2015’s Cruel Climate Count Continues as NASA Shows July Was Hottest On Record

Andrew Freeman is right. It’s been a cruel, cruel summer. Hothouse mass casualty events, spurred by a ridiculous accumulation of heat trapping gasses in the Earth atmosphere, have spanned the Northern Hemisphere. The result has been thousands of lives lost and the hospitalization of tens of thousands more as global temperatures rocketed to levels not seen in probably 100,000 years (related — Hothouse Mass Casualties Strike Egypt).

July of 2015 Hottest on Record

Now, in a record-shattering hot year featuring extreme weather weirdness and an emerging monster El Nino, yet one more record has fallen. For according to both NASA and Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA), July of 2015 squashed and smashed previous record hot Julys 2011 (NASA) and 1998 (JMA) to take the title as hottest July yet.

July Temperatures Japan Meteorological Agency

(Japan’s Meteorological Agency shows July of 2015 was the hottest on record by a wide margin.)

In the JMA graph, beginning in 1890, you can plainly see the new July record is well above the +0.67 C per Century warming trend line of the last 125 years. A new high that leaves the 1998 super El Nino year in the dust.

For JMA, that’s 0.72 C above the 20th Century average and about 1 C above 1890.  For NASA, global temperatures also hit a similarly hot range. July of 2015 was 0.75 C above their 20th Century base line — putting it at about 0.95 C hotter than 1880s values when annual record keeping began. Now we only wait on NOAA’s report coming out in a few days for a final confirmation of this obscene July heat.

2015 On Track For Hottest Year By a Wide Margin

Focusing in on the NASA measure, we find that January through July temperatures are setting a course for a record shattering 2015. Overall, global temperatures during that seven month period were 0.8 C above NASA’s 20th Century benchmark and about 1 C above 1880s values. A level of heat that, if it were simply maintained, would beat out previous record hot year, 2014, by a substantial margin (0.07 C).

To the layman, these may seem like small numbers except when one considers that just 3.5 C of cooling from Holocene climates means the start of a new ice age. In just 135 years we’ve hit 30 percent of the difference between the Holocene and an ice age — but on the side of hot. Moreover, an annual temperature climb of 0.07 C equals 7 degrees Celsius warming if maintained for one Century. So a one year jump in that range is a pretty wide margin, especially when we consider that we’re now experiencing back-to-back hottest years on record.

El Nino + Climate Change In the NASA Graphic

NASA Temp Map July 2015

(NASA’s July distribution of hot and cold temperature anomalies shows a world that’s tipping more and more toward climate extremes. Image source: NASA GISS.)

Geospatially, the representation of hot and cold temperature extremes in the NASA map hints at an absolute mess for July weather patterns. While abnormal and extreme warmth dominated the East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort airs, a plug of below average temperatures hovered over the Laptev. Two substantial chimneys of heat extended into the Arctic — one exploding up from the Hot Blob in the Pacific and another stretching diagonally over the Lake Baikal region of Russia (Related: The Dry Land Burned Like Grass). Most of Western Europe baked while the Yamal region cooled. In the North Atlantic the Climate Change signature and storm generating cool pool maintained — gearing up to throw a few wicked cyclones at the British Isles in the midst of, what should be placid, summer.

And all across the equatorial region anomalous heat built — pushing monthly temperatures from 1-4 degrees Celsius above average in some of the typically hottest regions of the world. In this analysis we must pause for a moment to point out the awesome and terrible wave of heat building up from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific, telegraphing through the Hot Blobs off the North American West Coast and extending on up through the Bering Sea. A teleconnection feature that must fall if California is to have any hope of receiving a drought busting set of storms this Winter — monster El Nino or no.

The mid-to-equatorial latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere were also abnormally warm with few regions showing any departure into cooler than ‘normal’ in this zone. Meanwhile, the Southern Polar Region was a mess of hot ridges and cold troughs indicative of a very wavy Jet Stream pattern for the zone. In particular, a ridge blazing south through the Weddell Sea set off some much warmer than normal readings for Coats Land and the Ronne Ice Shelf.

El Nino Zonal Signature

(Zonal temperature anomalies for July show a clear signature of El Nino and a climate change related heat sink in the Southern Ocean. Image source: NASA GISS.)

In the NASA zonal map, we can clearly see the signature of El Nino. Equatorial temperatures are the hottest in the measure pushing to +1.3 degrees Celsius above average over the world’s belt-line. To the north, heat gradually tapered off — still maintaining near +1 C through the 40 degree line before dipping down to around +0.8 to +0.3 C in the 50s, 60s, and 70s and then rising again to around +0.7 C at the pole.

To the south, anomalies rapidly plunged throughout most zones — dipping to +0.35 C in the range of the furious fifties (50 degrees South Latitude). In the oceanic heat sink region where fresh and icy water met the warmer, saltier waters of the Southern Ocean, heat uptake by that ocean-atmosphere interface hit an extreme level as negative zonal anomalies spiked to -1.4 C in the range of 65 South Latitude. This ocean heat uptake and related atmospheric cooling is associated with a global warming related fresh water outflow due to Antarctic glacial melt — the Southern Hemisphere version of the North Atlantic cool pool.  Zonal temperatures swing again higher, hitting +0.6 C at the land glacier edge in the region between 70 and 80 South, before dipping to around -0.7 C in the Antarctic interior near 90 South.

Conditions in Context

During the record hot July of 2015 temperature and weather hit new extremes. Variation between hot and cold temperatures became greater over many regions of the globe as hot and cool pools grew in prominence and related weather influence. Glacial melt and ocean current change related cool pools dominated the North Atlantic and a band near 70 South in the Southern Ocean. Meanwhile, extreme equatorial heat associated with El Nino developed teleconnections with high amplitude ridges — especially with the Hot Blob related Ridiculously Resilient Ridge over the Northeastern Pacific.

In addition, a synergy developed between high ocean temperatures, related high humidity, and a number of dangerous heatwaves. Near record and record hot waters in the regions of India, Pakistan, and Japan synergistically enabled deadly, mass-casualty producing heatwaves in those regions. This is due to the fact that hot waters enable higher wet bulb temperatures over land — pushing wet bulbs, at times, close to the human survival limit of 35 C.

With Global temperatures now at 1 C above 1880s levels we begin to witness hints of what a human-forced hothouse may look like. But what we see now are only the early, easy outliers.

Links:

Japan’s Meteorological Agency

NASA GISS

2015’s Cruel Summer

Hothouse Mass Casualties Strike Egypt

India Sees Worst Flood in 200 Years

El Nino Crosses Monstrous Threshold

(Please support public, non special interest based science, like the fantastic research produced by NASA and JMA without which this report would not have been possible.)

Leave a comment

143 Comments

  1. Keep hammering away, Robert.
    “Cruel Climate Count …mass casualty events…temperature and weather hit new extremes…”
    The ‘hammer’ of truth upon the ‘anvil’ of reality.
    DT

    Reply
    • And the beat goes on😉

      Next bit may be something you alerted me to, DT. Wet bulbs for the US South. Notably both the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of California are featuring 30-32 C sea surface temperatures. That’s some heat/moisture potential for trouble there.

      Predicted heat indexes in the Dangerous range of 110 to 115 + for the US Southeast over a broad region by Friday. Given those SSTs in the Gulf, this could get worse. Something to keep an eye on.

      Reply
      • You bet, Robert. A lot of people, in quite a few places, will get a ‘hot compress’ when they are already running a high fever.
        You’re staying in front of the curves while MSM chases ambulances and getting there too late.
        Thanks for that.

        Reply
      • Yes, it seems to be starting in South Florida and the Tampa Bay to Naples sections of the Florida Gulf Coast: temperatures predicted to be in the 100s F tomorrow.

        Reply
      • Robert is always light years ahead of MSM. The past two days I’ve been hearing on the “news” lots of talk about a “Godzilla El Niño” taking shape. A little late to the party, as we’ve been staying informed on the subject all along. Keep up the great work, Robert! You’ve really been producing a cornucopia of fantastic posts, and helping us stay well informed.

        Reply
    • Now this is a curve ball:

      http://grist.org/politics/al-gore-for-president-people-are-talking/

      The words that come to mind are — poetic justice.

      Reply
      • Jacob

         /  August 14, 2015

        I hope he does run. America could have used Al Gore as President in 2000 and needs him now more than ever.

        Reply
  2. Really paints a sobering picture. Yes it sounds an alarm. Which brings to mind that dangerous marginalization the “alarmist” There is a reason miners took canary’s into coal mines. Funny twist on that one. ; )

    Reply
  3. Kevin Jones

     /  August 14, 2015

    Cryosphere Today is indicating a -279,000 sq km below baseline sea ice area year-to-date for 8/13/15. You all know: that place down there that is gaining ice so as to cancel losses up there. C’mon ‘Tony’ ‘Watts’. Help us out here!

    Reply
  4. 1997 happened toward the end of the last positive PDO and we are currently beginning another positive PDO and we are already this hot. What in the crystal climate ball do you see happening going forward in regards to the PDO and heat?

    Reply
  5. we_are_toast

     /  August 14, 2015

    I love this:
    “To the layman, these may seem like small numbers except when one considers that just 3.5 C of cooling from Holocene climates means the start of a new ice age. In just 135 years we’ve hit 30 percent of the difference between the Holocene and an ice age — but on the side of hot. ”

    I’ve always wondered how to reach the lay person with the seriousness of our situation. You can talk about it’s the hottest it’s been in thousands of years, or sea levels might rise a foot and a half in the next 50 years, but it just doesn’t sound serious. But if you say if we were 3 1/2C lower than we were in 1880, there would soon be a half mile of ice over New York City and we’re already 1C above that 1880 average and we’re climbing fast, I think that might get their attention.

    And when is NASA going to wake up and quit announcing, in JANUARY, that we just had the hottest year on record?! Why in the world does NASA need to comply with the arbitrary calendar year? Every August NASA needs to hold a big press conference and announce the average temperature for the previous 12 months while people are sweating in their armchairs and giant heatwaves are sweeping the Northern Hemisphere.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  August 14, 2015

      they do that. they have always done this. go to GISS temp. Go Google James Hansen.
      concentrate. read.

      g

      Reply
    • I have found the only effective way to respond to people who say they can’t understand why 1 or 2ºC is such a big deal is to ask them how they would feel if they were running a 3.6ºF fever and how long they think they could survive.

      Reply
  6. climatehawk1

     /  August 14, 2015

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  7. James Burton

     /  August 14, 2015

    ” There seem to be two competing philosophies at work within the throbbing brain of the Empire: the environmentally hostile, infinite growth-oriented, natalistic view of economists, and the eco-friendly, Malthusian, population-control view of ecologists.”
    Dimitry Orlov sums things up nicely and in few words. I come with a strong background in technology from my youth, and economics in my later years, I have seldom seen such a short sighted course than the one the world’s economies are on right now. All the drivers are making the C02 rise, and the Global Warming it causes increase. Infinite growth economics is a dead end, but the leaders refuse to change course! Time for the passengers to revolt and grab the wheel?

    Reply
  8. Doug

     /  August 14, 2015

    Thought you would be interested in this article Robert from Climate Central. It has a map of the U.S. that shows where in the Country and when, will experience “Danger Days” There’s a few surprises on there at least for me, ie. Charleston, W.V. projected to have more of these days than anywhere else in the U.S.

    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/danger-days-on-rise-in-us-cities-19322

    Reply
  9. Wake

     /  August 15, 2015

    Do you remember how that coach trademarked 3peat before whomever won it and ESPN and everyone had to pay him to use it?

    I am thinking 3Heat. Next year probably being a record as well

    I gift it to you for all the good service to mankind

    Reply
  10. labmonkey2

     /  August 15, 2015

    Yes… it’s H O T. And for those that were around in 1968 – I bring you the crazy world of Arthur Brown

    As an aside – we’re experiencing 101 degree temps w/ 17% RH in the inland area of San Diego. Fairly typical for this time of year, but we sure need some rain

    Reply
    • redskylite

       /  August 15, 2015

      Thanks for that memory jog from 1968 . . . A great year for music

      Reply
  11. Jack Arnold

     /  August 15, 2015

    So… these New Jersey sized ice chunks that are popping off the arctic and floating out to sea; does this normally happen in the late ice melt season? This is my first year watching things like climate reanalyzer which are showing this.

    Reply
  12. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015

    Thanks for the excellent article on the temperature climb. There is a new tool developed now, where scientists grade journalism, it is an excellent idea and guide to the lay person, like myself.

    The Guardian….

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/planet-oz/2015/aug/14/scientists-get-tool-to-mark-online-climate-science-media-coverage-and-its-not-a-rusty-teaspoon

    Reply
  13. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015

    I’m pleased to see Andrew Freedman (Mashable’s Science Editor) was rated very highly by the new tool, on his story about Cyclone Pam and Vanuatu.

    http://climatefeedback.org/feedbacks/

    Reply
  14. Andy in SD

     /  August 15, 2015

    Lion Fish are now moving north as those waters become more hospitable. They are voracious eaters, and breed by large numbers.

    They are decimating indigenous species to the point they resort to cannibalism, as nothing is left.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/150723-lionfish-invasive-species-destructive-fish-cannibalism-florida/

    Reply
  15. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015

    The ARGO program is performing a fine job giving valuable data on the top 2000 meter layer of our oceans. Pleased to read a new sturdy float for the Arctic has been developed and is about to be launched…

    http://maritime-executive.com/article/arctic-proof-drone-to-study-climate-change

    Reply
  16. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015

    There has been a lot of news regarding Alaska and Californian fires, seems they are suffering similar headaches in Siberia . . . .

    http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/casestudy/news/n0352-siberia-on-fire/

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 15, 2015

      Head of Federal Baikal-Angara basin management Mikhail Voronov warned of long-term ecological damage to the lake. ‘Baikal’s cleaning capability is dramatically low, due to a small flow of water. No spring floods on Baikal for already 19 years and it’s scary,’ he said.

      Reply
  17. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015
    Reply
  18. Andy in SD

     /  August 15, 2015

    Susceptibility to food shock (decimated yields of a crop in a region) has become endemic since the 97/98 El Nino (in the 2000’s). When you read this report from the UK on food security, it becomes apparent we’ve actually been fortunate. We’ve suffered a reduction in either corn, soy, wheat,rice or other staples regionally. That has been the luck of the draw. As we get ready to crank the climate shift up a notch potentially with another El Nino, that chances of concurrent reductions in multiple locales becomes a stronger possibility. What we have seen with conflict, mass migration and civil unrest may multiply in such occurrences.

    http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/assets/pdfs/extreme-weather-resilience-of-global-food-system.pdf

    Reply
  19. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Dying California forests offer a glimpse into climate change
    Experts say effects could be worse in Canada

    Normally, only about two per cent of the trees in their study areas die. But this year, that number has grown to 13 per cent.

    “That’s a really severe uptick,” says U.S. Geological Survey ecologist Nate Stephenson. “We’ve never seen anything like it before.”

    Stevenson bends the branch of an incense cedar. Most branches are covered with dry, dead orange needles. The rest are bare.

    “I used to call them ‘the immortals,’ because they just never seemed to die,” he says. “In the fourth year of drought, they’ve started dying by the bucket-loads. So they’re no longer the immortals.”

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/dying-california-forests-offer-a-glimpse-into-climate-change-1.3187672

    Reply
  20. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    The Climate Change Election –

    For as long as Americans have voted and pundits have bloviated, each presidential election cycle has seemed The Most Important in All History.

    Next year, though, may truly – actually, seriously – be different, if climate scientists are right. The next candidate Americans send to the Oval Office, experts say, may also be the very last who can avert catastrophe from climate change.

    “It is urgent and the timeframe is critical and it has to be right now,” says Vicki Arroyo, executive director of the Georgetown Climate Center at Georgetown Law. “We can’t lose another four years, much less eight years.”

    Link

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  August 15, 2015

      Dear Colorado: Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig believes strongly this climate emergency. He believes we must rise up to return the Republic to We the People in order to deal with it. He is attempting to run on a mandate to do just this and only this, then hand the reins to his VP. Outrageous, I know…..but these are outrageous times. (his thinking is a vote for him could get Bernie or Warren, whomever the convention decides, in.)

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  August 15, 2015

        15h
        Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales becomes chairman of Larry Lessig for President campaign committee…… Any relation to Josey?

        Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  August 15, 2015

        I cannot cut and paste on my caretaking house’s machine but Huffington Post has an excellent video of Lessig explaining his idea. Why I Want to Run for President

        Reply
  21. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Meet The Seaweed Choking The Beauty Out Of The Caribbean

    It’s brown, smells like rotten eggs and is a breeding ground for fleas. Welcome to the stinky Caribbean, choked by record amounts of seaweed.

    Huge quantities of brown sargassum seaweed are burying the usually pristine beaches and coves of the Caribbean, The Associated Press reports. Tourists have canceled trips, and some lawmakers in Tobago have reportedly called the seaweed a “natural disaster.”

    Sargassum grows and floats in an area of the Atlantic called the Sargasso Sea. Sargassum mats are nurseries for sea turtles, and provide habitats for many marine creatures, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.

    When the seaweed washes ashore, the little creatures living inside it die, creating a putrid stink. Sand fleas breed in the piles, some of which are up to 10 feet tall.

    It’s unclear why there’s so much sargassum this year. Researchers have suggested that rising ocean temperatures and increased fertilizer runoff may be factors.

    Link

    Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Andy in SD –

    Drought Causes Food Crisis for Nearly 1 Million in Guatemala

    BOGOTA, COLOMBIA—

    Nearly 1 million people in Guatemala are struggling to feed themselves as poor rainfall has led to drought and shrunken harvests, worsening hunger among the poor, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said.

    Linked to the El Nino weather phenomenon, this year’s drought has been very hard on subsistence farmers living in Central America’s dry corridor that runs through parts of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua.

    “In Guatemala, 170,000 families, approximately 900,000 people, have no food reserves left. This is the third consecutive year they have been hit by drought,” Diego Recalde, head of the FAO in Guatemala, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

    Link

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 15, 2015

      Four dead, more than 20,000 affected by Niger floods

      The bad weather is showing no sign of abating as the rainy season continues in the impoverished sub-Saharan country, which has often faced severe food crises due to flooding or drought.

      Since late July, local media have reported repeated floods, particularly in central and southern Niger.

      Link

      Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  August 15, 2015

      Yup CB, it’s not a matter of “its coming”, it’s a matter of “it’s here”.

      Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    How many floods will these American cities have in 2030, 2045?

    We know now that America’s East and Gulf Coasts will be flooding more in upcoming years because of climate change. But how much? And how do you show that in a way that people can understand?

    That’s what we’re trying to do, with Vanilla Ice, in this data visualization app. We use data from this report, which may carry greater resonance on the 10th anniversary of the Katrina disaster and just weeks after President Barack Obama’s new initiative on climate change. Here’s how much more often these American cities will be flooded.

    Wait, Vanilla Ice? We’re using sound and video to illustrate the projected floods.

    Think of the number of tidal floods as the tempo of a song, say Vanilla Ice’s rap single “Ice Ice Baby.” The number of floods that we experience today might look normal, and this is represented by “Ice Ice Baby” played at its normal tempo. Now try this: for every increase of 10 floods in a year, speed up the song by one second. How fast will the song be when the number of floods hit 388 a year (Washington DC in 2045)?

    Link

    Reply
  24. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Jenga July 2015

    During this first half of July temperatures have been very high in the area north of Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, perhaps not as widespread as in 2011 and 2012, but remarkable nonetheless. It’s the average sea level pressure that really stands out, though. Except for 2011 no year comes close to the intensity and size of the high pressure area covering Greenland and almost all of the Arctic Ocean. This means that the relatively high temperatures were accompanied by a solar bombardment in those areas where ice is supposed to be thickest.

    And this trend continues during the second half of July:

    Neven’s new post At Arctic Sea Ice

    Reply
  25. appaling

     /  August 15, 2015

    There has been several heat waves recently with sever consequences. India with several thousands dead, Pakistan with close to a thousand dead, and Tokyo with tens of thousands hospitalized.

    However, I have been unable to find any meaningful statistics of the heat wave in the Iraq/Iran, with temperatures over 50°C and wet bulb temperature of 32°C (33?). This approaches the limit of human (and mammal) survivability. Is the lack of reporting due to that nothing happened, or the statistics are unreliable or that the news networks aren’t interested because it is Iraq/Iran?

    Does anybody have any more info this? I could only find that there were 70+ casualties in Egypt.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 15, 2015

      appaling

      My guess it’s just a function of lousy government, more than the Western Press not reporting. I know Iraq had protests because of poor electric . water service.

      Reply
    • Christina in Honolulu

       /  August 16, 2015

      Yes, I was wondering the same thing. Considering the refugee situation in Iraq is there any NGO observers that might have info?

      Reply
  26. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Mass extinction survival is more than just a numbers game

    Widespread species are at just as high risk of being wiped out as rare ones after global mass extinction events, says new research by UK scientists.

    There have been five mass extinction events in the Earth’s history, including climate change caused by volcanoes and an asteroid hit that wiped out the dinosaurs.

    In general, geographically widespread animals are less likely to become extinct than animals with smaller geographic ranges, offering insurance against regional environmental catastrophes.

    However, a study published in Nature Communications has found this insurance is rendered useless during global mass extinction events, and that widely distributed animals are just as likely to suffer extinction as those that are less widespread.

    Link

    Reply
  27. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Andy in SD –

    Here’s another one :
    French Corn Fried by Heat Wave Signals Plunging European Harvest

    Hot, Dry

    Rainfall in Spain, central France and northern Italy was less than 20 percent of normal in the 30 days through July 29, WorldAgWeather data show. Over that same period, temperatures were 4 degrees to 6 degrees Celsius (7.2-10.8 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than usual. Spain and Italy had their hottest July ever. The first three weeks of last month were the warmest on record in eastern France, where Esprit says some farmers will see output drop as much as 50 percent.” target=”_blank”>Link

    Rainfall in Spain, central France and northern Italy was less than 20 percent of normal in the 30 days through July 29, WorldAgWeather data show. Over that same period, temperatures were 4 degrees to 6 degrees Celsius (7.2-10.8 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than usual. Spain and Italy had their hottest July ever. The first three weeks of last month were the warmest on record in eastern France, where Esprit says some farmers will see output drop as much as 50 percent.

    Reply
  28. Eric Thurston

     /  August 15, 2015

    article in Truthout by Dahr Jamail

    “Environmentalists Sue EPA Over Dead Zone in Gulf of Mexico

    The second largest dead zone in the world is located in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers by industrial agriculture in the US is one of the leading causes of the dead zone. The fertilizers, which contain phosphorous and nitrogen, generate an increase in algae, which then starves other marine life of oxygen in the water.

    The Gulf of Mexico dead zone, which is the most closely studied human-caused coastal dead zone, was caused not only by massive amounts of the aforementioned chemicals, but also by other sources of nitrogen from animal feed, sewage treatment plants and urban runoff from the Mississippi River flowing into the Gulf. It has grown dramatically in recent years.”

    The rest is at:
    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/32354-environmentalists-sue-epa-over-dead-zone-in-gulf-of-mexico

    Reply
    • Extreme rainfall events generate the nutrient pulses. Warming adds to the problem by creating an environment in which bacteria/algae is favored to bloom. Added heat preconditions the water by lowering the available oxygen. So the hits come from many sources, but warming is the underlying amplifier.

      Glad to see this lawsuit go out. But we need to be careful to show that EPA has a critical role to play. That we need EPA strengthened and encouraged to do its job.

      Reply
  29. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    RS –

    redskylite / August 15, 2015

    Has found a real gem at the Siberian Times , you gotta read this .

    Prime Minister rages at emergencies’ supremo over fires in Siberia

    http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0356-prime-minister-rages-at-emergencies-supremo-over-fires-in-siberia/

    Puchkov’s officials said on Friday that 107 fires are ‘raging in the Siberian Federal District. They cover an area of 149,000 hectares ………………… Puchkov told journalists in Krasnoyarsk that all wildfires would be extinguished in two and a half days.

    Guess what the Russians are using to track their fires ?

    LANCE MODIS

    Reply
    • It’s an amazing tool. Really a public service to the whole world. If I were living in India or Pakistan or Tibet or the Kashmir I’d be using it to monitor those glacial dams and melt lakes. The governments there should have up stream spotters and flood horn warning systems for the communities downstream.

      I love this article. It’s exactly the kind of outrage we need. Without fossil fuel dependence, we wouldn’t be seeing these fires. And they’ll only get worse if we keep burning. There’s just too large a carbon store up there for it not to.

      Reply
  30. redskylite

     /  August 15, 2015

    Sad to see sea lion seizures due to toxic blooms …… accelerated by us with agricultural runoff and warming.

    “‘I’ve always been a total believer in climate change, and I try not to be an alarmist, because it’s not good for anyone,’ says Dutkiewicz, who is the paper’s lead author. ‘But I was actually quite shocked by the results. The fact that there are so many different possible changes, that different phytoplankton respond differently, means there might be some quite traumatic changes in the communities over the course of the 21st century.'”

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/derrick-crowe/sea-lion-seizures-toxic-a_b_7992512.html?utm_hp_ref=climate-change

    Reply
    • Yes, all is chemistry — in balance, or other wise: blood chemistry, atmospheric chemistry. All the way to too many chemicals.
      Earth, and nature, functioned just fine with it’s chemical balanced inventory. We humans have injected a gross number, and amount, of chemicals to this biosphere which our survival depends upon.
      Now, all is out of balance and is increasingly toxic to all.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 15, 2015

      redskylite
      You’ll want to paste more than your links. They tell a bigger a story.

      Reply
  31. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    I can’t get no SATISFACTION • Original • The Rolling Stones

    Reply
  32. Kevin Jones

     /  August 15, 2015

    It is rare indeed that our National Weather Service gives me no satisfaction. But at the moment Cheshire Co. NH is under a wholly unforecasted severe t-storm warning. dtlange: Smoke gets in my skies, then lightening in my eyes?

    Reply
    • “Smoke gets in my skies, then lightening in my eyes?”
      Sounds like a good mournful ballad, Kevin.

      – And, “wholly unforecasted”, that occurs with increasing frequency these days. There are so many systems out of balance that the usual models are of little use for anything than a wild guess (An overstatement but meaningful).

      Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Now I jump off the end of the world. You people are in deep of shit. Good luck, you’ll all need ir.

    Reply
  34. Colorado Bob

     /  August 15, 2015

    Colorado Bob
    I’m not coming back

    Reply
    • Anne

       /  August 16, 2015

      CB, don’t go.

      Reply
      • Anne

         /  August 16, 2015

        aargh, the video did exist when I posted it. Hothouse Flowers: Don’t Go

        Reply
    • You can’t leave yet, Bob. It’s not over yet.

      They haven’t rolled the credits.🙂

      Reply
    • utoutback

       /  August 16, 2015

      CB
      If you decide to move on I can’t blame you. The comments and links seem to be adding up. Reports from all quarters as we slide further into this morass. Meanwhile, I check the MSM and find next to nothing about this growing crisis.
      Still, you would be missed by us here at RS.
      And who is going to provide us with the great music clips!
      Although I haven’t met you anywhere but here, you are a brother.Be well.
      UToutback

      Reply
    • Been following Robert S. for some years now and you bring this thread truly alive, from one Bob to another, baby please dont go . . .

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob, please don’t go!

      Reply
  35. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    Bad hot here in SD today

    Reply
    • labmonkey2

       /  August 16, 2015

      Agreed. Hit 105.3 (not the radio station) in the shade on my front porch in Santee w/ RH at 16%. My AC was rockin’.
      Had to make a trip to Home Depot. Chatted with the helper in plumbing – they sold out of the portable AC units they had in stock, and he just sold 3 window units in the last hour.

      Reply
  36. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    This is a bloody inferno, Lake Baikal. Many of the fire have merged

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/24/2015-08-14/7-N53.3606-E106.49927

    Reply
  37. – Plus: Oregon is #1 priority in US for fire fighting resources.
    ###

    Oregon, Washington wildfires explode overnight with high winds, lightning (VIDEO, PHOTOS)

    Wildfires in Oregon and Washington exploded with the help of scattered lightning strikes and 40 mph winds Friday night, especially in the John Day area of eastern Oregon and the dry Cascade foothills around Chelan in north-central Washington.

    The human-caused Countyline 2 fire, which is burning on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs reservation northwest of Madras, is now Oregon’s largest at 55,000 acres. It grew 22,000 acres overnight, consuming sagebrush and timber, and destroying houses and outbuildings. It closed part of U.S. 26, which reopened late Saturday morning.

    http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2015/08/oregon_washington_wildfires_ex.html

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  August 16, 2015

      6.5 million acres in the US so far this year
      9.6 million acres in Canada so far this year

      16.4 million acres between the two so far this year (25,625 square miles)

      It is a larger area than West Virginia. Larger than any of the 9 smallest US states.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  August 17, 2015

      Wasn’t Oregon Known as the asbestos State in the firie fraternity due to extremely low Forest Fire incidence

      Reply
  38. Robert, there is a book coming out that may be of interest to some of your readers.

    Available for pre-order:

    The Worst of Times: How Life on Earth Survived Eighty Million Years of Extinctions by Paul B. Wignall

    I will be getting myself a copy. Wignall is of course something of an expert in the area of hothouse climates and mass extinctions.

    Reply
  39. Wow it really does drive climate change home here in the Bay Area, when right now I’m breathing in all the charred remains of wild-fire destroyed vegetation and animals. It’s an excellent time to have a talk with someone about climate change when their breathing smoke like this. To see how the smoke is spreading across California go to: https://pbs.twimg.com/tweet_video/CMeOwpcWwAA6Zqp.mp4

    Reply
    • Here’s the 0816 US AirNow loop for combined PM (smoke, emissions & traffic dust) & O3 for Calif.
      The warmer the color the more unhealthy.
      I’ve been following these for years. Everyone in the US should.

      Reply
      • Coastal areas should never have this problem.
        Lackadaisical coastal winds (CC & JS) are likely culprits (other than the FF emissions).

        Reply
  40. Ouse M.D.

     /  August 16, 2015

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/your-river-cruise-may-be-about-to-get-ruined-2015-08-05

    European rivers running extremely low- mentioned are Danube and the Elbe.
    What the article fails to mention is what about all the nuclear reactors these waters serve as a coolant for…
    IAEA also being dead silent on this matter- and I guess it’s not just Europe that’s affected by only knee- deep water levels at places.

    Reply
    • “all the nuclear reactors these waters serve as a coolant for…” That’s right, one more ‘unmentionable’ mass casualty event that can result fossil fuel induced climate change.
      Very important. So is the ‘silence’ surrounding obvious threats.

      Reply
      • And if those close to and upwind of metro areas’ water sources go off, the only water that’ll be fit to drink radioactivity wise will be in the tank of your toilet.😦

        (Someone suggested the turn in the toilet but that’s under polluted circumstances… yeeeccch! XP

        Reply
  41. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    If you look at the direction that the ice burgs are heading as they come out of Jakobshavn you can see the ocean current heading up between Canada & Greenland quite clearly.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8/2015-08-15/9-N69.73749-W50.33637

    Reply
  42. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    I was going over the Sistema Cantareira numbers this morning and 2 line items caught my eye (thanks to Google translate).

    1) The first technical reserve came into operation on 05/16/2014 and added 182.5 billion liters to the system – 18.5 % increase

    2) The second technical reserves came into operation on 10/24/2014 and added another 105 billion liters to the system – 10.7 % increase

    So since 5/16/2014 a 29.2% increase in reserves was added. One years later on 5/5/2015 the system was at 8.2%. Does anyone else see a problem here?

    Currently they are reporting 13.2% from the bottom. This is done as the previous reporting of reserves would be indicating a very low number, so they simply report something else that shows a better number. They can not report usable reserves above dead pool as that stands at -12.2% (a deficit). Of that 13.2% gross volume, how much is really usable? That is not reported so I did some digging as best as I could.

    If you take all of the reservoirs into account, they contain 535.19 million cubic meters from a max value of 1,869.42. This is 28.62% overall for the region. However, one can’t simply move water around between the sections. 2* is not terrifying, it is very bad. But if you start to peel away the surface values and get some specifics….

    Systema Cantareira is at 182.5 out of 982.0, (18%)

    Jaguari (the main section of Cantareira) is at 52.0 out of 808.0 (6%). Jaguari represents 82% of the system and sits at 6%.

    Thus the bulk of Cantareira which is reported is scattered around small reserves and not in the main branch (Jaguari). Jaguari is below critical at ~6%.

    Those relying on Jaguari are in trouble.

    http://www2.sabesp.com.br/mananciais/DivulgacaoSiteSabesp.aspx

    Reply
    • Doug

       /  August 16, 2015

      A few days ago I was with this guy who had just gotten off the phone with a friend of his in São Paulo. He said he was only getting water from the tap two days a week. It must be terrifying.

      Reply
      • Andy in SD

         /  August 16, 2015

        That is the only chance they have of making it to the rainy season. This was announced in Feb / March that water would be dropped to 2 days a week with reduced pressure.

        Even so, it is running dry.

        And once you factor in the draw downs from other sources, it paints a very grim picture. Unless they get some miracle out of the rainy season this winter, they’re toast. And if they get a miracle? Well that just kicks the can down the road.

        Reply
  43. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    Remember the floods in Texas / Oklahoma earlier this year? They were bad, yet celebrated as the end of the drought there. It didn’t take long to begin returning to the trend line.

    Severe drought returns suddenly to Central Texas
    =======================================

    http://kxan.com/2015/08/13/severe-drought-returns-suddenly-to-central-texas/

    Reply
  44. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    A conundrum
    ===========

    As we draw down and rely on ground water (ie: Central Valley) we pump up a higher salinity water. As it does not run off, deposition of salts occur. Thereby we render the soil less hospitable to agriculture over time. As droughts increase or continue, we destroy our arable land.

    http://www.grac.org/hv/summer09.pdf

    Reply
  45. NevenA

     /  August 16, 2015

    Robert, Jakobshavn calves another big one.

    Reply
  46. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    Air pollution killing 4000 in China a day, US study finds
    Air pollution is responsible for 1.6 million deaths in China each year, according to a new study from nonprofit Berkeley Earth. For 38 percent of the population, the average pollution level across the entire four-month period was deemed as unhealthy.

    http://budapestreport.com/natural-28/air-pollution-killing-4000-in-china-a-day-us-study-finds-221.html

    Reply
  47. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    Does this look like a problem to anyone else?

    If you look at this satellite shot, you’ll notice that Lake Mead has depleted to the point where there are 2 separate bodies of water connected with some Colorado River. So if the level / flow drops enough, those 2 sections will become 2 distinct bodies of water. Thus a section will not really be part of Lake Mead.

    Trying to locate elevation / topographic data on the land beneath the lake to determine at what water level this would occur. This would imply that the reported volume is in fact not correct, but rather inflated.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/24/2015-08-15/8-N36.25818-W114.66541

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/24/2015-08-15/8-N36.25818-W114.66541

    Reply
  48. – Wildfires: just take a quick look at the list of fires and locations that come up from a “wildfires” search on Google News. Mostly USA.
    https://news.google.com/news/section?cf=all&hl=en&pz=1&ned=us&csid=5d3e0d80b06dcf79&siidp=ddee8930fff8222adbb09b808702e19c2b99

    Reply
  49. Andy in SD

     /  August 16, 2015

    Robert, can you de-moderate a post for me? I accidentally added 2 links (and they the same link…dumb?)

    Reply
  50. redskylite

     /  August 16, 2015

    Parts Of Phoenix Slowly Sinking Due To Groundwater Pumping

    “At a rate of just a couple of centimeters a year, data on the sinking ground of Phoenix might seem insignificant. However, if this continues for several years and on long distances, structures like the Central Arizona Project (CAP) canals, water and gas mains, utility lines, storage drains and sewers will most likely be affected, further damaging office buildings and homes.

    Reply
  51. redskylite

     /  August 16, 2015

    Climate Change: Have We Reached the Point of No Return?

    The Real News discussion on Abrupt Climate Change with a two-member panel, Dahr Jamail and Guy McPherson. Dahr Jamail is a staff reporter with TruthOut. He currently focuses on the environment and climate change. And Guy McPherson is Professor Emeritus of conservation biology at the University of Arizona. Thank you both for joining us today.

    Reply
  52. Andy in SD

     /  August 17, 2015

    I would recommend to Watts et al that they should limit their global reporting to southern Greenland or northern Quebec and simply pretend that those 2 small locations are representative of the entire globe.

    If they don;t take this suggestion, they need to report on tiny fractions of the earth and time and pretend those represent the entirety….oh wait… they do that already…

    Reply
  53. rustj2015

     /  August 17, 2015

    For those in the NOAA:

    NOAA’s 40th Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop
    will be held in Denver, Colorado, on 26-29 October 2015
    Registration information at:
    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/outreach/CDPW40.shtml

    Reply
  54. redskylite

     /  August 17, 2015

    The ‘End of the high seas’, or we watch the seas die…………..

    Very strong words from a scientist (Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Coordinating Lead Author of section on ‘The Ocean’ within the latest IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report. Somehow I trust the words of a scientist a lot more than I do a politician.

    “We need to wake up to the idea that business as usual, even clever taxation schemes, will not act fast enough to reduce global emissions. This is a global emergency, which requires us to decarbonise within the next 20 years, or face temperatures that will eliminate ecosystems like coral reefs, and indeed many systems that humans depend on.”

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-08/eaog-to081415.php

    Reply
  55. Well, I mistook you for a soldier after hastily reading your cross post on the wet bulb in Iran at WU. Nonetheless, I looked up you blog-bio and agree with you 110% (apologies for the poor math). What a fortuitous stumble upon. Peace Robert.

    Reply
    • I served for 8 years in the USARNG. There’s not enough room for my full bio here😉

      Bob’s been a climate muse for much longer…

      Reply
  56. redskylite

     /  August 17, 2015

    Just read this update on the heatwave in Egypt that includes news from neighboring Sudan . ..

    On Friday, the health ministry in Sudan confirmed 15 people had died over two days at Wadi Halfa, a border town with Egypt.

    Schools in the region were ordered closed for a week as authorities there blamed “the worldwide climate change”.

    With such high temperatures come demand for cooling, and will cast further pressure on the region’s anaemic grid.

    It is also a generally arid area, meaning water resources are also threatened.

    The young and very old tend to be most susceptible, with overheating, heat exhaustion, heatstroke and dehydration responsible for a majority of the deaths.

    http://mgafrica.com/article/2015-08-16-egypt-sudan-heat-wave-kills-108-people-in-august-authorities-blame-climate-change

    Reply
  57. Abel Adamski

     /  August 17, 2015

    Some extra points
    http://www.allgov.com/news/us-and-the-world/bitterly-divided-federal-appeals-panel-halts-22-year-old-lawsuit-by-farm-workers-exposed-to-toxic-chemicals-150816?news=857212

    The Agrichemical Companies once again succeeded in covering up their destruction of lives and livelihoods for the sake of profit

    Reply
  58. Abel Adamski

     /  August 17, 2015

    Sticking to allgov for another
    http://www.allgov.com/news/controversies/global-warming-nurtures-infectious-disease-outbreaks-150816?news=857210

    Heat and humidity and intense rain, mammals may have difficulty but bacterium, viruses and insects thrive

    Reply
  59. Abel Adamski

     /  August 17, 2015

    A bit of potentially good news, marred by the bit at the end
    “But he also foresees some obstacles.

    “The carbon-intensive industries like coal and oil are making vast profits from the infrastructure that they have in place,” he said.

    “They will be looking askance at this technology and thinking well is it something we can profit from or is it something that’s going to inhibit our profits.”

    Professor Faunce had some advice for would-be competitors.

    “Look at it carefully because this is something that if you invest in now would actually earn you vast profits, because think of what you could earn if the process had to go on of retro-engineering artificial photosynthesis and to all the structures on the surface of the Earth,” he said.

    “There’s vast amounts of money made for the corporation prepared to take this challenge.”

    The research is published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.”

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-17/27artificial-leaf27-an-untapped-fuel-source/6703364

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  August 17, 2015

      Vast amounts of money to be made, from whom and where will it come from. ?
      Drive the world into abject poverty for the benefit of some greedy evil creeps just to save our lives and futures of crippling poverty and suffering

      Reply
  60. – Localized and Regional Extremes:Tampa, FL has been awash in rainfall but a bit east conditions are a bit different.

    ‘Cuba on edge as drought worsens’

    Cuba put its civil defense system on alert on Monday due to a year-long drought that is forecast to worsen in the coming months and has already damaged agriculture and left more than a million people relying on trucked-in water.

    The country’s civil defense system said the drought, record heat and water leakage have led to “low levels of available water for the population, agriculture, industry and services.”

    The government has not provided a national breakdown of drought damage but it said on Monday that emergency measures were being taken at all levels, including stricter rationing of water through the state-run waterworks.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/08/17/us-cuba-drought-idUSKCN0QM1P220150817

    Reply
    • I just want to thank everyone — Andy, Abel, DT, Timothy Chase and Colorado Bob especially — for keeping the news rolling through this weekend. You guys have done a fantastic job tracking events and providing helpful analysis.

      Reply
    • At least they’re rationing. Sao Paulo’s experience with privatized water services shows that the water company will pump the lakes down before rationing. And then they’ll ration in a very hamfisted manner (i.e., no water for certain times of day; ?poorer areas get more rationing than the rich areas).

      Reply
  61. – New Term ‘flash drought’ … language evolves.

    Texas suffers from ‘flash drought,’ weather service says

    People are familiar with the term “flash flood,” which means a heavy rain swells a creek, bayou or river so much that the water jumps the banks and engulfs homes, roads or vehicles.

    Here’s a new term, thanks to the National Weather Service:”Flash drought.”

    It means a region went from “super wet” to “super dry” in a matter of weeks, said Roger Erickson, warning coordinator meteorologist from the National Weather Service.

    http://www.beaumontenterprise.com/news/article/Texas-suffers-from-flash-drought-weather-6448648.php

    Reply
    • Amazing. Just a few weeks ago, a tropical storm kept going over Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri due to supersaturated soil!

      Reply
      • – Hold that thought. We need an up to date useful lexicon.
        Supersaturated soil
        Flash drought
        Explosive fires

        Reply
      • I remember… Normally a tropical storm will weaken as it passes over land. It relies on warm water and evaporation to driven its moist air convection engine. However, the soil in this case was so saturated that it was just as good as open waters in driving the moist air convection, and consequently the tropical storm remained at strength.

        Similarly, a typhoon will normally weaken as it moves away from the equator. The water at depth is cooler, and the same Ekman pumping that can be involved in the creation of Kelvin waves feeding an El Nino by pushing warm water down will also bring up water from at depth, cooling the surface so that the typhoon runs out of fuel. But in the case of Haiyan the water at depth was still warm enough to fuel the typhoon.

        A warmer environment that results in warmer water at depth or moister air and heavier rain over coastal land results in more intense storms and greater damage.

        Reply
  62. eric smith

     /  August 17, 2015

    Robert,
    Again I doubt you are a single entity but a very large team.
    A well appreciated team.

    Well there is love between real men.
    As Lincoln well knew.

    It is a higher love of purpose that has no physical expression.

    This is the beauty of it.

    And this is why our species can rise above.

    With luck. And guts.

    Love again,
    Eric

    PS Lets start with thorium. Move to carbon free tech and soon CO2 removal schemes.
    Then permaculture based social constructs which are an outgrowth of the true founding fathers of this nations vision.

    Love, love and love again.

    Reply
    • I’ll have to tell my wife that the conspiracies surrounding me now include the notion that I am the CIA. She’ll get a kick out of this. 3,512 pages on climate change written since 2012 (including Growth Shock). I feel like a team. But the team of commenters here certainly does help.

      Thorium… I’ve heard talk of that since the 1970s and it still remains vaporware. Meanwhile, the cost of wind, solar, and batteries continues to fall…

      Love. Absolutely, Eric. The kind of love it takes for people in power now to abandon their fossil fuel assets. The kind of love it takes for everyone to work together to find safe havens for those who are now most at risk. The kind of love it takes to prevent mass extinctions and to save species. The kind of love it takes to learn how to cooperate with the Earth’s natural systems rather than to destroy and dominate them. The kind of love it takes to recognize that pure competition is destructive and harmful and teaches all the wrong lessons. The kind of love it takes not to build bunkers, but to build a living world full of life granting civilizations. Not the death spreading ones we see today. Love enough not to consume other creatures for food. Love enough to not spend one’s life in search of ever-greater accumulations of wealth, but to spend it instead in search of ever-greater reductions of harm. Love to help the least powerful among us the most.

      That’s what it means to love today, Eric.

      Reply
  63. – I see evidence of plant enhancement via N quite a bit around PDX and Willamette Valley (All part of the I-5 interstate highway, and NAFTA, emissions corridor.
    The subject should be a given.

    – Ragweed pollen is only one allergen. NOX via FF emissions is everywhere and on the increase. It is strong indicator of overall FF aerosol pollution. Possibly, since so much is falling out of the atmosphere — some sort of saturation is likely taking place.
    – Much aerosol pollution is composed of caustic debris. Most of this attaches to mucus membranes, etc. which degrades and damages our respiratory protective system. Invasive plants with, or without, pollens are dominating much of our current climate stressed (and N nutrient rich) landscape as well.

    ‘Air pollution increases allergenicity of ragweed pollen’
    Nitrous oxide pumped out of cars from burning gas makes the plants more allergenic.
    NEUHERBERG, Germany, Aug. 17 (UPI) — Exposure to nitrous oxide exhaust gases in the environment makes the common ragweed pollen more allergenic, according to new research.
    Pollen allergies affect about 50 million people in the United States, and are the main cause of hay fever and other allergies.
    “After studies have already shown that Ambrosia growing along highways is clearly more allergenic than Ambrosia plants growing away from road traffic…
    http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/08/17/Air-pollution-increases-allergenicity-of-ragweed-pollen/4711439820872/

    Reply
  64. – This, I called years ago – at least the air pollution aspect of our increases in dementias (Congress has its own version). The subject should be a given.
    – Our brains operate on the flow of oxygen rich blood. Our blood gets its oxygen via our respiratory system breathing in the air of our atmosphere including toxic and neurotoxic particles, vapors and droplets. Pollutants from the uses, and misuses, of fossil fuel are the main component of our ‘air pollution’. GHG, etc, are the lighter elements and go up onto the atmosphere..

    – Further, in the USA (at least), we put many of our nursing, and convalescent, homes adjacent to ‘freeways’ and other traffic corridors. But then we do this with schools and hospitals too.

    ‘Why modern life is making dementia in your 40s more likely’
    From background radiation to chemicals in the food chain, environmental changes are contributing to a rapid global rise in neurological disease
    … Our first study, focusing on the changing pattern of neurological deaths from 1979 up to 1997, found that dementias were starting 10 years earlier – affecting more people in their 40s and 50s – and that there was a noticeable increase in neurological deaths in people up to the age of 74. In a follow-up study, taking us to 2010 and across 21 western countries, these increases were confirmed.
    … Deaths of men over 75 have nearly trebled in 20 years and deaths of women have increased more than five-fold. For the first time since records began, more US women over 75 are dying of brain disease than cancer.

    ‘ In the past 20 years, we have quadrupled our road and air transport, with the inevitable increases in air pollution exposing us to a range of noxious substances…
    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/aug/07/modern-life-dementia-40s-neurological-disease?CMP=ema_565

    Reply
    • Ps I do not have ‘senior moments’ on days when the air is relatively clean and the air or wind is blowing. On hot days with dirty still air — I have them.

      Reply
  1. The Climate Change Debate Thread - Page 5083

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