NOAA Shows June of 2015 Smashed All Prior Heat Records; El Nino Keeps Strengthening; Hothouse Mass Casualties Strike Europe, Japan

Under an oppressive human fossil fuel emission, the world just keeps getting hotter and hotter, the 2015-2016 El Nino just keeps looking ever more monstrous, and reports of tragic, heat-related, mass casualty events just keep rolling in.

*   *   *   *

JULY 21, 2015: All the major climate monitors have now chimed in — NASA, Japan’s Meteorological Agency, NOAA. And June of 2015 is now marked as the hottest recorded in every single one. But of these, the NOAA measure, which provided its Global Analysis report yesterday, clearly is the starkest.

Showing extraordinary warming, June of 2015, according to NOAA, hit +0.88 C above the 20th Century average. That’s an excessive leap of +0.12 C over last year’s previous record June measure showing a +0.76 C global temperature departure and just 0.02 C behind the all-time monthly record values for any month hit just this year during February and March (+0.90 C).  When compared to 1880s averages, June was fully 1.08 C hotter. That’s more than halfway to the (not safe) 2 C threshold which IPCC has marked off as the point where catastrophic impacts from human caused climate change really start to hit high gear.

June anomaly

(On the up ramp to a hothouse. The NOAA global climate record for land and ocean temperatures over the last 136 years in which June of 2015 is now the all-time hottest. Image source: NOAA.)

We can clearly see the progress of rapid warming over the past 136 years in the above graph. Particularly since 1980 — when global temperatures really started to hit a rapid ramp up. Note that the mythological pause is not at all evident in the above graph. Global temperatures through June measures just kept driving on — higher and higher.

Back to Back Record Years on the Way — The Human Warming Escalator and The El Nino Jump

With all the June measures coming in so strongly on the hot side, and with the first half of this year already substantially warmer than the previous record warm year of 2014, it appears that we are locking in for back-to-back years of record heat. These new records are occurring in the context both of the larger, human-forced warming trend and as we hit the warm end of the global natural variability scale — El Nino.

It’s important to remember that the driver of these new records is the underlying accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Deke Arndt, chief of the monitoring branch of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), noted at a press conference last month:

“Climate change is a long-term driver, so that’s like standing on an escalator as it goes up. So, the longer that we go into history, we’re riding up the escalator. And now that we’re getting an El Niño event, we happen to be jumping up at the same time, and so they play together to produce outcomes like what is likely to be the warmest year on record.”

And propelled by that human warming escalator, the current El Nino jump is starting to look absolutely savage.

El Nino Just Keeps Growing Stronger

For today’s Australia Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) report showed the current El Nino striking down yet another 1997 record. According to BoM findings, all key Nino ocean zones have shown surface temperatures in excess of 1 C above average for 10 successive weeks. This shatters the previous record duration for such an event — occurring in 1997 at 8 weeks in length. Notably, the current record heat build for Nino zones is still ongoing. So the new, 2015 record could extend further.

Overall, BoM shows the entire Eastern Equatorial Pacific now at +2 C. To get an idea what this looks like, we can take a peek at the Earth Nullschool sea surface temperature anomaly measure:

image

 

(The entire Northern, Eastern and Equatorial Pacific is exceedingly hot — showing anomalies in the +1 to +4 C range practically everywhere. Meanwhile, temperatures in the Central Pacific are starting to approach Super El Nino ranges. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

Taking in this shot, it’s worth pausing for a moment to appreciate the fact that not only is the Equatorial Pacific outrageously hot, the entire Northern and Eastern Pacific from the Arctic on south is just off-the-charts hot. If you ever wondered what the emerging face of a Godzilla El Nino looks like, well, just remember this shot.

NOAA, meanwhile, shows El Nino continuing to extend its foray into strong event range. The critical Nino 3.4 measure of Central Pacific Ocean temperatures jumped again in the July 20 weekly report — hitting a +1.7 C anomaly. This is jump up from last week’s +1.5 C measure and is now knocking on the door to a super El Nino threshold of +1.8 C. NOAA’s three weekly reports for July now average +1.53 C for the Central Pacific — solidly in strong El Nino range for the month.

NOAA also began to track a third warm Kelvin Wave running across the Pacific. This Kelvin Wave is propagating eastward as a result of a strong West Wind Backburst that has blown over the Western Pacific throughout much of July. These winds are pushing warm surface waters down and under the Equatorial region. Ocean heat that will resurface off South American. Recharging already hot waters with a new hot influx and further strengthening an already strong El Nino.

The signal of this new warm water flood is now really starting to show up in the model runs. Corrected seasonal models now show an event in the range of 1997-1998. Uncorrected runs, including the Euro ensemble, continue to show potentials for an event that would make the 1997 Super El Nino look tiny by comparison.

Monthly anomalies Nino 3.4 Monster El Nino

(NOAA’s CFSv2 models still picking up a heat impact murmur of a monster El Nino in our near future. Image source: NOAA.)

Typically, El Nino reaches peak strength during Northern Hemisphere Fall and Winter. So we’re in a ramp-up phase that could last through October and November and we are already starting to hit strong event values in July. The current El Nino is predicted to remain a feature until late Winter or early Spring of 2016. Strongest global temperature heightening impacts come during and slightly after peak ocean warming due to El Nino. So the temperature records we’ve seen so far in 2014 and 2015 may just be prelude to the main event.

Heat Related Mass Casualties in Europe and Japan

It really is the kind of global heat spike that you don’t want to see. The kind that enables heatwaves to put droves of people into hospitals with life-threatening heat ailments. Earlier this summer, both India and Pakistan suffered mass casualty heatwave events. Instances that filled hospitals with tens of thousands of patients. In India, 2,500 souls were lost. In Pakistan, the number hit 1,242. These represent the 5th and 8th most deadly heatwaves on record, respectively.

Now, reports are starting to trickle in that Europe and Japan are suffering similar, although still somewhat less acute mass casualty events due to record heat. According to Dr. Jeff Masters, excess mortality due to heat had claimed more than 1,200 lives across Western Europe through early July. Meanwhile, reports are also starting to trickle in from Japan of heat related mass casualties. A report last week from Japan’s Fire and Disaster Management Agency found that 3,000 people had been admitted for heat stroke to hospitals across the island nation during the period of July 6 through 12.

Over the next few days, record-breaking heat is again expected to invade parts of southern Europe, setting the stage for more potential heat casualties.

Conditions in Context — Heat Breaking New Records Means More Extreme Weather

All time record high global temperatures for 2015 and likely at least a decent period during 2016 means we are also likely to continue to experience odd and severe weather conditions over many regions of the globe. A fact that was punctuated in Southern California earlier this week as the remnants of a tropical cyclone dumped 1.69 inches of rain — or more than ten times the amount of rainfall typical for July — over parts of San Diego through Monday. Possibly a taste of what’s to come for California should the currently building Godzilla-type El Nino — pumped up by a catastrophic rate of human greenhouse gas emission — crush the West Coast blocking pattern and hurl a barrage of powerful storms at the drought-parched state. A situation many may be hoping for at this time, but which they could easily come to regret as the extreme intensity of weather switches in the new climate age of 1 C warming start to become evident.

Links:

NOAA Global Analysis

June 2015: Earth’s Warmest on Record

2015 On Track to Be Hottest Year Yet

NOAA Press Conference Notes

Earth Nullschool

What The Weekend Rains Did to Southern California

Hat Tip to Colorado Bob and Ryan in New England

Hat Tip to Andy in San Diego (How about that rain?)

Hat Tip to Matt

 

 

 

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66 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  July 21, 2015

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
    • CH — for the record, I saw recently that cap and trade is actually working in the US Northeast. So point to you on that one. That said, I still trust it quite a bit less than the alternatives. I’d agree that any policy is better than no policy and a well executed policy of any kind (as the Northeast apparently proves) is likely to work out.

      Best to you!

      –R

      Reply
  2. Greg

     /  July 21, 2015

    Nicely done RS. That 1.69 inches you might note for San Diego is from the first 19 days of this July, mostly in one storm, and is more than ALL July totals combined for the last 100 years! I’m wrapping myself around that bell curve shift and have no idea how many standard deviations it is outside of. Godzilla has awoken.
    A generic synopsis below:

    http://www.weather.com/safety/floods/news/5-insane-things-california-arizona-flooding

    Reply
    • It usually just doesn’t rain in that region during this time of year. Pattern completely shattered…

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  July 21, 2015

        Yep, it is dangerous to drive looking in the rear view mirror any more. Only Burt Reynolds could ever pull that off. Old patterns are less and less helpful for predicting. Meteorologists seem to be having increasing difficulty nailing these events beforehand and are mostly quoted afterwards with euphemisms of surprise.

        Reply
    • labmonkery2

       /  July 21, 2015

      Here’s a blog from a now local (was a weather guy in the midwest – now a beer guy in San Diego), that has a nice map of the rainfall totals from this recent storm for the entire county. Some locations received over 2.5″, which is typical of the topography.
      http://sandiegoweathercenter.blogspot.com/p/rain.html.

      Oh, and I agree, we have awoken a monster that will be difficult to manage or control.

      Reply
  3. Greg

     /  July 21, 2015

    We have so much to learn. I find it fascinating that only today, July 21st, 2015 do we have our first full view of the Earth in full sunlight. Courtesy of NASA’s Discovery satellite. So much water, our savior and bane:

    Reply
    • Absolutely majestic!

      Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  July 22, 2015

        Probably not many planets in the Universe are as complex and biologically diverse as Earth. Hopefully someday we’ll know for sure – meaning we survived this century intact and stopped a runaway greenhouse effect.

        Reply
    • Robert In New Orleans

       /  July 21, 2015

      If you blow up this image you can see the smoke from forest fires in the NW.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  July 21, 2015

        Yes. Good catch. Also, you can see the thinness of the atmosphere as a purple blue light on the edge of the Earth, particularly in the Pacific where the sunlight angle is strongest.

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  July 22, 2015

      Peter Sinclair has good coverage on how we have that image, interesting article.

      http://climatecrocks.com/2015/07/21/al-gores-dream-begets-a-new-blue-marble/

      That pesky Al Gore again

      Reply
      • Gotta love Al Gore. That guy doesn’t quit.

        Reply
      • Wanted to thank you as well, Abel. My condolences for your lost. Honestly don’t know how I’d make it without Cat. Warm thoughts out to you in consideration of the priceless gift that is love.

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  July 22, 2015

        Thanks RS, appreciated, she was Special and not just to me. But that is something I May mention more on in the future and it is very relevant to our future .
        Two months and still coming out of shock and fighting the black dog

        Reply
    • danabanana

       /  July 22, 2015

      It is also has a hazier atmosphere than the original Blue Marble. More vapour perhaps?

      Reply
  4. One step forward, two steps back. Tar sands mining expands to Utah. If we continue to identify, dig up and burn every bit of fossil fuel we can find, it will be like James Hansen said,”Game over for our climate.”

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/07/21/3682827/utah-tar-sands-green-light/

    And Robert, thank you for the hat tip! I’m honored🙂

    Reply
    • Robert In New Orleans

       /  July 21, 2015

      Utah is a very arid state, it will be interesting to see where the water for tar sand mining will come from.

      Reply
  5. – 2015
    “… mass casualty events just keep rolling in.”
    Thanks Robert for the ‘straight talk’ as these tragic events manifest themselves.
    It’s very important to put these many subjects into stark context

    One must wonder if coroner types, or civil gov., have official categories for types of casualties. They sure aren’t ‘natural’ disasters, or ‘acts’ of god. Rather they are human caused. And at one time fairly recent past — avoidable.

    So, will they be using generic bar codes on the toe tags, or will they just scribble a number with ‘Sharpies’? This isn’t as macabre as one might think.

    I really doubt the medical profession is prepared for the scale of mass casualties that will surely accrue from the wanton discharge of GGH and other pollutants into the atmosphere.

    Many times I have wondered if they will be reduced to triaging corpses. No lie.

    – Glad you’re back into action after your illness. 103? I get sweaty just thinking about that.🙂

    OUT

    Reply
  6. That El Niño as tweeted by Peter Gleick

    Reply
  7. Great post, Robert. Like you point out, the mother of all cherries doesn’t even stand out when looking at updated temperature graphs. And the amount of heat in the Pacific is terrifying. I think the recent deluge in So Cal is just a prelude to what we will see come Fall and Winter.

    Reply
    • The deniers will have to change their tune to ‘warming stopped in 2015…’ Until it didn’t. We’re shifting into positive PDO so the ramp looks a bit steeper. We’ve also loaded in a few amplifying feedbacks which makes the temp situation even worse. Deniers are just going to have to rely more on nasty and less on tricks to get the job done. So get ready for nasty.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  July 22, 2015

        Back when the AGW signal was first being detected and acknowledged, before deniers really emerged from the bowels of hell (fun fact- deniers are birthed in the same way as Orcs from Lord of the Rings) I used to think that that once the effects of climate change started becoming more obvious, those skeptical of the science would be forced to admit they were mistaken. I was the one who was wrong. They simply spend more in propaganda, shout louder, and as you say Robert, get nastier. Ad hominem attacks, red herrings and arguments from ignorance are all they have. They simply assert that the sky is not blue like you and I can plainly see, but in fact it is green. And our population is one of the most scientifically illiterate on the planet, so they agree that the sky is green, and if it looks blue it’s because the UN and scientists have conspired to fool us. Roughly half the population does not “believe” in reality, even when it is washing away or burning down their neighborhood. They cheer for the unsurvivable future they’re committing their progeny to. I still can’t believe that so many people can be so f***ing stupid. 20 years ago I would never have believed we would still be “arguing” over whether or not global warming exists.

        Reply
        • I don’t really mind the deniers that much, or even the crappy media. The real villains, it seems to me, are the big-money folks driving the Republican bus (and probably now also influencing the conservative parties in the UK, Australia, and Canada). They’re the reason why the Republicans have been able to remain competitive in Congress (indeed, erecting a permanent majority in the House until 2020 at least) and why almost all Republican Presidential candidates are in the denier camp. The damage they’ve done on the policy side has been immense–even moving toward cutting science funding, promoting phony education, and so on. I think it would be a bit harder for them to accomplish without the media they own, or the trolls, but just a bit. As it is, we are reduced to depending on the weather to do the convincing or to finding a way around Citizens United and the cash flood it has unleashed on the election system.

        • The Koch/Murdoch/Oil/Gas/Coal finance/campaign manipulation and the media wall/denial go hand in glove. But you’re right the denial and information suppression would not exist to the extent that it does without the former. That is, a small number of persons with a big monetary stake in continued fossil fuel burning have warped government action on climate change even as they’ve cast mud into the public discourse over the issue.

          Campaign finance reform would go a long way to help. But I don’t think it completely solves the problem. Media is basically free political support. So you’re dealing with multiple layers here.

      • Climatehawk1, “As it is, we are reduced to depending on the weather to do the convincing or to finding a way around Citizens United and the cash flood it has unleashed on the election system.”

        And if neither is feasible, we’ll have to depend on a debt-driven deflationary economic collapse.

        Reply
        • Maybe we will get “lucky” and get both overwhelming weather and an economic collapse. I don’t think the collapse alone will cut emissions enough to do the job.

  8. NOAA has a nice visualization comparing surface temps for the 1997 and 2015 El Ninos. Here’s the link:

    http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/MediaDetail2.php?MediaID=1726&MediaTypeID=1

    (Can someone please explain: How does one paste an image directly into a comment here?)

    Reply
    • You post the image url directly into comments. Right click on image, copy image location, paste. Should work.

      Great comparison by NOAA. Although July 2015 is not at peak if this thing develops along predicted trends. What’s most striking is how much warmer the Northeast Pacific is overall.

      Reply
      • Ah, very good. Thank you, Robert! Here’s the image:

        Reply
      • So 1997 SST anomalies peaked in November? If true, I imagine two possibilities:

        1. We’ll peak well before November but with slightly higher anomalies than 1997, and by November we’ll drop down to November 1997 anomalies or lower.
        2. The anomalies will continue an overall trend of rising, close to or even past November, and by then we’ll definitely have a beyond record-shattering monstrosity!

        Either way the Pacific will be hotter for much longer than it was in 1997. With most of El Nino’s impacts occurring in winter, I guess the only way for this El Nino not to be a monstrosity is if, for some unlikely reason, the trend were to reverse soon and continue cooling relatively rapidly. Seems unlikely though, and then there is the issue of all the heat anomalies in other regions of the Pacific – which Robert points out can provide a springboard for amplifying and/or diverting storms along atypical trajectories. As always, I’m very open to any corrections or additions.

        This Chris Farley video is funny, but I think Colorado Bob’s hell coming to breakfast clip might be more appropriate.

        Reply
        • Typically, El Nino peaks in late Fall or early winter. NOAA and practically all models predict a peak for the 2015 El Nino in the October to November timeframe.

          In general, this El Nino at least has ‘legs’ to strengthen for another 2-3 months due to the strong westerlies which set up early this July. This is basically recharging the warm Kelvin Wave running beneath the ocean and pushing heat up on the South American side.

          So we’re pretty much locked in for a strengthening system through at least that period. There might be a dip or two, but it’s looking rather positive at least through to September-October.

          Also, at this point, the model clarity would tend to be much higher. So confidence in a persistently strong to ridiculously strong system is on the rise.

      • Also I wonder how the hotter SSTs in more northern regions of the Pacific transfer oceanic or atmospheric heat to the SSTs in more equatorial regions?

        Reply
        • It’s more of the opposite. The expanding Hadley Cell results in more warming in northerly regions. In the first phase of climate change, heating is strongest at the higher latitudes primarily due to the tendency of ghg to more efficiently recirculate heat in the dark or when the angle of the sun is low.

          It’s not until the ice sheets get really involved and you start breaking down the ocean conveyors that heat really begins to concentrate at the Equator.

          Not to say we don’t have equatorial warming now. We certainly do, especially during these El Nino episodes when ocean heat comes back to haunt us. But we’re still primarily in the polar amplification phase.

      • I see. Thanks so much Robert for taking your precious time to help educate me and others! Especially on top of writing all your outstanding articles. I’ll continue looking for opportunities to link to your articles. keep up the outstanding work!

        Reply
  9. Loni

     /  July 22, 2015

    If this El Nino kicks the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge aside for the winter, what are the chances of it coming back?

    Another great post, Robert. Thank you.

    Reply
    • RRR may be a synergy between positive PDO and overall warming. If that’s the case, it could very well come back. Overall, the shift of patterns northward does create that atmospheric slot. La Nina would tend to tamp it down.

      Reply
    • Loni

       /  July 22, 2015

      Robert, I’ve rethought my question, and it’s this. Does the geography of the West Coast of the U.S. make it prone to collect hot water from the Pacific, and high pressure ridges over the west coast?

      Reply
      • Moreso the climate. You have this desert zone that wants to expand north as the climate warms. You have sea ice to the north receding. You have colder ocean currents slowing down and warming. On the Greenland side you have melt generating cold water outflow and encouraging trough development in that region which aids in the telegraphing ridge formation over the west.

        Geography’s role is to reinforce this kind of trend as well. As I said before, La Nina and negative PDO would push counter to the larger trend.

        Reply
  10. Griffin

     /  July 22, 2015

    Robert, as I was traveling through Vermont yesterday, the signs of a deluge were easy to see, in lots of places. It was somewhat disconcerting, the area had seen what would have been classified as typical summer thunderstorms the day before. But the raging rivers and washouts of mud told the story of how fast the rain had fallen. Last night I saw the images of the mud that was left behind in Barre. It really hit me that if we are on the verge of a non linear increase in temps, we are going to inevitably see even heavier rainfall events. I could envision a time in the not too distant future where a trip of any length would need to be carefully planned so as to avoid travel in thunderstorms. The rainfall rates will be very dangerous for travel. As is the case with so much re climate change, I don’t think too many folks realize that this is coming. They won’t like it either.

    Reply
    • Griffin —

      These are perceptive thoughts, I think. With Greenland melt, that slot in the NE US becomes pretty volatile as well. Big moisture bloom off the backed up and heating Gulf Stream. Cold, volatile air exploding out of that region of melting ice and fresh water outflow to the north. I’d think weather forecasting becomes very critical in that kind of world.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  July 22, 2015

        Been through two summer thunder storms in last two weeks here in VA. Both described by a passengers of mine as “worst I have ever been in” one in Pungo south of VA beach and one in Winchester. Both required hazard lights of all drivers and most ended up pulling over. Definitely a shift easily observed locally. Disconcerting and great starters for CC conversations with passengers….

        Reply
        • I’ve noticed a lot of storms requiring pull over as well recently. That 7-8 percent added atmospheric moisture loading really packs a punch, doesn’t it?

      • rustj2015

         /  July 22, 2015

        An expert comment on what’s going on…
        “We are underestimating the speed at which these things are beginning to happen,” Hansen, head of the Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions Program at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, said Monday on a call with reporters.
        The conditions of underestimation are being overcome by more startling conditions. So far, “startling” is covered by media as “Wow, can you believe that? Just wow!” And on to other news…sponsored by car dealers…

        Reply
        • Hansen’s right. News media just basically kills the sense of urgency by not adding responsible commentary or context.

      • There are many ways to deflate the sense of urgency, unfortunately, and it’s not just the news media that’s responsible:

        http://www.climatecentral.org/news/dire-climate-warning-questions-19268

        Reply
    • As someone who has lived in Vermont for almost 30 years, I can testify to the difficulty of wrapping your mind around this phenomenon. Thinking back, it definitely seems that the frequency and intensity of these events is increasing, as weather data show. However, I can also remember a summer or two of regular, very intense thunderstorms 10-15 years ago that seem worse (although I doubt they were). Each of these events seems like a one-off … until it doesn’t. Not sure when that will be. One thing that would help would be if state agencies took on NOAA-like responsibilities, publicizing data on events and their frequency, cleanup costs, etc., to draw more attention to the larger picture.

      Reply
      • Spike

         /  July 23, 2015

        Yes it’s the old shifting baseline syndrome as seen in biodiversity as well. Here in central England I haven’t seen a single butterfly in my garden this summer, not a single one, and very few in the countryside. When I was a boy they were all over the place. I remember being driven home at night with clouds of moths and insects in the sky and the car was spattered with them – now they are gone. We’ve had bats in the garden for years in summer – this year I’ve seen just one, and I tend a wildlife friendly patch.

        Likewise when I think of climate we had winters when I remember digging the car out of snow and deicing it on many mornings, building snowmen every winter, sliding on ice at school most winters. That would be no more than an occasional occurrence in this area now.

        But my kids think this is normal and are amazed when I tell them such tales.

        Reply
  11. Reblogged this on jpratt27.

    Reply
  12. Thanks for your great report Robert. Just when I was ready to go vegetation free I now need to rethink the landscape. Korean grass maybe. All bets are off at this point as to what to expect on any given day (SF Bay Area)

    Reply
  13. Greg

     /  July 22, 2015

    And severe flooding in north Iran. Could not find the video but cnn int’l showed a large apartment building imploding into the waters:

    http://en.trend.az/iran/society/2418210.html

    Reply
  14. Vic

     /  July 22, 2015

    Marjan Minnesma, the campaigner who helped bring landmark legal action to force the Netherlands to change its climate change policies is currently in Australia sharing her legal team’s expertise with like minded Australian counterparts.

    She said democratic governments reluctant to embrace climate change action “should feel vulnerable because what we did is basic civil law that’s the same in all jurisdictions”.

    “We’ve translated it into English. And you only have to do the last part, how it translates into your system,” she told Guardian Australia.

    “Others are now studying it. We have requests from all over the world. What I think is the best thing is people are getting hope again.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/22/campaigner-who-forced-25-emissions-cut-in-holland-says-australia-far-worse

    Reply
  15. Wharf Rat

     /  July 22, 2015

    Gov. Brown blasts climate change ‘deniers’ during Vatican conference

    Brown called for a campaign against the “fierce opposition and blind inertia” of “well-financed” climate change skeptics.

    With national leaders proving unwilling to act, the governor called on mayors “to light a fire, if I may use that metaphor – in terms of climate change, it’s probably the wrong one.”

    “We have very powerful opposition that, in at least my country, spends billions on trying to keep from office people such as yourselves and elect troglodytes and other deniers of the obvious science,” Brown said at the conference.

    New York Mayor Bill De Blasio, speaking after Brown, thanked the California governor for being “the leading voice in the nation” on climate change, and announced his intention to cut greenhouse gas emissions in New York by 40% by 2030, following California’s example.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/political/la-me-pc-gov-brown-blasts-climate-change-critics-during-vatican-conference-20150721-story.html

    Reply
  16. rustj2015

     /  July 22, 2015

    Then there is the other “political leadership” that intentionally destroys human society:

    Over the years, the motivations behind Big Oil’s actions have become abundantly clear and consistent: It always boils down to protecting, and enhancing, oil executives’ ridiculous profits at the expense of anything that gets in their way.

    The latest example can be seen in the halls of Congress lately, where the American Petroleum Institute and its friends have unleashed an army of lobbyists intent on killing a long-standing law regulating the export of crude oil in order to increase profits to the oil industry.

    Lift the Export Ban, Cook the Climate
    David Turnbull, Common Dreams, Wednesday, July 22, 2015
    http://www.commondreams.org/views/2015/07/22/lift-export-ban-cook-climate

    In contrast to that devilment:

    Wildly different and individualistic in their political persuasions as well as their art, the artists, writers and performers here collected offer us the aroused witness, the manifold reportage, the expressive freedom, the groundsong for our time of a diverse, still vibrantly alive society, that for all the difficulties of this moment would restore us to ourselves, awaken our stunned senses to the public interest that is our interest, and vindicate the genius of the humanist sacred constitutional text that embraces us all.
    E.L. Doctorow, Excelsior!

     A Calamity of Heart
    E.L. Doctorow, The Nation/Common Dreams, Wednesday, July 22, 2015
    http://www.commondreams.org/views/2015/07/22/calamity-heart

    Get up! Stand up! Stand up for your rights!

    Reply
  17. Well it’s hotter here in New Orleans, too. It made a headline above the fold in one of our daily papers.

    “In contrast to our extraordinarily wet June with more frequent thunderstorms, local weather experts say some areas of the state have seen weather up to about 5-8 degrees [F = 3-5 C] higher and less rain than the average southeastern Louisiana July.”

    Nola.com

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  July 23, 2015

      The SE USA was one of three areas singled out as at high risk of future heat stress on humanity in the UK climate risk assessment.

      Reply
  18. Matt

     /  July 23, 2015

    Thank you for the hat tip….far too kind🙂 I’m sure your eagle eye would have been over this update soon enough🙂

    Reply
  1. NOAA Shows June of 2015 Smashed All Prior Heat Records; El Nino Keeps Strengthening; Hothouse Mass Casualties Strike Europe, Japan | 2rhoeas3
  2. NOAA Shows June of 2015 Smashed All Prior Heat Records; El Nino Keeps Strengthening; Hothouse Mass Casualties Strike Europe, Japan | Artic Vortex

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