Record Hot Arctic: NOAA’s 2015 Report Card Shows Signs of Failing Climates

In NOAA’s most recent annual Arctic Report Card, the records just keep falling as the litany of global warming related events appearing throughout the far north continued to crop up with ever-more dizzying frequency…

(NOAA’s Arctic report is a stark expose of the state of the Arctic climate. What we view now is a system undergoing a rapid and dynamic transition from its previously stable state to something that is entirely new and alien to human civilization. Video source: NOAA.)

The 12 month period of October 2014 to September 2015 was the hottest one year time-frame since record keeping began for the Arctic back in 1900. As a result of these record warm temperatures, Arctic sea ice during the Winter hit its lowest maximum extent ever seen. Summer sea ice extent was likewise greatly reduced hitting its 4th lowest extent ever recorded. Old, thick sea ice which represented 20 percent of the ice pack in 1985, has precipitously declined to a mere 3 percent of the ice pack today. Snow cover also took a hit, declining to its second lowest extent on record during 2015 and striking a range of 50 percent below the typical average for the month.

Overall warming of the Arctic is at a much more rapid pace than the rest of the world. This accelerated pace of warming is due, in large part, to loss of snow and sea ice reflectivity during the Spring and Summer months. As a result, more heat is absorbed into dark land and ocean surfaces — a heat that is retained throughout the Arctic over longer and longer periods. And, though NOAA doesn’t report it in the above video, overall higher concentrations of greenhouse gasses like methane and CO2 in or near the Arctic region also contribute to a higher rate of warming (see NOAA’s ESRL figures). In a world that is now rapidly proceeding beyond the 400 ppm CO2 and 485 ppm CO2e threshold, this is exactly the kind of Northern Hemisphere polar amplification we would expect to see.

Warm Winds, Greenland Ice Sheet Melt, and Mass Migrations

NOAA notes a marked change in the distribution of life with mass migrations of all life forms well underway in and around the Arctic. Transitions and disruptions are most highly visible among marine mammals like walruses and polar bears — who are increasingly forced to live on land during the summer months. Meanwhile, an ever-broadening number of non-native fish are invading the Arctic from the south.

south-to-north-weather-pattern-alaska

(South to north weather patterns, like the one featured above, have increasingly drawn warm winds up and over Alaska. An anomalous new weather feature that has merited comment in NOAA’s recent annual Arctic report card. Image from “Arctic Heatwave to Rip Polar Vortex in Half”.)

NOAA also links the warm wind invasion events reported on widely here to the second worst wildfire season ever to strike Alaska in 2015. A dipole feature that displays teleconnections between Arctic snow and ice loss, the hot blob of water in the Northeastern Pacific, and the persistent trough that prevailed over the US East Coast during the Winter of 2014-2015.

Finally, Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt hit a maximum coverage above 50 percent for the first time since the extreme melt that occurred in 2012. NOAA notes that the amount of ice delivered to the ocean by glaciers also increased across Greenland even as recent studies continued to find an increasing prevalence of glacial destabilization and acceleration among Greenland’s ocean-terminating glaciers.

NOAA concludes: “Taken together, 2015 shows a continuing set of major changes in the Arctic.”

Links:

NOAA’s Arctic Report Card

Major Arctic Wildfire Outbreak

NOAA ESRL

Arctic Heatwave to Rip Polar Vortex in Half

El Nino, Polar Amplification or Both?

Hat Tip to Alexandr

 

 

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274 Comments

  1. That’s the exponential function at work:

    Arithmetic, Population and Energy A talk by Al Bartlett: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O133ppiVnWY

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jounce

    The derivatives in order from the first through the sixth are Velocity Acceleration Jerk Jounce Snap Crackle & Pop

    Sent from my iPad 🙏🏻

    >

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 22, 2015

      I’ve seen that presentation by Al Bartlett. It should be required viewing for everyone. Like he points out, human’s inability to grasp exponential growth may be one of our greatest shortcomings.

      Reply
  2. Andy in SD

     /  December 22, 2015

    Paper estimates widespread tree death in Southwestern forests under global warming scenarios

    http://phys.org/news/2015-12-paper-widespread-tree-death-southwestern.html

    Reply
  3. Andy in SD

     /  December 22, 2015

    Methane emissions in Arctic cold season higher than expected

    http://phys.org/news/2015-12-methane-emissions-arctic-cold-season.html

    Reply
  4. Jeremy

     /  December 22, 2015

    Stoopid fuckin’ humans!

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 22, 2015

      How will we solve climate change, which will affect our fellow humans, when we obviously exert a substantial effort making sure we destroy our fellow humans will increasing sophistication and efficiency? Will we really be interested in saving our brothers/sisters when it’s pretty clear we don’t want to save them?

      Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  December 22, 2015

        Simple answer Ryan – we won’t !

        FLOP 21 = “BULLSHIT”

        Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  December 22, 2015

        Problems can be solved.
        Predicaments can’t.

        We are in a predicament- its really that simple.

        Reply
  5. Jeremy

     /  December 22, 2015

    Fortunately, NTHE is now coming into clearer focus.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 22, 2015

      We are a species in overshoot, yet we are determined to keep growing as if there were only a handful of humans left on the planet. We are completely out of control.

      Reply
  6. Jeremy

     /  December 22, 2015

    “. . . . ships for free.”

    http://store.starbucks.com/deep-blue-starbucks-card-adorned-with-swarovski-crystals-011053891.html

    We truly have lost our minds!

    CB – where are you?

    Reply
  7. Andy in SD

     /  December 22, 2015

    The Arctic is seeing more precipitation as sea ice diminishes from climate warming, according to a research paper by U.S. and Canada scientists.

    http://www.adn.com/article/20151221/researchers-say-less-arctic-sea-ice-means-more-precipitation

    Reply
  8. Andy in SD

     /  December 22, 2015

    An interesting map which show ocean travel routes for oil. 63% of oil is moved via ships.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/most-oil-needs-pass-through-one-these-tiny-spots-180957523/?no-ist

    Reply
  9. Ryan in New England

     /  December 22, 2015

    The rapid loss and degradation of soil around the globe is cause for concern.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/12/21/3734206/soil-loss-unfolding-catastrophe/

    Reply
  10. Ryan in New England

     /  December 22, 2015

    At the AGU meeting one of the frequently discussed topics was the political attacks that scientists face from U.S. Republicans. It’s complete insanity that we still have an entire political party who thinks the Earth is flat. Yet these troglodytes embrace science when it gives them electricity, ac, planes, automobiles, computers and smartphones, medicine, etc. etc. They are the sole reason for inaction, and posterity should remember who it was that destroyed their once habitable planet.

    Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  December 22, 2015

      Hi Ryan-

      Oh, the politicians say what the fossil fuel enriched financial elites tell them to say, I think. The politicians are just tools of the super rich, IMO.

      Perhaps that momentum will shift as financial elites finally grasp that there will be few if any winners in climate destabilization, and lots of losers.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  December 22, 2015

        The movie Elyssium. Research shows the possibility of regenerating our Telermorese infinitely extending our lifespan at our prime and the focus on AI and robotics and Space exploration and Colonisation and mining and manufacture..
        Put it all together and maybe 99% of humanity etc is redundant to them.
        Even Bill Gates and so many leaders and politicians are looking for the miraculous technological breakthrough beleiving we have many decades up our sleeves

        Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  December 23, 2015

        Yes, I need to look up the latest telomere extension information.

        There does seem to be more than a touch of eugenics thinking and Social Darwinist thinking going on among our financial elites, and more than a touch of Disaster Capitalism as defined by Naomi Klein.

        Perhaps the momentum will shift when our financial elites finally grasp that even if a methane catastrophe results from their willful destruction of the climate, there will be decades to hunt down those responsible and take revenge.

        Reply
    • Absolutely. You can lay the blame for a total lack of appropriate government policy entirely at their feet. We can argue about how effective government response could be. But with republicans you get the worst of the absolute worst — more funding for fossil fuels, no funding for solutions, and a blanket denial that the problem exists at all.

      Reply
  11. Abel Adamski

     /  December 22, 2015

    Even the US Power Grid companies are affected

    http://phys.org/news/2015-12-extreme-weather-poses-threat-power.html#nRlv

    “It was clear to us that weather patterns were changing fundamentally. Severe weather events were becoming more frequent and devastating,” Allan Drury, a Con Ed spokesman, said in an email.

    Reply
  12. Colorado Bob

     /  December 22, 2015

    Green tundra is turning brown as Arctic warms

    And in another sign of change, 2014 and the first seven months of 2015 saw the combined discharge of fresh water from eight Eurasian and North American rivers into the Arctic Ocean rise by 10% above the level from 1980 to 1989. Scientists attribute the rise to increasing precipitation linked to global warming.
    http://www.climatechangenews.com/2015/12/21/green-tundra-turning-brown-as-arctic-warms/

    Reply
    • Well… Duh?

      As the paper notes it’s likely the winter period where many of the most profound impacts will occur. It’s the period that sees the most warming after all. The period that is in the process of transitioning to a very non-winter like state. At the very least not at all like the winters we’ve been used to.

      The methane feedback in the Arctic is absolutely a big deal when it comes to how much total warming and related geophysical change we see this century. With regards to how much more we can safely emit, it’s pretty clear that number passed zero a while ago.

      Reply
  13. Paper estimates widespread tree death in Southwestern forests under global warming scenarios

    “Averaging all the models together, the study results suggest that 72 percent of the region’s NET forests will die by 2050, with nearly 100 percent mortality of Southwest U.S. forests by 2100.”

    http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2016/dec/southwest-tree-death-122115.html

    Reply
  14. Colorado Bob

     /  December 22, 2015

    Across the North Atlantic, the warmth has been equally impressive. Earth’s longest-running climate archive, the Central England Temperature Record, has a chance at the warmest December in its 357-year history. The CET average for the month to date (12/1 – 12/19) is 9.9°C, a phenomenal 5.1°C above the 1961-1990 mean and well above the warmest December on record (8.1°C in 1934 and 1974). London Heathrow has made it above 10°C (50°F) every day thus far in December, and that streak may continue through month’s end. Gardeners in Cornwall, England, have reported spring-flowering camellias in bloom months ahead of schedule.
    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/holiday-heat-is-on-in-europe-australia-eastern-us

    Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  December 22, 2015

      I drove past a bank of daffodils today in Devon .
      Months early.

      Reply
    • We’re beating the old record by 1.8 C. That’s just absolutely insane.

      Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 22, 2015

        Just heard on the Spanish national TVE, 10 pm 22 Dec, 2015, that temps in Spain are running about +5/C above “normal,” for the time of year.
        Meanwhile we have had about 3 minutes of light rain in the last 2 months, needless to say its our rainy season! just south of Seville and north of Gibraltar here.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 23, 2015

        In CT our previous warmest Dec is 37.5, with the nearest warmest Decembers within a half a degree. This December is over 43 degrees for an average right now, with highs in the coming days forecast to be 55-70, with lows nowhere near freezing, or even in the 30s for that matter.

        Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  December 22, 2015

      Now back in England, today I visited a friend in Tiverton, Devon, which is the county immediately east of Cornwall. His camellias are blooming. It is warm and wet, and many plants and crops are way ahead of schedule. Daffodils are flowering outside our house.

      Reply
  15. Kevin Jones

     /  December 22, 2015

    Oh, just eye-balling Hansen’s Global Surface Temperature graph with the 132 month running mean (to smooth the 11 year slight solar cycle ‘noise’). 1885-1925 is at least .25C below 1951-1980 base. Oct & Nov 2015 are now in at 1.05C above that base. 1.3C above pre-industrial we have been for at least the past 60 days…. Perhaps it is time to review climate sensitivity yet once again…..

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  December 22, 2015

      Or we could add up the Decadal Anomalies from 1901-1930, divide by 3 and get -0.276C below 1951-1980 base period and add Sept.-Nov. 2015 avg. of 0.98 for 1.25C above ‘pre-industrial. I’m thinking a hotter 2016 may well lock in 1.25C as a new ‘base’. This puts the world LOTI (Land Ocean Temperature Index) at 5/8 of 2C….. 5/6 of 1.5C. Good-bye Yellow Brick Road….

      Reply
  16. Greg

     /  December 22, 2015

    Kind of wonder of most of us, as we keep heating up, are going to be living like the folks in Coober Pedy Australia, underground, where “the Jetsons meet the Flintstones”

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  December 22, 2015

      Dr. Strangelove , meet the Morlocks… (See H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine)

      Reply
  17. Jeremy

     /  December 22, 2015

    Cumbria flooded AGAIN!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cumbria-35159816

    These folks are going to become believers, goddamnit!!

    Reply
  18. Stephen

     /  December 22, 2015

    Nothing personal Jeremy but I couldn’t watch the weapons video through. I understand the point it is making. “Kothbiru”, however is one of the most lovely songs ever composed and performed and it seemed obscene for the video author to use it so.
    But then our world has become obscene has it not?
    In sadness,
    Stephen

    Reply
  19. Jeremy

     /  December 22, 2015

    Obscene sums it up.
    Shame you couldn’t watch it through – from 3:00 is the profoundly sad moment .
    People fed into the hopper by our scum “leaders”.
    Just tragic😦

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 22, 2015

      Great catch, God I wish these people would make comments when they post these amazing graphics.

      Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 22, 2015

        Hi Bob,
        It amazes me that a lot of site do not include even the location of the blogger!
        Its east to say, “massive storms in my area today.” Then I sit here and wonder, “where are you?”
        Happens all the time, after all I know you are in the Colorado zone and I am in southern Spain but where is everybody else?
        What sites need is a location for the bloggers in the top address line. Even a “long / lat would help!”
        If people are going to post on global sites, they need to specify where they are and of course what they are commenting on, agreeing with, or contesting; other wise its chaos like on WU!

        Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  December 22, 2015

        Comment: El Nino & The Blob go out on a blind date…..

        Reply
  20. PlazaRed

     /  December 22, 2015

    Sort of sitting here wondering what is lurking in the future? Temperatures wise that is.
    Today in Spain we had +20/C and its going to “warm up a bit” for Christmas.
    We had clear skies and heat to say the least.
    Now the rainfall map looks worse than a desert.
    The blue bits are rain!

    Meanwhile for the next 2 weeks we are going to have a blocking high pressure over the Med. So que sera sera.

    Olive picking time here and a neighbour of mine spent 2 days picking his 20 acres of olives. I watched as they took away to the oil factory a small trailer of maybe a ton (1000Kg,) of olives about the average size of raisins!
    Value might be about 400 Euros! $450! £300!
    At some point it is not going to be worth farming some of these zones and if 200 year old or more, olives wont produce fruit then there is little hope for anything else?

    Whole areas are just grey parched dead grass and of course lots of DUST!

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 22, 2015

      Many thanks PR.
      RS,
      I have not idea how you did it. But the world wide input here is just amazing .

      PlazaRed’s report reminded me of how the olive trees are under attack Bugs and heat.

      And todaysguestis report up thread about the Southwest forests is even more informing.

      If there are 2 tough trees. It’s olive trees , and junipers. They live for hundreds of years.

      Both are losing this battle on this thread . It’s real snapshot in time.

      All this modeling and talk of what we see around us means little. Nature doesn’t care, and she is moving her pieces.

      We are not sitting outside some girls house anymore –
      The American Republican Party is still stuck here .

      Reply
      • – Olive trees and fossil fuel simple-man:

        One of my findings in Santa Barbara, CA circa 2011 was black soot adhering to any tree that exposed sap or oil. I seem to have lost my olive tree photos, so I put up this palm tree as an example. The olive tree looked just as black as the palm in this photo.
        OUT

        Reply
      • – The worst part was that no on one seemed to notice or care even though it was staring them in the face. This ‘obvious’ sign was incomprehensible to the ‘average’ Santa Barbaran.

        Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 22, 2015

        Dust, sometimes the wind blows and the dust blows into the fields but then the trucks and tractors pass and the dust returns, all the time making the ruts in the tracks deeper.
        3 minutes of rain has fallen in the last 2 months!

        Then we look out over the fields, covered in dust and the olive trees some of which are over a 100 years old and think, what are they producing, nothing much other than the chance that they will survive, probably after we the watchers have long been gone and forgotten. Right now they seem asleep waiting for a better tomorrow when rains will return!
        Still we are the watchers and they the eternally watched.

        Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 22, 2015

        Here’s another photo from our olive farm, showing how dry it gets in these times.
        I just wrote that some of the trees were over a 100 years old, that was typing error, I meant to write a 1000 years old, in fact they were planted when Spain was part of another era of human habitation, when irrigation and development wee seen as part of the inheritance of mankind.
        A bit like an American Indian said,” when the Europeans came to North America, you could drink the water of every river. now you need a chemical analysis before you drink most of the natural waters here!”

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 23, 2015

        Right on, Bob. Such diverse and widespread contributors here, with fantastic information to share. A reflection of Robert’s incredible writing. And thank you, PlazaRed for the reporting on conditions in your corner of Europe.

        Reply
    • I watched La Vuelta a España the end of summer and saw similar landscapes. I’d hoped there would be some relief by now. I’m very sorry to hear/see that hasn’t been the case. I can only wish you some good rain in the new year.

      I wasn’t sure we would have one of our holiday treats this year but Pasolivo in California still produced an olio nuovo and knowing this could very well be the last makes every drop precious.

      Reply
    • Jean

       /  December 23, 2015

      I think I will just cry all day for the Olive trees

      Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  December 23, 2015

        Perhaps there’s an Olive ETF!

        Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 23, 2015

        I know a little bit about olive tress, having spent about 25 years now in Southern Spain and worked with them a bit.
        They can apparently survive up to 8 years out of the ground if dug up, they can also come back to being trees again, even if cut off level with the ground.
        They produce their best olives if pruned vigorously the second year after pruning.
        Most of them will not have a problem with it not raining, its just that they wont produce flowers in the springtime and olives in the winter. They need fall rains or October rains to swell up and increase their oil content.
        This year we have seen olive oil about double in price here from about $3 a litre to about $6 a litre, say about $3 a pint. This may seem crazy cheap to people in north America but Spain is by far the biggest olive oil producer in the world with over 10 million olive trees, mainly in Andalucía where I live.
        I would be surprised if 1% of the olive trees die but be prepared for savage price increases in olive oil on the shelves near you, even in Europe from this drought.

        Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 23, 2015

        23rd of December 2015,
        Here’s the Spanish rain map for today, the blue areas are rain events.
        Today an helicopter pilot died when his helicopter crashed while fighting forest fires on the north coast of Spain, an area which seldom see forest fires and its even called the “Costa Verde,” or green coast because of its normally very high rainfall levels.

        “Times they are a changing,” as Bob Dylan wrote a song about!

        Reply
  21. – DESMOG BLOG:

    George Bush Sr Cabinet Was Worried About Climate Change 27 Years Ago

    Two weeks ago, memos from the George H.W. Bush administration were released that detailed conversations between Bush Sr.’s cabinet members, where they discussed the growing threat of global climate change…27 years ago.

    The Hill has posted parts of those conversations:

    “Global climate change is the most far reaching environmental issue of our time,” a 1989 memo from Acting Assistant Secretary of State Richard J. Smith said. “If the climate change within the range of current predictions actually occurs, the consequences for every nation and every aspect of human activity will be profound.”

    Writing to Secretary of State James Baker, Smith said, “As you yourself stated we cannot wait until all the uncertainties have been resolved before we act to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare for whatever climate change we are already committed to.”
    http://www.desmogblog.com/2015/12/18/bush-sr-cabinet-was-worried-about-climate-change-27-years-ago

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  December 22, 2015

      Bi-partisan Treason. Hey, PlazaRed. This is from 43N 72.3W (I like your idea)

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  December 22, 2015

        Bi-partisan Treason.

        No, just human folly.

        Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  December 22, 2015

        Thank you,
        I’m at about 36 north and 4 degrees west.
        60 miles south of Seville and 80 miles north of Gibraltar.

        Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  December 22, 2015

    Here we are little rocky moons orbiting a gas giant like Jupiter .

    Reply
  23. James Burton

     /  December 22, 2015

    For all you older guys out there, do you remember how the scientific news about confirmed global warming hit all forms of the media in the 1980’s? I remember my local Duluth MN Sunday Paper doing a large expose on the Global Climate Warming likely impacts on Northern Minnesota. The science pointed to the end of the Boreal Forests and the rise of open prairies where the Superior National Forest and Canoe Area Wilderness then stood.
    Scientific American was awash with the latest science, from Atmospheric Chemistry, to long term climate models. The Ocean currents. etc. etc. We really were informed and nobody was challenging the science.
    Then in the 90’s, the fossil fuel companies went to work. They completely shut down the flow of information through main stream media. Then they went after popular science journals like Scientific American and gagged them. After shutting science up, they then went on the offensive, attacking every aspect of Global Climate change. As if the carbon cycle did not exist, and man was not adding carbon to the atmosphere.
    We went from free flow of information to the public through the media, to a near total shut down of the steadily worsening information.
    Today, many Americans wear their denial as a badge of honor. A sort of statement of Freedom. Conservatives, Libertarians, Union members, hunters, gun owners, just about every political group of the right has gone totally out of their minds.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 23, 2015

      It’s like living in an Orwellian dystopia, isn’t it?

      Reply
    • labmonkey2

       /  December 23, 2015

      Yeah, I remember. Those were good times. Too bad we didn’t pay enough attention back then.
      But for some, it’s more fun to watch Nero play the fiddle than do something constructive – just look at our political elites and their collective denial.
      I am sad for my young grandchildren. They will not be able to enjoy nature as we all once did.

      Much needed rain here in SoCal today – (I’m at 32.8 x -116.9 or thereabouts)

      Reply
  24. Colorado Bob

     /  December 23, 2015

    The Making of: The Outlaw Josey Wales (Hell Hath No Fury)

    Reply
    • wili

       /  December 23, 2015

      “The film was adapted by Sonia Chernus and Philip Kaufman from author Forrest Carter’s 1973 novel The Rebel Outlaw: Josey Wales (republished, as shown in the movie’s opening credits, as Gone to Texas). Forrest Carter was an alias assumed by Asa Carter: a former Ku Klux Klan leader, a speechwriter for George Wallace”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Outlaw_Josey_Wales

      Reply
  25. Abel Adamski

     /  December 23, 2015

    An interesting development of a high resolution camera to “see” and measure methane.
    http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/green/newsid=41995.php

    Also a lot of articles on storage technology research and advances and CO2 capture and conversion

    Reply
  26. Colorado Bob

     /  December 23, 2015

    Our modern myths.

    Reply
  27. Colorado Bob

     /  December 23, 2015

    Fighting the bozos was once thing I wanted to do.

    But now. making peace with my failures is the only I am about. And that is 3 fingers.

    Life is a funny ole’ dog.

    Reply
  28. PlazaRed

     /  December 23, 2015

    Here’s an article about the glut of oil in Europe due to the warm weather:-

    “UK awash with oil as tankers forced to turn around.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/markets/uk-awash-with-oil-as-tankers-forced-to-turn-around/ar-BBnOZ5Z?srcref=rss

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 23, 2015

      I noted
      “The mild weather is causing havoc for the oil industry across Europe. Oversupply is presenting oil refineries with such slim margins that fuel tankers bringing supplies from the US are doing mid-Atlantic U-turns, according to Reuters.”

      The GOP’s backers will be pleased

      Reply
  29. eric smith

     /  December 23, 2015

    I believe Lovelock. The earth tries to maintain current climate until no longer possible then jumps to next steady state. The weather in eastern US in December is SO bizarre I wonder if this is not the leading edge of this jump. Also reports of fungus killing snakes here now too, after so many amphibians and then the bats. I am starting to think the fungi may be the prime killer in the end. Just a thought.

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  December 23, 2015

      I agree with you, Lovelock simply applied the laws of physics to a much larger system (equilibrium and balance are met, after a change has settled).

      To further your observation regarding fungi, you may notice the news reports spiking over the last 2+ years and especially in 2015 regarding algae blooms and jelly fish blooms. They are also simple life forms.

      Then toss in the mass die offs of higher life forms that seems to be now an epidemic and it ties in very well.

      Simple life forms are more malleable and adaptive. They likely are the top survivors of past mass extinctions as well.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 23, 2015

      An article on just that subject of shift in Climate State. The last step apparently was in 1987 (Occurred over the 1980’s)
      http://phys.org/news/2015-11-climate-evidence-global-shift-1980s.html#jCp

      “Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

      Scientists say that a major step change, or ‘regime shift’, in the Earth’s biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to Antarctica, was centred around 1987, and was sparked by the El Chichón volcanic eruption in Mexico five years earlier.

      Their study, published in Global Change Biology, documents a range of associated events caused by the shift, from a 60% increase in winter river flow into the Baltic Sea to a 400% increase in the average duration of wildfires in the Western United States. It also suggests that climate change is not a gradual process, but one subject to sudden increases, with the 1980s shift representing the largest in an estimated 1,000 years.”

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  December 23, 2015

        The other aspect is geological consequences of melting land ice and emptying aquifers is change in the rotational balance affecting the axis with resultant tectonic adjustments as the equatorial bulge is shifted. Including increased volcanic activity.
        Plus one I was unaware of, namely the Earths vents that are cooling our core and upwelling minerals and heat into the oceans. Newly discovered highly active class along expansion rifts between the plates that these tectonic adjustments will increase.

        http://phys.org/news/2015-12-mystery-loss-earth-crust.html#nRlv

        The first discovery of a new type of hydrothermal vent system in a decade helps explain the long observed disconnect between the theoretical rate at which the Earth’s crust is cooling at seafloor spreading ridge flanks, and actual observations. It could also help scientists interpret the evidence for past global climates more accurately.

        This discovery has been made by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and the University of Southampton using a combination of robot-subs and remotely operated vehicles operated by the NOC.

        Dr Bramley Murton, who co-supervised this research, published today in Nature Communications, said “This will really improve our understanding of how the Earth’s interior cools. Theory has long predicted that there must be more cooling in certain locations on the Earth’s crust than we could account for using the known mechanisms….and this new class of hydrothermal vent system may account for that difference.”

        What makes these hydrothermal vent systems different is that the source of heat driving them comes from hot rock pushed towards the seabed by low angle faults, called tectonic spreading centres, rather than volcanic heat from magma chambers. Dr Murton has been involved in research that discovered tectonic seafloor spreading centres at a number of sites across the ocean floor.

        “We expect this new type of vent system can be found in tectonic seafloor spreading sites across the globe. However, since they are almost invisible to the traditional ways of searching for hydrothermal vents, and the process driving them was not understood, they remained unaccounted for in scientific models of how heat and chemistry is transferred from inside the Earth’s crust

        Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  December 23, 2015

      I’ve read James Lovelock from The Ages of Gaia to A Rough Ride to the Future. The man’s mind has taken mine on an extraordinary journey. I believe he is the giant of our time. No disrespect to the world’s greatest climatologist, James Hansen. Lovelock just looks through a larger window.

      Reply
  30. Andy in SD

     /  December 23, 2015

    Report card shows which states are best prepared for climate change

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/report-card-shows-which-states-are-best-prepared-climate-change

    Reply
    • jonzo13

       /  December 24, 2015

      Florida gets a B ? I guess half the State plans on leaving, because half the State will be underwater by 2100.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 25, 2015

        That’s funny, jonzo13! You’re right. I find a B a bit generous for Florida, especially since the Republican politicians banned talking about climate change/global warming in any plans for the future.

        Reply
  31. Greg

     /  December 23, 2015

    Yes, weather is very warm, but bizarre implies the science can’t explain and didn’t warn us. The next few days here in Virginia (38.0° N, 78.48° W) with rain and thunderstorms in the forecast for several of these days:

    Today Dec 23 – 63°F/61°
    Thu Dec 24 – 73°/63°
    Fri Dec 25 – 72°/61°
    Sat Dec 26 – 70° /59°
    Sun Dec 27 – 74° /51°
    Mon Dec 28 – 54°/ 46°
    Tue Dec 29 – 63° /46°
    “Historic” average: December High 45°F / Low 28°

    Reply
  32. Ryan in New England

     /  December 23, 2015

    Jeff Masters’ blog is about the “tenacious” heat setting records across the globe. The U.S. map of mean temperature anomaly is very striking. I can’t recall seeing such widespread warmth with deep browns used as color because yellow, orange and red just aren’t enough. Half the country is averaging 8F degrees above normal.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/holiday-heat-is-on-in-europe-australia-eastern-us

    Reply
  33. Abel Adamski

     /  December 23, 2015

    There will be those who genetically can cope better with higher heat and humidity as the Sherpa’s can cope with altitude.
    I wonder how many of the GOP and racist right realise it will be those from Africa and the Middleast that will be most likely to have the genetic advantage and most likely be dominant in that hothouse world.
    Some quick lessons in how to say yes massa might be in order

    Reply
  34. President Obama talks climate change with NPR:
    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/21/460281257/watch-obama-insists-climate-deal-will-outlast-gop-climate-denial

    **The comments section is so depressing…climate denial comments in full bloom. WTF…are wrong with these people? I just can’t comprehend it.

    Reply
  35. Andy in SD

     /  December 23, 2015

    James Bay is still not frozen over. One year does not make a trend, just found it curious with the Temp anomaly.

    Also, unless there is a good snow dump early 2016, what are the thoughts on mid west drought next growing season as there would then be a lack of moisture for absorption in the spring?

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 23, 2015

      Here in parts of New England we are running low on precipitation for the year. I just noticed the river by my house is so low it actually stopped running. It’s raining now, so that should help a little bit, but still won’t get us back to normal.

      Reply
  36. – Video of California Methane Crisis

    Published on Dec 20, 2015

    Aerial footage filmed Dec. 17, 2015, shows potent, climate-damaging methane gases escaping from a massive natural gas leak at a storage facility in California’s Aliso Canyon, with the San Fernando valley pictured in the background. The giant methane plumes were made visible by a specialized infrared camera operated by an Earthworks ITC-certified thermographer.
    First Aerial Footage of Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Leak

    Reply
  37. – Anthropogenic Methane Releases

    “… No one responded.”

    ‘Porter Ranch [Aliso Canyon] Methane Leak Does Not Bode Well for Climate’
    By Hilary Lewis, Earthworks

    Have you ever seen methane? What about benzene? Or the chemical the gas company adds to make your stovetop gas stink, mercaptan? I asked residents at a Save Porter Ranch meeting in northwest Los Angeles if they had seen the pollution they knew was in their community, pouring down from the SoCal Gas storage facility on the hill behind town.

    No one responded.

    For months now, methane pollution has been billowing from the breached facility into their community. Families have reported bad odors resulting in headaches and nosebleeds. Over 1,000 families have already chosen to relocate and the school district recently authorized the two local schools to move out of the area. But no one had actually seen the pollution.

    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/34158-porter-ranch-methane-leak-does-not-bode-well-for-climate

    Reply
    • earthfirstjournal.org

      Giant Stream of Methane is Blowing Hundreds of Feet Into the Air in Los Angeles County

      Reply
      • … Some researchers say not enough attention has been paid to to underground gas storage fields, a mainstay of the natural gas distribution system, if little known to the average gas customer. In the western United States these storage areas often consist of older oil fields where the original production wells have been converted to injection wells for gas. Sometimes new injection wells are drilled. The natural gas is gathered from remote areas, in this case Texas, New Mexico, the Rocky Mountains or Canada. Pipelines bring it to places like Aliso Canyon where it is compressed and pushed into formations until it is withdrawn…

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 24, 2015

      This is a major disaster, yet it’s not reported on at all. Tragic.

      Reply
  38. PlazaRed

     /  December 23, 2015

    If you are in, or going to the North of England over the next few days, then this is the article for you.
    It outlines that you might have up to 6 inches of rain or 150 MM, so keep and eye out for bad weather and stay alive:-

    “Seven hundred Environment Agency staff and military personnel are being deployed as flood warnings have been issued in the North and Scotland for late Christmas Day and Boxing Day.”:-

    http://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/army-on-stand-by-for-christmas-floods-crisis/ar-BBnRsPy?li=AAaeUIW

    Reply
  39. 30N 90 W here!

    It’s unusually warm here, too. There are outdoor tropical plants — not suited to NO, LA mind you — that are actively growing!

    And that tornado outbreak today, that’s more typical of April! Lots in MS, TN and KY. We even had two over in Mobile. What’s up with that?

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  December 24, 2015

      El Nino is pushing warm air into the continental US causing a barrier which is inhibiting any cold fronts to come south. It seems to be causing a lot of problems and some significantly high temp anomalies.

      Out here in So Cal, we really have not received anything rain wise which can be attributed to El Nino yet. Apparently it is delayed (we’ll see come January).

      Hang in there, hope all is good.

      Reply
      • James Burton

         /  December 24, 2015

        Andy, thanks for the Southern California update. Do you hear anything about possible rain events going into January? The El Nino was supposed to provide the rains, I wonder will this El Nino track past El Nino or will local weather events not follow traditional patterns we expect. Given the massive overload of heat in the Oceans in places past El Ninos did not have such a heat burden, except off of Greenland!

        Reply
      • Andy in SD

         /  December 24, 2015

        James,

        All bets are off the table. It may track further north, with the blob and high SSTA it may hold off entirely. Nobody knows what is coming (or not). The current media talk is “delayed”, which really means “haven’t seen it, not sure if/when we will”.

        We’re in new territory, and as changes are afoot, next El Nino may be further different.

        Reply
  40. Matt

     /  December 24, 2015

    As I head off to a bloody hot Xmas day for us 33C @ (43s 147e) to all the Scribbler Bloggers have a safe and happy Xmas day!🙂

    Reply
  41. Ryan in New England

     /  December 24, 2015

    Here in Connecticut (41.6N, 72.7W) it’s going to be 70F today, 62 tomorrow, 50s on Saturday and 60s again on Sunday. Our Christmas low temp is warmer than last Easter, and about 15 degrees above our normal high for this time of year, which is supposed to be in the upper 30s. Everybody is talking about the crazy weather, especially the local/national news, but I have yet to hear the words climate change or global warming mentioned by anyone. Our culture is so completely disconnected from the real world that we don’t even recognize the obvious reality that is slapping us in the face every single day.

    Reply
  42. Kevin Jones

     /  December 24, 2015

    PlazaRed: “Even a longitude/latitude would help.” A great idea and it’s taking off! (43N/72E)

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  December 24, 2015

      Need Coffee! Not in Russia! 72W!

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  December 24, 2015

        Note to self: Remove foot. Insert coffee mug. Apologies to Kazakhstan. Happy Fare-the-well to 2015, you all! w/ warmest regards. 🙂

        Reply
      • uilyam

         /  December 26, 2015

        So I just got another cup of coffee (56:00N,38:22E). Several days in the past week or so had a daily high temperature near 3 am, about 6 hours before sunrise.

        Reply
  43. Stephen

     /  December 24, 2015

    Christmas Eve morning-daffodil tops are poking through the ground. Chester County, Pa, about 30 miles northwest of City Hall, Philadelphia.

    Reply
  44. James Burton

     /  December 24, 2015

    “the enormity of the Aliso Canyon gas leak cannot be overstated. Gas is escaping through a ruptured pipe more than 8,000 feet underground, and it shows no signs of stopping,” as according to the California Air Resources Board, methane – a greenhouse gas 72 times more impactful in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide – has been escaping from the Aliso Canyon site with force equivalent “to a volcanic eruption” for about two months now.”

    California’s gas leak is taking on a new scale of damage to air quality. The media is silent as ever, or at least Main Stream media. I awake this morning to my internet news blog leading it’s coverage with the California gas leak. Media in America is totally corporate, and thus we can expect to be left in the dark.
    Happy Holidays to all the readers and posters out there, who keep the comments invigorating all year!

    Reply
  45. Spike

     /  December 24, 2015

    Merry Christmas Robert from a very soggy UK, and to all the regulars on here who provide such valuable chronicles of our times.

    Reply
  46. Griffin

     /  December 24, 2015

    Michael Mann wrote this article that points out that, essentially, the situation overall is much more dire than is widely reported. This is of course no shock to anyone here but it is an interesting read anyway. Of course there are many factors left out of the equation (methane) but he was obviously trying to keep things simple.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-e-mann/how-close-are-we-to-dangerous-planetary-warming_b_8841534.html

    Reply
  47. Colorado Bob

     /  December 24, 2015

    Lais·sez-faire runs into a buzz saw.

    Chennai floods present a lesson in urban planning

    The Chennai floods have thrown up some fundamental flaws in our system of urban planning. Across India, city after city has experienced floods, while some others live with the fear of impending disasters. In Mumbai, flooding was caused by wrong developments at the Bandra estuary and negligence along the Mithi river, and in Uttarakhand the disaster was caused by unplanned regional development and the unholy nexus between the land mafia and politicians. The Srinagar valley suffers from an unfortunate geographical disadvantage of being the recipient of water from an enormous watershed above the valley.

    Meanwhile, in Delhi, the two governments are merrily building on the city’s flood plains, ignoring the ministry of environment, which is supposed to protect the Delhi Ridge and the Yamuna river. Calcutta’s new growth is entirely in the wetland area, creating multiple infrastructure barriers for surface water flow from the mother city, which in any case has a lower elevation than the Hooghly river. In the past decades, Bangalore’s expansion had been at the cost of an elaborate pond system in the sub-region, a majority of the scattered ponds being built upon by land sharks. The Bruhat Bangalore Development Plan came too late, while artificial land values were created by project-driven infrastructure. In other words, all our metropolitan cities have ignored watershed management and environmental planning to their own peril.

    Link

    Reply
  48. Colorado Bob

     /  December 24, 2015

    The water machine is running flat out –

    The Adelaide River Township recorded 181 millimetres, pushing river levels up to nearly six metres overnight.

    Dum-in-Mirrie, about 53 kilometres from Darwin, copped 234 millimetres in 24 hours, while Charles Point recorded an all-time high of 242 millimetres over 24 hours.

    In Darwin, more than 110 millimetres have been recorded at the airport.

    Christmas Eve monsoon across Top End brings severe weather warning, destructive wind and record rainfall

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 24, 2015

      5 Dead, 150,000 Evacuated In Latin America Floods

      Asuncion, Paraguay: Flooding in parts of Latin America dampened Christmas eve celebrations on Thursday, leaving five people dead and driving almost 150,000 from their homes in Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay.

      Some 130,000 people have been forced from their homes across Paraguay, officials said, as President Horacio Cartes declared a state of emergency to free up more than $3.5 million in disaster funds.

      Link

      Reply
  49. seth borenstein ‏@borenbears 5h5 hours ago

    Like Christmas in July in December; Washington sets record highs & record moisture in air; HT @capitalweather

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 24, 2015

      CANADIAN CAPITOL & US CAPITOL – NEW RECORD WARMEST CHRISTMAS EVE: The temperature in Ottawa was 16 C / 61 F at 1 PM. beating the previous December 24 record of 8 C / 46 F. The temperature in Washington DC was 70 F / 21 C by 2 PM, beating the previous December 24 record of 69 F.

      Capital Weather Gang ‏@capitalweather 45s45 seconds ago
      RT @usatodayweather: Virginia Beach is reporting a heat index of 86 degrees

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  December 24, 2015

        CB, that record was broken by 8C/15F! What is the statistical chance of that?!

        Reply
  50. – Via Jason Box: ‘2015 will be the hottest year on record – and the impacts related to warming have been devastating.’
    Published on Dec 21, 2015

    Reply
  51. – Beware of ‘Judicial Watch’.

    Suspecting climate change conspiracy, Judicial Watch sues NOAA for scientists’ e-mails
    FOIA request from Judicial Watch mirrors congressman’s subpoena.

    We’ve been covering the twists and turns of Congressman Lamar Smith’s (R-Tex.) tussle with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Rep. Smith, who chairs the House Science Committee, has accused NOAA scientists of manipulating climate data for political ends. While the NOAA has provided Smith with all the (publicly available) data and methodology behind the peer-reviewed study in question, Smith has also subpoenaed the scientists’ e-mails.

    Now, a new combatant has joined the fray: conservative government watchdog and FOIA factory Judicial Watch.

    [Wikipedia: Judicial Watch is an American conservative educational foundation, which, according to its website, “advocates high standards of ethics and morality in our nation’s public life and seeks to ensure that political and judicial officials do not abuse the powers entrusted to them…]

    http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/12/private-group-now-sues-noaa-for-climate-scientists-e-mails/

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 24, 2015

      This is just the beginning. , they have the packed courts, and they think that corporations are people. Nature however, is about to run over them like a cross town bus.

      Reply
    • Judicial Watch is just another ideologue group funded by right-wing cranks, in this case the Scaifes (and, amazingly, not the Kochs; maybe they just divvy up the evil to be done). Anyway, a bit more info here: http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Judicial_Watch

      Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  December 25, 2015

      Judicial Watch is almost solely a creation of Richard Mellon Scaife, who used it to file something like 80 nuisance lawsuits against Bill and Hillary Clinton a few years ago. Judicial Watch appeared to actively collaborate in Scaife’s effort to “get Bill Clinton” as documented in Joe Conason’s excellent book The Hunting of the President, which culminated in the impeachment effort against Bill Clinton and the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Judicial Watch also has filed lawsuits over various issues including the Benghazi incident.

      Far from being the high minded political watchdogs they style themselves to be, Judicial Watch has a history of using the law to harass people that the conservative movement or Richard Mellon Scaife didn’t like.

      Richard Mellon Scaife was also a major funder of global warming denial. He contributed heavily to CFACT (Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow) which employs arch denier Marc Morano. Morano used to be Senator Inhofe’s Communications Director, but left for a position at CFACT after bloggers publicly investigated how Morano was running a network of climate change deniers out of Inhofe’s office He has carried on essentially the same function at CFACT, it appears – coordinating the climate change denier network.

      Scaife died in 2014, so I wonder who is calling the shots, now. But the conservative foundations Scaife controlled (Sarah Scaife Foundation, Carthage Foundation, Allegheny Foundation, and a couple more) will live on, because they have in excess of three hundred million dollars in assets. Likely they will continue their support for conservative think tanks like the Heritage Foundation, the climate change denier George C. Marshall Foundation, the climate change denier think tank CFACT and its European collaborators, and so on.

      http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Scaife_Foundations

      Reply
      • – Inhofe and the Judicial Watch thread — this is just a quasi-legal aspect. There is still the corrupt criminal element that is the undercurrent of these menacing efforts to undermine our existence.
        Thanks for the Foundations link.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 25, 2015

        Thanks for the fantastic and insightful summary, Leland!

        Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  December 26, 2015

        Hi Guys-

        It must be terrible to live in the artificial reality created by our corporate press – actually believing that Judicial Watch is a group of high minded individuals who sue the government to protect our rights, or believing that the CFACT is actually a committee, or that they are concerned with a constructive tomorrow. Like you said DT – corrupt criminal elements with huge amounts of money trying to undermine our existence.

        Richard Mellon Scaife’s sister Cordelia Scaife May had her own foundations – supporting population reduction and anti-immigration groups like those run by John Tanton. Among those that were associated with Cordelia Scaife May and her Laurel Foundation was Garrett Hardin, who proposed Lifeboat Ethics:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifeboat_ethics

        More than anything else this effort to destroy the stability of the climate seems to be an effort to create a world in which lifeboat ethics is appropriate. It’s a totally unnecessary effort to turn meanness into a virtue, I think.

        All we have to do to live in peace and prosperity is tap into the huge resources of solar energy available to us, and use our science to preserve the stability of the climate, I think.

        Reply
  52. – Algae, NZ 2015

    Toxic algae levels increasing in Tasman area rivers, councils urge caution

    Increasing levels of toxic algae in local rivers have seen Tasman District Council singpost about its presence in the Wai-iti and Takaka rivers and urge caution around the Waimea and Lee rivers.

    Exposure to the dark-coloured algae found on rocks and riverbanks can cause vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain in humans, and is potentially deadly to dogs.

    “It’s only in the last decade that it’s become toxic and a potential dog killer. The alga has a musty smell so it’s attractive to dogs, but it’s a horrible death. It’s like a cyanide poison.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/75380332/toxic-algae-levels-increasing-in-tasman-area-rivers-councils-urge-caution

    Reply
  53. Griffin

     /  December 24, 2015

    Greetings from Massachusetts. It is downright swampy here tonight. A damp towel on a rack next to a wide open window has not dried one bit all day and a healthy adult mosquito just cruised by my face. I thought of you all.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 24, 2015

      This new low is forecast to dump 20 inches of snow , at Clovis New Mexico.

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 25, 2015

      Griffin, a bit south of you here in Ct, and it’s feeling like Spring…late Spring. Really warm, and quite humid (as you point out) which is unheard of around the winter solstice. I have my windows wide open and it’s over 70 in my house! It is truly unbelievable since we reside in a location that is traditionally considered very picturesque for Christmas, with the white snow, fires and heavy sweaters being staples of this season. If you told people around here in the 1980s they would need the windows open to sleep comfortably on Xmas eve by 2015 they wouldn’t have believed you. It’s like mission creep. These profound and rapid (on geological time scales) changes have occurred just slow enough that people disconnected from nature don’t really notice how much things have changed.

      And Bob, that’s remarkable, 20 inches in a very dry place. Things are certainly way out of wack.

      Reply
      • Griffin

         /  December 25, 2015

        Merry Christmas from the Pioneer Valley Ryan! Wintry mix is possible on Tuesday, maybe we can start to feel a bit normal next week.

        Reply
      • Not so sure about that last part. Was at Grand Canyon in Jan 2012. Got home just before two feet of snow buried the area. Not sure how unusual such events are, although I feel certain that anomalies will increase as the climate system gets further out of whack.

        Reply
  54. Colorado Bob

     /  December 24, 2015

    Another hat tip to Dr. Jennifer . This low will slide into Mexico, before racing north into Canada. Her lazy loopy jet stream theory is in effect in the West this winter. So far the jet stream has made her a very very smart girl.

    Reply
  55. Colorado Bob

     /  December 24, 2015

    Reply
    • redskylite

       /  December 24, 2015

      C.B . . .Thanks for including that great song from my favorite artist, and for all the other great songs and entries . . Have a great Christmas and happy new year.

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 25, 2015

      Fantastic song. Thank you Bob, and have a very Merry Christmas!!

      Reply
  56. Apneaman

     /  December 24, 2015

    “Nature however, is about to run over them like a cross town bus.”

    Brazil Declares State of Emergency Over Mosquito Virus

    http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Brazil-Declares-State-of-Emergency-Over-Mosquito-Virus-20151224-0004.html

    Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  December 25, 2015

      One of the side effects of the Zita virus appears to be microcephaly – babies born with tiny heads and brain damage. From your link:

      “However, Zika is also believed to cause impaired and untreatable brain development in unborn infants.

      Brazil has discovered cases of microcephaly in 20 of its 27 states, notably in Pernambuco, where there were 1,031 reported cases and three deaths from the condition.

      Initially concentrated in northeastern Brazil, many cases of microcephaly have now been detected in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo to the south.”

      Thanks for the information, Apneaman. How terrible. What a terrible toll global warming is going to make us pay…and it has just begun. This year is just a tiny preview of coming events. It’s going to be like a slow motion train wreck – inexorable, almost infinitely tragic, and even more tragic because it was predictable and preventable.

      And if the methane hydrates destabilize – this will be the good old days.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  December 25, 2015

      Nasty-ass mosquito making it’s third appearance on the blog tonight! I really do dislike that creature. I still can’t believe that I had one buzzing around on Dec 24th in New England. It shows remarkable adaptability and resilience. Both traits that will position the species as a winner in our warming world.

      Reply
  57. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    The moon is coming up. Everyone go see it. It is beautiful.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 25, 2015

      Hard to believe a small planet hit the Earth and made the Moon. But none of that religious thinking ever explained our world.
      Ever.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  December 25, 2015

      Thin cloud ceiling here but still visible. Here’s to you buddy!

      Reply
  58. Andy in SD

     /  December 25, 2015

    Reply
    • Griffin

       /  December 25, 2015

      Incredible.

      Reply
    • That’s just nuts. Given the weekly measure, this thing is still in the running for top spot. And we have another strong WWB setting up just west of the date line over the next few days. This thing looks like it may get yet one more kick and extend well on into next year. We should be seriously looking at the possibility that 2016 is also a record warm year. At possibly three record warm years in a row the climate is going to look radically different going forward. We’re hitting a dangerous range now. The next decade’s going to be a rough one.

      Reply
  59. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    Birth of the Moon

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 25, 2015

      We required a remarkable course of events to take place in order to make the Earth what it is, a home to an unbelievably diverse variety of life forms and an oasis in the vastness of the cosmos…and we’re trashing it like there’s another one right next door to move into.

      Reply
  60. Andy in SD

     /  December 25, 2015

    Southern Brazil getting a normal December rainfall fortunately.

    http://www2.sabesp.com.br/mananciais/DivulgacaoSiteSabesp.aspx

    Reply
    • That’s good news. But it’s worth noting that El Nino does tend to bring increased rainfall for that region. If it’s just getting normal rain, well, there is likely to be more drying further down the road. I think Brazil will be working to husband its water better. Hopefully it will not be too little effort too late.

      Reply
  61. Warm weather threatens to delay Canada’s busiest ice road

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/dec/24/canada-warm-weather-threatens-ice-road-tibbitt-to-contwoyto-winter

    “To climate scientists, this year’s late freeze could be a harbinger of winters to come. It also raises the alarming prospect of thawing permafrost – the frozen layer of soil covering nearly half of Canada’s landmass – which traps methane, a greenhouse gas, which would only hasten warming.”

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 25, 2015

      Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all my friends here, and Robert. And thank you to Robert and all the commenters that provide me with so much information and knowledge. You are my adopted family, and far more informed than my actual family that can’t seem to ever become interested in any meaningful topics or conversation. This year everyone will be talking about the weather…but not what’s causing it.

      Reply
      • Happy Holidays to you to Ryan. I agree completely with your sentiments. My Christmas was spent around family who are completely clueless and uninterested in any topic other than the superficial. It is so discouraging and disheartening.

        Reply
      • Merry belated Xmas, Ryan. You guys are the absolute best! I’ve missed you over these busy weeks. Looks like a little clear air ahead though. Your predictions about the weather two days ago appear to be quite prescient. Powerful storms from Texas to Iceland to England wildfires in California and Australia and so much more…

        Reply
  62. Ryan in New England

     /  December 25, 2015

    Jeff Masters on the record warmth across the eastern half of the country, which I am experiencing right now. Our previous record in Ct today was smashed by over 10F.

    “Off-the-charts record warmth for Christmas
    The well-advertised holiday warm wave continues to astound, with “instant” record highs set overnight in many locations from the Great Lakes to the Northeast. Readings at midday Friday were already into the 70s Fahrenheit from southeast New York to the Gulf Coast, with widespread 80s across Florida. Some of the daily record highs along and near the East Coast on Thursday will be 10°F or more beyond the warmest Christmas Eve in more than a century of recordkeeping. Breaking a longstanding daily record by more than 10°F is noteworthy in itself, and the intense zone of high pressure off the southeast U.S. coast is uncannily similar to the Bermuda highs common in midsummer! Given the intense interest in holiday weather and the many family gatherings under way, we can expect this bizarre weekend to spur countless dinner-table conversations about climate change and “global weirding.” A warm wave like this doesn’t “prove” climate change; it is one manifestation of the weather that results from natural variations such as El Niño playing out in a global atmosphere that is being warmed, moistened, and shifted by ever-increasing amounts of greenhouse gases. Like the spectacular warm wave of March 2012, which brought 90°F readings to Michigan, the tropical Christmas Eve 2015 could serve as an excellent candidate for attribution research–the attempt to unravel how much long-term climate change raises the odds of a particular weather event. ”

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/tornadoes-rake-mississippi-delta-more-storminess-ahead

    Reply
  63. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    Soggy Bottom Boys – I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow

    Reply
  64. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    My Love Will Not Change – Del McCoury Bhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU61jRLk1OA&feature=youtu.beand (Music Video)

    Reply
  65. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    These are best songs one will ever hear …………

    Steve Earle – Texas Eagle
    Del McCoury is playing back -up.

    Reply
  66. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    Texas.

    Reply
  67. Colorado Bob

     /  December 25, 2015

    Reply
  68. Andy in SD

     /  December 25, 2015

    A good read on how the indigenous people regret allowing tar sands extraction on their land.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2015/may/28/carbon-bomb-canada-tar-sands-fort-mckay-town-sold-itself

    Reply
  69. Leland Palmer

     /  December 25, 2015

    It rained a bit here today in California, which was great.

    But the drought is far from over:

    If you go to the website and click on the individual reservoirs, the recent rains have produced a tiny slight uptick on an overall downward trend. Let’s hope we get lots of rain this winter.

    Reply
  70. Kevin Jones

     /  December 25, 2015

    ESRL shows week beginning Dec. 13 at Mauna Loa 3.31ppm CO2 above week of one year ago. El Nino (tropical Pacific out-gassing?) & Indonesian peat fires of ’98 resulted in largest annual jump of 2.93 ppm to date. Be interesting to watch 2015 (and ’16) final average increases.

    Reply
  71. Syd Bridges

     /  December 25, 2015

    Merry Christmas from soggy old England. I, too, noticed the jump in CO2 from last year. The preliminary figures for Dec 21 show 403.89, which makes me dubious that we will ever see less than 400 ppm in my lifetime.

    Reply
    • PlazaRed

       /  December 25, 2015

      Its got so much against it, from reduced tropical forestation to permafrost thaws! Everything in between as well.
      Probably more chance of finding intelligent life on the moon, than getting back to below 400 PPM throughout the rest of the existence of humanity.

      Now with reduced costs of fossil fuel derivatives then its going to be burn, burn, burn from now onwards into foreseeable future!

      Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  December 26, 2015

      I think it’s possible but unlikely that you and I will ever see 400 ppm again. Only by a massive program of implementing BECCS (Biomass Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage), planting massive biomass plantations, banning fossil fuels, and totally shifting to renewable energy sources could we see this, I think.

      It is likely still technologically possible to reverse course and get back to 400 ppm. But politically it is tragically unlikely that we will see such a happy outcome – we agree on that.

      Reply
  72. – My thoughts, and anger, mirror this statement:
    “Focusing solely on long-term carbon emissions reductions ignores the fact that immediate cuts could save lives today.”
    – It also shows how callous and ruthless we are.
    – Smog does kill children. It always has. Really — and in so-called, civilized societies.

    Global Health
    The immediate cost of air pollution: millions of lives lost

    Focusing solely on long-term carbon emissions reductions ignores the fact that immediate cuts could save lives today. More than 5 million people died from air pollution in 2013 – information we have thanks to major advances in collection of air pollution data using satellites. And many countries that emit the most carbon dioxide stand to gain the most in terms of lives saved if they cut pollution.

    Air pollution kills more people than alcohol and drug use (around 3 million deaths in 2013) and unsafe water, sanitation and handwashing (around 1 million deaths in 2013). In terms of the number of deaths it caused, air pollution was the fourth-highest risk factor globally in 2013 (see Figure 1). In developing countries, it was the third-highest risk factor for death in 2013.

    [Notice how many threats to human health are either corporate sponsored (Mudrer Inc.) or community generated. This speaks to the high cost of health care as well.]

    Reply
  73. Here’s a fresh example of how a “global average” temperature rise means significantly greater temperature increases over large land-masses:

    “Russia Warming Over Two Times Faster Than Rest of Planet”

    http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/12/25/russia-warming-over-two-times-faster-rest-planet

    Reply
  74. Jeremy

     /  December 25, 2015

    After a week in Austria on snow-barren mountains I’m now in a roasting North Carolina .
    83° degrees at Raleigh Airport yesterday.

    The profound difference is that whereas in Austria all the talk was climate change.
    In NC nobody wants to engage in a discussion.

    The air-conditioning is on full blast and the house is ablaze with indoor lights – and it’s the middle of the day.

    And I’m staying with educated “liberals”.
    Completely unaware of the methane volcano in SoCa.

    We are fucked!

    Reply
    • PlazaRed

       /  December 25, 2015

      I was chatting along with an assortment of university gradates the other day, who pointed out to me that the plant life will absorb or take up the extra CO2 with no problems. If fact the plant life may benefit from all the extra CO2 according to them!
      They then returned to talking about the advantages of large capacity gasoline V8, 4 X 4s for winter driving in sometimes muddy conditions?
      I explained as best I could in the “face” of such “superior intellect,” that we should consider the inheritance for our children? To which they said that they had the ultimate confidence that the future generations would be able to “handle” any climatic anomalies.
      At this point I retired from the conversation and drifted off kicking dust from the drought parched ground.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 25, 2015

        It is truly unbelievable just how detached everyone seems to be from what’s happening. And what’s worse, as you point out PlazaRed, nobody seems to care when you try and educate them. As Jeremy points out, here in the U.S. even “educated liberals” are completely ignorant of our situation, or supremely naive in regards to the severity of the problem. The comment about plants absorbing the extra CO2 is a perfect example…first of all every year there are more humans and less plants, and second of all if that were the case CO2 concentrations wouldn’t continue rapidly rising as they do every single year. Our culture has created an alternate reality that embraces the majority that displays intense cognitive dissonance.

        Reply
  75. PlazaRed

     /  December 25, 2015

    I was looking on a Spanish website and got side tracked to a few links and ended up on some distant place reporting that there are places to visit before they disappear.
    So I got it translated by the computing thing and this is what came out:-

    – Venice (Italy): One of the most touristic European cities and classic on which we been warning for a long time that is sinking slowly over the lagoon on which it was founded.
    – Maldives: The nation less altitude in the world. 1200 paradise islands could submerge at any time by climate change or by a tsunami.
    – Kilimanjaro: More than the Tanzanian-Kenyan mountain itself, what worries is their perpetual snow on top. Some say it will not exceed 2030.
    – Belize Reef. World Heritage Site and one of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world and too much affected by hurricanes, excessive fishing and pollution
    – Naples (Italy): On the slopes of Vesuvius volcano that buried Pompeii and Herculaneum and lives under the constant threat.
    – Glaciers in Patagonia. As the Argentine Perito Moreno that melt at the rate of 20 million tons per year deserve urgent visit
    – Madagascar: The “Island treasure “home of endemic and enormous natural wealth. Deforestation, poaching and air pollution every day they put in greater danger.
    – Dead Sea (Israel): Famous for the weightlessness of the water at 430 meters below sea level and that continues to sink each year. At this rate it could dry in 2050.
    – Taj Mahal (India): The spectacular palace suffers every year from the massive influx of tourists, pollution and poor repairs. Unesco studies close for a while.
    – Las Vegas (United States): The drought threatens the city of casinos located in the Mojave Desert.

    There are hundreds more including a few I personally know about but this is the tip of the melting iceberg for now.
    Happy Christmas and into the New Year from PlazaRed.

    Reply
    • Great list, PR…just today, in New England where I’m spending the holiday, someone mentioned several of the above places as “must see’s” before CC takes them from us.

      As an antidote to some of the sad posts re: educated liberals being oblivious, the people I am with this w/e in a coastal area of New England are keenly aware of CC–as are their children. While walking along the beach during high tide when we hoped there would be enough coast to let the animals frolick during a 65F morning(there wasn’t), a 15yo lamented, ” I can’t be happy about this. I know that AGW is the problem.” Without prompting from anyone. She has lots of friends, lots of years ahead of her………..my hope that we and her generation can work together to save(even if compromised) the planet that we and she will grow old in lives on…..naive? Perhaps………but when with young children, with their entire lives, dreams, and hopes in the long distance horizon, hope and the actions that emanate from them are what I feel I owe them. It doesn’t even feel like a choice, but instead, an obligation…

      Reply
  76. – 1225 Davis Strait between Baffin Island & Greenland:

    NWS OPC ‏@NWSOPC 57m57 minutes ago

    #Low pressure in the Davis Strait has strengthened to #hurricane force as of the OPC 18Z #surface analysis

    Reply
  77. Ryan in New England

     /  December 25, 2015

    Like past Christmases,I was struck today by the massive amounts of waste created by just a single day of hyper-consumerism. Hundreds of millions of people all buying crap made by wage slaves in China, wrapped up by paper made of precious trees that gets thrown to the curb in enormous piles, and houses wrapped in lights that still get their electricity from burning fossil fuels. Even while temperatures are 30F above where they should be, people are brainwashed into thinking everything is just fine. The sheer scale and pervasiveness of it all makes my head spin, and feel like we will never get it together.

    Reply
  78. DrFog

     /  December 26, 2015

    Quite impressive images of the huge transformations that humans keep performing on this (still) amazing spaceship Earth:

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/gallery/2015/apr/01/over-population-over-consumption-in-pictures

    Quite like this quote in the above article: “I don’t understand why when we destroy something created by man we call it vandalism, but when we destroy something created by nature we call it progress.”

    If indeed most people think that wild animals, forests, biodiverse ecosystems, etc. don’t matter at all then human population can surely keep on growing, at least in the short term. We’ll then leave the Cenozoic (era of the mammals) and enter the Eremozoic, the era of solitude. In effect humans will turn the planet into a prosthetic extension of themselves, they’ll then look about the world and find nothing but their own detritus.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 26, 2015

      That’s a great quote. I think we are long overdue for rethinking what “progress” really is. Sadly, I don’t believe we will change in time to avoid a very bleak future.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  December 26, 2015

      Increased ozone in the troposphere weakens the trees until they are no longer able to fight off the fungi. It is the fungus that is killing them, but we would be foolish to think that the trees are healthy before the fungus attacks.

      Reply
  79. redskylite

     /  December 26, 2015

    As many of the contributions to this excellent post point out these are desperate times and it is easy to get down-hearted, dispirited and depressed. But I’m not ready to join Prof. Guy McPherson just yet. This report from the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting organization, suggests at one stage, two opposing parties were coming together on Climate Change, seems fossil fueled interests prized it all apart (with a fistful of dollars). I think the same two party split applies to many other countries, just the individual party labels are different (it certainly does in mine). Once science can divorce itself from politics then we certainly have hope. I’ve totally lost any trust or interest in mainstream politics now (left, right and center). Anything challenging to their doctrines gets dismissed as “by Environmentalists/greenies” (not that there is anything wrong with environmentally concerned people).

    Florida Center for Investigative Reporting : Climate Change: A Tale of Two Governors

    “For a brief shining moment there, it seemed like there was a way forward,” Adams said. “A blend of Republicans and Democrats working together on this issue.”

    http://fcir.org/2015/12/26/a-tale-of-two-governors-florida-climate-change-denial/

    Reply
  80. PlazaRed

     /  December 26, 2015

    It seems that the extreme wet weather is returning to the north of England where places which normally don’t suffer flooding are now on their 3rd flood of the winter so far.
    5 inches of rain expected to fall in parts of the north of England.

    http://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/severe-flood-warnings-as-cumbria-braces-for-rain/ar-BBnVz4g?li=AAaeUIW

    Here in Southern Spain 36 N, 4 W, we may get a few showers on Monday, which will be the second time we have had light rain in the last 2 months!

    Reply
  81. Phil

     /  December 26, 2015

    Merry Christmas and all the best for 2016 to everyone here.

    Interesting times – 116 houses lost in a bush fire in Victoria (Australia) on Christmas day.

    Also some comments on Neven’s blog of a possible strong WWB that might produce another Kelvin Wave and prolong the El Nino a bit more in 2016 than is currently being forecast by most models.

    Also, apparently some very hot temperatures now in store for some parts of the Arctic (CAB).

    Reply
  82. Lancashire homes evacuated as severe flood warnings issued

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-35181139

    Reply
  83. Spike

     /  December 26, 2015

    Major flood incidents underway in northern UK – some horrific scenes on social media, and looks like another big storm brewing for around midweek. By midday today some areas in north Wales had had173mm rain, and amounts of 65-85 are widespread.

    Storms of my grandchildren seem to be beginning a little earlier than our complacency allowed for.

    Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  December 26, 2015

      Before coming here, I was reading the BBC report on the flooding in Lancashire and Yorkshire. Still not close enough for Cameron to worry, though the COBRA committee is meeting again. The flood alerts and warnings now seem to cover southern Scotland, Wales and all the north and much of the west of England. The BBC article makes no mention of possible causes, though with the combination of the warm US Eastern seaboard and the cold pool south of Greenland, it’s been obvious for months that this was coming.

      Neven termed our time “the Age of Consequences.” We are now seeing the first ripples of this incoming tide of consequences. But, as the old saying goes: “We aint seen nothing yet.”

      But there may be an upside to this. If, as I suspect, the cost of these winter floods runs into billions of pounds, our arrogant, bungling Chancellor, George Osborne, will be able to blame the failure of his “recovery” on the totally unforeseeable extra costs incurred by the cleanup after these “acts of God”. And to pay for all this, we’d better frack more National Parks.

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 26, 2015

      Homes Evacuated, Cars Submerged as Bad Flooding Hits Britain

      Floods Minister Rory Stewart said rainfall in the affected areas is unprecedented.

      Resources are thin. Officials said 85 percent of Britain’s flood defense barriers have already been deployed to the Cumbria area, in the far northwestern corner of England.

      http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/12/26/world/europe/ap-eu-britain-flooding.html?_r=1

      Reply
      • Bill H

         /  December 26, 2015

        Further info on the devastating floods in the North of England:

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-35182274

        Mother Nature seems to be toying with Britain: a succession of floods in the county of Cumbria, now the same persistent jet stream pattern moving a tad southwards to inundate Lancashire, immediately to the south of Cumbria, not to mention taking in a fair bit of Yorkshire to the East. It’s like the seemingly endless succession of floods in S.W. England two years ago: a jetstream pattern that just isn’t budging. (Calling Jennifer Francis…..)

        Reply
  84. 1226 California — ‘Ventura Fire Shuts Down Freeway Between Carp and Ventura’

    – This is just up the coast from the oil field methane plume. Notice in this photo the various gas and oil infrastructure in the fire area.

    Reply
  85. Colorado Bob

     /  December 26, 2015

    Why Is Russia Warming More Than Twice As Fast Than Rest Of World? Climate Change Experts Raise Concerns

    Record-high temperatures prompted the closing of some of Moscow’s skating rinks this week. A new report shows Russia is warming 2.5 times faster than the world average.
    The report came as many areas of Russia have seen record-high temperatures in recent weeks. Moscow reached record-breaking temperatures every day of the past week, with the Russian capital hitting 8.5 degrees Celsius (47.3 degrees Fahrenheit) Thursday. The weather prompted closings of the city’s skating rinks and other wintertime attractions. One Christmas fixture, a 22-foot-high ice slide, melted four days after it opened, according to the Russian news agency Tass.

    The Russian environmental ministry report noted the rise in droughts, floods and ice melting around the country, according to Agence France-Presse. The report also referred to the “catastrophic rise in fires” and the increase in sea levels.

    Link

    That clattering sound you hear is Napoleon is rolling in his tomb .

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 26, 2015

      That description of Moscow speaks volumes. When you think of Moscow, or Russia in general, around Christmastime the first thing that comes to mind is cold, snow, ice and fur-lined ushankas. You don’t think of thawing skating rinks and melting ice slides.

      Reply
    • – Don’t forget Operation Barbarossa and the cold winter that stopped the German army in WW II.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 27, 2015

        The Russian Winter also defeated Napoleon and his army. It was reportedly so cold the starving soldiers carved frozen flesh off of the horses while they were alive and still walking, and the cold froze the wound and prevented the horses from bleeding too much. Winters in Russia used to be the stuff of legend.

        Reply
  86. Ryan in New England

     /  December 26, 2015
    Reply
  87. Ryan in New England

     /  December 26, 2015

    Lots of heat records being broken this month. A hot end to an even hotter year.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/12/26/3735055/christmas-heat-records-shattered/

    Reply
  88. Andy in SD

     /  December 26, 2015

    The Siege of Miami
    As temperatures climb, so, too, will sea levels.

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/12/21/the-siege-of-miami

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  December 26, 2015

      A pretty nifty tool to explore future water levels in Miami

      http://eyesontherise.org/app/#tab2

      Reply
      • Andy in SD

         /  December 26, 2015

        You’ll start to see permanent issues (not just tidal) at roughly 1.25 feet. At the current rate (if it was linear, which it isn’t) of ~1.25″/year this will take 10 years. As this is not a linear function, it will be less.

        That 300 million dollars worth of pumps will not buy much time.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 27, 2015

      “Many geologists, we’re looking at the possibility of a ten-to-thirty-foot range by the end of the century,” he told me. And Miami Beach is still erecting billions in property just a foot or two above current high tides. Complete insanity/denial.

      Reply
    • Great article…Thank you soooo much for posting. I have emailed it to everyone I know..just hoping people read and share it. I love Elizabeth Kolbert’s book “The Sixth Extinction”. And this article is just so well done, concise and clear.

      Reply
  89. Colorado Bob

     /  December 26, 2015

    I walked outside this morning at 6 AM , and it was like late March in the old climate. Damp. warm, still. Now the blizzard is coming . The NWS is calling for 10 foot snow drifts Northwest of me. The low pressure system didn’t slide deep into Mexico, so they may right. And according to the the graphics this low is going to be very very deep. I’ve been watching it for days since, it was out at Atuk. It went down the whole West Coast , and didn’t help them at all. But Clovis, and Tucumcari are about to get creamed.

    Reply
  90. Colorado Bob

     /  December 26, 2015

    Andy in SD / December 26, 2015

    The Siege of Miami

    That’s one the best climate stories ever . Everyone read this one.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  December 26, 2015

      “I have called the city of Miami,” the first sister said. “And they said it’s just the moon. But I don’t think it’s the moon anymore.”

      Reply
      • Griffin

         /  December 26, 2015

        That was written by Elizabeth Kolbert. She is the author of The Sixth Extinction and a wonderful writer.

        Reply
    • ” In his office, Wanless keeps a jar of meltwater he collected from the Greenland ice sheet. He likes to point out that there is plenty more where that came from.”

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 27, 2015

      Indeed Bob, it is a fantastic article. Thank you Andy. The non-negotiable physical reality of climate change will soon prove to the deniers in Florida just how much of a “hoax” this climate change thing really is. Billions of dollars still being invested in areas that don’t have more than a couple of decades of viability left.

      Reply
  91. Apneaman

     /  December 26, 2015

    Thanks dt.

    Reply
  92. – Open House David Cameron style:
    Waterside Inn in Summerseat partly collapsed due to the River Irwell flooding

    Reply
    • David Cameron ‏@David_Cameron 4h4 hours ago

      My thoughts are with people whose homes have been flooded. I’ll chair a COBRA call tomorrow to ensure everything is being done to help.

      Reply
    • – Excellent ‘drone’ cam footage.

      Reply
  93. Earthjustice ‏@Earthjustice 2h2 hours ago

    A huge win for #Monarchs! EPA pulls approval of toxic chemical Enlist Duo

    Reply
  94. – Here’s a rewarding, for me, piece of news.
    One of my last ‘official’ acts, six or so years ago, was training a dedicated young person on counting (estimating) and monitoring Monarch butterflies at the various overwintering sites in Santa Barbara.
    She is now teaching US Fish and Wildlife Service biologists to do the same.
    Check out the video in the link.

    Monarch Butterflies of Ellwood Mesa
    http://www.fws.gov/ventura/newsroom/release.cfm?item=350

    Reply
    • – Good set of Flickr photos too.
      I used to spend mid Oct. to mid Feb. doing this at a dozen or so sites.

      Reply
    • DT: Judging by my eye test, this was a better than usual season for the monarchs…I lived, until aroundT’giving, on their main migratory highway in the SF Bay area, and I saw–what seemed like more– than the previous year….anecdotal? For sure, but it made me feel better. I’m looking forward to the actual numbers. Activists like yourself have gradually stacked the consciousness of residents in these important areas with the information they lacked to take the plight of monarchs seriously..

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 27, 2015

      Monarchs are amazing and beautiful creatures, and their annual migration (that actually consists of four generations that each fly a separate leg of the journey) is one of the most impressive on the planet. A tiny little butterfly (after being born in a totally different body) flies thousands of miles across North America to a tiny, isolated micro-climate high in the Sierra Madres in Mexico. It borders on miraculous. And sadly our culture cares more about mindless consumption and greed than they do about the preservation of remarkable species like the Monarch and all the other beautiful cousins of ours that share this planet with us.

      Reply
  95. Svein T veitdal ‏@tveitdal 9h9 hours ago

    Mississippi River to reach flood stage, 17 ft, in New Orleans by Jan. 19

    Reply
  96. Tsar Nicholas

     /  December 27, 2015

    Yesterday, I went for a Boxing Day walk near my home in Wales. Admittedly, winters in Britain aren’t generally as cold as New England but honestly! – people were out in their tee shirts walking their dogs, and much of the flora (which wouldn’t bloom until March/April) is displaying vigorous green shoots.

    Reply
  97. Woke up again to more rain hitting the windows here in S.FL. It has been so wet and humid here. The mosquitoes are just outrageous. The air-conditioning is on even during the nights. But if you try to talk to people about it and the relationship to global warming, all I get is the “blank stare” or the statement “Can’t do anything about the weather”. Meanwhile, TX is getting slammed with tornadoes…and parts of England are flooding (again).
    But let’s all distract ourselves with the latest post-Christmas sales….or football.
    I could just scream.

    Reply
    • mudawg

       /  December 27, 2015

      “Can’t do Anything about the weather?” My response is; but we already have.

      Reply
  98. entropicman

     /  December 27, 2015

    When I described the West Atlantic Glider Gun firing depressions at the UK it was intended as a joke.

    My apologies. Watching the UK flooding over the last 24 hours the joke has gone very flat

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  December 27, 2015

      Never took it as a joke but rather a concise description!

      Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  December 27, 2015

      I have been watching the Greenland Cold pool and the backed up Gulf Stream and high SSTs off the US Eastern seaboard for some months now. I expected to see a repeat of the winter of 2013-4 as a result. Unfortunately, my expectations have been met so far this winter.

      In August 2012, Neven called the huge cyclone, the Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012, or GAC 2012. Now we have the Great Atlantic Cyclone Generator of 2015, or GACG 2015. Sadly, I suspect it will be GACG 2016, before making reappearances regularly in years to come. AGW will prime the warm part of the system and Greenland ice melt the cold component for many years (maybe centuries) to come.

      So let’s frack the country harder, because it doesn’t have any downside according to our mendacious politicians. David Cameron has promised to “do everything we can” except, of course, to tackle, or even mention, the cause of the floods.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  December 28, 2015

      Don’t worry – we English are well used to sardonic humour to make a point :>)

      Reply
    • James Burton

       /  December 27, 2015

      Just read about the flooding in York, where the barrier and pump motors nearly flooded out, the gates had to be opened to prevent the loss of these flood defenses. Now the defenses against floods are threatened by floods! York has flooded so many times in recent years.
      If this year does not wake England up to climate change, what will. The floods this year are amazing and just keep coming.
      Robert’s posts on Greenland melt waters and the build up of ocean heat off of the US N.E. being the storm generator make it no mystery at all why England is hit and why it will continue. The cold off Greenland and heat off the US N.E. are a storm machine.
      Still Daily Mail covered the floods, but nothing about the real cause of the floods. So lets Frack England next, what can go wrong?

      Reply
      • Bill H

         /  December 27, 2015

        The English denial machine is working like crazy at the moment. One favourite target is the European Union’s “ban on dredging”: apparently if we just kept dredging and “canalising” all our rivers, no matter how small we’d be OK.

        Oh Dear

        Reply
  99. NWS OPC ‏@NWSOPC 3h3 hours ago

    12Z OPC Atlantic surface analysis w/960mb hurricane force low just SE of Cape Farewell, Greenland & still deepening.

    Reply
    • Keep an eye on that one, guys. What Category shall we give it when it slams into the UK or Ireland?

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  December 27, 2015

      Seems like you have posted one after another DT!

      Reply
    • That one is heading directly for Iceland. It is predicted to combine with a few other lows and then really explode. GFS has it bombing out at 929 mb or lower by Wednesday. The thing is predicted to center over Iceland but its impacts will be far-flung. We have a 1500 mile south to north synoptic pattern in front of the thing and driving all the way to the North Pole. Makes our previous warm winds episodes look tame. Writing about this now. But hold onto your hats because everyone from the UK through Iceland and Svalbard and on to the North Pole is about to see some really unprecedented weather from this thing.

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  December 27, 2015

        Did I just see a forecast of above freezing at 90N for Wed. 1500 UTC? (Climate Reanalyzer)

        Reply
  100. – Bob, are you close to this?
    Snow drifts in Friona of nearly 10′ ! From a @NewsChannel10 viewer. #Blizzard2015 #txwx @TxStormChasers @NWSLubbock

    Reply
  101. – As SoCal Gas wrestles with their anthropogenic runaway natural gas, tertiary butyl mercaptan, tetrahydrothiophene, methane release near LA — SoCal Edison, worried about El Nino power, scurries for backup power generators in Santa Barbara.

    Southern California Edison Installing 41 Backup Generators in Santa Barbara, Goleta Areas

    Electricity provider places generators along South Coast in preparation for winter storms and possible power outages

    The pre-staging ahead of a stronger-than-normal El Niño weather forecast has never happened locally.

    Reply
  102. – Aliso Canyon gas and oil geo-holding facility.

    Why Engineers Can’t Stop Los Angeles’ Enormous Methane Leak

    “Our efforts to stop the flow of gas by pumping fluids directly down the well have not yet been successful, so we have shifted our focus to stopping the leak through a relief well,” Anne Silva, a spokesperson for the Southern California Gas Company, told Motherboard, adding that the company is still exploring other options to stop the leak. “The relief well process is on schedule to be completed by late February or late March.”

    Part of the problem in stopping the leak lies in the base of the well, which sits 8,000 feet underground. Pumping fluids down into the will, usually the normal recourse, just isn’t working…

    So far, over 150 million pounds of methane have been released by the leak, which connects to an enormous underground containment system. Silva says that the cause of the leak is still unknown, but research by EDF has also revealed that more than 38 percent of the pipes in Southern California Gas Company’s territory are more than 50 years old, and 16 percent are made of made from corrosion- and leak-prone materials.

    Right now, relief efforts have drilled only 3,800 feet down—less than half of the way to the base of the well. At that rate, the torrent of methane pouring into California won’t be stopped any time soon.
    http://motherboard.vice.com/read/why-we-cant-stop-the-enormous-methane-leak-flooding-la

    Reply
  103. 220 Flights Canceled in China Over Pollution – Reports

    Thousands of people were stuck at Beijing’s International Airport on Friday after 220 flights were cancelled in the Chinese capital because of immense pollution.

    http://sputniknews.com/us/20151227/1032350085/flights-cancelled-china-pollution.html

    Reply

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