Fossil Fuel Ecocide Forces Starving Polar Bear to Hold Breath For Three Minutes in Seal Hunt

(A starving polar bear is forced to hold breath for a record three minutes in a failed hunt for seals.)

Like so many other innocent creatures on this planet, polar bears are facing ever-worsening life-threatening conditions due to the fossil fuel industry’s insistence to keep burning, and to keep us dependent on their horrific energy sources. The bears’ Arctic home has been transformed in ways that are profound and terrible. The sea ice they used for hunting grounds is greatly depleted. The seals they hunted for prey have ever-more-numerous avenues of escape into dark and warming waters.

It’s a merciless and terrible burning. One that encompasses many genocides together. Ecocide, ecological shock, growth shock, the sixth great extinction. All words to describe what we now watch. What fossil fuel industry influence is preventing us from stopping. But to the bears themselves, it’s a wrenching torture. A forced orphaning and starvation combined as the bears grow increasingly emaciated, weak, and desperate. Transformed into walking skeletal beings, they’re ghosting off toward the obliteration fossil fuel interests are sentencing them to.

(Plunging Arctic sea ice driven by Northern Hemisphere polar amplification is the chief agent of habitat loss and extinction pressure for polar bears. As you can see in the superbly rendered video above by Andy Robinson, the fall has been merciless and precipitous.)

To a climate change denier, the plight of these poor creatures is a subject of ridicule and derision. ‘Who cares about stupid bears’ is the rallying cry of heartless ignoramuses everywhere. They’d rather us be worried about our own petty day-to-day existences. The back and forth, stuck in traffic, want more money, pay less taxes, fear of far off ISIS daily grind of the right wing soundtrack. Or when the tinny siren song of that ever-more-stuffed-with-straw appeal fails it’s back to the old — pretend it’s not happening — trick. Starving polar bears so desperate that they’re now forced to hibernate in summer to conserve energy must be photo-shopped by some imaginary government agency after all, right?

Deny as deniers do, for the bears it’s all too real. For one bear in particular, recently filmed in the above video, it was a life and death struggle. Not some narcissist’s thrill like the needless poaching of innocent wild lions for blood-sport in Africa. No, for this bear, success in the hunt meant a continuation of blessed life. A second chance to keep going, to keep living in the great world. Failure meant weakness, fading, pain and death.

The bear, in dire need of food, was forced to hunt in a way it was not adapted to — by stalking in the water. It was forced, in desperation to swim toward near-water seals. And it was forced to hold its breath underwater. Hold it for longer than any polar bear ever witnessed. Hold it for a full 3 minutes where a mere 72 seconds was the previous record. It was as if the starved bear had been forced to perform impossible feats — or die. That’s the situation the callous greed and disregard of some have put them in. Do the impossible, or just die.

Gaunt and Emaciated Polar Bear that Broke Diving Record

(The gaunt, emaciated and obviously starving polar bear that broke the recent diving record in a photo by Rinie van Meurs. Image source: Meurs Study and The Weather Network.)

This bear’s struggle is not one occurring in isolation. It’s not just the struggle of a single individual. But the struggle of an entire race that is now being torn from the fabric of existence.

The cliche phrase to say at this time is that we are all responsible. That we all share the guilt. But it’s not true. In fact to say such a thing is a terrible lie providing an out for the real perpetrators of this egregious harm. There are some of us who want to change the bear’s situation. Some of us who want to improve its chances. Some of us who want to cut the destructive fossil fuel threads that bind the bear and us all to a terrible and ever worsening ecocide. The ones who want to help are not the problem. The ones attempting again and again to stop the ongoing damage are not the guilty party.

But the deniers and the fossil fuel industry the deniers wittingly or unwittingly serve are entirely different. They don’t care one whit about bears suffering an all-too-real existential crisis. And it seems they don’t care about their own children’s rising existential crisis either. They are the ones who deserve blame. For they are the authors of this great harm.

Links/Credits:

This one’s for Colorado Bob

Polar Bear Forced to Hold Breath for a Record Three Minutes

Record Breaking Polar Bear Spurs Climate Concerns

Food Situation so Bad, Polar Bears now Hibernate During Summer

Sea Ice Volume Decline By Andy Robinson

Leave a comment

146 Comments

  1. Terrible cruelties are being inflicted upon innocent life forms such as this dignified Polar Bear.
    The fossil fuel industries, their operatives, their callous greed — and their cowardly consumers are the cause of this. Harbor no doubt of this.

    Shame and honor seem to absent in the American gas and oil character.
    America, Henry Ford, Standard Oil, Peabody Coal, and the rest of their ilk begat this descent into vicious cruelty.
    Then the Canadians, Australians, British, Russians, and so many more followed along without coherent moral or ethical principles.
    Now we have an unmitigated mess on our hands that our children will curse us for — if they don’t already. For we sure deserve it.

    Thanks for this, Robert and Colorado Bob.

    DT

    Reply
    • A Polar note:
      A recent C-SPAN comment by the USCC Commandant noted the growing need for “traffic separation schemes” in the ice free Arctic oceans.
      That means more vessels — all burning fossil fuels, are expected in an extremely fragile Arctic.
      This is the last thing the Arctic needs.
      OUT
      ###

      Reply
  2. labmonkey2

     /  August 7, 2015

    May have already appeared here… but THE RACE IS ON. That is, the race to ruination.
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/04/russia-lays-claim-to-vast-areas-of-arctic-seabed

    Reply
  3. climatehawk1

     /  August 7, 2015

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  4. marianne

     /  August 7, 2015

    The polar bears are not the only ones struggling, cf. the article “The Status of Glaucous Gulls Larus hyperboreus in the Circumpolar Arctic”,

    http://arctic.journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/arctic/index.php/arctic/article/view/4462

    Reply
  5. Paul Beckwith covers a lot of ground here ruminating on the PMOC and flow across the arctic from the Pacific to the Atlantic.

    Reply
  6. Steve from NZ

     /  August 7, 2015

    Hi Robert – Thankyou for your hard work on this blog – it is so refreshing to be able to read comments that are not laden with denier lies – even though that must mean a lot of moderation. All the best, Steve.

    The polar bear photo breaks my heart. I feel my heart breaks a little more each day. Since realising the enormity of the destruction of the environment I have felt strangely awake but dream-like at the same time. Nothing is quite the same. So many things that seemed important have just faded away. Trivialities. Sometimes I envy those who are unaware, momentarily at least, but you can’t live a lie, no matter how horrible the truth is.

    The world spins on like a three ring circus. I saw some of the Republican debate on the news, full of petty point scoring and “playing the game”, it was beyond contempt and sickening. It’s not just the United States, it’s everywhere, a crisis of leadership.

    I grew up in New Zealand in the 1970’s. It was dull but blissful. The country had a conscience. Protests against South African apartheid and the moment NZ became nuclear free filled me with pride. With the 1980’s came Neo-liberal economics which destroyed that quaint little country (along with the planet). I don’t recognise the place now but I hope the people return,they are lost, searching for a memory.

    Sometimes I sustain myself with a fantasy that there will be a world trial where all the politicians and corporations, the polluters and money men would stand and face their crimes. Would they at that moment find contrition? Or would they say they were just “following orders”?

    All that remains is for us is to not follow their “orders”. To resist in any and every way we can. To say this was not done in my name.

    Reply
    • Have to say I agree wholehearted with this sentiment, Steve. I feel I must apologize on behalf of my country for the public embarrassment and spectacle of wanton greed the Republican Party has become. I sincerely hope we do resist in every way we can and that the effort is so broad as to be overwhelming. For my part, I don’t think we have too much time left before things really start going down hill. We see bad impacts now but this is the easier stuff. Later it’s a really tough slog.

      Reply
    • James Burton

       /  August 9, 2015

      My heart goes out to you in NZ. I was there for a time in the late 80’s and I saw just what you describe. The Neo Liberals hit New Zealand hard in the 80’s! ” With the 1980’s came Neo-liberal economics which destroyed that quaint little country (along with the planet)”

      Reply
  7. Steve from NZ

     /  August 7, 2015

    Thank you Robert – you really don’t have to apologise – it is a crisis of leadership that is continually downgrading the level of ‘debate’ to a point where it becomes just a grotesque parody of itself. Ted Cruz cooking bacon with a machine gun for instance – when I saw that I felt we had entered a world where normal ideas around a contest of ideas had become completely irrelevant.

    A few years ago I saw the “B” comedy movie “Idiocracy” – incredibly it has become an accurate portrayal of our near future.

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  August 8, 2015

      “Idiocracy”

      It is not just an American condition. It is contagious and rampant. Canada & Australia are both starring in that one as well.

      Between ambivalence, ignorance, denial (many forms) and plain old fashioned stupidity not much is left to reason.

      The presidential quest turned WWF grudge match complete with masks, pageantry, choreography and muscle flexing has left me wondering what the absolute lowest common denominator of simpleness will be the magic key to the white house (opening bid $1Billion).

      I am stunned by what childish stunts are required to obtain a sound bite in the media now. Don’t get me started on questioning slogans for what is under the veneer of handlers.

      ie (This was this past week).

      News Person: You said you would build a wall between the US & Mexico and make them pay for it. How will you make them pay for it?

      Trump: It will be easy.

      News Person: You said you will stop illegal immigration 100%, how will you do that?

      Trump: I’ll make sure everyone who comes in is legal.

      –END… that’s it! Those are now acceptable answers! —

      Is that all it takes now? You don’t have to provide anything more that some stupid slogan, and you won’t have your feet held to the fire as to “how”, “when”, “what”? No wonder we are in deep poo poo. Too many people slurp it up and are grateful that nothing was presented that might force them to think. It is like a crappy sitcom where a laugh track tells you when “funny” happened.

      —— 5 years from now ——-

      2020 Election Clown: I promise I’ll put a Chevy Tahoe (Eddie Bower edition) in every driveway with all options, taxes will be a 0%, I’ll quadruple the military size, I’ll build 5,000 aircraft carriers, I’ll create 50 gorillian jobs, corporate taxes will be so low we pay them to be in business, everyone will get anything they want whenever they want, and I’ll balance the budget… hell we’ll have the biggest surplus ever imagined.

      News Person: So how will you do that?

      2020 Election Clown: It’ll be easy.

      News Person: Ok, glad you answered that one so factually. Lets move on to your favorite color.

      I hate to say it but Stupid sells. Stupid works wayyy…. better than smart.

      Reply
      • rustj2015

         /  August 8, 2015

        Christy Rodgers:
        “No mission now but money, no justice now but money no collective destiny no vision just money driving us to claw and pull in all directions, pretending this is what life is, farther apart always till the gravity of shared humanity is finally broken.”

        This is part of a more stark augury, but it is at the point of what our civilization is dying of.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  August 8, 2015

        Your “5 years from now” scenario sounds pretty much like the platform Reagan ran on to me. Even his Republican opponent (and soon-to-be VP) G. Bush Sr. called it ‘voodoo economics.’

        Reply
      • Steven Blaisdell

         /  August 10, 2015

        Andy
        You have noticed that all the Anglo countries trending dangerously stupid are News Corp strongholds. I read not long ago an analysis showing the specifics of this influence. As simplistic as it seems, it’s Murdoch. Or Moloch, given the scorched Earth effects of News Corp’s relentless propagation of puerile narcissism, where consuming (the planet) becomes the highest and only good. A very costly sacrifice indeed.

        It’s really a rather stark and obvious choice, but one must exit history’s largest bubble – day to day life as almost every human in industrialized society experiences it – in order to see it. Hard to do, which for me is where the Pope enters the picture, giving a clear alternative to business as usual (with the white robe and everything). Not even good v. evil, but life v. death – pretty stark and pretty clear. It’s time for a new, ecological “Ten Commandments” to lead the way out of our self immolating worship of the golden calf.

        In a way, having Trump distill, focus, and codify the Murdoch message is, I think, good for American politics. No ambiguity. Now the American left has to stand up and demand that Democrats seize the day and take an unshakable, positive moral stance: either humanity is something more than a colony of yeast with forebrains, or……death to life as we know it.

        Anyways, the battle lines are in the statehouses. Republicans have full control of 24 state governments; Democrats have 6. Democrats reliably turn out in Presidential election years, then effectively concede mid-term and state election cycles. With a strong moral message and imperative, however, I think that can change, perhaps faster than most folks think. And I think Robert’s approach is pretty close to the right one – a strong, understandable but not simplistic moral message backed by irrefutable facts, repeated as often as necessary. Sanders gets it. We’ll see if Clinton, et al get it.

        Reply
    • The premise of Idiocracy isn’t that far off. The American public is not only ignorant, but downright hostile to science, education and knowledgable experts…and idolize morons who are nothing but narcicistic über-consumers. We find ourselves in some Orwellian dystopia full of doublespeak and doublethink, where the media conditions the ignorant populace to be afraid of non-threats like terrorism, when our climate inaction and own police force is far more dangerous.

      Reply
  8. “In 2009, global leaders agreed to try not to let the world warm more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. This is sometimes seen as a rule of thumb for keeping on the right side of climate change, within “safe” territory.

    “But that’s not at all how scientists meant it, Professor Camille Parmesan, an expert in biodiversity at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom said. Climate risks don’t begin at 2C, she said; it’s more like where they go from high to intolerably high.”

    http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/08/07/before-the-century-ends-it-may-be-too-hot-for-people-to-work-outside/

    Reply
  9. Eric Thurston

     /  August 8, 2015

    The Polar Bear photo is indeed heartbreaking. One of the hardest things I’ve had to do in my 15 years or so of participating in internet forums like this is to develop a greater tolerance for other’s points of view, and a thicker skin because of the inevitable flames that occasionally get thrown my way.

    Having said that… sometimes I feel near the breaking point (I’m with you C. Bob)
    I hung out at The Oil Drum for a number of years and there was one arrogant Canadian who insisted that the Polar Bear population was thriving. He also claimed that the Athabasca River was just as polluted before the tar sands operation began as it is now, with ‘natural’ seepage of oil causing the pollution. (Dr. David Schindler’s research gives lie to a lot of these claims). But the most outrageous claim was that the tar sands operation is actually a massive clean-up operation because all this polluting bitumen is getting extracted, leaving much cleaner earth behind!!!!!!!! The oil companies of course claim they will ‘restore’ the ‘Tar Pits of Mordor’ to its previous state with vegetation and all, a claim that has less than a snowball’s chance in hell (or on the US Senate floor) of happening.

    This kind of sh*t makes you want to climb right through the internet screen and strangle the son-of-a-bitch!!

    It just ain’t easy dealing with the amount of intentional ignorance out there. Thanks Robert Scribbler for giving us a forum where we can cry on each other’s shoulders, share good news as well as bad and find some solace and strength in knowing there are many others who share our views and our pains.

    Reply
    • My opinion on the Oil Drum is that it was kind of a shooting gallery where the oil folks could have open season on those of us who supported energy transition, renewables, and a general moving away from fossil fuels. I had it out with that oil company cheerleader Robert Rapier a number of times. And all the information put out on any real solutions to fossil fuel use was horribly mangled — tilted drastically in favor of fossil fuels themselves. But I think it all finally crystallized for me at the first keystone XL protest in Washington DC. As I was walking in there was some guy handing out fliers on peak oil. The guy was claiming that, basically, we shouldn’t be protesting the pipeline because we needed it to stop peak oil. The fliers, of course, were printed by one of our fossil fuel think tanks. Peak oil was thus a convienant excuse to keep burning oil until it ran out. Climate be damned.

      I do remember you and your level headedness fondly from the forum. And I’m very glad that there’s a haven for you here. You’re a good heart and I wish we had a hundred more like you.

      Thanks for your kind words and insights,

      –R

      Reply
  10. James

     /  August 8, 2015

    Excellent article. Hear, hear.

    Reply
    • Cheers, James. The thing I tend to wonder is why do people let themselves be blamed along with those who prevent action and block helpful policy?

      Reply
      • Really good question. Maybe it just sounds profound to say “we’re all guilty”? But I agree, far more of a hindrance than a help, except to the extent that it encourages people to take responsibility for reducing their own GHG footprints. On the other hand, that is not all bad, since it creates the kind of consumer pressures that are–SOOO slowly–forcing the capitalist system to respond.

        Reply
  11. Greg

     /  August 8, 2015

    Robert, this post is really hard. Thank you and CB. This is the kind of story that resonates among the masses and is particularly poignant for me now. I have internet again for a night and of course had to come back to this blog to catch up. Alaska has been magical and reminded me of the power and wildness of nature. Climate change is visible and real here every day. I have seen it in the fire damage and the dirty glaciers and their tremendous retreats and the too easy views of Denali, that should be hidden in the clouds, and the need for a fan to keep cool several nights this past week and in the stories of change from the locals I meet. Yet, still the incredible abundance and resilience is seen everywhere. I saw the opposite of this polar bear, a truly fat and ready for winter, brown bear. The injustice of the contrast. I watched a salmon run in remote Katmai as they lept to reach above the falls, the river thick with them and then, quietly, without warning, a gigantic brown bear came out of the woods, more than 300 pounds bigger than an inland grizzly, and sat down below the falls to catch the leaping salmon. The fish suddenly stopped. We watched for over an hour as the giant bear waited and waited, all of us, humans, bear, salmon nearly still in a relentless high latitude burning sun. How did the fish know, across the width of the river, that he was there, none willing to leap despite the instinct to spawn upstream? We waited and waited for the bear to catch a fish as he scanned back and forth for one to leap. He, in turn, waited for the fish to jump but none did. It was a test of patience for all. Finally, he gave up, stood and moved 10 meters over and found three salmon in the shallows in the space of a few minutes. Roughly 4500 calories each. Some starve while some of us are fat. We humans know this among our species all too well. Keep up the fight Robert.

    Reply
  12. Abel Adamski

     /  August 8, 2015

    Robert
    What really is so heartwrenching is the photo of that bear and the look on his face and in his eyes, he knows he is done but is trying to fight on, he is that weak and emaciated, that huge try would have taken so much from him, unlikely he could do it again, just no reserve of energy and strength left and he knows it,, but he will keep on fighting to survive.

    Maybe a symbolic representation of where those who try to prevent catastrophe find themselves.

    A picture tells a thousand words

    Reply
    • A symbolic representation of where those who do not prevent catastrophe find themselves. If there hadn’t been a staunch, five decades long opposition to the sustainability movement and rational policies to rapidly move away from fossil fuels the bear wouldn’t be there, starving now. So stop blaming the victim and start blaming the criminals.

      Reply
  13. dnem

     /  August 8, 2015

    This is a shameless plug; I hope you don’t mind, Robert. I’d like to call your attention to a brilliant new book by my friend and mentor, Carl Safina. It’s called Beyond Words and it’s about the inner lives of animals. Here is a rave review from the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/science/review-beyond-words-carl-safina.html?_r=0

    It is a deep, profound and poetic book and will give you a deep and new insight into the fabric of life on this planet, and our proper place in it. You will NOT be disappointing.

    Reply
  14. Doug

     /  August 8, 2015

    I’m really shocked that nobody has organized a march on Koch headquarters. This time, more than waving signs.

    Reply
  15. 11 social media posts (& great pics) show reality of extreme weather worldwide http://ecowatch.com/2015/08/07/extreme-weather-worldwide-photos/

    Reply
  16. Colorado Bob

     /  August 8, 2015

    RS many thanks for the post –

    Bear #339 and The Bear A Tones Join Dona Nobis Pacem

    Reply
    • Cheers, Bob. You were rightly impassioned about it. So I decided to help by sending up a flare or two. The polar bear abuse on the right is just as shameful as many of their other talking points. The bears absolutely matter.

      Speaking of bears, my wife and I saw a mother black bear bound up a tree in Shenadoah with her three cubs this weekend. She had to have been 500 pounds + . They were about 50 feet from us, having approached us from the left at a trail head. I saw them out of the corner of my eye as they rapidly approached. Before I turned to face them, I thought they were just more hikers. It gave me a bit of a start when I locked eyes with the mother bear. She spent a half second taking Cat and I in, then just rocketed up the tree with cubs in tow. Amazing, majestic sight. Made me think a bit more about their polar bear cousins up in the Arctic.

      Reply
  17. Colorado Bob

     /  August 8, 2015

    One more –
    Bear #339 Arctic Drilling Op-Ed

    Reply
  18. Griffin

     /  August 8, 2015

    Robert, if you are interested in a short movie from life on the front lines of the battle in the Arctic, the one-day time lapse from Barrow, AK is a must see. They got some waves. How unusual that is, can be gauged by the number of folks lining the protective berm on the shoreline. At one point, the surf clearly breaches the low point of the berm and washes beyond. Time is wearing thin for the settlement on the shore up there.
    http://seaice.alaska.edu/gi/observatories/barrow_webcam

    Reply
  19. Colorado Bob

     /  August 8, 2015

    A heat wave that has already killed dozens and sickened thousands in Japan reached another torrid milestone Friday as the nation’s capital, Tokyo, suffered an unprecedented eighth consecutive day of extreme heat.

    Tokyo reached 37.7 degrees Celsius (99.9 degrees Fahrenheit) Friday, marking its eighth straight day of highs at or above Japan’s “extreme heat” threshold of 35 C (95 F). An analysis of Japan Meteorological Agency data, conducted by The Weather Channel, confirmed that the previous record was just four consecutive days sent on five different occasions between 1978 and 2013. Records began in central Tokyo in June 1875.

    http://www.weather.com/news/news/japan-heat-stroke-deaths-illnesses-2015-august-2

    Reply
  20. Colorado Bob

     /  August 8, 2015

    Corrected sunspot history suggests climate change not due to natural solar trends

    The Sunspot Number is a crucial tool used to study the solar dynamo, space weather and climate change. It has now been recalibrated and shows a consistent history of solar activity over the past few centuries. The new record has no significant long-term upward trend in solar activity since 1700, as was previously indicated. This suggests that rising global temperatures since the industrial revolution cannot be attributed to increased solar activity.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-08-sunspot-history-climate-due-natural.html#jCp

    Reply
  21. – WARNING: ATTEMPTED IRONY HERE:🙂

    According to the Coca Cola Company (The sugar and caffeine centric appendage to the Mcdonald’s empire.) polar bears are doing just fine.
    Why, they’ve been seen happily rolling around on snow and ice drinking — you guessed it — Coca Cola.
    It’s all here.
    There’s no need to Photoshop this.
    No, indeed.

    Reply
  22. – Terminology note:
    It may be helpful sometimes, when mentioning soot — to add, or describe it, as ‘carbon black’ soot or ‘black carbon’ soot.
    From what I know, soot’s black coloration is from the carbon. ‘Carbon’ is the source material of so many of our climate dysfunctions.
    ##

    Polar Portal
    ‏@PolarPortal

    Late #icephoto for #fieldphoto Friday from Japanese colleague Teruo Aoki – #Greenland ice sheet, Qaanaaq 2 weeks ago

    Reply
  23. – From Kevin Hester on Arctic News Facebook:
    – This should apply to all marine and air traffic in the polar regions.

    Think about how much soot and sulphates these planes are depositing on the snow and ice?

    ‘Flying in Arctic on Tupolev Tu-160 The White Swan – Blackjack’

    Reply
  24. Jon Stewart’s 5 Best Segments Bashing Climate Deniers

    ‘… let’s take a moment to reflect on one thing Jon Stewart was really, really good at: skewering climate deniers. In his 16-year run, Stewart had no tolerance for those who denied the science of climate change, only becoming more vocal and more adamant as the need to act became ever more pressing. Here are the very best of Jon Stewart skewering climate deniers:’

    http://ecowatch.com/2015/08/03/jon-stewart-climate-deniers/?utm_source=CR-TW&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=ClimateReality

    Reply
  25. – Bill Nye

    Bill Nye Reading Mean Tweets– The Bill Nye Film

    Reply
  26. – As Arctic sea ice weakens and declines, and the USCC concerns its self with increasing marine shipping and maintaining traffic lanes lanes, shipping in the more equatorial regions experience severe carbon induced climactic shits — as drought.

    BBC News – 8 August 2015
    Latin America & Caribbean
    Panama Canal to limit ship draft due to drought

    The Panama Canal Authority says it will temporarily cut the draft of ships allowed through because of drought caused by El Nino.

    From 8 September, the maximum draft – or depth in the water – will be cut to 39ft (11.89m), which may affect up to 20% of traffic.

    Reply
  27. – Dis-gusting! America.

    Rocky Mountain National Park found to have unhealthy air pollution

    Colorado’s four national parks — Rocky Mountain, Great Sand Dunes, Mesa Verde and Black Canyon of the Gunnison — were among 36 national parks found to experience moderate or worse ozone pollution according to the Air Quality Index developed by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    A recent analysis from the National Parks Conservation Association graded pollution in the country’s 48 national parks and found that every park is plagued by air pollution and climate change impacts.

    Air quality in parks can be as bad, or worse, than in some major cities because of emissions from outdated coal plants, and in the Southwest, the pollution is driven by drought, human development and an unprecedented surge in oil and gas development.

    http://www.summitdaily.com/news/17598433-113/rocky-mountain-national-park-found-to-have-unhealthy

    Reply
    • When will people realize that the “American Dream” — in reality is an environmental NIGHTMARE!
      OUT

      Reply
    • islandraider

       /  August 9, 2015

      Back in the early 90’s, I had the opportunity to conduct a study in RMNP looking at dry deposition of nitrogen onto snow. Spent a 4 months hiking up to a snow field along the continental divide, collecting samples off snow from a watershed, & hiking back down to process the samples for analysis. Even back then, there was a strong signal from the brown cloud that coats the front range of Colorado, floating up to higher elevations of “pristine” (very overused word, that) mountain ecosystems & depositing onto the snow. I am 100% certain that it is much worse now.

      We are impacting every part of this planet. The cancer analogy (also overused) seems apt. I wish I could share Robert’s optimism. Best I can tell, from a scientist’s perspective, mixed with observations of human nature, I am seeing no significant trajectory changes on our path to oblivion. I sincerely hope that I am wrong. I will continue to live my life as if it matters. I will continue to try to convince others to “see” & act is if it matters. I have little hope.

      “One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds. Much of the damage inflicted on land is quite invisible to laymen. An ecologist must either harden his shell and make believe that the consequences of science are none of his business, or he must be the doctor who sees the marks of death in a community that believes itself well and does not want to be told otherwise.” ― Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

      Reply
      • James

         /  August 9, 2015

        The cancer analogy is very apt. See it at http://www.megacancer .com, but you might want to avoid the site if you hold many sustaining beliefs.

        Reply
      • Mark from New England

         /  August 9, 2015

        Well said. And to think that Aldo Leopold wrote that in the 50s, or was it earlier even?!

        Reply
      • islandraider: I will continue to live my life as if it matters. I will continue to try to convince others to “see” & act is if it matters. I have little hope.

        Beautifully articulated. Thank you and for the Aldo Leopold quote. After reading your post I thought about how CO is the state(after CA) that I’ve visited most often over the years. Visited those National Parks and I spent the winter/spring of ’13/’14 in the Rockies—town of Carbondale. I recall one beautiful winter afternoon—in particular because the sun happened to be perfectly aiming at the Roaring Fork River where I was walking with my dog and taking pictures…………The snow still fresh and looked like cotton balls atop on the fragile, skinny branches of bushes. I decided to eat some some of it—reveling in this child-like behavior that brought many fond memories. It tasted so very pure on the palette. When I returned home and told friends they said that it was a terrible idea. That snow at that altitude, and position, in the Rockies, would be polluted with anything beyond what I’m breathing from day-to-day didn’t enter my mind……….it was this afternoon—I did use a filter for effect.

        Reply
    • Griffin

       /  August 9, 2015

      If only folks would realize that the ozone is systematically killing the trees of the Rockies.

      Reply
  28. Fish are diving deeper to escape warming waters:

    “As oceans warm across the planet, one species of fish is escaping the heat by swimming deeper underwater.

    “For up to a year, scientists at James Cook University monitored the behavior of Redthroat emperor fish (Lethrinus miniatus) around Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef. After being tagged with transmitters, the fish have been shown diving beyond the reef slope they normally inhabit.”

    http://www.planetexperts.com/fish-are-diving-deeper-to-escape-warming-waters/

    Reply
  29. redskylite

     /  August 8, 2015

    Animated GIF from National Geographic highlights Arctic ice retreat . .

    “Until you have a hard-copy map in your hand, the message doesn’t really hit home.”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/global-warming-climate-national-geographic-arcitc-ice-sheet-striking-retreat-10446724.html

    Reply
  30. redskylite

     /  August 8, 2015

    In Norway Researchers track the retreat of Arctic ice . . .
    “The last time we could walk on it was in the winter of 2003-04.”

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2015/08/08/environment/researchers-track-retreat-arctic-ice/#.VcaOmrX93Ql

    Reply
    • 2003-04 !!! Bad sign.
      Hansen and others had warned Congress — and through them the American people.
      “Walk this way , Senator…”

      Reply
  31. So painful to see knowing this is just one visible victim of our American dream.

    Reply
  32. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    Sorensen said the plane flew through a powerful thunderstorm in Nebraska near the Colorado border.

    The turbulence battered the plane, shaking it sideways and up and down, bouncing like a cork on a rough sea, Sorensen said. The plane dropped 14,000 feet in altitude over a two-minute time span.

    “Babies were crying. Some young teens behind me were screaming and crying,” Sorensen said………………….

    One attendant told it was her worst flight in 30 years of working as a flight attendant.

    http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_28607221/delta-flight-from-boston-makes-emergency-landing-denver

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      Baseball hail did this to the front of that Airbus.

      Reply
    • eric smith

       /  August 12, 2015

      Shades of William Shatner’s performance on the Twilight Zone.
      I love Shatner so much. True guts with his self depricating humor in his recent ad performances.

      Perhaps we as sane folks should steal a thing or two from his playbook.

      Just a thought.

      Eric

      Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    California drought: River that runs through downtown San Jose goes dry; fish and wildlife suffer

    The river that runs through America’s 10th-largest city has dried up, shriveling a source of civic pride that had welcomed back trout, salmon, beavers and other wildlife after years of restoration efforts. Over the past two months, large sections of the Guadalupe have become miles of cracked, arid gray riverbed. Fish and other wildlife are either missing or dead, casualties of California’s relentless drought.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/drought/ci_28607817/california-drought-river-that-runs-through-downtown-san

    Reply
  34. redskylite

     /  August 9, 2015

    News of NASA’s latest Greenland project:

    “While scientists have recently worked out reliable data sets for losses of ice mass in its interior, this task is trickier at the island’s edges, where glaciers tend to be warmer, thicker and full of crevices. Achieving a precise understanding of the mass of these glaciers will form another major part of the Oceans Melting Greenland project.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/aug/09/omg-nasa-project-oceans-melting-greenland

    and in Bonny Scotland

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/environment/ocean-drifters-off-shetland-tackle-climate-change-1-3853355

    Reply
  35. Andy in SD

     /  August 9, 2015
    Reply
  36. Andy in SD

     /  August 9, 2015

    Boats high and dry as Central Europe fights drought

    RIVER traffic on the Danube has been disrupted with boats left high and dry, and crops destroyed as Central Europe battles one of its worst draughts in decades.

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/environment/boats-high-and-dry-as-central-europe-fights-drought-1-3852796

    Reply
  37. Andy in SD

     /  August 9, 2015

    Lloyds of London Report
    ——————————-

    The global food system is under chronic pressure to meet an ever-rising demand, and its vulnerability to acute disruptions is compounded by factors such as climate change, water stress, ongoing globalisation and heightening political instability.

    “A global production shock of the kind set out in this scenario would be expected to generate major economic and political impacts that could affect clients across a very wide spectrum of insurance classes. This analysis has presented the initial findings for some of the key risk exposures.

    http://www.lloyds.com/~/media/files/news%20and%20insight/risk%20insight/2015/food%20system%20shock/food%20system%20shock_june%202015.pdf

    Reply
  38. Andy in SD

     /  August 9, 2015

    The New Climate “Normal”: Abrupt Sea Level Rise and Predictions of Civilization Collapse

    This article covers a lot of territory.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-new-climate-normal-abrupt-sea-level-rise-and-predictions-of-civilization-collapse/5467184

    Reply
  39. Andy in SD

     /  August 9, 2015

    Some estimates put our soil resource at 60 years of workable soil for agriculture (in a significant amount required to maintain the population).

    Human existence relies on healthy soils, writes Jane Rickson. But all over the world they are being lost and degraded by inappropriate land use, reducing their capacity to produce food and store water, nutrients and carbon. Sustainable land management must be incentivised to conserve this essential resource.

    http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/Blogs/2961577/conserving_soil_precious_finite_and_under_threat.html

    Reply
  40. redskylite

     /  August 9, 2015

    NASA’s doing great work in Greenland . . . part of their Greenland project . . .
    “While scientists have recently worked out reliable data sets for losses of ice mass in its interior, this task is trickier at the island’s edges, where glaciers tend to be warmer, thicker and full of crevices. Achieving a precise understanding of the mass of these glaciers will form another major part of the Oceans Melting Greenland project.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/aug/09/omg-nasa-project-oceans-melting-greenland

    Reply
  41. If polar bears want a better deal, they need to seek the right to vote, or better still, seats on the boards of directors of major enrgy corporations. Until, of course, the Methane Monster burps.

    Reply
  42. Abel Adamski

     /  August 9, 2015

    Lets not forget Iceland, the Geologically and Volcanically active land of ice
    http://www.icenews.is/2015/08/08/iceland-volcanic-eruptions-could-be-a-consequence-of-melting-glaciers/.

    This consequence of AGW Robert has covered previously, so just an update

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      The study – Climate driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by CGPS geodesy – was carried out by researchers from the University of Iceland and the University of Arizona. The group studied data from 62 GPS sensors around Iceland to work out how the earth responded to climate change-driven glacial melting; they found that the country is actually rising by as much as 35 millimetres a year.

      Geologically speaking , this like a rocket ship.

      Reply
  43. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    Here’s goes Russia :

    Fires near Lake Baikal, Russia

    Aqua/MODIS
    2015/220
    08/08/2015
    05:30 UTC

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      Same shot one day earlier –

      Terra/MODIS
      2015/219
      08/07/2015
      04:40 UTC

      Fires near Lake Baikal, Russia

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  August 9, 2015

        Today’s pass –

        Terra/MODIS
        2015/221
        08/09/2015
        04:25 UTC

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  August 9, 2015

        Smoke so thick, it looks like mud. It must be a firestorm down there.

        Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      It’s a classic shot of when the duff is burning, That darker grey ballooning over the fire is the Earth burning, tree roots 18 to 24 inches of moss, needles leaves etc. With little wind surface blowing, That stuff will be on fire next spring. Just like a coal mine.

      Siberia does this every summer now. It’s now a tag team in boreal zone. We saw Canada, and Alaska at the same time this year early , and thank God Russia, was not as active.
      They slowed down some, but the “old fire season”, has just started. We are about to enter a world where all 3 start burning in May, and burn all the way to Oct.

      Note the smoke is going due North in these images.

      Reply
  44. Long time lurker, new commenter who wants to express his deep appreciation for Robert’s work here (and the amazing commenters that add so much). I have been following the arctic ice seasons since 2007, and 2015 is exciting in that we don’t know what is going to happen this deep into the season. Certainly the Beaufort is at a tipping point that could go either way (the daily Bremen maps are fascinating and now a must-see every day), but I think the big story this week is the Atlantic side. The ice is very thin (< 2 m) and the heat is now there and the ice edge is moving closer each day towards the pole. It would be one of the stories out of this season if it reaches 85 degrees N.

    I don't know if anyone feels up to it, but it would be great to track the average latitude of the ice edge on a day-to-day basis for the rest of the season from the Barents to the Greenland Seas. (That would be easier than the Beaufort where there is more than one ice edge😉 ). Just a thought.

    I do think we are going to hit 2 degrees C but our quest is to not go to 3, 4 and beyond. Thank you Robert for your efforts and for also being a beacon of hope (there are too many people throwing up there hands or have a death wish) that we can move forward towards a better world.

    Reply
    • bill shockley

       /  August 10, 2015

      According to Hansen, if we hit 2C this century, that very likely takes us to 3C or 4C later on, from feedbacks and heating in the pipeline, not to mention sea level rise and the loss of civilization on the way to 2C. But along with these grimmest of prognostications he also sees the possibility of at least partial salvation through swift action. I hope we have more than hope in the tank!

      Reply
      • I agree with Hansen. We are on a very dangerous track. One thing that worries me is that countries misreport their emissions (e.g. China) so that the positive events in climate policy mitigation don’t lead to the results they seek. We only have 5-10 years to move things in a better direction. I appreciate your words…we need more than hope…let’s get to work!

        Reply
      • bill shockley

         /  August 10, 2015

        rolling up my sleeves… what do we do?

        Reply
      • There is the battle against coal–Obama is doing a lot and natural gas is displacing it too. What I worry about is oil and cars spewing carbon out the tailpipes. We are using almost 100 million barrels of oil a day and that is still growing with the shale fields. It is hard to replace a few billion cars with zero-emission vehicles in a short time frame. I work on biofuels but that takes time to commercialize and make viable as an alternative. We have to be active in the political area, both across kitchen tables and in campaigns. Climate change is my litmus test because it will affect us more than any other issue in the US and the world. We also have to walk the walk in terms of alternative vehicles and economic efficiency steps in our homes and businesses. I applaud you for your interest in the fight–we can make a difference from a scary future.

        Reply
      • bill shockley

         /  August 10, 2015

        I defer to Hansen, who has been studying the problem for 30-40 years, intensely, at a high level. Quantitatively. For the last decade he’s been stumping on the campaign trail, while keeping up with the science and contributing important articles. He’s been offering his solutions and hearing the feedback, so his ideas are the most informed and the most well vetted. I feel like everyone should shut up and listen to him.

        He doesn’t worry about cars and oil. He says we need to get electricity completely converted to carbon-free sources–renewables and nuclear. Once electricity is carbon-free and we have excess generation, then we can begin to make our own liquid fuels using carbon-free energy.

        Renewables are growing fast but so is world-wide energy useage. He says we won’t achieve the required pace of carbon reduction without a strong carbon tax. And he doesn’t see that being achieved through international agreements. He thinks the most likely way is if China or the US initiate it on their own, individually or, even better, bilaterally. A carbon tax “exports” well, because countries selling goods to the US, for example, would have to pay tax on any fossil fuel content in the manufacture of the product. So, it would be in the exporting country’s best interest to tax it themselves, rather than give the money to the US.

        Further, a carbon tax should be revenue neutral — the proceeds 100%-distributed to citizens on a per-capita basis — so that it does not stress the majority of the people, who have low income. It would be a socialist policy, redistributing wealth. It would encourage efficiency, discourage FF use, and stimulate the economy while creating an even playing field for alternative energy sources. It would have to be phased in over 10 years or so, so that the price signal could have the desired effect without too much disruption to the economy.

        He thinks a revenue neutral carbon tax should be appealing to conservatives, because it doesn’t grow government. He actually thinks it is more likely to take hold with Republicans than with Democrats — the revenue neutral part — because Democrats just can’t keep their hands off the money. Problem is, I don’t think Republicans resemble, anymore, his image of what they are… they’re off the deep end.

        I think the science end of climate change is settled. Where we’re at and what needs to be done. Attention should be on implementation and politics. I’m curious what can happen with this election. What would happen with Hillary (ugh); with Sanders (??); with a Republican (yeow!). I’ve been watching Chris Hedges videos. Amazing man. This one is recent. It’s personal, talks about his life and career, his father, his beliefs.

        Youtube: Chris Hedges “Wages of Rebellion”

        The difference between rebellion and revolution. The difference between taking power and scaring those in power.

        Reply
  45. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    Cyprus heatwave: British holidaymakers given extreme weather advice after temperatures rocket to 57C

    It is so hot steering wheels have started to melt and people have been advised to remove newspapers from car dashboards for fear they will burst into flames

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/cyprus-heatwave-british-holidaymakers-given-6195638

    The average August temperature for the country is 30C to 40C.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      134.6 F

      Reply
      • Is that an official temperature or is the sun shining on those thermometers? On-the ground temperatures are sometimes different than air temperatures in the shade (think stadium grounds). That seems incredibly high.

        Reply
      • bill shockley

         /  August 9, 2015

        Highest recorded temperature
        DEATH VALLEY
        56.7 DEGREE(S) CELSIUS
        UNITED STATES
        10 JULY 1913

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  August 9, 2015

        bill shockley

        Cyprus is an island surrounded by water DEATH VALLEY is lowest spot in the Western Hemisphere . If you read the link , and follow this stuff , you understand that High Pressure over the Persian Gulf is drifting to the East. It’s that same system that made a 165 F degree index over the Northern Persian Gulf last week.

        Let me make one more point,

        IN the 21st century, giant High Pressure systems Will slowly drift around, and extremely deep Lows will race race around them . Baseball hail will destroy the face of airplanes. Twain will see 4 to 5 feet of rain from every cyclone.

        bill shockley –

        I nope you aren’t invested in beach front property. See Chile clip. None of those people are D. Trump.

        Reply
      • bill shockley

         /  August 9, 2015

        Colorado Bob,

        Thanks for the pointers. Yes, I do watch these things but I don’t have the expertise to recognise the important nuances that add meaning to the numbers… that’s what attracted me to Robert’s blog — the expert, passionate focus on world-wide weather and climate phenomena contributed by Robert and his coterie of loyal and avid commenters. It’s what I consider makes this blog unique.

        With respect and gratitude,
        bill shockley

        Reply
  46. James Burton

     /  August 9, 2015

    Ever warming seas have consequences! “An unprecedented bloom of toxic algae that spreads thousands of miles across the Pacific Coast of the United States and Canada is raising concerns for health and massive economic loss through the closing of fisheries.
    The massive algae bloom emerged in May and spans from the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California to Alaska’s Aleutian Islands.”
    A preview of the future is taking place on the West Coast. Toxic seas bordering a fire ravaged coast. The cost of global warming is mounting so fast it is hard to keep up. We either change now, and fast, or the price will be a 1,000X the cost of switching off of fossil carbon.

    Reply
  47. Salmon on Vancouver Island threatened by heatwave http://www.cbc.ca/1.3179468

    Reply
  48. Opinion: Climate change has arrived in Central Europe: Deutsche Welle http://www.dw.com/en/opinion-climate-change-has-arrived-in-central-europe/a-18637340

    “It’s been hot in Germany, really hot. Newspapers are full of tips on how to endure temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius (105F): avoid strenuous physical activity, stay in the shade and drink lots of fluids. The dome of Berlin’s Reichstag building was closed several times last week to avoid exposing tourists to the melting heat in the glass construction. In the state of Baden-Württemberg, highway police have repeatedly asked motorists to adhere to the heat-related speed limit of 80 kilometers per hour (50 mph). Old highway lanes made of concrete can literally buckle to form ramps similar to jumps on a ski slope. In Potsdam’s Park Sanssouci, trees dating to the days of the 18th-century Prussian King Frederick the Great are endangered by the heat.

    “But no one is speaking of climate change. Most people in Germany view it as a problem elsewhere, like in Africa, where desertification and hunger have led to war and the exodus of inhabitants, or in Poland, where the ice is melting away.”

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 9, 2015

      The dome of Berlin’s Reichstag building was closed several times last week to avoid exposing tourists to the melting heat in the glass construction. In the state of Baden-Württemberg, highway police have repeatedly asked motorists to adhere to the heat-related speed limit of 80 kilometers per hour (50 mph). Old highway lanes made of concrete can literally buckle to form ramps similar to jumps on a ski slope.

      Reply
  49. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    Here are another old 60’s tune foretold our fate :

    Grateful Dead – Hell In A Bucket – Studio Version

    Reply
  50. Colorado Bob

     /  August 9, 2015

    I post music music, because it moves people.

    Reply
  51. Bill H

     /  August 9, 2015

    Arctic sea ice area (not extent) now below the value for the same date in 2007. Also very close to 2011 level. If Robert’s suggestion about a 2 year period for el Ninos to fully impact on the arctic then there will be precious little left in 2017.

    http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/arctic.sea.ice.interactive.html

    Reply
  52. – Fossil fuel climate change forensics using the CO2 Keeling Curve

    – An automobile and traffic centric Disneyland opens July 17, 1955 in Anaheim, CA.
    – Scores of acres of farmland are converted to asphalt parking lots to accommodate this enterprise based upon pure fantasy and fossil fuel dependent access .

    – 1955 CO2 per Keeling Curve: aprox. 310 ppm.

    Image source: wikimedia.org

    Reply
  53. – 1955 and a few months later, nearby Los Angeles smothers in a blanket of toxic ‘smog’.

    – The highest ozone level the station ever recorded was .68 parts per million in 1955 and the lowest was .14 ppm in 1996. Ozone is a chief component of smog. – aqmd.gov home library

    Reply
  54. -Photo & a link.
    -A set of photos worth a look:

    Long-Exposure Photos of California Wildfires at Night
    by Michael Zhang

    Reply
  55. Oh my, DT. Those photos are incredible. Thanks so much for posting them.

    Reply
  56. Seeing this poor bear, an example of what many innocent creatures/species are facing, simply breaks my heart. It may be the greatest crime ever committed, the destruction of an astonishingly complex and beautiful web of life that took millions of years to evolve, for the greed and comfort of a few individuals over the course of a couple generations. The most immoral act I can think of. It’s cliche to say “extinction is forever”, and the words don’t capture the immensity of it all…never again for the life of the entire universe will these creatures live and breathe and passionately love and care for their kin, and fight for survival on this precious blue oasis floating in a vast sea of emptiness.

    Reply
  57. Colorado Bob

     /  August 10, 2015

    Jefferson Airplane – “Wooden Ships ”
    I don’t think so. ,

    ” How do you feel ? ”

    Jefferson Airplane “How Do You Feell ?”

    Uploaded on Apr 14, 2008

    Title: How Do You Feel
    Album: Surrealistic Pillow
    Track No: 8
    Written By: Tom Mastin

    Marty Balin – Vocals
    Grace Slick – Vocals
    Jorma Kaukonen – Lead Guitar
    Paul Kantner – Rhythm Guitar, Lead Vocals
    Jack Casady – Bass Guitar
    Spencer Dryden – Drums

    Music
    “How Do You Feel (Stereo Version)” by Jefferson Airplane (Google Play • AmazonMP3 • iTunes)

    Tom Masterson was my friend he wrote this song .

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 10, 2015

      “How Do You Feel (Stereo Version)” by Jefferson Airplane
      Tom Masterson was my friend he wrote this song .

      Reply
  58. Colorado Bob

     /  August 10, 2015

    We all need this.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 10, 2015

      He was on a second story window in the Haight. Drinkh Ripple. In 1966, he wrote it in 2 minutes. This girl started walking up the street.

      Reply
  59. Colorado Bob

     /  August 10, 2015

    Here’s our song folks –

    Simon and Garfunkel – Save The Life Of My Child – [Lyrics in description]

    Save the Life Of My Child

    “Good God! Don’t jump!”
    A boy sat on the ledge
    An old man who had fainted was revived
    And everyone agreed ‘twould be a miracle indeed
    If the boy survived

    “Save the life of my child!”
    Cried the desperate mother

    The woman from the supermarket
    Ran to call the cops
    “He must be high on something” someone said
    Though it never made The New York Times
    In The Daily News, the caption read

    “Save the life of my child!”
    Cried the desperate mother

    (Hello darkness, my old friend
    I’ve come to talk with you again)

    A patrol car passing by
    Halted to a stop
    Said officer MacDougal in dismay:
    “The force can’t do a decent job
    ‘Cause the kids got no respect
    For the law today (and blah blah blah)”

    “Save the life of my child!”
    Cried the desperate mother

    “Oh what’s becoming of the children?”
    People asking each other

    When darkness fell, excitement kissed the crowd
    And it made them wild
    In an atmosphere of freaky holiday
    When the spotlight hit the boy
    And the crowd began to cheer
    He flew away

    “Oh, my Grace, I got no hiding place”

    Music
    “Save the Life of My Child” by Simon & Garfunkel (Google Play • iTunes • AmazonMP3)

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 10, 2015

      I’m a lot smarter than I appear. This is our song.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  August 10, 2015

        “Save the life of my child!”
        Cried the desperate mother

        “Oh what’s becoming of the children?”
        People asking each other

        Reply
      • Beautiful, Bob. Made me fall into a reflective mood.

        Reply
      • rustj2015

         /  August 10, 2015

        “Oh, my Grace, I’ve got no hiding place…” has come to mind frequently through these years.

        Reply
        • No hiding place. The sooner we realize that. The sooner we realize we’re all together in this, the sooner we can have a chance to effectively fight this thing off. The predatory, individualistic activity, however, just makes the situation worse and worse.

  60. Colorado Bob

     /  August 10, 2015

    40 years ago.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 10, 2015

      Get your bit it your Teeth, play this in the back of your head. , The Pope say’s it’s God’s work..

      Reply
  61. redskylite

     /  August 10, 2015

    National Geographic on mega-fires in the U.S . . . .

    “Megafires are remaking forests in ways that scientists are still struggling to understand. They incinerate habitat for songbirds like the yellow-rumped warbler, push already-vulnerable whitebark pine trees closer to extinction, and, when they are especially ferocious, burn down whole forests so thoroughly, they never grow back.”

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150809-wildfires-forest-fires-climate-change-science/

    Reply
    • ” and, when they are especially ferocious, burn down whole forests so thoroughly, they never grow back.”
      This is all human caused from fossil fuels.
      Terrible.

      Reply
  62. bill shockley

     /  August 10, 2015

    We’ve paid in hell since Moscow burned
    As Cossacks tear us piece by piece
    Our dead are strewn a hundred leagues
    Though death would be a sweet release
    And our grande army is dressed in rags
    A frozen starving beggar band
    Like rats we steal each other’s scraps
    Fall to fighting hand to hand

    Save my soul from evil, Lord
    And heal this soldier’s heart
    I’ll trust in thee to keep me, Lord
    I’m done with Bonaparte

    What dreams he made for us to dream
    Spanish skies, Egyptian sands
    The world was ours, we marched upon
    Our little Corporal’s command
    And I lost an eye at Austerlitz
    The sabre slash yet gives me pain
    My one true love awaits me still
    The flower of the aquitaine

    Save my soul from evil, Lord
    And heal this soldier’s heart
    I’ll trust in thee to keep me, Lord
    I’m done with Bonaparte

    I pray for her who prays for me
    A safe return to my belle France
    We prayed these wars would end all wars
    In war we know is no romance
    And I pray our child will never see
    A little Corporal again
    Point toward a foreign shore
    Captivate the hearts of men

    Save my soul from evil, Lord
    And heal this soldier’s heart
    I’ll trust in thee to keep me, Lord
    I’m done with Bonaparte

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 10, 2015

      bill shockley
      200 years of wisdom, about invading Russia,

      Take your over coat, you’re going to meed it.

      Reply
  63. bill shockley

     /  August 10, 2015

    Some people get a cheap laugh breaking up the speed limit
    Scaring the pedestrians for a minute
    Crossing up progress driving on the grass
    Leaving just enough room to pass
    Sunday driver never took a test
    Oh yeah, once upon a time in the West
    Yes and it’s no use saying that you don’t know nothing
    It’s still gonna get you if you don’t do something
    Sitting on a fence that’s a dangerous course
    Ah, you could even catch a bullet from the peace-keeping force
    Even the hero gets a bullet in the chest
    Oh yeah, once upon a time in the West
    Mother Mary your children are slaughtered
    Some of you mothers ought to lock up your daughters
    Who’s protecting the indigency?
    Now heap big trouble in the land of plenty

    Reply
  64. redskylite

     /  August 10, 2015

    If it keeps on rainin’, levee’s goin’ to break
    If it keeps on rainin’, levee’s goin’ to break
    When the levee breaks I’ll have no place to stay

    Mean old levee taught me to weep and moan
    Mean old levee taught me to weep and moan
    It’s got what it takes to make a mountain man leave his home
    Oh, well, oh, well, oh, well

    Don’t it make you feel bad
    When you’re tryin’ to find your way home
    You don’t know which way to go?
    If you’re goin’ down South
    They got no work to do,
    If you don’t know about Chicago

    Cryin’ won’t help you, prayin’ won’t do you no good
    Now, cryin’ won’t help you, prayin’ won’t do you no good
    When the levee breaks, mama, you got to move

    All last night sat on the levee and moaned
    All last night sat on the levee and moaned
    Thinkin’ about my baby and my happy home

    Going, going to Chicago…
    Going to Chicago…
    Sorry but I can’t take you…
    Going down… going down now… going down….

    Reply
  65. wili

     /  August 10, 2015

    Bob Dylan: “If it keep on rainin’ the levee gonna break”

    Reply
  66. bill shockley

     /  August 10, 2015

    Preacher was talking there’s a sermon he gave
    He said every man’s conscience is vile and depraved.

    I read the story somewhere of how he heard this line. Might have been his autobiography, part I. He was in the South, recording an album and during a break he went out for a motorcycle ride in the country. Stopped into a store along the way and a dour man behind the counter delivered the line, with no apparent provocation.

    Reply
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