Unprecedented Cyclone Chapala Bears Down on Yemen

Chapala, now the unprecedented 23rd category 4 or category 5 tropical cyclone to form during 2015, is bearing down on the nation of Yemen. A nation that is likely to experience hurricane force winds and may receive as much as 8 years worth of rainfall from Chapala’s intense spiral bands over a 24-48 hour period.

Chapala Bears down on Yemen

(Unprecedented category 4 Chapala bears down on Yemen in the Halloween satellite shot. Image source: NOAA.)

* * * * *

After a rapid bombification on Friday, Cyclone Chapala became the most intense storm on record to form so far south in the Indian Ocean. Like Patricia, this storm gathered strength in waters that were much hotter than normal (+1 to +2 C above average for the region). Like Patricia, the storm rapidly intensified in a single 24 hour period — gaining 90 mph of wind intensity in just one day. And like the 5 billion dollar weather event that was Patricia, Chapala threatens severe damage along its likely land-falling path. A hothouse storm for a hothouse world that in 2015 has seen the previous record for the rate of formation of the most intense tropical cyclones shattered by five storms so far this year. The previous record, set in 2004 was for 18 such storms over a one year period. Now, the new record is 23 and counting.

Chapala is expected to track west-by-northwest, weakening to a category 1 or 2 storm just before making landfall in Yemen on Monday. At that point the storm is predicted to dump as much as 12 to 16 inches of rain over parts of Yemen. If this happens as current weather models predict, parts of Yemen which typically receive less than 2 inches of rain per year may see as much as 8 years or more worth of rain fall over the course of a day or two.

Chapala predicted path

(Chapala’s predicted path and intensity brings an unprecedented rain-maker to Yemen. One that is capable of delivering as much as 8 years worth of rainfall in 1-2 days. Image source: Joint Typhoon Warning Center.)

Large, powerful storms of this kind do not typically track into Yemen. And the predicted and possible rainfall amounts would almost certainly shatter all-time records for the arid state. A potential event that Dr. Jeff Masters over at WeatherUnderground yesterday called unprecedented. Such heavy rains would hit a region that is not at all equipped for dealing with so much water falling from the skies. Dry lands that form a hard baked surface will tend to enhance pooling and run-off. Regions that typically see extreme flooding from just 1 or 2 inches of rainfall could see 5 to 10 times as much. Needless to say, this is a developing and dangerous situation that bears careful monitoring.

Conditions in Context — Powerful Hurricanes in a Hothouse World

2015 will close out as the hottest year in the 135 year climate record. It will hit temperatures, globally, about 1.1 to 1.2 C hotter than 1880s averages. This extreme temperature departure, is nearly 1/3 of the difference between 1880 and the last ice age — but on the side of hot. An extreme heating that is starting to force the glaciers of the world to rapidly melt, the seas to rapidly rise, the oceans to rapidly decline in health, and climates around the world to rapidly destabilize.

The oceans of the world draw in more than 90 percent of this excess heat energy. The added energy at the ocean surface, in its turn, provides more fuel for the most intense category 4 and category 5 tropical cyclones. These storms draw their energy directly from heat and moisture at the ocean surface. So as we, through our burning of fossil fuels and emitting of greenhouse gasses which in turn warms the climate, are unwittingly both increasing the frequency of strong storms as well as adding to their maximum potential energy.

During recent years, we have seen greater and greater numbers of the most intense versions of these storms globally. During 2004 a new record number for category 4 and 5 cyclones was breached, only to be supplanted this year with the formation, so far, of 23 of these monster cyclones. In addition, the number of records for most intense storms for regions seems to be falling at an increasing rate. In 2013, cyclone Haiyan, roared into the record books as one of the most intense storms the world had ever seen. And this year we have two basin records — Patricia (Western Hemisphere) and Chapala (strongest to form so far south in the Indian Ocean).

The human hothouse, thus appears to be providing more storms of high intensity. And with more warming in store — with nations, corporations, and politicians continuing to fight to delay climate action, ever more dangerous storms are coming.

Links:

NOAA

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

Cyclone Chapala Likely to Make Rare, Destructive Landfall

2015 Sets Record for Most Category 4 or Category 5 Hurricanes

Weather Channel Update on Chapala

Hat Tip to Colorado Bob

Leave a comment

148 Comments

  1. Loni

     /  October 31, 2015

    As if droughts, dictators, civil unrest and revolutions weren’t enough, now the desert gets flooded.
    God Bless ’em.

    Reply
  2. The info keeps getting worse: like the old Chinese curse, we live in interesting times…

    Sent from my iPad 🙏🏻

    >

    Reply
    • LJR

       /  October 31, 2015

      From Wikipedia

      “May you live in interesting times” is an English expression purported to be a translation of a traditional Chinese curse. Despite being so common in English as to be known as “the Chinese curse”, the saying is apocryphal, and no actual Chinese source has ever been produced.

      Reply
  3. I wonder if this cyclone is the record latest Category 4 storm in a calendar year for the Indian Ocean. So late in the season!😮

    Reply
  4. – Thanks, RS and CB,
    This is timely news.
    Climate related ‘weather deformities’ around the globe.
    I’m sure more will follow.

    – An ‘armchair editor’ request re:
    “Like Patricia, this storm gathered strength in waters that were much hotter than normal (+1 to +2 C above average for the region).”
    It may add color, import and depth to the data above if actual values of water temps were added.
    Plus some F values alongside the C. Your work is often shared with C illiterate readers. Most of whom would benefit greatly.
    Not a big deal but every little bit helps…🙂
    OUT

    Reply
  5. Abel Adamski

     /  October 31, 2015

    Arabia is also concerned
    http://dohanews.co/opinion-time-is-running-out-to-save-qatar-region-from-global-warming/

    They don’t have the EXXONS and Loony right and Murdoch Media

    Reply
    • – A bit about Saudi (or wealthy ME oil rich fo$$il fuel) actions which will likely increase — or signs to watch for due FF driven AGW.

      – A wealth enabled pre-migration purchase?
      – This is one I noted from Santa Barbara, CA 2012. It’s a large tract of shoreline and bluff.

      ‘More Mesa Sold to Saudi’

      With Conservation-Development Deal in Limbo, Owner Sells Six Legal Parcels for $25 Million

      The 265 privately owned acres that compose the bulk of More Mesa ​— ​a coastal bluff-top open space between Goleta and Santa Barbara popular with hikers, bikers, gliders, beachgoers, and nature lovers ​— ​have been sold for $25 million, according to the County Assessor’s Office.

      The buyer is listed as Khalid Saud Al Shobily LLC, a prominent Saudi Arabian real estate investment group headed by Khalid Bin Saud Al Shobily.
      – independent.com/news/2012/dec/18/more-mesa-sold-saudi

      Ps Many language schools in US have large enrollments of Saudi students learning ‘American’ english.
      There’s likely an investigative piece here for someone. I have a full slate and much behind.
      Real estate and language instruction could be keys to future ‘migrations.’
      OUT

      Reply
      • In 2012, I noticed an influx of Arab students at a ‘Chapala St.’ language school in Santa Barbara. All seemed to be well off.
        Black soot on white walls got me interested.
        PHOTO: Soot fallout has collected on these corner outcroppings. The language school logo is on the wall to the right. It is on a street named Chapala.
        The succulent looking burnt to a crisp is to the left.

        Reply
      • -Ps Portland, OR also has a large number of Arab enrollment at language schools.
        No numbers — just from what I see.
        Historically, I believe, the UK was the place to lean ‘English’.

        Reply
  6. Colorado Bob

     /  October 31, 2015

    From Dr. Master’s latest –
    Chapala’s southward track will make it only the second tropical cyclone recorded near the mouth of the Gulf of Aden, which is crossed by roughly 400 ships a week. The adjustment in Chapala’s track could have major implications for Yemen, as it brings the center closer to the 980-year-old settlement of Al Mukalla (also known as Mukalla), a busy port and Yemen’s fifth-largest city (population around 300,000). If Chapala were to pass just south of Al Mukalla, the sharp angle of approach to the coast would accentuate any storm surge. Yemen has been in the grip of a civil war since March, so any landfall near this populated area could intersect with the conflict in hard-to-predict ways. According to an October 30 article from Reuters, ten of Yemen’s 22 governorates were assessed as being in an emergency food situation in June, one step below famine on a five-point scale. The assessment has not been updated since then, partly because experts have not managed to get sufficient access to survey the situation. About a third of the country’s population, or 7.6 million people urgently require food aid, the The U.N. World Food Programme said (thanks go to wunderground member barbamz for alerting us to this article.)

    As it moves ashore, Chapala will slam into steep mountains near the coast,

    The port of Al Mukalla.

    Reply
  7. Kevin Jones

     /  October 31, 2015

    The Day is Coming when most people, even lied to Americans, will figure this thing out. Look out Ministers of Propaganda. The planet will continue to break records like a broken record. And a tune will begin playing in peoples heads, broken record style: Indict the Bastards, Indict the Bastards, Indict the Bastards….

    Reply
  8. climatehawk1

     /  October 31, 2015

    Tweeted.

    Reply
  9. Bill H

     /  October 31, 2015

    Robert, do you have a reference for Hurricane Patricia causing 5 billion dollars worth of damage? You reference your earlier post, but I can’t find any mention there.

    A price tag like this would cause some red faces among those who were dismissing it as a negligible event.

    Also, it would be good to have data on incidence of class 4/5 storms, since this was one of the IPCC’s predictions: fewer cyclones in total, but more high strength cyclones.

    Meanwhile, a HUGE thank you for all the data that you are bringing to light.

    Reply
  10. Ryan in New England

     /  October 31, 2015

    In recent years we’ve been having to use superlatives so often to describe weather/climate events that they are beginning to lose the impact and effect that those adjectives are intended to have. The public develops a perception that scientists, meteorologists or newscasters are loosely and inaccurately using these words and just claiming biggest, strongest and unprecedented for dramatic effect. An example is a caller I heard on NPR not long ago in reference to last year being the hottest on record. The caller brushed of the news by saying that to him, it seems like every year “they” say it was the hottest year every. Apparently without any clue that that is one very clear result of anthropogenic global warming! The point is, the more dire and unprecedented the events become, the more the ignorant masses simply ignore the entire situation.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  November 1, 2015

      Ryan in NE: “Omens were as nothing to him, and he was unable to discover the message of prophecy till the fulfillment had brought it home to his very door.” Joseph Conrad Typhoon

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  November 1, 2015

      Great point. I believe that this is a form of shifting baselines. “That happens all the time” can be used to imply normality, even if the event is anything but. Ignorance is a daunting foe to progress.

      Reply
  11. Ryan in New England

     /  October 31, 2015

    Leading up to Paris, many countries have pledged to reduce their emissions. Sadly, it doesn’t add up to an acceptable target, and still puts us on track for 3C warming this century.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/oct/30/worlds-climate-pledges-likely-to-lead-to-less-than-3c-of-warming-un

    Reply
  12. Greg

     /  October 31, 2015

    Nicely timed. Thank you Robert. Of course the water and wind are just delivery vehicles for energy and the excess energy we are enabling into our ocean atmospheric system are tremendous and described in terms of hundreds of thousands of hiroshima bombs worth per day. Texas felt some of that again last night. Rooftop rescues and very high rainfall rates.
    http://www.weather.com/storms/severe/news/severe-weather-impacts-southern-plains-texas

    Reply
  13. Exceptional things like Chapala should make climate denial a thing of the past. But we still have a long way to go. There are signs that even the Republicans are starting to be divided on this issue. Comparing the demise of climate denial with climate it self is quite interesting, it gradually increases almost unnoticeable. When certain tipping points are reached things start to accelerate resulting even in abrupt climate denial demise.

    Reply
  14. Tad Davis

     /  November 1, 2015

    Hey Robert…Started following your posts about two months ago. Great read, thank you. Sent links to my friends. Keep up the wonderful work.

    Reply
  15. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    Talk about a study that will be miss used –

    NASA study: Mass gains of Antarctic Ice Sheet greater than losses

    “We’re essentially in agreement with other studies that show an increase in ice discharge in the Antarctic Peninsula and the Thwaites and Pine Island region of West Antarctica,” said Jay Zwally, a glaciologist with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and lead author of the study, which was published on Oct. 30 in the Journal of Glaciology. “Our main disagreement is for East Antarctica and the interior of West Antarctica – there, we see an ice gain that exceeds the losses in the other areas.” Zwally added that his team “measured small height changes over large areas, as well as the large changes observed over smaller areas.” …………………………………… But it might only take a few decades for Antarctica’s growth to reverse, according to Zwally. “If the losses of the Antarctic Peninsula and parts of West Antarctica continue to increase at the same rate they’ve been increasing for the last two decades, the losses will catch up with the long-term gain in East Antarctica in 20 or 30 years — I don’t think there will be enough snowfall increase to offset these losses.” ………………………………. Zwally said that while other scientists have assumed that the gains in elevation seen in East Antarctica are due to recent increases in snow accumulation, his team used meteorological data beginning in 1979 to show that the snowfall in East Antarctica actually decreased by 11 billion tons per year during both the ERS and ICESat periods. They also used information on snow accumulation for tens of thousands of years, derived by other scientists from ice cores, to conclude that East Antarctica has been thickening for a very long time.

    “At the end of the last Ice Age, the air became warmer and carried more moisture across the continent, doubling the amount of snow dropped on the ice sheet,” Zwally said.

    Link

    Reply
    • wili

       /  November 1, 2015

      If this is true, that means we’re _really_ going to see some major increases in slr rates once the Antarctic starts kicking in. But for now, does this mean we are not likely to see the doubling every five years or so that Hansen posited as a possibility, iirc.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  November 1, 2015

        Nope. their findings are at top of the ice pile, remember it’s as large as America. What our problem is, everything that is melting is at the coast. The ice they found is not going to change sea level rise. Because much older ice is qued up to melt long before this snow ever reaches the coast. If anything it will add more weight at the of the pile.

        The most interesting comment is that , snowfall is increasing because the world is warming. That means means it’s getting warmer.

        One of the great denier ideas is that snow is sign of “cold”. It is not, I have lived at over -50 F for over a week . There is zero water vapor at this temperature. It is driest

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  November 2, 2015

        Actually worth noting that Antarctica in the geological record has tracked a couple of centuries at least behind the Arctic, postulated to be the ocean transfer of heat . However we have been heating at a far faster rate with higher GHG’s so all bets off

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 1, 2015

      I find this study very interesting for a number or reasons, the main one is that it is based on radar altimetry , i.e the height. They are assuming mass based on height.
      Greenland and I assume also Antarctica use GPS stations to measure the rebound from ice loss which is appreciable, affects altitude and thus the entire premise.
      Does not factor the melt underneath or the internal lakes and moulins which at times empty in a huge voluminous rush.
      As they state creates a mystery as to why slr, and the massive cold surface meltwater in the Atlantic and Southern oceans. Maybe they are just making erroneous assumptions based on partial information.
      The Grace satellites tell a different story and they do measure MASS

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  November 1, 2015

        Good thinking, Abel Adamski.

        Reply
      • The Zwally figures always seemed to be a bit overly optimistic when it comes to ice mass. One wonders if they aren’t double counting water invading under the ice sheet perimeter from the oceans as ice mass?

        Reply
    • Mblanc

       /  November 1, 2015

      this is the part that stood out to me

      “The good news is that Antarctica is not currently contributing to sea level rise, but is taking 0.23 millimeters per year away,” Zwally said. “But this is also bad news. If the 0.27 millimeters per year of sea level rise attributed to Antarctica in the IPCC report is not really coming from Antarctica, there must be some other contribution to sea level rise that is not accounted for.”

      So he is saying that overall discharge rates are unchanged globally. That implies some other source/s has/have ramped up significantly faster than we thought.

      If that is an extra 0.5mm from Greenland, for example, I would think the net result of this study is pretty negative, because we only need one ice sheet to start collapsing rapidly to have dramatic effects.

      Reply
    • Wharf Rat

       /  November 2, 2015

      from Sou..

      Antarctic ice – growing or shrinking? NASA vs Princeton and Leeds etc

      http://blog.hotwhopper.com/2015/11/antarctic-ice-growing-or-shrinking-nasa.html

      “wasn’t data from the past six years”.
      In the comments, somebody pointed out ESA has data for those years.

      CryoSat detects heavy Antarctic ice loss
      May 22, 2015 The ESA CryoSat mission has detected significant ice loss in a usually stable Antarctic region. The data recorded by the satellite revealed how multiple glaciers along the Southern Antarctic Peninsula started shedding ice in the 2009, with no prior warning.

      The findings were made by researchers from the University of Bristol in the UK. While studying the data captured by the ESA’s ice mission, the team found that the glaciers have been losing ice at a rate of around 60 cubic km (14.4 cubic miles) per year. That makes them one of the largest contributors to sea level rise in Antarctica, depositing some 300 cubic km (72 cubic miles) of water into the ocean over the last six years.

      Prior to 2009, the 750 km (466 mile)-long peninsula had shown no signs of change. It’s thought that the ongoing warming of surrounding oceans is to blame for the sudden ice loss, as changes in air temperature or snowfall are not significant enough to account for the shift.

      http://www.gizmag.com/cryosat-antarctic-ice-loss/37653/

      Reply
  16. Syd Bridges

     /  November 1, 2015

    Thanks for keeping us up-to-date on this, like all your other posts, Robert.

    I worry that this might be much more devastating than it would be in other parts of the world, due to a total lack of preparedness in Yemen. I do not blame the Yemenis: why prepare for something that has never happened before? I think few countries are really prepared for what global warming is going to bring us.

    While reading this article, I was reminded of a conversation I had with an English ex-pat, who had worked in Oman for several years. He moved into a new one story house, which had air con and electric light. All went well for three years, until one night they had a rainstorm. It was then that he found out that all the lights had been installed by running wires across the flat roof and simply drilling holes in that roof, where the light would hang from the ceiling. He found himself in the dark, with an interesting combination of water and live wires coming from above. It was the first rain on that house.

    A similar thing happened to my parents soon after they moved to Kenya in 1951. Their new, Government provided house had louver windows facing east. The architect, who had worked in Mumbai for many years, failed to realize that the East African monsoon does not come from the same direction as the Indian monsoon, with the result that after they had been in the house less than a week, with me and my twin brother being six months old at the time, the house was flooded out unexpectedly when the first rains arrived.

    With the rapid changes, it won’t just be places like Yemen that are unprepared. Sea defenses, drainage schemes, flood prevention and wind proofing of infrastructure will all be overwhelmed by the storms to come. And the politicians, who preferred tax cuts and FF bribes to action, will bluster that “no one could have foreseen such a storm, or prepared for it even if they had.” What they won’t say is that such storms need never have happened in the first place, if the plethora of warnings had been heeded and the scientists listened to, rather than choosing to believe manufactured “anti-knowledge” as a basis for policy.

    Reply
    • Good points, Syd. Add these kinds of construction issues to how population centers are situated on the coast — low lying with hard baked and very steep mountains at their backs — and we begin to get an idea of what such a severe rainfall event could mean for this region.

      Reply
    • Mblanc

       /  November 1, 2015

      Excellent examples Syd. Many places in the world have buildings that are just good enough for current climactic conditions, and that has been appropriate, because it is wasteful to build anything else.

      But if the climate ‘regime’ changes, the underlying assumptions on which those buildings are built, become outdated.

      Anyone want to price up replacing every bit of guttering and drainage pipework in a nation?

      That is a systematic problem on a worldwide scale, and it is the poorest areas that will suffer most.

      Reply
  17. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    Quoting 185. BaltimoreBrian:
    What a preposterous idea, not worth contradicting ;)ColoradoBob I don’t know much about the pine beetles advancing their ranges as the climate warms. It will be sad if they kill off the oldest known living tree. I’ll defer to your expertise🙂

    Climate Change is killing the Joshua Trees below them in the driest place in America.

    Climate Change Threatens an Iconic Desert Tree

    The Desert Southwest and the Arctic are being ripped apart by climate change faster than anywhere else because they are North America’s most extreme ecosystems.

    Link

    Reply
  18. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    WILDFIRES crackled across Siberia this summer, turning skies ochre and sending up enough smoke from burning pines to blot out satellite views of the 400-mile Lake Baikal.

    To many climate scientists, the worsening fires are a consequence of Siberia getting hotter, the carbon unleashed from its burning forests and tundra only adding to man-made fossil fuel emissions.

    Siberia’s wildfire season has lengthened in recent years and the blazes were among the biggest yet, layering the lake, the “Pearl of Siberia”, in ash and scorching the surrounding permafrost.

    However, the Russian public heard little mention of climate change, because media coverage across state-controlled television stations and print media all but ignored it.

    http://www.thenational.scot/world/siberia-burns-as-the-globe-warms-but-moscow-still-plays-it-cool.9367

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 1, 2015

      http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2015/10/29/world/europe/29reuters-climatechange-summit-russia-media.html?_r=1

      The president believes that “there is no global warming, that this is a fraud to restrain the industrial development of several countries including Russia,” says Stanislav Belkovsky, a political analyst and critic of Putin. “That is why this subject is not topical for the majority of the Russian mass media and society in general.””

      From the highly respected (Hrrmph” Daily Caller
      Russian President Vladimir Putin believes global warming is a “fraud” — a plot to keep Russia from using its vast oil and natural gas reserves.

      Reuters has a fair article “Russian media take climate cue from skeptical Putin”

      Reply
      • – Can there really be any surprise there.
        Herr Putin is is a motorcycle loving gangster whose prize possession is a National Football League Super Bowl ring.
        That is his value system in a nutshell.
        The same applies to many Americans of course.
        They’re ruthless, as we have seen.
        – Every ‘tailgate’ party is really a ‘tailpipe’ party. The deviously turn their engines off though.
        – So much for morality among ‘men’. But real ‘men’ are moral.
        – V P has a lot of power, but he’s no more ruthless than the current Republican majority.
        OUT

        Reply
      • Add Putin to the long list of idiots… It really is amazing how much this dictator has in common with republicans these days.

        Reply
        • And they also believe in free markets. There is nothing conservative about the GOP or about Putin & Co., except when it comes to people’s sex lives; then, they’re “socially ‘conservative'”, i.e., control freaks.

      • Abel Adamski

         /  November 1, 2015

        RS
        From the Daily Caller article. Linkages are more extensive than apparent.

        “Putin’s comments likely came after his staff “did very, very extensive work trying to understand all sides of the climate debate,” according to Andrey Illarionov, Putin’s former senior economic adviser, who’s now a senior fellow at the libertarian Cato Institute.”

        Reply
        • Wow, now that is totally bizarre–the Daily Caller, a rabid right-wing outlet, in league with the Kremlin. Who would have thought it possible? Almost as weird as the Kochs’ father spending time in the USSR. Hey, what if the Kochs are actually sleeper agents, trying to bring down capitalism by encouraging its excesses?

        • Woah. So CATO is now importing Putin staff. The revolving door gets weirder and weirder.

      • Ryan in New England

         /  November 2, 2015

        Putin and his staff and the Cato Institute are strange bedfellows indeed. Especially considering that until as recently as the late eighties Russia was the backbone of the “evil empire” that conservatives used to scare Americans. Now they are so rabid towards sane thinking policy makers they have put their differences aside. The enemy of your enemy is your friend.

        Reply
    • – Events are showing us that the ‘average’ stockholder in any fossil fuel corporation is just as ruthless and immoral as any criminal in human history.

      Reply
      • Have to agree with this one. Anyone not actively divesting in fossil fuels is implicated in these increasingly difficult to manage crises.

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 2, 2015

      Meanwhile in Azerbaijan
      “The climate’s point of no return”
      http://www.azernews.az/analysis/89273.html

      By Javier Solana

      When it comes to climate change, the world has reached a point of no return. That may sound ominous, but it is precisely where we need to be: unable to continue retreading old ground, we must resolutely set our future path.

      Reply
  19. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    “Get ready little lady , Hell is coming to Breakfast”

    Lone Wati

    Reply
  20. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    Zombies – Time Of The Season HD

    Reply
  21. California’s Dungeness crab season start in doubt due to toxic algae offshore

    With just a week to go before sport anglers can begin setting traps for Dungeness crab, a persistent bloom of toxic red algae off the Pacific Coast is threatening to disrupt the start of the catch and one of California’s most valuable fisheries.
    http://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/4685052-181/californias-dungeness-crab-season-start

    Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    One thing we all carry is our “Party on Garth” gene. That is 40 thousand years old. To bend that is going to really. tough.

    Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  November 1, 2015

    Good night all –
    Just remember the smallest things have huge jump on us. The bacteria, the viruses. the fungi. the simplest things on this Earth own it lock stock and barrel. We serve at their pleasure. And they don’t care.

    Reply
  24. Doug

     /  November 1, 2015

    I don’t remember if the following piece was posted on Robert’s site, but I found it better than anything I’ve read yet, that expresses the urgency of how quickly we need to change. Highly recommended reading, and worth passing around.

    https://www.skepticalscience.com/must-stop-new-carbon-infrastructure-2018.html

    Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  November 1, 2015

      From your linked article Doug:
      “…I suddenly felt guilty bringing this up, and desperately tried not to think that one day those happy children will despise us for leaving them a ransacked planet whipsawed by a chaotic climate.”

      As I have posted here before – our children are going to hate this generation😦

      Reply
    • wili

       /  November 1, 2015

      I was just thinking about this article yesterday. It really needs to be plastered everywhere continuously. And keep in mind that he is using rather conventional modeling to come up with this conclusion, iirc, and we all know that those are rather wildly conservative.

      Reply
    • dnem

       /  November 1, 2015

      One of the most dramatic manifestations of this phenomenon is port infrastructure. I live in Baltimore and the powers that be here seem to have no inclination whatsoever that investing billions in an ever deeper port to accept ever larger ships might not be the best way to view the future. This idea is writ even larger in the Panama canal expansion and the, god help us, Lake Nicaragua canal. Really?! Decades and decades of huge ships crisscrossing the globe sending meaningless crap back and forth will be required to ever amortize these investments. The only ways to explain this behavior is either utter delusion that it might actually work or criminal callousness to make a buck off the building of this infrastructure now knowing that the model upon which it is built is doomed. I don’t now which is worse.

      Reply
      • It’s pretty clear that investors in these projects aren’t taking SLR seriously enough.

        Reply
      • Exactly, Robert. 1m of SLR at the end of this century is “not that bad” in these f[rack]ers’ collective mindset.

        Of course we won’t get only 1m of SLR or less between now and the end of this century…😮

        Reply
    • Another great talk by Kevin Anderson on this general subject: “Delivering on 2°C: evolution or revolution?” He’s making the same point, essentially, with a lot of background and detail:

      Reply
  25. Spike

     /  November 1, 2015

    Getting warm across the pond guys.

    Reply
    • Jeremy in Wales

       /  November 1, 2015

      Was in Aberystwyth today meeting up with my son as it is his 21st, beautiful sunny day and very warm. Got back home and the BBC is reporting it as the UKs hottest November day, 22.4C (72.3F). http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34693529 (Foggy everywhere else though).

      Obviously we will pay for it later.

      Reply
  26. doug

     /  November 1, 2015

    I did my part this morning and passed around the article. But I used the original post from The Leap, which I think is more effective than the re-post from Skeptical Science.

    http://theleap.thischangeseverything.org/a-hard-deadline-we-must-stop-building-new-carbon-infrastructure-by-2018/

    With a little effort you can get things to the attention of the “difference makers”. I think that is a far more effective strategy, than just passing things along among friends and like- minded individuals.

    I sent the article to two influential people at PNM which is the utility here in New Mexico, and asked if they could get it to the C.E.O.

    I think if we got a bit more active, that would be more useful than just checking in with the latest global warming articles, when we already know what to do, to fix the problem.

    Now, whose going to act?

    Reply
    • You’re right about this one, Doug. Continuing to build FF infrastructure — it’s like putting nails in the coffin for modern civilizations.

      Reply
  27. Via the NWS I find that PDX, for October 2015, had average daily temperatures 5.2 degrees F (2.8 C) above normal.
    Not a good sign. And above the 2 C mark.
    Some parts of the PNW are getting some cool temps, and rain or snow with some flooding.
    In a week though temps are expected to go back up and be a bit dry.
    For now, no lasting snow or snow pack is likely.

    Reply
    • – Re the above: the daily low and the high temps were 5.2 F above — the nights were warm, and the daytime too.
      Drivers and consumers are just as reckless as they have been for the the half century.

      Reply
    • Wildlife doesn’t which season it is either.
      It’s a crime against nature.

      Reply
    • The Jet is starting to flatten a bit. Watch out for that storm track. Bound to be a doozy this year, as Texas already knows.

      Reply
      • Here in New Orleans, too. Looks like we’ll have one bad rainstorm every weekend!😡 :x(: :mad as Cartman:

        Reply
      • Yeah, I saw that. Thx.

        Reply
      • Ed-M, are the very many petrochemical industries there being monitored for flooding and contamination.
        It seems info on them is not as readily available as it once was.

        Reply
        • The info is no longer available like it used to be because of 9/11, the “gift” that keeps on “giving.” Apparently the monitoring data on the refineries’ flood protection / petroleum release containment embankments are not available because of terrorists who would “get ideas” to blow up the weak points.

          Plus, we have Jindal, who (if not someone before whether R or D) probably let the petrochemical companies monitor themselves.

  28. Doug

     /  November 1, 2015

    I just got confirmation from a “higher up” in PNM that my e-mail will go to the CEO. Now my guess is that this CEO lives in a bit of an information bubble which is very common among the rich and powerful. So, with just a little bit of effort on my part, the CEO of the largest utility in New Mexico, will hopefully read this article from The Leap, that is among the most effective climate articles I’ve ever read.

    PNM wants to keep two of their four coal fired plants open, and this CEO has been on television making the case for that. Now, maybe, perhaps, she’ll rethink that decision. Again, it doesn’t take that much effort in the Information Age to reach influential people. I think we should all try this approach.

    Reply
    • Karhu

       /  November 2, 2015

      Gandhi believed he could reason w the British to get them out of India

      Reply
    • Fantastic job, Doug. A level of unique moral action that sets a strong example for us all. And why shouldn’t we lobby decision makers who have the ability to halt operations at plants that produce the most carbon? I sincerely hope this works out.

      Reply
      • doug

         /  November 2, 2015

        Thanks Robert. I will keep up this strategy, and I hope others try it!

        Reply
    • Great and inspiring action you took, Doug. I’ve not gone that route…Thanks for the idea and keep us posted.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  November 2, 2015

      It’s a great idea – the one thing that will occasionally turn dogmatists and ideologues around is pointing out to them that their investments may lose out. One of the reasons I always push the carbon bubble idea on general fora. These people may not give a damn about ecosystems or human deaths, but mention £/$ loss and they start to listen.

      Reply
  29. “Wildlife doesn’t (know) which season it is”, one day it’s summer, next day it’s fall, next day starts out as spring but ends in winter…!
    The same for the trees, flowers, and the birds and insects.
    They are being squeezed with an ever tightening climate vise of our invention.
    It’s ugly.
    It’s tragic.
    It’s our fault.
    It’s sad.
    OUT

    Reply
  30. – South Africa

    MAP: Extreme SA weather as snow and heatwave forecast

    Cape Town – South Africa’s weather has been swaying between the extremes as the SA weather service warns of snowfall and heat waves in certain parts of the country.

    Heavy rain is expected along the South Coast and adjacent interior of the Western and Eastern Cape on Sunday evening.

    Heavy rainfall, gale-force winds and snow
    – traveller24.news24.com/News/Alerts/MAP-Extreme-SA-weather-as-snow-and-heatwave-

    Reply
  31. Griffin

     /  November 2, 2015

    I am not sure of the meteorological conditions that created this flood but these are some seriously amazing pictures of flooding in Calabria.
    http://strangesounds.org/2015/11/violent-surges-and-flash-flooding-hit-calabria-and-sicily-pictures-and-videos.html

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  November 2, 2015

      Thanks for that – had seen a forecast suggesting that was on the cards. Gibraltar was flooded with heavy rain and I saw a report of similar in southern Portugal.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  November 2, 2015

      In Chiaravalle, in the province of Catanzaro, 600 mm rain fell in 48 hours and 234 in 24 hours.

      Reply
      • That is just an insane rate of rainfall…

        In other news, NOAA’s El Niño report shows Niño 3.4 at 2.7 C positive anomaly. This ties the 1997 record for hottest weekly measure… Hottest monthly measure was 2.6. My prelim grid analysis for today is at +3 C daily in Nino 3.4. Yesterday’s was +2.9 C. My bootstrap tends to run about 0.1 C hotter than NOAA’s weekly in the average.

        It’s worth noting that some models show a peak during the next few weeks. Others push the peak out to late November or early December. So we may have peaked this past week but the timing of the recent WWB/Kelvin Wave cycle hints that weekly maximums may continue to heighten into November.

        Reply
  32. Greg

     /  November 2, 2015

    Reply
  33. Greg

     /  November 2, 2015

    From the little heard about but incredibly unique Socotra islands on the south side of Chapala. Crazy that the children were outside but have these islanders ever seen a hurricane?

    Reply
  34. Torrents of water in places that can’t deal with it. Meanwhile, the old system, snowfall and glacial runoff, by which nature has gently watered croplands around the world, is being disrupted. “Let it Snow” is an essay I just wrote about that, in dread of another bare winter here in the Pacific Northwest: http://blog.edsuom.com/2015/10/let-it-snow.html

    Reply
    • rayduray

       /  November 2, 2015

      Ed,

      Thanks for providing the link. I very much appreciated your Halloween blog item. We share a number of concerns. As a resident of a ski resort, (Mt. Bachelor/Bend, OR) I fully endorse your call for great snows in the PNW this winter. Of course I’m sober enough to have read the NWS projections with El Nino’s contribution over the next few months. So, I’ll settle for any snow at all that we can get.🙂

      Reply
  35. Abel Adamski

     /  November 2, 2015

    A BBC video on Global Wierding on a Murdoch Publication
    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/video/id-drdGw2djrGHHsehSdmnGGFzxllkBDA10/Global-Weirding

    Reply
  36. rayduray

     /  November 2, 2015

    The BBC Horizon program on Global Weirding is available in the U.S. at this location:

    Reply
  37. Jeremy

     /  November 2, 2015

    Now that China has rescinded their one child policy, they will have to move all those new bodies around.

    Good news:
    China now makes jumbo jets!

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/chinas-first-big-passenger-jet-rolls-off-the-production-line-2015-11-02?dist=beforebell

    We are screwed!

    Reply
  38. LAM78

     /  November 2, 2015

    Just a notification; Cyclone Gonu in June 2007 was even stronger than Chapala peaking at 145 kts according to JTWC. Best regards, LAM

    Reply
    • Cheers, LAM. Chapala, according to reports from Weather Underground and the Weather Channel, was the strongest storm to form so far south in the Indian Ocean in the climate record. A basin record, though not as decisive as Patricia which was an all time Hemisphere record for Western Hemisphere storms.

      Reply
  39. Wharf Rat

     /  November 2, 2015

    Nick Stokes

    NCEP/NCAR index up 0.2°C in October

    …That makes October by far the highest monthly anomaly in the record; in fact, it beats the previous record (Jan 2007) by 0.15°C.
    Relative to the 1951-80 base of GISS, October would be 1.18°C, and on the NOAA 20th Cen base, it would be 1.14°C. I wouldn’t expect to see those indices rise so high, because they have been somewhat lagging the NCEP/NCAR index recently. In September, GISS was only 0.81°C. Still, there is clearly a possibility of GISS reaching 1°C, and a very strong probability of being the highest anomaly ever, in all indices.

    http://moyhu.blogspot.com/2015/11/ncepncar-index-up-02.html

    Reply
  40. – Nutrient dependent algae reach still expanding — PNW
    Water temps (warm?) may play a part too.

    Environment Local News Northwest

    Toxic-algae advisory: Don’t swim or fish in 5 Thurston County lakes

    OLYMPIA — Officials have issued health advisories for five lakes in Thurston County that have tested positive for high levels of toxic blue-green algae.

    The Olympian reports the advisories apply to Black, Deep, Long, Pattison and Scott lake

    http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/toxic-algae-advisory-dont-swim-or-fish-in-5-thurston-county-lakes/

    Reply
  41. wili

     /  November 2, 2015

    Elsewhere on the Arabian Peninsula: Ice Storms!

    https://www.rt.com/news/320455-ice-flood-saudi-arabia/

    Reply
  42. From Twitter. Alamoudi211 appears to be on the spot. He says the power just went off. –

    Stephen W. Day ‏@DaySWTweet 20m20 minutes ago
    If #Mukalla eyewitness reports accurate – #Chapala winds no more than 60 km per hour, rain is light, then it’s less than Category 1 cyclone

    @Alamoudi211 21m21 minutes ago
    Al-Qaeda dominates the city of Mukalla and there are no trained rescue teams .
    #Mukalla
    #Chapala

    Reply
  43. – PNW PDX 110115
    NWS Low temp 8 degrees F above normal.

    Reply
  44. Aldous

     /  November 2, 2015

    I saw this study and article trending on social media. Unfortunately, a lot of people, both of influence and not, are taking this as an opportunity to say goodbye to climate change.

    http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/nasa-study-mass-gains-of-antarctic-ice-sheet-greater-than-losses

    Most people probably only read the headline and failed to dig a tad deeper,

    “If the losses of the Antarctic Peninsula and parts of West Antarctica continue to increase at the same rate they’ve been increasing for the last two decades, the losses will catch up with the long-term gain in East Antarctica in 20 or 30 years.”

    Reply
    • Aldous

       /  November 2, 2015

      Another important consideration left out of discussion (at least on social media).

      “At the end of the last Ice Age, the air became warmer and carried more moisture across the continent, doubling the amount of snow dropped on the ice sheet,” Zwally said.

      The extra snowfall that began 10,000 years ago has been slowly accumulating on the ice sheet and compacting into solid ice over millennia, thickening the ice in East Antarctica and the interior of West Antarctica by an average of 0.7 inches (1.7 centimeters) per year. This small thickening, sustained over thousands of years and spread over the vast expanse of these sectors of Antarctica, corresponds to a very large gain of ice – enough to outweigh the losses from fast-flowing glaciers in other parts of the continent and reduce global sea level rise.”

      Reply
      • Added rates of precipitation do serve to somewhat moderate SLR and probably helped to govern the very slow variations of Sea level during the Holocene. But if the notion is that under a regime of 400 ppm CO2 and 485 ppm CO2e that snowfall will beat out the geological record evidence pointing toward between 25 and 75+ feet of additional sea level rise in the pipe already or what basically amounts to most of Antarctica eventually going down at between 550 and 600 ppm CO2e, then I’d say my bets are against any such assessments.

        Of course we have added snowfall. And that was expected. But the physical forces of glacial destabilization now in effect are already starting to overwhelm the integrity of the Antarctic ice sheets. Even more concerning is that other studies contradict Zwally’s figures — showing net losses now even as we have increasing evidence of margin destabilization, basal melt and flooding beyond grounding lines, and increasing rates of seaward motion of an ever larger number of glaciers.

        Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  November 2, 2015

        Aldous –
        Dr. Rood’s site at WU has taken this discussion up . Lot’s of very good comments on this study

        Dr. Rood’s Climate Blog

        PS –
        The mods delete the trolls there as well.

        Reply
      • The problem with Zwally’s technique — it uses volume, not mass. And volume, as we know, does not see what’s going on at the base of the ice sheet, which we know from Rignot and others is flooding with water in key regions.

        From a report from April of this year:

        “The researchers “weighed” Antarctica’s ice sheet using gravitational satellite data and found that from 2003 to 2014, the ice sheet lost 92 billion tons of ice per year, the researchers report in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. If stacked on the island of Manhattan, that amount of ice would be more than a mile high — more than five times the height of the Empire State Building.”

        https://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S43/0 4/11E77/index.xml?section=topstories

        It’s not just a question of ‘at this time.’ It’s a question of Zwally using a less refined data set. In other words, if you have snow adding volume to the top of the ice sheet, but the snow is less dense than the compacted, high mass, ice that’s melting away at the bottom, then you can have a net mass loss even though the volume measure provides the illusion of a gain. The GRACE measures show such a discrepancy explicitly.

        Reply
    • At least partly the headline writer’s fault, although deniers will latch onto anything to mislead–would have been easy enough to add “currently,” “at moment,” or some such just to make it a bit harder.

      Reply
  45. Colorado Bob

     /  November 2, 2015

    Another crazy Mideast event –
    Chapala Closing in on Yemen; Record November Warmth in Florida, Europe

    It is difficult to overstate the rarity and gravity of this event: a hurricane-strength storm striking near a large, ancient city, situated near mountains, with no modern experience in dealing with tropical cyclones. Although Hurricane Patricia got much more media attention, Chapala may end up bringing more damage and misery by far. The ongoing civil war in Yemen can only exacerbate the suffering of those affected and complicate relief efforts. “The humanitarian situation in Yemen is deteriorating rapidly,” reported the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in an October 15 update. We can only hope that the powers that be respond to this threat in line with its seriousness.

    Link

    Reply
  46. Rapidly acidifying waters pose major threat for Southern Ocean ecosystem

    http://phys.org/news/2015-11-rapidly-acidifying-pose-major-threat.html

    Reply
  47. PlazaRed

     /  November 2, 2015

    190+ litres of rain per sq meter, or about 9 inches in the Valencia, Spain region today with winds of about 120 KPH.
    A large amount of beach damage and localised flooding.
    Worst storm since 1995 according to the Spanish National news for this kind of damage.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  November 2, 2015

      Amazing all the stories we have seen where storms rake Spain, France, Italy , the Blakans ., and on into the Mideast. They make Texas seem mild, because the just keep coming.

      Reply
  48. I see the latest NOAA ENSO update has pacific sea temperatures resuming their upward spiral over the last week, with the “Nino3.4” region (east-central equatorial pacific) at 2.7C above normal.
    If I remember correctly 1997/98 reached 2.6C and we are now basically in record territory?

    Reply
    • We are… It looks like we are about level with 1997 now. If we keep this 2.7 reading for a few weeks or if we continue to climb, then we will likely surpass 1997 at peak intensity.

      Reply
  49. Bill H

     /  November 2, 2015

    News via twitter from Somalia:

    Chapala has struck: thousands already homeless.

    Reply
  50. Colorado Bob

     /  November 2, 2015

    Portugal floods: elderly man dies after heavy storm hits Algarve

    The storm swept away cars, uprooted trees and washed away roads. Stores in the town centre were flooded with brown water almost to the ceiling.

    There were reports of waves up to five metres high coupled with winds of about 50mph.

    http://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/portugal-floods-elderly-man-dies-after-heavy-storm-hits-algarve-a3105186.html

    Reply
  51. – Arctic News – Sam Carana
    Friday, October 30, 2015
    Methane Vent Hole In Arctic Sea Ice?

    In October 2015, an area appeared in the Arctic sea ice where the temperature of the ice was a few degrees Celsius higher and where ice concentration and salinity levels were substantially lower than the surrounding ice.
    http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2015/10/methane-vent-hole-in-arctic-sea-ice.html

    Reply
  52. Apneaman

     /  November 3, 2015

    More Denial, More Problems: UN Predicts Millions of Climate Refugees to Come

    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/33456-more-denial-more-problems-un-predicts-millions-of-climate-refugees-to-come

    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Reply

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