The Hothouse Yet Worsens — Japan Meteorological Agency Shows June of 2015 Was Warmest on Record

The global June temperature measures are starting to come in and indications are that the past month was a brutally hot beast.

According to Japan’s Meteorological Agency, June beat previous all-time hot temperatures of 0.68 C above the 20th Century average set just last year (2014) by 0.08 C. Coming in at 0.76 C above the global 20th Century average and about 0.96 C above 1880s values, this past June was the hottest since Japan began taking measures in 1891. By comparison, El Nino years 2010 and 1998 came in as tied for third hottest at 0.51 C above 20th Century average levels respectively.

June 2015 hottest on record

(Severe global heat during 2015 continues with a record hot June. Image source: Japan Meteorological Agency.)

As we can clearly see in the Japan measure, June-to-June temperatures show a steady increase from the 1890s onward with most recent years warming substantially above trend line. A visible pace of warming directly at odds with recent false rumors of a global warming ‘hiatus.’ Meanwhile, the nearly 1 C worth of global warming since record keeping began in 1891 has proceeded at a pace roughly 25 times faster than the warming that occurred at the end of the last ice age.

Record June heat caps off a record hot first half of 2015 amidst a still strengthening El Nino in the Equatorial Pacific as well as numerous heat-related weather events across the globe. In the US, a continuation of a severe western drought drove Lake Mead below the rationing line for the first time in its history. California extended extreme drought conditions and a record fire outbreak consumed more than 2 million acres of forest, tundra and permafrost in Alaska. In South America, water rationing continued in Brazil’s most populous city of Sao Paulo as severe drought conditions pervaded over much of South America, Central America and the Caribbean. In India and Pakistan severe heat and humidity pushed wet bulb temperatures to dangerous levels — setting off two mass casualty events that left thousands dead and tens of thousands hospitalized. Northern Hemisphere sea ice hit third lowest extent on record and an odd blob of hot water in the Northeastern Pacific continued to harm marine life as waters grew more stratified and toxic due to heat-related causes.

image

(Very hot temperature anomalies throughout the Eastern Pacific running from Equator to Northern Hemisphere Pole were a major contributor to record-breaking global heat during June. Still warming waters in the Equatorial zone are likely to pump still more heat into an atmosphere overburdened with human greenhouse gas emissions through at least early 2016. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

So far, with El Nino still building and with global CO2 levels rising to a record 404 parts per million in May, 2015 is leading 2014 as the hottest year on record by a significant 0.07 to 0.1 C margin. Substantial westerly wind bursts during late June and through mid July have increased the likelihood that the 2015 El Nino will be a strong to record-breaking event — backing still more ocean warmth into an already over-heated atmosphere. As such, there is a strong potential that record warm global readings will maintain current intensity or even worsen through to the end of this year.

Links:

Japan Meteorological Agency

Pause? What a Joke

Monster El Nino Appears to Be on the Way

Lake Meade Below Rationing Line for First Time in its History

Worst June on Record for Alaska Wildfires

Drought Rages From Caribbean Through South America

Human Hothouse Kills Hundreds in Pakistan

Hat tip to Wili

Leave a comment

71 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  July 14, 2015

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
    • The wording was a bit odd, so I changed it. Hope it’s clearer now.

      Reply
    • Derecho bearing down on my area right now…

      Reply
      • I saw that derecho on the radar, Robert, and thought of you down there. Hope you didn’t suffer any damage, and were able to enjoy the storm (I love witnessing storms/extreme weatger).

        Reply
      • You should move to the Valley (Shenandoah)–the storms rarely make it over Shenandoah Mountain. We seem to be the Camelot of climate change in fact–which makes it hard to persuade people there’s a problem.

        Reply
  2. Magma

     /  July 15, 2015

    In addition to the above, to date fires have burned 3 million hectares (7.5 million acres) of forest in Canada and led to the largest evacuation in the history of one of its western provinces.

    Reply
    • Looks like we are closing in on 12.5 million acres for Alaska and Canada both. For Alaska, they are more than 1 million acres ahead of the previous record fire year (2004). The 13,000 evacuation in Saskatchewan province was certainly ominous. I wish I had better news, but when you add permafrost fuels such as peat like understory and methane due to the great human-caused thaw there’s billions and billions more tons to burn. Warming brings the lightning strikes that start the big fires… It pretty much makes it rigged to go. And all that extra burning is an amplifying feedback to the already extraordinary human emission.

      Reply
      • LJR

         /  July 15, 2015

        Alaska has 600K+ square miles of area but I’m wondering how many of those acres are combustible? Even if it’s ‘only’ 200,000 square miles, that means there’s lots left to burn. Ditto for Canada’s NWT.

        Reply
  3. Syd Bridges

     /  July 15, 2015

    It won’t be long before we see NASA and NOAA figures and this does not forebode well.

    Reply
  4. Reblogged this on jpratt27.

    Reply
  5. Look at these people spending $800 million plus on this Lake Mead pipe so they can use up more of what reserves they have, and put off the inevitable a little longer, and ensure it’s even worse when it gets there. Though probably they see this as a stopgap while they plot to steal water from somebody else.

    http://www.gosanangelo.com/news/national/insightvegas-waterlake-mead_43723412

    Reply
    • Andrew Dodds

       /  July 15, 2015

      One of the problems with global warming denial is that it acts to stop effective mitigation. There should be a serious, evidence based appraisal of how much water is available in the Colorado river system, how much is generally going to be available in the future, and allocations made based on that – this may mean we have to shift agriculture around, but it needs to happen.

      In a similar way, since we have set off several meters of sea level rise, ALL long term infrastructure projects need to take this into account. There is no point building anything close to sea level if you want it to be there in a century. But this would also require an admission that global warming was happening.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  July 15, 2015

        There are many levels of denial. Nearly all of us are in it, to some extent. There are no politicians, parties, or even NGOs, that I know of, that are proposing bills that address the problem anywhere near the level it needs to be addressed at. Consider just this one study:

        https://www.skepticalscience.com/must-stop-new-carbon-infrastructure-2018.html#comments

        “A Hard Deadline: We Must Stop Building New Carbon Infrastructure by 2018”

        As far as I know, there is no politician or political body anywhere in the world, however well informed and concerned about GW, that is calling for a halt to all production of all fossil-death-fuel-burning machines, vehicles, buildings and plants by the year 2018.

        Reply
      • jonzo13

         /  July 15, 2015

        The insurance industry is already identifying high-risk areas. Many coastal areas will become un-insurable, and the areas will only increase over time. No insurance, no additional development.

        Reply
    • They’re not doing what’s necessary to ensure resiliency. So, in the end, that mismanagement leads to collapsing the resource base more rapidly. To malinvestment in properties and industries that won’t be supportable. And in bringing the crisis timeframe forward. They need to be looking at reducing the water draw on Lake Mead to preserve its lifespan. Adding more draws in the face of a climate forcing that will keep drying that region out is a recipe for fracturing the SW water system sooner and sooner.

      Reply
  6. wili

     /  July 15, 2015

    Thanks for the hat tip, rs.

    Reply
  7. Andy in San Diego

     /  July 15, 2015

    When things go bad while coal mining. Just another example of how humans shit where they eat.

    Centralia Pennsylvania.
    ===================

    Coal mining sometimes has an unfortunate side effect. The coal ignites, and burns under ground. Centralia Pennsylvania was abandoned due to a fire that began on May 27, 1962. In 1992, Pennsylvania governor Bob Casey invoked eminent domain on all properties in the borough, condemning all the buildings. Underground coal seam fires are notoriously difficult to extinguish, and can burn for decades.

    To this day the fire under Centralia burns underground after 51 years. At its current rate, it could burn for over 250 more years.

    This is not a unique incident. In India, as of 2010, 68 fires were burning beneath a 58-square-mile (150 km2) region of the Jharia coalfield in Dhanbad, Jharkhand. This region has been hit by the unique phenomenon of mine fires which started in 1916 and is rapidly destroying the only source of prime coking coal in the country.

    “This was a world where no human could live, hotter than the planet Mercury, its atmosphere as poisonous as Saturn’s. At the heart of the fire, temperatures easily exceeded 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit [540 degrees Celsius]. Lethal clouds of carbon monoxide and other gases swirled through the rock chambers.”

    —David DeKok, Unseen Danger: A Tragedy of People, Government, and the Centralia Mine Fire (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986)

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  July 15, 2015

      Wow Andy, thanks. Eerie images similar to the vision of The Road.

      Reply
    • If we keep heading along the path we’re now on, this is what permafrost in the Arctic looks like. Fire on top and fire below.

      Reply
  8. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    2015 Hurricane Season Off to Record Start: 11 Storms in Central, Eastern Pacific, Atlantic Basins Combined

    It may not seem like it if you’re focused solely on the Atlantic Basin, but the 2015 hurricane season is off to a record start. And, yes, El Niño is playing a strong role.

    Through July 13, there’s already been 11 named storms in the eastern Pacific, central Pacific and Atlantic basins combined this season.

    Dating to 1950, this is a season-to-date record, according to Colorado State University tropical scientist Dr. Phil Klotzbach and National Hurricane Center specialist Eric Blake.

    The previous peak number of named storms by July 13 occurred in the 2012 hurricane season, when four Atlantic named storms – including landfalling tropical storms Beryl and Debby – and six eastern Pacific named storms flared up by that date.

    Link

    Reply
  9. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    Smoke over northern Alaska

    Aqua/MODIS
    2015/195
    07/14/2015
    23:50 UTC

    Link

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  July 15, 2015

      Fires in eastern Russia

      Aqua/MODIS
      2015/196
      07/15/2015
      04:40 UTC

      Link

      Reply
  10. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    This is nuts –
    Extreme weather hits Papua,
    11 dead

    Speaking to The Jakarta Post in a phone interview on Tuesday, Lanny Jaya regional administration secretary Christian Siholait said extremely cold temperatures along with hail had occurred in Ku-
    yawage, Goa Baliem and West Wano districts from July 3 to 5.

    “During the three days, hail continuously fell from morning until evening. At the same time, local residents experienced extreme cold weather as the air temperature dropped to minus 2 degrees Celsius,” he said. ……………………………………
    Like the three isolated districts in Lanny Jaya, the Agandugume district is located between 2,300 and 2,500 meters above sea level and can only be accessed with small aircraft. The district is situated just below the 4,884-meter Puncak Jaya mountain, one of the world’s seven tallest summits. –

    See more at: Link

    Reply
    • That looks like it could be a part of the ocean/atmospheric gradient establishing along the boundaries of our El Niño. Anecdote for an intense event, perhaps.

      Reply
  11. dnem

     /  July 15, 2015

    Nice multi-media piece in today’s NY Times about the growing “…California [fire] season that threatens to become a terror. Between Jan. 1 and July 11, California fire officials have responded to more than 3,381 wildfires, 1,000 more than the average over the previous five years.”

    And while not a total blackout on any attribution to climate change, this is as far as the piece is willing to tread: “But as teams of firefighters finally took control of the Lake Fire, the future looked bleak. Four years of drought, along with climate change, had turned what should have been cool and moist higher elevations into a tinderbox, and then a burned-out moonscape of ash and wooden skeletons.”

    The piece includes some very nice GIS maps of tree deaths in the Sierra.

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/07/15/us/california-fire-season-drought.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

    Reply
  12. And crazy fires are still raging:-/

    Alex

    Reply
  13. nwkilt

     /  July 15, 2015

    Hello RS, thank you for a clean and useful forum for climate related information.
    I noticed on the nullschool site that there is a reverse vortex at the northern tip of Greenland, at the jet stream level (250hPa). Is this normal?
    nwk

    Reply
    • That’s a feature we like to describe as the Greenland high. It’s an upper level signature of a high pressure cell over Greenland. And while not abnormal, it can have some pretty substantial impacts. Highs over Greenland have been associated with warming there. In addition the high Greenland, low Siberian side dipole is a feature that tends to export sea ice out of the Arctic through the Fram Strait. This can have an impact on end melt season totals. Generally, from the point of view of those who monitor the Arctic, the Greenland high can be kind of a big deal. Especially if it’s part of a persistent or more extreme pattern. Thus far the net effect has been to nudge the ice. To speed melt and compaction in the ESS and Chukchi, to disperse and fracture the ice in the Laptev (generating more ice edge and bottom melt), and to enhance export through the Fram. If this continues, it could be a system to remember. But it’s not one that’s unusual per se. Just one that, in the presently warmed and warming Arctic, can have an impact.

      Reply
  14. labmonkery2

     /  July 15, 2015

    Regarding the drought in CA, the Speaker of the House Facebook feed has a posting about our “It’s Green to go Brown” water conservation campaign (one of many). He cannot seem to understand, and the comments are utterly laughable (diverting water b/c of the delta smelt).

    No wonder it’s an uphill battle to even open a discussion with these ‘folks.’

    Reply
    • labmonkery2

       /  July 15, 2015

      Oh, and they also blame – wait for it – Obama! smh

      Reply
    • Sorry to hear… Unfortunate to say that I’m not all too surprised.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  July 15, 2015

        I read great quote on this topic not too long ago , “You can pour all the concrete you want, but that won’t make it rain”.
        Sorry i forget who gets the credit.

        Reply
        • What I find funny and all too typical of republican talking points is that their policies generate scarcity. In this case, human-caused warming generated the water shortages in California. And when liberals seek to conserve the water to prevent even worse scarcity in the future, the republicans basically attack the solution along with those promoting it. You probably couldn’t find a political strategy that was more out and out diabolical if you tried.

  15. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    Across The Globe, Wildfire Season Is Lasting Longer

    With 35 active large fires currently burning up and down the West Coast — and with dry, hot conditions sparking an unprecedented number of fires throughout Western Canada — the 2015 wildfire season has started strong, and shows no sign of slowing down.

    Now, a new report out in Nature Communications has a some more bad news for the West, and wildfire-prone regions around the world: In the last 35 years, wildfire season has gotten longer, and the global area affected by wildfire has doubled.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/07/15/3680916/climate-change-wildfire-season-longer-study/

    Reply
  16. Stephen

     /  July 15, 2015

    Robert,
    I visit your website every day. Please keep doing what you are doing. It is vital work.
    Thank You.
    Stephen
    P.S. It is “per se”.

    Reply
    • Got it… And thank you for the kind words. Can’t stop now. Far, far too much invested. Just a bit under the weather today. Got an Arctic wildfire update coming out probably by around 4ish.

      Reply
    • I’d like to second that. I’m just a person looking to learn more and stay informed about climate change, and this has become the one site I check every day – and I even read all the comments. Your work is important and appreciated.

      Reply
  17. Andy in San Diego

     /  July 15, 2015

    Melt ponds (lakes) below Jacobshavn Glacier are getting pretty darn big, and you can see they are now forming at higher elevations in towards the ice cap. It would be interesting to see over the course a couple of decades of data the max altitude at which melt ponds have formed each year. When they form (month) and duration before freeze up.

    If you scroll up the west coast of Greenland, you can see melt ponds along the entire length between coastline and high elevation.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8/2015-07-14/9-N68.56559-W49.23559

    Reply
  18. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    Extreme weather hits Papua,
    11 dead

    I was really “God Smacked” by this report, I knew zero about these people’s location , but I knew they were in the tropics. The mountain in the article is located here :

    Puncak Jaya

    How does it hall, all day long for 3 days . And freeze at night just below the equator ?

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  July 15, 2015

      Snow is not part of the history of this mountain –

      Puncak Jaya

      Reply
  19. eric smith

     /  July 15, 2015

    Robert,
    You know better.
    This is but a play.
    We men know better.

    Regards,
    Eric

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  July 15, 2015

      8th grade tripe.

      Reply
      • Yep.

        Message to Eric — you need to get your butt in gear and stop being a distraction. There are lives to save. The good Earth to protect. So stop the ridiculous,, narcissistic stalker crap.

        Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  July 15, 2015

      Eric –
      Stop being lazy . Only a young man would write this child like gibberish . We’ve sown the seeds, you get the to reap the whirl wind.

      “Now spit”…………………….

      Reply
  20. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    A really good read –

    My thoughts on Mini-Ice Ages, Pluto, and a Weather-Densensitized Nation

    By: Dr. Marshall Shepherd

    A couple of things in the weather, climate, and science world caught my eye this week. I just wanted to take a moment to get some thoughts down…

    Link

    Reply
  21. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    Time –
    How Climate Change Is Making Wildfires Worse

    In a vicious cycle, wildfires are also making climate change worse, a study finds

    Increasingly hot and dry climates, the result of global climate change, have led to a worsening of wildfires around the world, according to new research. In turn, wildfires are aggravating climate change by killing trees that could absorb carbon in the atmosphere.

    Link

    Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  July 15, 2015

    Dear Think –

    You really want to think about throwing off all the trolls overboard. Driving traffic, and truth are 2 different worlds
    robertscribbler has a troll free site , and his traffic is growing, you have army of interns
    Place one of them to work , throwing off all the crap on these threads/

    Reply
    • Seconded…

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  July 15, 2015

        RS –
        Your work is moving worlds, I am a happy helper.

        Reply
        • You were here before me, Bob. Doing the same. And you’ve been with me since the start. Couldn’t have done it without you and there isn’t a one like you on this Earth. You built the team, Bob. You’re our band leader.

      • Colorado Bob

         /  July 16, 2015

        No, no, no. The universe tuned where certain people meet a just the right time. Poor Eric may never know this, Let’s hope his skinny ass is run over by Jimi Hendrix’s “Cross Town Bus “.

        Reply
    • Just looking at this Wili. Note that the NASA average for first six months is a very severe + 0.8 C above the 20th Century. We are now officially + 1 C over 1880. Looks like I have another post to write.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  July 15, 2015

        ” first six months is a very severe + 0.8 C above the 20th Century… now officially + 1 C over 1880.”

        Ouch. I think it’s time to try to get this into international headlines. The world is (or should) be focused on the 2 C degree barrier. It is a very big deal, imho, that we have just blown past the halfway point. It’s too bad that, apparently, none of the IPCC report is completely clear on what the exact standard is for ‘pre-industrial’ levels. But at this point, we may be far enough above all the metrics out there that 1 degree can, as you say, now be called.

        Reply
    • wili

       /  July 15, 2015

      That is, confirming jma’s determination that June was the hottest ever. Thank again go to BornFromTheVoid at neven’s forums, who seems to always be on top of these things.

      Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  July 16, 2015

    When I warned about hell and breakfast this is not a new thing . ISIS is not new a thing.

    We live a world where Ted Cruz and Isis say the same thing.

    “Follow me and all will be corrected”

    All of this as as old as dirt, and it never stops.

    Reply
    • You’re right Bob. I just wonder when those of us who keep getting tricked will wise up. It’s a race between the evolution of liars and the evolution of perceptive, well-meaning, people.

      Reply
  24. Colorado Bob

     /  July 16, 2015

    The New Horizons is using 10 watts to talk to Earth. When I was 16 , I needed, 50,000 watts, just hear the Rolling Stones.

    Reply
  25. Colorado Bob

     /  July 16, 2015

    The New Horizons is using 10 watts to talk to Earth. everyone roll that marble. around your head. Ir has a power plant that may last 20 years,

    Reply
  1. Ocieplenie ziemskiej atmosfery wkrótce przyspieszy (aktualizacja 15.07.2015) | Exignorant's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: