isn’t happy with the money the two national security agencies are spending on climate-change research”

    We have representatives of the electorate who are obviously totally corrupted by big money flowing from legal but undisclosed corporate interests. How else explain this attempt to stifle important national security research? These Senators and Congressmen have sworn an oath, I maintain that they have gone back on it, and all for the ocean of campaign monies that fossil fuel industry gives them in return for their votes in congress.

    Reply
  29. Kevin Jones

     /  March 17, 2015

    james cole: You maintain correctly. I call it High Treason.

    Reply
    • Don’t leave out evil. Evil does happen.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  March 17, 2015

      There really is no other way to call it.

      Reply
      • Or evil that is emboldened, and enabled by a dysfunctional populace. And with lethal consequences for all.
        A bizarre and tragic circumstance at any rate.

        Peace.

        Reply
      • A few years ago I had a back-and-forth with Lars Svendsen about the inherent evil of preventable climate change.
        At the time he couldn’t quite agree that it was evil, or my contention that it was worse than evil.
        If anyone wants to take the time, here’s a good lecture by him.
        Uploaded on Jun 22, 2010

        Acclaimed Norwegian philosopher and academic, Lars Svendsen, discusses the fact that despite the overuse of the word in movies, political speeches, and news reports, “evil” is generally seen as either flagrant rhetoric or else an outdated concept: a medieval holdover with no bearing on our complex everyday reality.

        Lars Svendsen: The Nature of Evil

        Reply
    • entropicman

       /  March 17, 2015

      Few people regard themselves as evil. Even Senator Inhofe probably believes he is acting “for the greater good”.

      Reply
      • I have a hard time believing Inhofe even knows how to think. He is devious for sure. Deep thought would likely have him hiding under this bed.

        Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 18, 2015

      Oh, what a beautiful mourning.

      Reply
    • rustj2015

       /  March 18, 2015

      Well, DTLange, did you get an answer from the philosopher about those whose idealism, or at least their “urge” to better their (own) lives results in evil?
      I slogged through this presentation, with some reservations to his statements and ideas, certainly with that question constantly present. So: evil acts but not evil people? But this view is not easily apparent, as I accept Professor Svendson’s assertion that we are all of these sorts, in differing amounts, but also that Ms. Arendt’s assertion that our acts are acceptable because we lack the courage to accept that, and halt acts, as best we can. It has been stated that we are all, so far as our own energy, food, shelter, economy is within and not external to the global mechanisms of production, complicit.
      I slogged through it with the lump in my gut that I have not done other things, perhaps also of some degree of evil, perhaps taking responsibility for maintaining some conditions of “good life.”

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 19, 2015

        Can an Evil Man Change? The Repentance of Eugene de Kock MARCH 13, 2015
        http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/14/opinion/sunday/the-repentance-of-eugene-de-kock-apartheid-assassin.html?_r=0
        South Africa’s most notorious apartheid-era assassin, Eugene de Kock, has received parole after spending 20 years in prison. The government’s decision to let him walk free has unleashed a sort of identity crisis among South Africans. Could a man once known as “Prime Evil” really have changed? Why are we showing such charity to the deadliest cog in apartheid’s racist machine? And more important, why are so many South Africans — mostly white — so angry that this specific prisoner has been freed?…

        Mr. de Kock disclosed the full scope of his crimes as part of his testimony before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as both an amnesty applicant and an expert witness. This commission was set up as an example of restorative justice — granting amnesty to perpetrators of violence after they confessed in public. By telling the truth and proving that a crime was committed for political reasons, a perpetrator could receive relief from civil and criminal prosecution. Witnesses and victims of gross human rights violations also testified before the commission, and some received reparations.

        As a reporter covering the often heart-rending hearings in the 1990s, I watched Mr. de Kock calmly correct facts, expose lies and name superiors who then quickly had to apply for amnesty themselves. He became the polygraph machine of the commission. Without him the “truth” part of the T.R.C. would have been sorely lacking….

        Then the unthinkable happened. With his intimate knowledge of apartheid-era security agencies, he began to assist victims in finding the remains of loved ones. He provided answers and pointed to places where bodies could be found. Mr. de Kock openly confessed his regret directly to victims and admitted that nothing could redeem him. This contrasted sharply with many of his commanders, who openly refused to apply for amnesty, or the politicians who denied that he had carried out their orders….

        South Africans are obsessed with Mr. de Kock because his case presents us with ethical dilemmas that fundamentally challenge our ways of thinking. Some people dismiss him as a psychopath merely playing at repentance, others believe he has indeed changed….

        The underlying goal of the T.R.C. was to build a new ethical society through change: The truth about our past should transform all of us from a people apart into a people who care for one another.

        Mr. de Kock is a problem for South African society precisely because he presents the capacity of an evil man to change.

        But his parole also reminds us of something more universal: the different life he might have led, had he grown up in a different and more just society. What would he and many others have become if they were not schooled in racism, indoctrinated through religion and educated into violence to protect an unequal social order? And how much of this violence perpetrated by past generations has remained in today’s young men? The increasing number of family murders committed by young Afrikaner men in recent years (Oscar Pistorius is just the most famous of several accused) confronts us with the challenge of changing a culture that propagates machismo and violence in order to protect privilege.

        It should continue to torment us that many people like Mr. de Kock who have been jailed as terrorists, guerrillas or fanatics might have — in a different world — become soft-spoken, kind and caring men.

        Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  March 18, 2015

      For a few years, but not too much longer…

      Reply
    • james cole

       /  March 18, 2015

      ” Florida has banned the phrase “climate change,” at least as far as the staff of the state’s environmental agency are concerned. Also “global warming.” And “sustainability” is verboten, too, according to an investigative report in the Miami Herald.”

      Reply
  30. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Federal agency: Starving sea lions, seabirds may mark big shift to warmer, more barren Pacific

    Starving sea lion pups and seabirds up and down the West Coast this year may be part of a large-scale shift of the Pacific Ocean to warmer and less productive conditions, according to a new federal fisheries report.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented the findings on the warming Pacific in an annual report on the state of the waters off California.

    “We are in some ways entering a situation we haven’t seen before,” Cisco Werner, director of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California, said in a statement from NOAA. The situation demands that scientists consider the impact on ocean life as a whole, Werner said.

    From 2014, waters off Southern California and the Gulf of Alaska turned significantly warmer than usual. The so-called “warm blobs” have grown to cover most of the West Coast, making for record-high water temperatures.

    http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/6985af92541a449d8da106ad56d08188/CA–Warming-Pacific-Dying-Sealife

    Reply
    • Yeah, this has been building up for for quite a while. We are in an undeclared state of climate emergency.

      Reply
    • Apneaman

       /  March 18, 2015

      Sea Lions fight back?

      Sea lion flash mobs prey on fishermen’s catch (with video)

      Smart, determined sea lions learn how to jump in and out of commercial seine nets to exploit herring catches in the Strait of Georgia

      http://www.thestarphoenix.com/technology/lion+flash+mobs+prey+fishermen+catch/10800488/story.html

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 18, 2015

        The fishermen are being respectful; not harming the crafty creatures.

        …Morton says they’ve learned to live with the marine mammals and when one occasionally gets its teeth caught in the seine it is safely removed by adjusting the net or spraying the animal with a hose. Some fishermen bang the ship’s steel bollards with a hammer to try to scare the sea lions away.
        “We put up with them,” he said. “But there are so many now. It’s amazing, actually.”

        Party time for pinnipeds!
        It may also be a case of the animals just finding it a lot of fun, leaping over and being with all these fish. Like it’s party time, everyone is excited.”

        …marine mammal populations are increasing in the Strait of Georgia and … humans must adapt. “Things have changed. It’s important to realize this is the new normal. Marine mammals have come back. It’s now a question of how to coexist with them, whether it means changing where or how one fishes or just being prepared to give up a certain portion of the catch.”

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 18, 2015

        Russian Fisherman Accidentally Catch A Sea Lion; the Sea Lion is not amused

        Reply
  31. On some days I think of people like Pliny the Elder as someone to admire and feel a certain connection with. Me, I’m just a field naturalist busy body trying to make sense of a crazy world doing havoc on the natural world. Others here may also connect.

    Back to Pliny the Elder (Pardon while I copy & paste from a short PBS description.):

    Solder, lawyer and writer, Pliny the Elder (23 79 AD) research into the natural world formed the basis of scientific authority for centuries to come. He died during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

    Historia Naturalis

    During this time, he wrote extensively on subjects as varied as grammar, the history of Rome, and military history and skills. His most famous work, however, was Historia Naturalis (Natural History), an encyclopedia of natural science that spanned thirty-seven books.

    In this work, Pliny describes in detail the physical nature of the world. It includes books on geography, anthropology, zoology, botany, and the medicinal uses of plants. Much of its importance lies in the way Pliny organized previously random facts and spotted important details which had been ignored by others.

    …Pliny returned to Rome to take up a number of official jobs.

    The last of these was commander of the fleet in the Bay of Naples, where his task was to stamp out piracy. While there, he heard of a strange cloud formation and was keen to discover for himself what was going on.

    Pompeii

    The clouds had been caused by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Pliny the Elder wanted to reassure the people of Pompeii and help his friends there out of any danger. Leaving his nephew, Pliny the Younger, at home to record what was happening, he sailed across to the base of the volcano to a friend’s house.

    Once there, he was overcome by the volcanic ash and died of asphyxiation, along with thousands of other people from Pompeii and its surrounding towns. The sky remained dark for three more days.

    http://www.pbs.org/empires/romans/empire/pliny_elder.html

    Reply
    • Other days I think of solitary figures like Edmund Dene Morel who was keeping the ledger for some of King Leopold’s enterprises in the Congo. He had a habit of noting certain details and trends.

      ‘It was while working as a young clerk for the shipping company Elder Dempster that Edmund Dene Morel first realized that something was wrong. He supervised the shipments to and from the Congo Free State and he noticed that despite the enormous influx of rubber and ivory, two very lucrative trade items, the only things being shipped back to the Congo in abundance were soldiers, guns, and ammunition. Morel also noticed that the shipping accounts he managed did not match up to the official trade statistics of the Congo Free State: there was a significantly higher percentage of capital flowing out of the Congo than into it. It was while working for Elder Dempster that E.D. Morel realized that the ivory and rubber coming out of the Congo were being extracted by slave labor.’

      williammorrisonproject-wordpress-com

      – Of course barbaric atrocities were the order of day — elephants slaughtered for their tusks, limbs hacked off slave workers, others shot dead for moving too slow, etc. Next, though, was the thirst for rubber — for tires for white people which, of course, helped propel the fossil fuel frenzy now condemning us.
      We have a long lineage of barbarity just as we have people like Edmund Morel, and others, who to take the time to notice — and talk about it.

      https://williammorrisonproject.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/tumorel.jpg?w=157&h=229

      Reply
      • wili

         /  March 18, 2015

        Ah, two of my heroes. I, on the other hand, feel in turns like Pliny the younger, watching and recording as all that is dear to him is incinerated, and King Leopold himself–completely knowledgeable of and complicit in horrific destruction that he hides from others (and even from himself no doubt at some level), while putting the best possible gloss on all he does. ‘-) :-/

        Reply
  32. Phil

     /  March 18, 2015

    I saw a report today on the Arctic Sea Ice Forum that a cyclone is affecting sea ice in Hudson Bay area, causing an overall drop in both extent and area of around 36K offsetting partially some of the more recent gains.

    Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Delta smelt on brink of extinction due to drought

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KGO) —
    The California drought may have pushed a tiny fish species to the point of no return.

    In a recent survey, researchers found only six Delta smelt in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta when there should be thousands of them.

    The smelt population has been declining for 30 years, but a biologist at UC Davis says it’s now on the verge of extinction.

    To protect the smelt, state water officials must shut down the massive pumps that send water to farmers in the Central Valley.

    If the smelt is declared extinct, it could change how the state’s water supply is managed.

    http://abc7news.com/science/delta-smelt-on-brink-of-extinction-due-to-drought/562216/

    Reply
    • A lot of other sea creatures depend on the smelt for survival. If the smelt go so do many other ocean species — and on up the food chain.
      Otherwise, all hell-in-California-agribusiness will break loose if the water pumps are shut down.
      But then again, with SLR and saltwater intrusion the pumps will have to go. The pumps don’t just pump — they suck water into their intakes first.
      California has been playing this water roulette for a long time.

      Reply
  34. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Patagonia forest fires may be worst in Argentina’s history

    The worst of these fires has passed, leaving vast tracts of land and trees that are thousands of years old completely destroyed. A lack of rain has contributed to the fires.

    Read more: http://www.cctv-america.com/2015/03/06/patagonia-forest-fires-may-be-worst-in-argentinas-history#ixzz3UjwT76ta

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 18, 2015

      Socioenvironmental Catastrophe Emerges from the Ashes of Patagonia’s Forests

      BUENOS AIRES, Mar 17 2015 (IPS) – In the wake of the fire that destroyed more than 34,000 hectares of forests, some of them ancient, in Argentina’s southern Patagonia region, the authorities will have to put out flames that are no less serious: the new socio-environmental catastrophe that will emerge from the ashes.

      The worst forest fire in the history of the country will take a while longer to fully extinguish in the area surrounding Cholila, a town set amidst the lakes, valleys and mountains in the northwest part of the southern province of Chubut. Its 2,000 residents are longing for the start of the rainy season in April in this region that borders Chile and the Andes mountains.

      But in the town, which counts among its tourist attractions the fact that the legendary U.S. outlaws Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid bought a ranch in Cholila in 1902, as a hideout, the big fear now is what will come after the fire.

      The blaze broke out on Feb. 15 and was officially extinguished on Mar. 6, although there are still some hot spots, predicted to burn for another few weeks, according to experts.

      http://www.ipsnews.net/2015/03/socioenvironmental-catastrophe-emerges-from-the-ashes-of-patagonias-forests/

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 18, 2015

        It also killed, or drove away, endemic fauna such as tiny pudu deer, lizards, birds and foxes, and endangered species like the rare huemul or south Andean deer….

        …everyone knew this was “a critical year” because of a phenomenon that occurs every half century: the flowering and death of the Chilean feather bamboo, which produces an enormous amount of highly flammable dry vegetation.

        There was also a severe drought and climate conditions that favoured strong winds and high temperatures in the southern hemisphere summer, “which were decisive for the expansion of the fire,” that at one point was spreading at one kilometre per hour….

        The government sacked the official responsible for the National Fire Management Plan over errors in how the fire was handled, and stated that it had been intentionally set.

        That is also the conclusion of Chubut Governor Martín Buzzi, who said the fire was linked to the real estate business, which due to the ban on cutting down trees, protected as part of the country’s natural heritage, “makes them disappear.”

        To curb the land speculation, Buzzi announced measures such as a 10-year moratorium on selling or transferring land with forests that have been burnt, and the creation of an investigative committee…

        Fernández said the “green business” involves everything from country clubs and tourist developments to the forestry industry, which “needs to eliminate native species” in order to introduce commercial timber like pine. “The common denominator is the clearing of forests,” he added….

        Reply
  35. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Scientists have obtained the most detailed views yet of ice deposits inside the permanently shadowed craters at Mercury’s north pole.

    Link
    “You could be forgiven for wondering how a planet where temperatures soar above 400C could host water-ice.”

    Answer :
    No atmosphere.

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 18, 2015

      Fascinating. Adds a great retort to deniers along with the fact that Venus is hotter than Mercury and is further from the Sun due to CO2. Love asking a denier to explain the Venus phenomena and, while they are staring blankly at me, I’ll now throw the ice on North pole of Mercury to finish ’em off. Thanks Bob!

      Reply
      • Exactly. Deniers don’t just deny AGW. They flat out deny physics, chemistry, thermodynamics, geology, basically science and reality in general. Ask them to explain anything and you’ll get a blank stare…after they call Obama a communist socialist who is secretly a Muslim from Kenya working for Al Quaeda. They are completely detached from reality and totally impervious to any facts or reason.

        Reply
  36. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Divers will brave Arctic ice to unlock secret of Franklin’s doomed voyage

    Navy divers and marine archaeologists are about to attempt a daring feat of polar exploration. In a few weeks they will drill beneath the thick ice in the remote Canadian Arctic and in freezing water explore the wreck of the Erebus, flagship of Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition to discover the North-West Passage.

    Link

    Reply
  37. eric smith

     /  March 18, 2015

    Robert,
    I think the Eastern US has been cold the past two winters because the Pacific has been storing the heat that has been building. But now it is so warm it is pushing atmospheric temps higher and this warm air is rushing to the North Pole and it pushes cold Arctic air to the south into Canada and the US. Do you agree? If so why does this warm air tend to rush to the poles? What is the mechanism at work here?

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 18, 2015

      eric smith

      Heat seeks cold.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 18, 2015

        The law of opposites.

        Reply
      • – I wonder if there are some katabatic forces at work as well that help the process along.

        Katabatic wind (from the Greek: katabaino – to go down) is the generic term for downslope winds flowing from high elevations of mountains, plateaus, and hills down their slopes to the valleys or planes below. Katabatic winds exist in many parts of the World and there are many different names for katabatic winds depending where they are located and how they are formed.

        …Cold and usually dry katabatic winds, like the Bora, result from the downslope gravity flow of cold, dense air. Katabatic flows slumping down from uplands or mountains may be funneled and strengthened by the landscape and are then known as mountain gap wind such as the Santa Ana, mountain breeze or drainage wind. The gentler katabatic flows of hill slopes produce frost hollows. Mountain breezes are part of a local wind system. When the mountainside is heated by the Sun the mountain breeze will break down, reverse and blowing upslope. These winds are known as valley wind or anabatic wind.

        Reply
      • Apneaman

         /  March 18, 2015

        Heat seeks cold. Bob your repeating that along with your opening the window when the air conditioning is running on a hot day example worked for me. It brought together and simplified a lot of technical stuff. When your a grade nine drop out like me who was always bored to death with science class, but years later became fascinated and started learning on my own scheduled, I find I missing some of the foundational stuff made it harder.

        Reply
    • Eric —

      We have warming at the pole, which weakens the Jet and facilitates persistent high amplitude ridges and troughs. We have a warm pool of water off the US West Coast which facilitates south to north meridional flows associated with the strong western ridge. This ridge exploits the related weakness in the polar Jet. Another meridional flow has tended to develop over the Atlantic — consistently pumping warm air over the Barents and Svalbard.

      The resulting pinchers of warm air have driven cold air about 1500 miles south toward a new haven near Greenland. The U.S. eastern half has seen this displacement in the form of colder winter temps and much more extreme winter weather. The US west is comparatively hot and drive and the North Atlantic is increasingly stormy.

      Reply
  38. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Supply barge adrift in the Arctic for months

    The company says it will try a recovery in July. A spokesman for the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Colorado suggests the barge could circle the Arctic if it gets caught in the trans-polar drift stream and come out on the Atlantic side, possibly through the Fram Strait between Spitzbergen and Greenland, depending on the weather

    But as NSIDC Director Mark Serreze, says, they’ve been getting “crazy weather patterns in the Arctic as of late.”

    The drifting barge has traveled somewhat erratically about 1,360 miles since it broke free, being pushed at times west, at times north, then further west by winds, ocean current, and the drifting icepack.

    Reply
  39. rustj2015

     /  March 18, 2015

    Of some note (though out of synch on this writing):
    Microbial hotspots
    Article details importance of methane seeps in microbial biodiversity of sea floor
    Biddle believes the data set created with her colleagues may offer an important window into understanding the current state of diversity and dispersal in the deep sea. This is particularly important, she said, because consumption of methane by microbes is an important control for methane concentrations from the seafloor.
    http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2015/mar/methane-seep-microbiome-031615.html

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 18, 2015

      Recent local sea floor mapping efforts by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration have led to discovery of new seeps up and down the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic coast.</b

      Reply
  40. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Strongest MJO Event on Record Boosts El Niño Odds

    By: Dr. Jeff Masters ,

    The Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a pattern of increased thunderstorm activity near the Equator that moves around the globe in 30 – 60 days, and has many important impacts on weather patterns world-wide. For example, when the area of increased thunderstorms associated with the MJO is located in a particular ocean basin, the odds of tropical cyclone formation increase there. Scientists use the Wheeler-Hendon MJO index to monitor how strong the MJO is, and this week, the amplitude of the MJO set a new all-time record for the strongest MJO event observed since record keeping began in 1974 (with no data available from 3/17/1978-12/31/1978 due to satellite problems). The MJO index hit 4.09 on March 15, 2015, beating the old record of 4.01 set on February 14, 1985. On March 16, 2015, the MJO index set an even higher mark–4.67. That was likely the peak of this record MJO event, as the MJO index fell to 4.51 on March 17, and is forecast to drop significantly over the coming week. Thanks go to CSU’s Phil Klotzbach for alerting me to the MJO record.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2938

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  March 18, 2015

      I wonder if Jeff Masters is aware that this is appearing more like an ‘El Nino Modoki’ event than a more typical El Nino ‘Classico’. (see Robert’s recent article on the El Nino for background)

      Reply
  41. eleggua

     /  March 18, 2015

    Vanuatu disaster exposes limits of Australian internationalism March 17 2015
    http://theconversation.com/vanuatu-disaster-exposes-limits-of-australian-internationalism-38918
    in important ways, the disaster also exposes the limits of Australian internationalism.

    First, Australia’s disaster relief package masks the gutting of our aid program. While Australia’s leaders express concern for the people of Vanuatu, the welfare of poor states is a commitment from which Australia is walking away.

    In its first budget, the Abbott government announced a $7.6 billion cut to Australian aid over five years. This was the largest single saving announced in that budget.

    This action clearly paints a poor picture of our concern for vulnerable outsiders. But it also undermines the capacity of those in impoverished states to adapt to disasters. This is particularly the case in the Pacific, where the vulnerability of island nations to cyclones is a product of geography, rising sea levels and under-development.
    Pleas on climate change ignored

    Second, Australia’s domestic inaction on climate change – despite increasingly urgent warnings from Pacific island nations – exposes a lack of concern for the well-being of the most vulnerable. Vanuatu President Baldwin Lonsdale was quick to link Cyclone Pam to climate change, and he has a point. The scientific community has consistently identified an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as cyclones as a likely effect of climate change.

    We cannot say with certainty that this was an event caused by climate change. But we can say with confidence that this type of event will be both more likely and more severe in a climate-changed world, however unpopular such a position may be with Prime Minister Tony Abbott. This reality compels all states to consider the ways in which they can significantly reduce their greenhouse gas emissions – a consideration Australia is simply not taking seriously.

    No-one can reasonably make the case that concerted Australian action on climate change will be enough to prevent climate change or its effects. But Australia is not doing its fair share to reduce emissions, and its inaction makes a significant global agreement more difficult. As a wealthy nation with among the highest per capita emissions in the world, Australia has a particular obligation to provide leadership and to help significantly reduce global emissions….

    ….aid should ultimately be focused on the task of helping poor states and societies to develop. This in turn will help provide them with the resources to “weather the storm”: to limit the damage wrought by natural disasters and recover more quickly.

    Australian aid is not a charity. It is an obligation that is internationally codified and morally compelled by our wealth. This aid should be focused on long-term poverty reduction rather than high-profile disaster relief, however necessary (or popular) such measures may be.

    Australia needs to focus urgently on capacity-building in impoverished states, which will help such states in the region manage disaster. And, as a nation, Australia needs to do its fair share to limit the risk of such disasters in the future.

    Reply
  42. Amazon’s trees removed nearly a third less carbon in last decade – study

    “Dr Roel Brienen of Leeds University said the Amazon was responsible for one-fifth to one-quarter of carbon sequestered on land, so any decline in its efficiency as a carbon sink was of consequence to efforts to combat climate change.

    “If this trend continues then that is worrying because that means that basically the subsidies that we have been getting from nature – the forests that are taking up part of the emissions that we have been putting out into the atmosphere – if that is going to stop then that means that we have to make even stronger cuts in our CO2 emissions in order to keep the rate of climate change as low as possible,” ”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/mar/18/amazons-trees-remove-third-less-carbon-decade-ago-emissions

    Reply
  43. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Beer Makers Unite To Fight Climate Change

    Twenty-four beer brewers from across the US are are joining Ceres’ Climate Declaration, pledging to reduce emissions and take action on a national level to stop climate change.

    Ceres is a nonprofit coalition of companies, investors, and public interest groups dedicated to sustainability. The Brewery Climate Declaration is bringing together companies including Allagash, Aslan, Brewery Vivant, Guinness and Red Hook with a promise to find ways to be more efficient with their energy usage, water consumption and waste management in order to benefit the environment as well as their businesses.

    Link

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  March 18, 2015

      And Smuttynose out of Portsmouth, NH; the favorite beer of summering gray seals on the Isles of Shoals😉

      Reply
  44. corey

     /  March 18, 2015

    Sorry if this was already alluded to:

    http://insideclimatenews.org/news/18032015/fema-states-no-climate-planning-no-money

    (h/t Eli Rabett)

    Reply
    • Mark from New England

       /  March 18, 2015

      Excellent news. It’ll put those Republican governors in the hot seat – or wet seat…

      Reply
      • -From the news piece:

        Republican-led regions constitute eight of the top 10 recipients of this category of FEMA money between 2010 and 2014. Louisiana was No. 1, having received almost $1.1 billion from FEMA for hazard mitigation. New Jersey was third with nearly $379 million, and Texas fourth with almost $343 million.’

        Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 18, 2015

      Starting next year, the agency (FEMA) will approve disaster preparedness funds only for states whose governors approve hazard mitigation plans that address climate change.
      This may put several Republican governors who maintain the earth isn’t warming due to human activities, or prefer to do nothing about it, into a political bind. Their position may block their states’ access to hundreds of millions of dollars in FEMA funds. Over the past five years, the agency has awarded an average $1 billion a year in grants to states and territories for taking steps to mitigate the effects of disasters….

      Climate change affects droughts, rainfall and tornado activity. Fracking is being linked to more earthquakes, he said. “This could affect state leaders across the country.”

      Among those who could face a difficult decision are Republican Governors Rick Scott of Florida, Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Chris Christie of New Jersey, Greg Abbott of Texas and Pat McCrory of North Carolina—all of whom have denied man-made climate change or refused to take action. The states they lead face immediate threats from climate change.

      The five governors’ offices did not return requests for comment by press time….

      Reply
      • Jacob

         /  March 19, 2015

        Good for FEMA. I wonder if the GOP in Congress will try to defund FEMA like they want to do to the US military (specifically as it pertains to funding climate change research and mitigation).

        Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 19, 2015

      FEMA on Climate Change
      https://www.fema.gov/climate-change

      Reply
  45. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    The Joe Romm links are really interesting these days, somehow they always land on the “Yahoo” feed. And flight of “Yahoo Monkeys” never fail to fly in , and with their pretzel protractors , they “prove” that CO2 is not greenhouse gas, the Earth hasn’t warmed in 16, 17, 18 or 20 years, and that man is too puny to change the Earth.

    All of this got me to thinking about the background of the original flying monkeys:

    In the original Oz novels, the winged monkeys were just what the name implies: intelligent monkeys with bird-like wings. The Winged Monkeys were once a free people, living in the forests of Oz. They were carefree, but rather mischievous. One day the King of the Winged Monkeys, as a prank, tossed a richly dressed man into a river, ruining his costume of silk and velvet. The man whose name was Quelala was good natured enough, but his fiancée Gayelette was furious and punished the Winged Monkeys by making them the slaves to the Golden Cap she had prepared as a wedding present for her betrothed. The cap allows its possessor to command the winged monkeys three times.

    Winged Monkeys

    Reply
  46. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    Shell’s Global Warming Strategy Is Psychopathic & Paranoid, Says Former UK Climate Envoy

    Britain’s former top climate envoy has delivered a scathing review of the climate outlook of the fossil fuel industry, in general, and of oil giant Shell, in particular, whose global warming strategy he described as narcissistic, paranoid, and psychopathic in an open letter to the Dutch company’s CEO, Ben Van Beurden.

    Link

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 18, 2015

      he described as narcissistic, paranoid, and psychopathi

      Shell’s Global Warming Strategy Is Psychopathic & Paranoid, Says Former UK Climate Envoy

      Funny how oil has made everyone who runs it , that way . Somewhere in Hell, John D. Rockefeller is passing out dimes to the souls of of all the coal miners that fed the first railroad.

      Reply
  47. Colorado Bob

     /  March 18, 2015

    As snowfall records are set, ferry gets stuck in sea ice off Nova Scotia

    As meteorologist Bob Henson reports for Weather Underground, the same storm that pushed Boston over the top to its snowiest winter on record this weekend dumped nearly two feet of snow in Charlottetown.

    The city’s seasonal total snowfall this winter is 182 inches, or about 15 feet, which is about twice that seen in Boston. The city’s previous record, Henson writes, was 177.7 inches, set just last year.

    St. John in New Brunswick saw 170 inches of snow pile up so far this winter, beating the all-time seasonal total of 167 inches set in 1962-63. More snow may still fall in these areas this week and into mid-March, as the cold and stormy weather pattern across the East continues.
    http://mashable.com/2015/03/17/ferry-stuck-in-ice-off-nova-scotia/

    Reply
  48. Colorado Bob

     /  March 19, 2015

    As I read about the Totten findings, one article made great point.

    As the sheer mass of the ice in Antarctica melts , it’s mass lets sea water flow North. As it melts it has less gravitational “pull”. Sea water has a at a very high level around Antarctica due to it’s mass , but if it’s mass weakens the high water around the South Pole gets a “Get’s a of Jail Free Card”, this gravity question , ain’t in models , And as we all know water is fluid.
    Make no mistake –
    This idea ain’t in the models.

    Opps.

    Reply
  49. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    Gentle reminder.

    Tomorrow afternoon at 2 PM Pacific Standard Time, March 19th, 2015,
    Robert Scribbler will be appearing ‘live’ on air, on ‘The Visionary Activist Radio Show’
    on KPFA Free Public Radio, Berkeley, CA, USA.

    You can listen ‘live’ online here at 2PM PST:
    http://www.kpfa.org/

    or if in the Bay Area, on radio at 94.1 FM.

    If you’re unable to tune in ‘live’ at 2PM PST, the show will be available at the KPFA archives.

    Reply
  50. Andy in San Diego

     /  March 19, 2015

    suggestion for a posting.

    Are We Watching A Food Chain Collapse?

    What we may be observing is a collapse of a food chain before our eyes. Last year we saw the wholesale mass death of starfish / shell fish along the coast (Northern Cal up through BC). This was followed by mass deaths of fish (starting around Jun / 14). Now we are seeing seals perish in droves.

    Seals eat fish, bottom feeder fish eat star fish. With these predator dependencies, hypoxia influenced zones are able to spread their reach further. Combine that with species migration and an entire local ecosystem can become severely broken. A food chain with links missing here and there, spreading.

    Killer Whales eat seals, will they start to suffer next?

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 19, 2015

      Related:

      The Cove: Mercury Rising: A mini-documentary on the hazards of mercury in fish
      From the Producers of the Oscar nominated film, “The Cove”.
      It explores the dangers of mercury contamination and how it affects society and the global environment.
      In the U. S., eating tuna, swordfish and other high-mercury fish is the number one source of mercury exposure.


      …an anonymous experiment conducted by Japanese doctors whose mercury levels skyrocketed after they started eating a regular diet of tuna, which is considered to be a safe fish (levels rise as you go up the food chain).

      Mercury accumulates up the food chain, so large predators such as dolphins, tuna and swordfish tend to have the highest levels.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 19, 2015

      Phytoplankton’s Dramatic Decline: A Food Chain Crisis in the World’s Oceans July 29, 2010
      http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/phytoplankton-s-dramatic-decline-a-food-chain-crisis-in-the-world-s-oceans-a-709135.html
      It is the starting point for our oceans’ food chain. But stocks of phytoplankton have decreased by 40 percent since 1950, potentially as a result of global warming. It is an astonishing collapse, say researchers, and may have dramatic consequences for both the oceans and for humans….

      Reply
  51. Feeling ignored by government, Canadian academics offer their own climate policy

    Under the conservative government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Canada has become a tough and frustrating political environment for researchers trying to advance evidence-based policies to reduce emissions. The country has withdrawn from international climate pacts, muzzled government climate researchers, and put new regulatory efforts on the back burner. Now, one group of prominent Canadian academics is trying to change the dynamic by releasing its own set of climate policy recommendations for the nation.

    http://news.sciencemag.org/climate/2015/03/feeling-ignored-government-canadian-academics-offer-their-own-climate-policy

    Reply
  52. – More human meddling

    Pythons wipe out rabbits—and probably much more—in Everglades

    Everglades National Park, a world-renowned wetland in southern Florida, once abounded with rabbits, raccoons, muskrats, and other small mammals. But roughly 15 years ago, these species started to become scarce. About the same time, biologists noticed a boom in the population of a predator that had invaded the 64,238-hectare park: the Burmese python. Now, an experiment adds to the evidence that the pythons, which grow up to 5 meters long, are to blame for the collapse of the mammals’ populations.

    “There’s no question that this is an environmental disaster,” says J. D. Willson of the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, who was not involved in the study.

    The pythons are native to Southeast Asia and may have been released into the Everglades decades ago by people who kept them as exotic pets. From studying the stomach contents of dead snakes, biologists knew that they eat a variety of animals—even large alligators. But mammals account for 75% of their diet.

    http://news.sciencemag.org/environment/2015/03/pythons-wipe-out-rabbits-and-probably-much-more-everglades

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  March 19, 2015

      …here’s the real reason Ireland has no snakes… March 17, 2015
      http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/Science-Notebook/2015/0317/On-St.-Patrick-s-Day-here-s-the-real-reason-Ireland-has-no-snakes-video
      …Around 8,500 years ago, melting glaciers caused ocean levels to rise, cutting off the Emerald Isle. Some animals could still swim over, but scientists have never found a snake species that could migrate across open ocean. (For this reason, several other large islands don’t have snakes either, including Greenland, Iceland, and New Zealand.)….

      Many think the snake legend is symbolic. Several pagan religions in and around Ireland used serpent imagery. So when stories say that St. Patrick cast out the snakes, they actually mean that Christians cast out the pagans….

      Snakes have became a favorite pet among rich Irish, who enjoyed defying the legend by importing high-end species, according to a The New York Times report from 2013. But as Ireland’s economy turned several years ago, some snake owners couldn’t afford their scaled pets. Many snakes were set loose. “A California king snake was found [in 2012] in a vacant store in Dublin,” reports the Times, “a 15-foot python turned up in a garden in Mullingar, a corn snake was found in a trash bin in Clondalkin in South Dublin, and an aggressive rat snake was kept in a shed in County Meath.”

      Reply
  53. – And out west high in the Sierras in Reno, NV:

    Drought brings request for immediate water-use cut

    With the drought in its fourth year and this winter shaping up to be the driest yet, the major water provider for the Reno-Sparks area is asking folks to begin curbing water use immediately.

    The 118,000 homes and businesses served by the Truckee Meadows Water Authority are asked to reduce all water use by at least 10 percent from amounts consumed in 2013…

    Lake Tahoe, which dipped below its natural rim in October, cutting off flow into the Truckee River, will probably not rise above the rim at all in 2015…

    “I wouldn’t expect to see any water coming out of the lake,”…

    http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2015/03/18/drought-brings-request-immediate-water-use-cut/24990711/

    Reply
  54. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    These 15 animal species have the lowest chance for survival: Researchers urge to act 16-Mar-2015
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uosd-t1a031615.php
    …A new study shows that a subset of highly threatened species – in this case 841 – can be saved from extinction for about $1.3 billion a year. However, for 15 of them the chances of conservation success are really low….

    The 15 species with the lowest chances for survival in the wild and in zoos are:
    Amphibians:
    1. Bay Lycian salamander, Lyciasalamandra billae, Turkey.
    2. Perereca Bokermannohyla izecksohni, Brazil.
    3. Campo Grande tree frog, Hypsiboas dulcimer, Brazil.
    4. Santa Cruz dwarf frog, Physalaemus soaresi, Brazil.
    5. Zorro bubble-nest frog, Pseudophilautus zorro, Sri Lanka.
    6. Allobates juanii, Colombia.

    Birds:
    1. Ash’s lark, Mirafra ashi, Somalia.
    2. Tahiti monarch, Pomarea nigra, French Polynesia.
    3. Zino’s petrel, Pterodroma madeira, Madeira.
    4. Mascarene petrel, Pseudobulweria aterrima, Reunion Island.
    5. Wilkins’s finch, Nesospiza wilkinsi, Tristan da Cunha.
    6. Amsterdam albatross, Diomedea amsterdamensis, New Amsterdam (Amsterdam Island).

    Mammals:
    1. Mount Lefo brush-furred mouse, Lophuromys eisentrauti, Cameroon.
    2. Chiapan climbing rat, Tylomys bullaris, Mexico.
    3. Tropical pocket gopher, Geomys tropicalis.

    Their low chance for survival is due to at least two of the following factors:
    High probability of its habitat becoming urbanized
    Political instability in the site
    High costs of habitat protection and management.
    The opportunity of establishing an insurance population in zoos for these 15 species is low, due to high costs or lack of breeding expertise for the species.

    Reply
  55. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    Amazon’s carbon uptake declines as trees die faster 18 March 2015
    http://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3676/amazons_carbon_uptake_declines_as_trees_die_faster

    Reply
  56. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    Pesticides Not the Sole Culprit in Honey Bee Colony Declines March 18, 2015
    http://cmns.umd.edu/news-events/features/2877
    …“Everyone is pointing the finger at these insecticides. If you pull up a search on the Internet, that’s practically all anyone is talking about,” said Galen Dively, emeritus professor of entomology at UMD and lead author of the study. “This paper says no, it’s not the sole cause. It contributes, but there is a bigger picture.”…
    Dively and vanEngelsdorp both agree that a synergistic combination of many factors is most likely to blame for colony declines. Climate stress could be taking a toll, and malnutrition could be a factor as well. The latter is a particular concern for industrial bee colonies that are rented to large-scale agricultural operations. These bees spend much of their time eating pollen from one or two crops, which throws their diet out of balance….

    Reply
    • Phony…!

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 19, 2015

        You may be jumping the gun on that one, dt.
        Check out the folks that did the research.

        Reply
    • I did check them out. This ‘colony collapse’ is one thing but there are still a lot of dead bees when neonics have been used. Plus, no one seems to read the label on these insidious ‘cides sold in every (almost) big box nursery or hardware store, etc. It’s usually some property owner hiring some untrained peon with ‘GARDENER LANDSCAPER’ stenciled on the door of their pickup truck who does the damage.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 20, 2015

        I’m not defending toxic pesticides; horrid stuff. You’re totally correct about the ignorance of the ‘exterminators’.

        A friend, now deceased, put out a dollop of toothpaste every few days for the sugar ants that invaded his home; the ants fed exclusively on the toothpaste and kept away from the rest of the rest of the place. He squeezed the toothpaste on the tile floor in a bathroom. Rarely saw an ant anywhere else, except on the pheromone trail leading to and from the toothpaste and the side porch. He was a pest control expert by trade.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 20, 2015

        Paul Stamets patents “universal biopesticide” that Big Ag calls “the most disruptive technology that we have ever witnessed.” February 28, 2015
        http://exopermaculture.com/2015/02/28/paul-stamets-patents-universal-biopesticide-that-big-ag-calls-the-most-disruptive-technology-that-we-have-ever-witnessed/
        …Paul Stamets, the world’s leading mycologist, filed a patent in 2001 that was purposely given little attention. In the words of pesticide industry executives, this patent represents “The most disruptive technology that we have ever witnessed.” The biopesticides described in the patent reveals a near permanent, safe solution for over 200,000 species of insects and it all comes from a mushroom. After what is called ‘sporulation’ of a select entomopathogenic fungi (fungi that kill insects) the area becomes no longer suitable for any insect(s) the fungi are coded for. In addition, extracts of the entomopathogenic fungi can also steer insects in different directions.

        This literally is a paradigm shift away from the entire idea of pesticides. Instead of having an aim to kill all problematic insect, a farmer could simply disperse a solution of pre-sporulation fungi amongst the crops. The insects would then simply live their lives around the crops paying no attention to them. This simple idea flies in the face of the current, poorly thought-out, practice of spraying ever increasing amounts of pesticides on resistant bugs. Going further, this biopesticide would also eliminate the need for round-up ready GMO seeds and BT seeds that grow the pesticides in the crop needlessly endangering us, the consumer. Perhaps the most enticing element of this biopesticide fungi is that it’s essentially free. According to the patent, it can be “cultivated on agricultural waste.” We are looking at a 100% safe, natural technology that literally can end all GMO and pesticide manufacturers overnight with a new class of SMART Pesticides…..

        Due to the fact that they spend untold millions lobbying (purchasing) our politicians and regularly operate revolving doors between public and private positions means that only a paradigm shift will eliminate the entire industry. At that moment, which is approaching, pesticide manufacturers can decide if they would like to cease being the problem and assist in the solution.
        The good news is that whatever decision they choose won’t matter. A shift in consciousness around pesticide and GMO use eliminates their influence and knocks them off their fictitious monetary pedestals they believe to be sitting on.

        Reply
  57. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    The first European sea turtles became extinct due to changing sea level March 16 2015
    http://www.agenciasinc.es/en/News/The-first-European-sea-turtles-became-extinct-due-to-changing-sea-levels
    …Because of their dependency on coastal environments, the changes in the sea level which occurred at the end of the Jurassic period – around 145 million years ago – had a drastic impact upon the environments they lived in. As a result, “these turtles, in addition to other groups of sea reptiles, became extinct at that time,” Pérez-García confirms….

    Reply
  58. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    New lake surface temperature database will help in study of climate change

    A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985–2009 17 March 2015
    http://www.nature.com/articles/sdata20158
    …a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985–2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues….

    Reply
  59. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    Caserones mine in Chile fined for environmental failures Mar 19, 2015
    http://in.reuters.com/article/2015/03/19/us-chile-copper-caserones-idINKBN0MF07B20150319
    The Japanese-owned Caserones copper mine in northern Chile has been fined $11.9 million for breaching environmental rules, Chile’s environmental regulator said on Wednesday.
    The fine was for a number of infractions, including failure to implement mitigation measures to prevent the contamination of underground water supplies and the construction of unauthorized transmission lines, said the SMA regulator….

    “We believe this action by the regulator will not affect our mining license or operation of Caserones mine,” (Masayoshi Yamamoto, public relations manager at JX Nippon Mining & Metals in Tokyo) said, adding that the fine was partially factored into its profit forecast for this business year that ends on March 31.

    Grrrr. They should’ve been permanently put out of business.

    Reply
  60. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    NASA Sees Heavy Rainfall, Hot Towers in Tropical Cyclone Nathan Mar 18, 2015

    NASA-JAXA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite showed that the heaviest rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Nathan on March 18 at 0758 UTC (3:58 a.m. EDT) was falling at a rate of over 119 mm (4.7 inches) on the eastern side of Nathan’s eye.
    TRMM Precipitation Radar data were used to create a 3-D view of cyclone Nathan that showed storm heights in a rain band circling the storm’s northwestern side reached heights of over 16 km (9.9 miles).
    Those data also showed that storm tops in Nathan’s eyewall were reaching heights of over 13 km (8 miles).
    Towering thunderstorms like these near a tropical cyclone’s eye can be an indication of future intensification.

    Reply
  61. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate in the Anthropocene 2015-02-06
    http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/cdem.2014.19.issue-1-2/cdem-2014-0001/cdem-2014-0001.xml?format=INT
    Humankind actions are exerting increasing effect on the environment on all scales, in a lot of ways overcoming natural processes….

    Taking into account these and many other major and still growing footprints of human activities on earth and atmosphere without any doubt we can conclude that we are living in new geological epoch named by P. Crutzen and E. Stoermer in 2000 – “Anthropocene”. For the benefit of our children and their future, we must do more to struggle climate changes that have had occurred gradually over the last century.

    Reply
  62. eleggua

     /  March 19, 2015

    EPA debunks ‘chemtrails,’ further fueling conspiracy theories March 14, 2015
    http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2015/0314/EPA-debunks-chemtrails-further-fueling-conspiracy-theories-video

    Reply
    • climatehawk1

       /  March 19, 2015

      Huh, sounds like how Al Gore became “polarizing.”

      Reply
  63. Kevin Jones

     /  March 19, 2015

    Well the good news from Walnut Grove, Sacramento County California is that latest data (from January) show CO2 down from 453ppm to a mere 427ppm. CH4 down from 2500ppb to under 2100ppb. ESRL GMD (all kinds of atmospheric and hydrologic ‘experiments’ going on out there).

    Reply
  64. Kevin Jones

     /  March 19, 2015

    Balmy 55F in Moscow. 28F expected high southwest NH today.

    Reply
  65. – Palm oil from certain palm trees for consumer junk…

    Another Culprit Of Air Pollution: Palm Oil Used In Deodorants And Cookies

    To the growing list of human behavior causing pollution and climate change, you can add one more: unsustainable production of palm oil, needed for multiple consumer products from deodorants and toothpastes to cookies and chocolates.

    The Union of Concerned Scientists, a nonprofit science advocacy organization based in Cambridge, Mass., in a report says air pollution in South East Asia, including the infamous and debilitating haze that can grip the region, is caused by, amongst other things, unsustainable practices like deforestation, landscape fires and draining peatlands.

    “Now that palm oil is a common ingredient in everything from muffins to moisturizers, the demand for palm oil is increasing,” said Lael Goodman, analyst for the Tropical Forest and Climate Initiative and author of the report. ”In the scramble to meet demand, some oil palm plantations are using practices that contribute to climate change, endanger human health and weaken the economy. Ultimately, these unsustainable practices are making a lot of people sick.”

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghabahree/2015/03/19/another-culprit-of-air-pollution-palm-oil-used-in-deodorants-and-cookies/

    Reply
    • – Take a look at some Santa Barbara, California ‘palm oil’. Palm oil in a fossil fuel atmosphere.

      Reply
      • – See the palms that no one but me seemed to notice.

        http://windspiritkeeper.blogspot.com/p/palm-trees.html

        Reply
      • – The palm oil, or sap, oozing from the tree trunk is sticky. Soot in the local atmosphere adheres to the oil resulting in a very visible indicator of pollutants.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 19, 2015

        You might considering doing public presentations, dt. You’ve been keenly observing local effects of air polluntants, and have good images to back up your observations and conclusions.
        It’d be worthwhile, spreading the word, particularly in local communities, with particular focus toward mothers of school-age children and school teachers.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 19, 2015

        Pardon me if I’m assuming here. Perhaps you’re already doing such public presentations. 🙂

        Reply
      • eleggua, thanks but the short answer to ‘public presentations’ is yes and no. I have shared my evidence with public officials, and others. For the most part all seem to have a reasons for denials, acceptance, or excuses to allow it.
        Most people, when they find out what I’ve been up to, stop talking to me.
        One excuse sticks in my mind. The executive editor of the SB local independent weekly whom I was on friendly term flat out told me, “People don’t want to hear (see) bad news.”
        This sentiment is everywhere, along with denials or acceptance.
        So I find myself constantly strategising, and watching for opportunities.
        Peace

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  March 20, 2015

        Right on, dt; you’re welcome. Please keep strategizing and watching for the opportunities.
        As per the article on Paul Stamets’ biopestide that I just posted, a phase shift in consciousness is coming and receptivity to your presentation is in concert with the shift.

        Likely there’s a way to reframe the ‘bad’ news into good. The bad news isn’t a wall; it’s a door leading to better things, to goodness and good news. Showing others the door and inviting them through it is tricky but possible. You’ve got the goods, dt. Hopefully the way to present the door will soon be present for you.

        Reply
  66. — Smog: a dastardly four letter word for socially acceptable poison gas (w/ particulate). We could probably date the coinage of the word with the CO2 levels on the Keeling Curve — same age same cause, same drivers, flyers, etc. ad nauseum, et al.

    Toxic smog hits UK: Will your area be affected by the extreme air pollution?
    Health experts are warning the deadly smog could put thousands of ill and vulnerable Brits’ health at risk

    Experts have revealed the areas most likely to be affected by the toxic smog set to sweep the nation.

    And medics have warned it could put thousands of ill and vulnerable Brits’ health at risk.

    Doncaster and the surrounding areas will be the worst affected with a level 9, high warning.

    Nottingham, Loughborough, South Wales, Bristol and most of Devon and Cornwall, along with Birmingham, Coventry and Leicester will also be covered by the massive cloud of deadly smog.

    People in Northern Ireland, mid-Wales, London and the South East, the East Midlands, the North and North East, Northumberland and mid-Lothian in Scotland will also be seriously affected.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/toxic-smog-hits-uk-your-5360189

    Reply
  1. Big Warm-up Predicted for Northwest Territory as Pacific Side of Arctic Melts Out Early | robertscribbler

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