“It Feels Like Doomsday” — Massive Lake Baikal Wildfires Threaten Water Supply

From the satellite shot, it appears as though Lake Baikal is burning…

Lake Baikal Burning

(Massive wildfires surrounding Lake Baikal spew huge columns of smoke into the air masking the lake and sending off thousand-mile long clouds of gray from the burning forests and permafrost. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

*    *    *    *    *

Lake Baikal. A great 350 mile long body of water sitting amidst the lands of southeastern Siberia. It’s the largest reservoir of fresh water in the world. From the satellite eye floating far above, it usually appears as a graceful splash of blue among the green hills and plains of summertime.

But today, this enormous lake is almost completely shrouded by smoke. Not a hint of blue. All is steely gray from the smokes vomited out by permafrost and forest fires surrounding the lake. Fires that are old and long-burning. Fires that began back in April when locals reported instances where the dry land — likely thawed and dried out sections of permafrost and duff overburden — “burned like grass.”

A Russian Emergency

During mid-August, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev helplessly vented his anger at Russian fire response authorities who seemed unable to deal with the disastrous blazes raging around Lake Baikal. He ordered Puchkov, a top Russian emergency response official, to “Fly there to deal with this…” while making a broader accusation that officials had been ‘complacent’ in dealing with the disaster. Medvedev added in his August 14 statement:

“Unfortunately, as usual in August we have a … number of problems. The situation this year is really hot when it comes to fires. This week fires [were] fought in Yakutia, near Gelendzhik in the Krasnodar region. Now in Siberia and the Far East large wildfires are blazing. [The] most difficult situation[s] [are] in the republics of Buryatia, Tyva, in the Irkutsk region, the TransBaikal region and the Chukotka Autonomous District.”

Contrary to Medvedev’s statement, facing off against large fires in August was not a typical situation for Russia. At least until about the mid 2000s when permafrost thaw began to really ramp up as human-forced warming of the climate provided extra heat and fuels for wildfire ignition. Since that time, Russia has been forced to deploy thousands of firefighters on a yearly basis.

It’s a problem extra resources alone will not be able to solve. For the burning comes due to added atmospheric heat thawing permafrost and providing billions and billions of tons of additional wildfire fuels by turning what was once ice into a peat-like under layer. This thawing creates an understory fuel for the fires spreading over large sections of Siberia. Now, trees will often burn all the way to the roots and the newly thawed land itself will burn to a depth of three feet or deeper. Even worse, some of these fires will continue to smolder beneath the snow and ice throughout Winter — only to explode over the land once again during Springtime.

Such is all-too certainly the case with the massive fires now surrounding and endangering Lake Baikal.  Medvedev’s rants aside, it’s a situation that is now endemic to the thawing permafrost itself. One we will have to deal with and one whose outcomes we can only solve if we halt carbon emissions and bring Earth back into temperature ranges that are more natural to the Holocene.

A Threat to the Lake’s Water Supply

Lake Baikal Burning shores

(‘The sky is aglow with uncontrolled burning.’ Lake Baikal residents sit helplessly by the waters edge as monstrous plumes of smoke blot out both sky and sun. Image source: The Siberian Times.)

Russians often call Lake Baikal ‘the Jewel of Siberia.’ It’s a jewel that contains 20 percent of all the fresh water on Planet Earth. So it’s understandable why they’re desperate to save it. But the massive fires, spewing out volcano-like plumes of smoke and ash, are, sadly, a threat to this beautiful and valuable resource. For, according to reports from Mikhail Slipenchuk — Russia’s deputy head of ecology and natural resources, near-shore burning wildfires can often cut off the lake’s water arteries. The result is a reduction of water flows to the lake and its ultimate diminishing.

Unfortunately, Lake Baikal water levels were already dropping due to a combination of persistent drought and over-use of water resources well before this Summer’s epic wildfires. Now the fires cast yet another pall over one more threatened fresh water source.

‘It feels like doomsday’, said one eyewitness to the large fires raging all about the precious water source.

Links:

Lake Baikal Burning

Prime Minister Rages Over Lake Baikal Wildfires

Siberia’s Road to Permaburn Hell — The Dry Land Burned Like Grass

Drying Lake Baikal Threatens New Era of Water Wars

LANCE MODIS

Hat Tip to RedSky

 

 

 

 

 

 

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76 Comments

  1. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    The explosive growth of the Washington fires in the last post , got me to look at the last 2 days in Russia , Smoke and fires in eastern Russia

    Aqua/MODIS
    2015/235
    08/23/2015
    04:50 UTC

    Terra/MODIS
    2015/236
    08/24/2015
    03:45 UTC

    They’re merging into long fire fronts, and new fires are breaking out to the Northeast of the main complexes.

    Reply
    • They beat them back a little last week. But it doesn’t seem to me that these are the kinds of fires you can fight. They’re the kinds you just get away from as they burn away areas the size of small to medium sized states.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  August 24, 2015

        One of the Siberia Times articles about a week ago , showed a man’s hands holding the ash that was landing on the lake . Most of the pieces were the size of a guitar pick from bark that was still burning when it landed on the lake . It wasn’t “ash” in the way we all think of it. It was flying through the air on fire , and landed on water.
        Next time you hear – “spot fire”, these things are what;s doing it.

        Next summer Baikal ; is going to turn green as gourd, with giant ring of mud around it as runoff enters the Lake. As GarryRogers said on the last thread –

        Instead of the gradual death of forest trees due to drought stress and insects, fire can cause abrupt changes in vegetation cover. Introduced invasive plants can spread and add fine fuel, and if fire frequency increases, recovery of original vegetation and wildlife is blocked. The result is a permanent decline in productivity and biodiversity

        And what really drives this comment , is these fires are 1,,000 F degrees when they burn over the land it sterilizes the very ground the trees were living on . It kills the entire ecosystem system below ground, that once fed the forest. Plus the trees form an oil that coats the soil, in this type of heat that coats the soil. So afterwards, water can’t get into it and bring back life.

        And lastly because there is no water in soil this heat can go really deep.

        If one says the word “fire” , we each have our own image. A fire in an ash tray. Or a fire in brick kiln. It’s important that we all understand these fires more like the brick kiln, and not the ash tray.

        Reply
        • Looks to me more like the trees are closer to exploding in many cases rather than simply burning. The kind of energy it takes to propel material of that size is not ‘normal.’ And hardening soil into crust is just sci-fi in its wickedness. You couldn’t imagine this if you tried.

      • CB, to me these fires are like the arson fires of “Devil’s Night” in Detroit back in the 1980s when they were at their peak. The worst year had about 840 fires; the DFD went right from one fire to the next. But yes, they are also like brick kiln fires in the intensity of heat.

        Reply
  2. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    Opps another double link stuck in mod pit.

    Reply
  3. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    The last pass of the Terra , this is North and East of the lake , notice the smoke is headed almost due North. New fires much farther North.

    Terra/MODIS
    2015/236
    08/24/2015
    03:40 UTC

    Reply
  4. PlazaRed

     /  August 24, 2015

    This is a very interesting post following closely to the last one.

    The smoke will be packed with particles from the scrub and coarse grasses in the area. This will fall like volcanic ash onto the lakes surface and seriously affect the quality of the water.
    Possibly a large die off of aquatic life will follow or run in tandem with the fires.
    The next problem will be the airborne smoke and ash drifting up into the Arctic causing all sorts of problems with the ice if is settles on it, leading to accelerated melting, if not immediately then within a short time span.
    More permafrost will melt in the area burned along with more trapped greenhouse gases being released.
    Heath in the people and animals in the area will suffer from smoke inhalation!

    I think the Russians must be really taking the fires seriously this time around, they are possibly a lot more worried than they like to admit, especially as these fires may not be a problem with an easy solution, if they have one at all in the short term.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 24, 2015

      PlazaRed
      We watch the the Russian fires much more here than Russians. I went looking for a fire quote today that I posted 8 years ago. RS’s posts popped up on every search.

      PlazaRed –
      Really good to see you here. You do good work.

      Reply
  5. PlazaRed

     /  August 24, 2015

    Evening Bob, I have been trying to get a larger image of the Russian fires but everything is covered in smoke so much that the land features cant be seen.
    This is an attempt but it might not paste well. Hope its the correct area?
    I’m toying/Struggling with the idea of what might/will happen if those fires just keep on burning. The CO2 is going to go into overdrive.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  August 24, 2015

      PR –
      google Russian fires 2013, then google Russian floods These fires are not as bad , but only because “bad” means area burnt.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  August 24, 2015

      Hi Plaza. NASA also has the Worldview website that allows you to see stitched together images and look from a different angle. I find it interesting for a quick zoom in on an area.
      https://earthdata.nasa.gov/labs/worldview/

      Reply
  6. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    eric smith
    nature’s way spirit

    Reply
    • labmonkey2

       /  August 24, 2015

      You sure know how to pick ’em, CB. I still have this vinyl, among other works of the era. Yeah, I’m an old fart, too.
      Off to Spirit land ….

      Reply
  7. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    eric smith

    Spirit-Spirit 1968

    Fresh Garbage –

    Reply
  8. Syd Bridges

     /  August 24, 2015

    The Blue Eye of Siberia now turns grey. The temperate rain forests of Oregon and Washington are burning. July is the hottest month ever recorded since records began in 1880, following on from the hottest first six months of a year ever recorded. And that following on from the the hottest year on record, 2014. Record heat in areas of North America, South America, Europe and Asia. Lethal heatwaves kill thousands and hospitalise many thousands more in Asia. The highest temperature ever recorded in Antarctica. Less old, thick ice in the Arctic than at the end of the 2012 record melt season. Record numbers of tropical storms in the Pacific accompany unprecedented heat in the eastern part of that ocean. El Nino ramping up to be one of the strongest on record. Am I beginning to see a pattern in all these dots?

    Fortunately not, because it was colder than usual here in the mountains of Colorado a few nights ago. And there’s a lot of cold water on the Atlantic just south of Greenland. And Senator Imhofe was able to make a snowball this past winter. All the things I referred to above are a HOAX, as the illustrious and sagacious Senator has pointed out. Some scientist, who is after extra grant money is adding that smoke digitally to that image of Lake Baikal. They’ve even managed to get the Siberian Times in on this monstrous act of fraud.

    IIRC, at the end of his novel, August 1914, Alexander Solzhenytsin wrote ,”Untruth did not begin with us; it will not end with us.”

    Reply
  9. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    I can;t believe it took me this long to post this here , but like a blind pig, I found the acorn –

    Nature’s Way by Spirit

    Reply
  10. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    I don’t give a rats fuzzy butt what you post If it doesn’t tell me where I’m going then sorry.

    The shortest thing I ever post –
    Plume from Cotopaxi, Ecuador

    Terra/MODIS
    2015/236
    08/24/2015
    15:30 UTC

    Context people context.

    Reply
    • Wharf Rat

       /  August 25, 2015

      “I don’t give a rats fuzzy butt what you post”

      That’s good, cuz Rat’s fuzzy butt isn’t yours to give.

      Reply
  11. Colorado Bob

     /  August 24, 2015

    MR SKIN – Spirit

    Reply
  12. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    Spirit –

    SPIRIT- “I GOT A LINE ON YOU” (W/LYRICS)

    Reply
  13. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    “I GOT A LINE ON YOU”

    Reply
  14. redskylite

     /  August 25, 2015

    I’m not sure this is a surprise anymore, but a new warning from the University of Maine.. . . . . .

    Seems we (or some politicians and political parties) do need to be repeatedly warned and prodded and the prodded so more . . .

    Thank you Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine.

    Evidence from Earth’s climate history supports the possibility of such a surprise in the rate of ice-sheet response and climate change in the Southern Hemisphere, he says.

    For instance, around 14,500 years ago, global sea level rose by 20 meters, at a rate of 4 meters per 100 years. Marine sediment reconstructions and modeling studies indicate the rise was partially due to a rapidly collapsing West Antarctic ice sheet.

    https://umaine.edu/news/blog/2015/08/21/climate-surprises-possibly-in-store-for-antarctica-say-mayewski-birkel/

    Reply
  15. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    The Chambers Brothers – Time Has Come Today

    Reply
    • labmonkey2

       /  August 25, 2015

      Saw them live at the San Diego Sports Arena (the sound inside that place was, and still is awful) back when this album, and this song, was getting a lot of airplay.
      Brings back the good time of high school (and maybe some fast times, too).

      Reply
  16. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    Now the time has come
    Nowhere (place) to run
    Might get burned up by the sun
    But I’ll have my fun
    I’ve been loved, pushed (put) aside
    I’ve been crushed by tumbling tide
    And my soul has been psychedelicized

    Reply
  17. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    Time has come today.

    Reply
  18. Colorado Bob

     /  August 25, 2015

    Now the time has come ,

    Reply
  19. James Burton

     /  August 25, 2015

    The one thing that massive wildfires do do is burn giant firebreaks on the landscape, making following years fires more prone to run into one and halt. The trouble with this is that sooner or later you have burned off the entire region. The real question is “can this continue or even worsen?” Since Global Warming is growing worse, the answer must be “yes, it can and will grow worse”. Fires will begin to run down after they burn off the potential fuel, leaving the recovery forests of the future. That is if they even get a chance to recover.
    I’ve read this blog for several years now, and my take is that Global Warming is simply hammering the earth, and we aren’t even into the intense warming that is coming soon. What will it look like in a decade?

    Reply
  20. Holy friggin frack…have we waited to long? I’ve be writing climate change music for a decade but it’s becoming ever so harder to find a message to stir action and engender hope…”permafrost burning”…after “firestorm”…use to find a degree of hope in our escalating transition to renewables but just feel like downing a gallon of vodka asset the moment…

    Thanks for the ongoing chronicle… Hope to wake up…is give you a hug.

    Reply
  21. Andy in SD

     /  August 25, 2015

    Southern BC / Northern Washington. What a smokey mess.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/24/2015-08-23/6-N48.64307-W118.54248

    Reply
  22. Andy in SD

     /  August 25, 2015

    2.8% drop in Systema Cantariera in the past 30 days at a delivery rate of ~2 days per week.
    It is at 16.1% (using the odd ball math Sabesp created). Rainy season should start in November.

    At the current rate of depletion it should be at 10.5% with the “new math”.

    http://www2.sabesp.com.br/mananciais/DivulgacaoSiteSabesp.aspx

    Reply
    • 2 days of delivery and they’re on track for somewhat lower than last year if my math is right. Probably fair to say that São Paulo is undergoing collapse and without amazing outside assistance is on a path to failure.

      In our world this is how it starts to happen. One region. One city at a time.

      We are dealing with environmental disasters now that are city and region breaking. We really don’t want to push this on to the next level.

      Reply
  23. utoutback

     /  August 25, 2015

    “It feels like doomsday”, one witness said.

    I’m here in Oregon now. Sitting out this evening in the smoke from many fires, I mentioned I had been following climate for more than 30 years and things are looking bad. I got no response from the other 5 people I was with. There is a hardcore denial to address this as I think people are overwhelmed and feeling impotent. That and they want to continue to haul their camp trailers across the land while burning FF. It doesn’t seem that people will change their behavior until we receive some hard leadership from those we elect. Who in this next presidential cycle is going to tell us the truth.
    Meanwhile, this year is feeling like that tipping point into a cascade I have been warning people about for the past 10 – 15 years.

    CB – as your contemporary, I’m right there with you. “Time has come today”.

    Reply
    • danabanana

       /  August 25, 2015

      “It doesn’t seem that people will change their behavior until we receive some hard leadership from those we elect. ”

      A strong dictatorial approach no less is what we need. People are like sheep and as such need to be guided by a shepperd and his/her dog.

      Reply
      • Strong leadership is not the same as dictatorship. A strong leader builds teams and coalitions, stands on principle, and supports effective policies. A dictator simply bullies. Authoritarianism would probably make the situation worse. Good policy is better than a ‘good King’ any day of the week.

        Reply
      • danabanana

         /  August 25, 2015

        “Strong leadership is not the same as dictatorship. ”

        A Dictator can be benevolent too.
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benevolent_dictatorship

        Reply
        • Look, the old Soviet Union pinned its hopes on benevolent dictators. They got Stalin instead.

          What we need is a Roosevelt and a movement to support the like. Someone strong enough to do what must be done, but human enough to avoid the spiritually corrosive lust for power that is inherent to dictatorship. And more importantly, the social mindset of sharing burdens, helping the poor, and being critical of the wealthy and those who take more than their fair share that supports this kind of leadership.

      • wili

         /  August 25, 2015

        Ideally with a few Frances Perkins’s in the cabinet! ‘-)

        Reply
      • wili

         /  August 25, 2015

        And with a spouse like Eleanor!

        Reply
      • danabanana

         /  August 26, 2015

        “human enough to avoid the spiritually corrosive lust for power that is inherent to dictatorship”

        For that you need another Ghandi. There are very few people that may qualify for that role. How many non-self serving politicians that match your description with a chance to win an election can you count? those who don’t play the western democracy game have no chance to get in power. I’m not one to condone the current democratic system in which parties present you with a manifesto that sounds great, then you give them your vote and once in power they do the complete opposite. Then again how can the system be changed for the better without removing what stops the change? for a true open, transparent system that benefits our home, our environment, a clean up of many corrupt, self serving individuals would be required and that my friend is not going to be possible.

        Is no secret that most current western democracy style government members are bought by corporations with lobbying (bribes) and as it happens (and for our misfortune) Fossil Fuel related industries have been one of the main lobbyists for sometime now.

        This is a race against time which really we have not much of.

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  August 26, 2015

        Re the “lobbying” and “corruption”
        An interesting article on climate crock.
        Those darn pesky bankruptcy laws unravelling the snake pit like this

        http://climatecrocks.com/2015/08/25/news-flash-chris-horner-leading-climate-de-nihilist-funded-by-big-coal/

        Christopher Horner, an attorney who claims that the earth is cooling, is known within the scientific community for hounding climate change researchers with relentless investigations and public ridicule, often deriding scientists as “communists” and frauds.

        Horner is a regular guest on Fox News and CNN, and has been affiliated with a number of think tanks and legal organizations over the last decade. He has called for investigations of climate scientists affiliated with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and NASA, and inundated climate researchers at major universities across the country with records requests that critics say are designed to distract them from their work.

        New court documents reveal one source of Horner’s funding: big coal.

        Last Thursday’s bankruptcy filing of Alpha Natural Resources, one of the largest coal companies in America, includes line items for all of the corporation’s contractors and grant recipients. Among them are Horner individually at his home address, as well as the Free Market Environmental Law Clinic, where he is a senior staff attorney.

        Then we go onto the rest of the recipients of largesse, well worth a read.

        However doesn’t cover cash transactions and brown paper bags , or is it briefcases at this bracket

        Reply
  24. I had to respond to some of the comments on that Guardian thread. I actually ended up scaring myself, a little.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/aug/24/firefighters-climate-change-drought#comment-58129388

    My back-of-the-envelope calculation was that .2* of (average) ocean warming (of the top 2000m) would amount to 15.8 Gt/year of Antarctic mass loss, but recent estimates show it is up to 160 Gt/year. Truly amazing.

    Reply
  25. redskylite

     /  August 25, 2015

    Australia – New report out from the Climate Council entitled “Climate Change 2015: Growing Risks, Critical Choices” – looks very informative

    http://www.smh.com.au//breaking-news-national/climate-report-poses-dire-warnings-20150825-41lxu.html

    Reply
  26. redskylite

     /  August 25, 2015

    Sunlight bright upon my pillow
    Lighter than an eiderdown
    Will she let the weeping willow
    Wind his branches round

    Reply
    • redskylite

       /  August 25, 2015

      Did you see the frightened ones
      Did you hear the falling bombs
      Did you ever wonder
      Why we had to run for shelter
      When the promise of a brave new world
      Unfurled beneath a clear blue sky

      Did you see the frightened ones
      Did you hear the falling bombs
      Did you ever wonder
      Why we had to run for shelter
      When the promise of a brave new world
      Unfurled beneath a clear blue sky

      Reply
      • redskylite

         /  August 25, 2015

        Did you see the frightened ones
        Did you hear the falling bombs
        The flames are all long gone
        But the pain lingers on
        Goodbye blue sky
        Goodbye blue sky

        Reply
  27. Why James Hansen’s “fee and dividend” proposals seem preferable to “cap and trade” –

    “As a result of political horse trading at UN negotiations on climate change, countries like Russia and the Ukraine were allowed to create carbon credits from activities like curbing coal waste fires, or restricting gas emissions from petroleum production.
    Under the UN scheme, called Joint Implementation, they then were able to sell those credits to the European Union’s carbon market. Companies bought the offsets rather than making their own more expensive, emissions cuts.
    But this study, from the Stockholm Environment Institute, says the vast majority of Russian and Ukrainian credits were in fact, “hot air” – no actual emissions were reduced.
    They looked at a random sample of 60 projects and found that 73% of the offsets generated didn’t meet the key criteria of “additionality”. This means that these projects would have happened anyway without any carbon credit finance.”
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34042115

    Reply
  28. This new report by the Center for Global Development predicts that an area of tropical forest the size of India is to be cleared as a result of deforestation by 2050 if carbon pricing policies are not put in place:

    The Future of Forests: Emissions from Tropical Deforestation with and without a Carbon Price, 2016–2050

    Abstract

    We project the future of tropical deforestation from 2016-2050 with and without carbon pricing policies, based on 18 million observations of historical forest loss spanning 101 tropical countries. Our spatial projections of future deforestation incorporate topography, accessibility, protected status, potential agricultural revenue, and a robust observed inverted-U-shaped trajectory of forest cover loss with respect to remaining forest cover. We project that in the absence of new forest conservation policies, 289 million hectares of tropical forest will be cleared from 2016-2050—an area about the size of India and one-seventh of Earth’s tropical forest area in the year 2000. We project that this tropical deforestation will release 169 GtCO2 to the atmosphere from 2016-2050 — one-sixth of the remaining carbon that can be emitted if the rise in Earth’s temperature is to be likely held below 2 °C. We estimate that a universally applied carbon price of $20/tCO2 from 2016-2050 would avoid 41 GtCO2 of emissions from tropical deforestation while a carbon price of $50/tCO2 would avoid 77 GtCO2. These prices correspond to average costs to land users of $9/tCO2 and $21/tCO2 respectively. By comparison if all tropical countries implemented anti-deforestation policies as effective as those in the Brazilian Amazon post-2004 then 60 GtCO2 of emissions would be avoided. Our analysis corroborates the conclusions of previous studies that reducing tropical deforestation is a sizable and low-cost option for mitigating climate change. In contrast to previous studies, we project that the amount of emissions that can be avoided at low-cost by reducing tropical deforestation will increase rather than decrease in future decades. Encouragingly, 89% of potential low-cost emission reductions are located in the 47 tropical countries that have already signaled their intention to reduce emissions from deforestation in exchange for performance-based finance (REDD+).

    Link: http://international.cgdev.org/sites/default/files/future-forests-complete-8-21-jo.pdf

    Reply
  29. Abel Adamski

     /  August 25, 2015

    I like the man
    http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/5700/50-Shades-of-brown-global-warming-hits-Vancouver.html

    There are so many interesting news stories that made the summer of 2015 memorable. But I’ll stick with the “Brown is the New Green” theme, because apart from, Mike Duffy, Nigel Wright, and Pluto, water was the story of the summer in BC.

    Metro Vancouver is under a Stage 3 Water Restriction. It hasn’t rained much since April. May was unseasonably warm and dry. June was hot and dry. Despite some showers in July and August, Vancouver has felt more like San Diego this summer. And at times, Dubai.

    Forest fires covered the south coast of British Columbia with so much smoke in early July, you couldn’t look at a sunset on English Bay without seeing deep purple, and getting Smoke on the Water stuck in your brain. But fires raged throughout the province this summer and now, nobody’s singing anything. The latest and most destructive was at Rock Creek in the southern interior, started apparently by a cigarette but thrown from a car.

    With a line like
    The climate change deniers are an odd bunch of ducks, aren’t they?

    And a point i wasn’t aware of
    Fortunately, not as hot as Bandar Mahshahr, a city of more than 100,000 people in Iran, where the temperature hit 73 C (164F) in August.

    Reply
  30. Greg

     /  August 25, 2015

    Hansen has a Global Temperature Update posted yesterday, his first in a couple of months:

    http://www.columbia.edu/2150824_GlobalTemperatureUpdate.pdf

    For those of us living southwest of Greenland we have little consolation with the relative cooling the last couple of years to the rest of the world. The scraps are getting thrown into our corner.

    Reply
  31. Dave Person

     /  August 25, 2015

    Hi Folks,
    Recurring comments on this forum often go something like ” how many more catastrophes do people need to connect the dots?” or “with so much evidence, how can anyone remain ignorant about climate change?”, or “this disaster should be a wake up call to everyone.” For folks interested in realistic insight into why so many people and governments do little or none of those things I urge you to read the following books:

    Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
    Logic of Failure by Dietrich Dorner

    For those of a technical mind wanting to read about a robust framework for addressing many of our complex resource and environmental issues, climate change being the most dangerous, I urge you to read:

    Adaptive Environmental Assessment by C. S. Holling
    Adaptive Resource Management by C. J. Walters

    These are seminal and robust books that will help arm you for the struggles ahead.

    dave

    Reply
  32. Leland Palmer

     /  August 25, 2015

    Uh guys…

    On earthnullschool I’m seeing carbon monoxide concentrations of up to 30,000 ppb or 30 ppm. 35 ppm over 8 hours is enough to cause CO poisoning, I think.

    Who ever heard of CO poisoning…out of doors?

    Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  August 26, 2015

      For the sake of accuracy, 35 ppm over 8 hours of carbon monoxide is not as serious as I thought this morning, unless you’re a fetus, a baby, a pregnant woman, old, or a heart patient… all of them probably being exposed in the Siberian population even as we speak.

      Here’s the earthnullschool link:

      http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/chem/surface/level/overlay=cosc/orthographic=-250.64,54.36,3000

      Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  August 26, 2015

      Fortunately, the wind was blowing away from Ulan Ude – a small city of about half a million people. So, they only got about 500 ppb (0.5 ppm) of carbon monoxide, comparing latitude and longitude with the earthnullschool image..

      Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  August 26, 2015

      Severobaykalsk, on the north end of Lake Baikal, was not as lucky. About 25,000 people got exposed to several ppm of CO over a period of several days.

      Reply
  33. BobinSpain

     /  August 26, 2015

    It’s all very disturbing, to say the least. What disturbs me the most is how the mainstream media find crap like Pistorius’ experiences in prison more important ‘news’ than our imminent demise. This article is old and I apologise if you’ve all read it, but it still rings true
    http://mediamatters.org/research/2012/07/03/study-media-avoid-climate-context-in-wildfire-c/186921

    Reply
    • They’re completely avoiding context. It’s ridiculous. We’re probably going to experience the wettest summer on record in England and all I can find in the mainstream press is reports about bookies betting on it. No clearer sign of decadence.

      Reply
  34. BobinSpain

     /  August 26, 2015

    Five years? Sounds ’bout right

    Reply

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