Mangled Jet Stream, River of Moisture Set to Deliver Extreme Flooding to Mississippi Valley

The potential rainfall totals for a broad region centering just west of the Mississippi River Valley are absolutely extraordinary. For even a strong spring storm, this event may hit unprecedented levels. It’s the kind of abnormal event we’ve now come to expect in a world driven 1 C + warmer than 1880s levels by a merciless burning of fossil fuels that just won’t quit.

****

Mangled Jet Stream Aims River of Moisture at Central US and Gulf Coasts

Over the past few weeks, a record warm El Nino has been slowly cooling down in the Equatorial Pacific. One of the top three strongest events on record, this particular warming of sea surfaces in the Pacific coincided with never before seen global heat as atmospheric CO2 levels spiked to above 405 parts per million on some days during February and March. The record warm sea surface and atmosphere held a never before seen excess of water vapor and moisture in suspension — primarily over the Equatorial Ocean zones. And as the world hit peak temperatures during early March and began to back off a little, some of that massive excess of moisture was bound to wring out somewhere.

For such events, all you really need is a trigger. And over the past two days, forecast models have been predicting an insane dip in the Jet Stream. Today, we got it. A raging storm track over the Northeast Pacific roared its 200+ mph upper level winds down over the Western US and Mexico. It drew deep from a rich, record global warming intensified, low Latitude moisture flood as its tail end reached all the way to the Equator itself. This insanely deep trough then turned north, aiming an unprecedented atmospheric moisture flood fire-hose style at the storm-tossed airs above the Mississippi River Valley.

Huge Dip in the Jet Stream March 8

(An extreme dip in the Jet Stream stretching through the Western US and all the way to the Equator is aiming both Pacific and Gulf moisture at the Mississippi River Valley today. The severe storms that are now firing and that are predicted to continue over the next three days may result in an unprecedented flooding event. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

Severe storms are now firing off along a line stretching from the Gulf Coast to Nebraska. Coastal flooding, gale force winds, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes and hail are all expected as part of what can best be described as an epic storm system. But perhaps the most dangerous feature of the whole event is the severe rainfall totals that are expected to accumulate over the next three days.

Foot of Rain or More over Mississippi River Valley in the Next Three Days

Rain that is expected to be extraordinarily intense and long lasting. Reports from the Weather Channel indicated the risk for rainfall rates in the range of 3 inches an hour in some of the heaviest storm cells. Meanwhile, model runs earlier today indicated a potential for as much as 20 Inches of rain for some regions over the next 72 hours. Official NOAA models are now indicating nearly a foot in peak rainfall regions in Eastern Texas and Western Louisiana with the potential for greater than five inches along a broad swath running from the Gulf Coast through to Illinois.

72 Hour rainfall totals NOAA NCEP

(NOAA predicts very extreme rainfall totals over a broad region of the Mississippi River Valley during the next three days. Image source: NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center.)

According to NBC news reports, more than 15 million Americans are falling under risk of flooding from this very severe weather system. One that has been compared with the South Carolina floods of 2015 due to its potential to produce severe rains. But one that is also much wider in coverage — capable of impacts over a far broader region.

In addition, those flooding rains will fall all over the Mississippi River Valley — resulting in an extreme threat of very severe flooding all along this great river and its tributaries. As such, we are likely to be dealing with a flood situation for many days after the initial rain event tapers off. With Spring on the way, with so much moisture still bleeding off the Pacific, with a record level of global warming greatly amping up the hydrological cycle, and with a trough development tendency setting up for this region — this particular extreme rainfall event may, sadly, be but the first of many this season.

Links:

Earth Nullschool

NOAA El Nino

NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center

The Roof is On Fire

Models Predict Big Jet Stream Dip

National Weather Service Radar Loop

National Weather Service Alerts Map

The Weather Network

The Weather Channel

Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana Face Drenching, Possible Tornadoes

Hat Tip to DT Lange

Hat Tip to Anthony Sagliani

Leave a comment

185 Comments

  1. Highest ever annual rise in carbon dioxide levels recorded

    It is not just temperature records that are falling. The average carbon dioxide level recorded at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, during February 2016 was 404.02 parts per million – 3.76 ppm higher than the average for February 2015, according to preliminary figures.

    That is the biggest ever increase over a 12-month period.

    A new record has also been set for the biggest rise over a calendar year. Global average CO2 levels (which differ slightly from the figures for Mauna Loa only) rose by 3.09 ppm in 2015. The previous record was a rise of 2.82 ppm, in 1998.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2079995-highest-ever-annual-rise-in-carbon-dioxide-levels-recorded/

    Reply
    • The warm ocean surface is doing its work — locking out some of the great waters’ ability to take down CO2. 2016’s another really rough year for our climate.

      Reply
  2. Kevin Jones

     /  March 9, 2016

    Charles David Keeling was one of our nation’s and worlds greatest scientists. His son carries on his monitoring. Scripps. Charles David Keeling was awarded the Presidential Medal for Science. By George W. Bush. ‘Splain that you Kochs. Explain this, G.W.!

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  March 9, 2016

      National Medal of Science, I meant…. His son Ralph, I mean.

      Reply
    • Speaking of Ralph Keeling, here’s a little personal anectode.

      I live not too far from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography — have a membership to the Scripps-Birch Aquarium. One of the bennies of being a member is free admission to monthly lectures given by Scripps scientists.

      (Tip for those out there who give lectures and would like to spice them up with a bit of humor. The phrase “Fox News” is a guaranteed laugh-getter at almost any climate-science lecture. I’ve seen it work in person).

      But I digress: now, back to Ralph Keeling.

      Once a year (in May), the Scripps-Birch Aquarium hosts the Charles David Keeling Memorial Lecture (MC’d by Dr. Ralph Keeling). While waiting in line outside the Keeling Lecture venue a couple of years ago, I noticed that Dr. Keeling was standing in line behind me.

      The event organizer then stepped outside the door and noticed Dr. Keeling standing in line. She called out to him, “You are a very important person here; you don’t need to stand in line. Come right on in”.

      His reply? “Everyone here is important. I’ll just wait in line”.

      And that he did; he continued to wait in line and filed into the lecture hall along with everone else.

      That apple didn’t roll far from the tree. Dr. Ralph Keeling is truly a gentleman and a scholar.

      Reply
      • “anectode”. Say what? I meant “anecdote”!

        Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  March 9, 2016

        Great story, caerbannog. Over the years I’ve met some great scientists and been struck by their humility, earthiness (makes sense ’cause their earth scientists!) and accessibility. Kind of makes you want to listen to what they have to say….

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 9, 2016

        Wonderful story, caerbannog, thank you for that🙂 It’s knowing how great most of these scientists are, their humility, their respect for others, their tireless efforts to expand humanity’s knowledge, that gets me so furious when crackpot deniers dismiss them as con-artists and know-nothings…when the deniers themselves are usually the embodiment of Dunning-Kruger.

        Reply
      • Here’s my story, of a brief interaction with Ralph, while researching where Charles David did his first CO2 sampling in the Big Sur area.
        http://aireform.com/big-sur-state-park-where-the-keeling-curve-was-born/

        As rough as the world has gotten, it is thoroughly pleasing to run into people like the Keelings!

        Reply
  3. Jay M

     /  March 9, 2016

    pineapple express is predicted again to hit California over next week
    Looks like vigorous storms and many reservoir get recharged

    Reply
    • NorCal may also see 15-20 inches of rain for the week. SoCal still getting a light treatment. Central Valley north looks like it may have the drought edge shaved off a bit.

      Reply
    • Yes, reservoir levels are recharging.🙂 There’s a huge ground water deficit to make up, though. Some areas have been subsiding very rapidly – from May 2014 to January 2015 total subsidence due to ground water depletion around Corcoran, CA was about three feet, according to NASA.

      http://water.ca.gov/groundwater/docs/NASA_REPORT.pdf

      But, here in California, we’ll take it. Any rain at all is welcome. One reservoir is actually above average, and several major ones are now approaching average levels.

      Reply
      • Maybe the California state government ought to drill injection wells getting water from ponds built along the California aqueduct system. Then when we have these events, water could be quickly injected down into the affected aquifers, supplied by the reservoirs.

        Reply
      • Steven Blaisdell

         /  March 10, 2016

        To Leland re: injection wells. I’ve been thinking the same thing for a long time, especially for the Ogallala. We have the technology – be a nicely ironic ‘re-purposing’ of oil drilling materiel.

        Reply
      • Hi Steven-

        I guess it’s not a new idea, although I didn’t know about it – the USGS has been studying it for example. They call it aquifer storage and recovery:

        http://ca.water.usgs.gov/misc/asr/

        Apparently other sources of water are being considered for aquifer storage and recovery including runoff and water from sewage treatment plants. One problem is clogging of injection wells by particulates. Another problem is legal control of the injected water.

        You know, in the fruit juice and beer industries, they use diatomaceous earth filters to remove particulates and clarify their products. One would think that a series of filters including sand and diatomaceous earth, along with flocculation could help the clogging problem. And then there is backflushing, I guess. Maybe a device that works like a pool vacuum could periodically vacuum out the wells to remove particulates.

        The USGS says hydrological and geological knowledge of the aquifer is necessary for aquifer storage and recovery, to prevent unintended consequences.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 10, 2016

        A peer reviewed study linked wastewater injection from fracking in California to a swarm of earthquakes.

        http://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2016/03/04/why-degree-temperature-jump-more-important-than-trump-hands/lCyz5MHZkH8aD0HIDJrcYJ/story.html?event=event25

        I also read, though I can’t recall where, that a lot of California’s aquifers exist in ground that is clay-like. The problem there is that when water is removed the pressure of the above ground squeezes the clay together, eliminating the void that was previously occupied by water, leading to subsidence but also eliminating the ability for the aquifer to store as much water in the future. So California is not just losing water from their aquifers, they are also losing the ability of those aquifers to recharge fully to pre-drought levels no matter how much rain they get. Like many effects of climate change, and climate change itself, we are doing things that can’t be undone.

        Reply
      • Hy Ryan-

        Well, Californians might be willing to tolerate small earthquakes to recharge groundwater, but not for fracking. I know I would, and I am a homeowner with cracks in my drywall when the house moves and settles.

        Some of the aquifers can be recharged, likely, and some cannot. Recharge the ones that can, if we can find the water to do that.

        And stop allowing the clay aquifers to collapse. Stop digging – do what we can. Like the USGS says, the first step is knowledge. And we need to stop making unsustainable withdrawals from the ground water. That’s going to require regulation, and permits, and meters on private wells, likely. There was one guy near Merced, CA, who was selling billions of gallons of water he was pumping out of wells on his land with big pumps last year. That has to stop, I think.

        Reply
    • Link to major reservoirs map from the CDEC (California Data Exchange Center):

      http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/products/rescond.pdf

      Clicking on the individual reservoirs will generally take you to more detailed graphs of the individual reservoirs, but the individual reservoir links aren’t working right now.

      Reply
    • Dan in Oz

       /  March 10, 2016

      I am in no way under-estimating the drought and its impact in SoCal, but here in Perth, Australia we have the lowest dam levels we’ve had in years (not sure if it’s at record lows – don’t have the data to hand). The aggregate level of our various dams is just below 24% of capacity. Granted, we are now at the end of our summer, and entering autumn, but that’s pretty awful. And the next potential for rain is about 22/23 March, so another 2 weeks or so with no rain at all.
      The 2 million people of Perth rely on 2 desalination plants. They have various environmental issues with them, hyper-saline hot water discharge being one of them. However, on the plus side, the first one had a wind farm built in conjunction with it, so its power needs are offset by the turbines. Originally it was meant to be 100% offset, but I’m not sure what the reality is. Interestingly that was done by a Labor Government. The one done by the Liberal government (right of centre conservatives) had a much looser set of renewable energy initiatives to off set the power needs.

      Reply
  4. – Gnarly weather (and RS post) for sure.
    US politics and election primaries appear to be weather-proof though.

    – St Louis on Mississippi may get 4″ rain.
    NWS St. Louis ‏@NWSStLouis 4h4 hours ago

    flash flood watch issued until noon Thu. 2-4 inches of rain expected w/ locally higher amounts. #stlwx #mowx #ilwx

    Reply
    • – Also some extreme down Laredo, TX way.
      NWS WPC ‏@NWSWPC 2h2 hours ago

      Today’s National High/Low temps: 96 at Laredo, ( 1 at Lake Yellowstone, WY)

      Reply
    • – “record global warming intensified, low Latitude moisture flood as its tail end reached all the way to the Equator itself.

      With Spring on the way, with so much moisture still bleeding off the Pacific, with a record level of global warming greatly amping up the hydrological cycle, and with a trough development tendency setting up for this region — this particular extreme rainfall event may, sadly, be but the first of many this season.”

      – Gnarly synopsis, Robert.

      Reply
    • Ha. Yeah. Weather and climate proof for the most part.

      The West Coast, as you allude to below really gets hammered later this week. Very heavy weather for US over next ten days.

      Reply
  5. – Some visually inspiring symmetry of the cloud/moisture plumes:
    Of course the rain in Acapulco is a direct result of <-5 SD trough digging into Mexico at the moment.

    Reply
  6. Cento

     /  March 9, 2016

    Will this lead to greater flooding of the Mississippi than in 2011? What is the trend so far and are rainfall events becoming more intense in line with the models?

    Reply
  7. 09:41 UTC
    Svein T veitdal ‏@tveitdal 1h1 hour ago

    NOAA: Trends in Atmospheric CO2. Increase January 2014-2015 smash prevous records

    Reply
  8. – Mercy, mercy, mercy… What a picture sequence.
    – Pardon if it’s been posted before.
    – A ‘flowplayer’ gif like file.

    Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide
    CO2 emissions
    http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/ff.html

    Reply
  9. 1:08 min.
    NASA Captures Total Solar Eclipse on Camera

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 10, 2016

      Awesome. Thanks for that, dt! Question; do you know what that purple arc-like protrusion is at about 11:30 (if the moon was a clock, not the time of video)? Is that a solar prominence I am seeing?

      Reply
  10. dnem

     /  March 9, 2016

    truck breaks through ice

    Neven has a post this morning that I thought folks here would appreciate:

    An 80-thousand pound metaphor crashed through the ice in the Northwest Territories Saturday in the form of an off-white Western Star fuel tanker.

    The CBC reports that the tanker was carrying heating fuel to Deline, a town of about 500 near the Great Bear Lake. The accident happened just three days after the territory’s transportation department raised the allowable weight on the Great Bear Ice Crossing from 10,000 kilograms to 40,0000 [you have got to be kidding; N].

    The truck is currently semi-submerged in the top portion of the ice, which one official estimates to be between 100 and 120 centimetres thick. No one was injured in the incident.

    The symbolism of a fuel truck trapped in the ice in Canada’s north will not be lost on anyone who follows news from the scientific community about climate change.

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  March 9, 2016

      I thought the tank was empty and it’s buoyancy was keeping the cab from deep sixing. If that thing was full it should have been an anchor.

      Reply
      • Andy in SD

         /  March 9, 2016

        Bad guess on my part, perhaps partially filled.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 9, 2016

        Aren’t hydrocarbon-based fuels less dense than water, making the tanker likely to float whether it is full of air or fuel? I’m not trying to be a smart ass here, I’m actually curious about the answer. I Googled it and wasn’t satisfied with the single relevant hit I got.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 9, 2016

        I think I recall hearing that the commercial airliner that landed on the Hudson was kept afloat due to the fuel in the tanks. I could, however, be completely mistaken.

        Reply
      • Andy in SD

         /  March 10, 2016

        Fuel floats on water, but I am puzzled whether it is just dead weight in a container? Or probably acts like Styrofoam (floating magic!).

        Reply
      • The weight of diesel fuel is slightly temperature dependent, but for the purposes of this discussion, lets say it is 7.5 pounds per gallon (and water is 8). So, if the tanker is carrying, say, 5000 gallons, that fuel will weigh 37,500 pounds while the water it displaces weighs 40,000 pounds, a difference (and resulting buoyancy) of 2500 pounds. However, the metal in the tanker trailer alone weighs much more than that, thus the trailer has a net negative buoyancy, not counting the tractor.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 10, 2016

      Thank you Planet in Distress!!

      Reply
  11. dnem

     /  March 9, 2016

    http://neven1.typepad.com

    I pasted the link to the photo on Neven’s blog in my previous comment, above. I thought the photo would display here but all I got was the link. What did I do wrong?

    Reply
  12. The big question is whether & when the Atchafalaya

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1987/02/23/atchafalaya

    will become the main channel.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 10, 2016

      That was an enjoyable and very extensive article. I really enjoyed this phrase;

      In an average year, some two hundred million tons of sediment are in transport in the river. This is where the foreland Rockies go, the western Appalachians. Southern Louisiana is a very large lump of mountain butter, eight miles thick where it rests upon the continental shelf, half that under New Orleans,

      It’s almost magical to think that the mountains I have stood on in the Rockies, and also those in Appalachia, get transported one particle at a time down the Mississippi to make the “mountain butter” that is the delta.

      Reply
    • Yes, we need to remember that even as the rain falls and the reservoirs fill, there are millions of dead trees in California forests. Groundwater is still severely depleted, and some places in the Central Valley have subsided more than 10 feet due to groundwater depletion. Forests are full of dead wood and vulnerable to fires and insect infestations, and so on.

      These rains are from the pineapple express, from Hawaii, not from the cold northern storms that used to fill the Sierras with snow every year, regular as clockwork, I think.

      So, any rain is welcome, but if the drought is tied to the loss of Arctic sea ice, that loss is permanent and so the drought will be permanent, at least in our lifetimes, I think. We can hope that the drought in California is not tied to the loss of Arctic sea ice, and was a random phenomenon. But the once in a millennium nature of this drought argues against chance alone. Another hope is that the pineapple express from Hawaii will ramp up as the northern storm track ramps down.

      Reply
  13. The levels of the climate gas methane is increasing more than expected at measuring stations both on Svalbard and in Southern Norway.

    Director of the Norwegian Environment Directorate, Ellen Hambro, said that the development gives reason for concern: “It is very disturbing that the concentration of methane and CO₂ are increasing. It shows once again the urgency of implementing measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions both in the short and long term.”

    http://www.thebarentsobserver.com/ecology/2016/03/scientists-beat-alarm-levels-methane-increasing-rapidly-arctic#.Vt8cNGJTn20.facebook

    Reply
  14. Greg

     /  March 9, 2016

    It has begun:

    Residents are evacuating the Tall Timbers subdivision off of Highway 80 in Bossier Parish, La. as major flooding has occurred in the area.

    Reply
  15. Greg

     /  March 9, 2016

    From Jeff Masters:
    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/flash-flood-emergency-in-northern-lousiana-over-a-foot-of-rain-in-24-
    “near-record levels of atmospheric moisture for this time of year–more than 200% of average–remain in place over the region, and renewed rounds of heavy rain are likely through Friday. Extreme flooding rains were spreading into Southern Arkansas on Wednesday morning, and rainfall amounts of a foot in 24 hours are possible there, as well. Additional major flash flooding over the next few days is also possible in Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Shreveport, Little Rock, Memphis and New Orleans….A large low pressure system (a “cut-off” low) has separated from the jet stream, and will stay parked over the U.S./Mexico border region during the next few days. The counter-clockwise flow of air around this low is bringing up plenty of warm, moisture-laden air from the tropics along the east side of the low, causing the heavy rains we’ve observed. By this weekend, when all of this rain has had time to flow into area rivers, expect to see several rivers crest at near-record flood levels. Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) are near average over the Gulf of Mexico, which will keep the amount of moisture available to this week’s storms lower than would be the case if SSTs were unusually warm. However, the cut-off low has tapped into a moisture source in the deep tropics over the Eastern Pacific where SSTs are record warm.”

    Reply
    • Fantastic follow-up by Dr. Masters as usual. Man is this event huge. Should have pointed out the risk of getting a cut-off low of this kind with such a huge dip in the Jet. Prayers and concerns for everyone in the flood zone.

      Reply
  16. Greg

     /  March 9, 2016

    Re DT above: “– Some visually inspiring symmetry of the cloud/moisture plumes:
    Of course the rain in Acapulco is a direct result of <-5 SD trough digging into Mexico at the moment."
    five-sigma corresponds to a p-value, or probability, of 3×10-7, or about 1 in 3.5 million.

    Reply
  17. – Meanwhile in parts of the nominally dry Middle East:
    – The vid in the piece is worth a look.

    Weather: Rain, strong winds disrupt life across UAE

    Motorists stuck for hours, schools closed, flights cancelled and safety warnings issued across emirates

    Dubai: Rain and thunderstorms caused major disruptions across the UAE on Wednesday as flights were cancelled, motorists were stuck for hours, traffic on major roads diverted and schools were closed.

    Wind gusts of up to 130 kph shattered glass windows while flooded roads stalled life and even caused the Abu Dhabi stock market to shut down trading.

    Schools in Dubai sent their students earlier, while some parents reported hours of delay in their children’s school bus service.

    Police issued safety warnings to motorists. Accidents were reported, while flashfloods in low-lying areas in the eastern emirates of Ras Al Khaimah and Fujairah were also reported.
    http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/weather/weather-rain-strong-winds-disrupt-life-across-uae-1.1687066

    Reply
  18. Reply
    • OAA NCEI Climate ‏@NOAANCEIclimate 3h3 hours ago

      ICYMI Alaska had its 2nd warmest winter on record in 2015/2016:

      Reply
    • Ouch. That’s pretty extreme. And it’s all in a region that’s now undergoing rapid permafrost thaw. I’d say maybe we should be using the hashtag #dontincreasetheweightclass . Because, well, we don’t want climate change to become a real heavyweight kind of problem.

      Reply
  19. – USA – Remind Republican’s SCOTUS demands nine (9) justices on the bench — NOT eight (8). No (Zero) Exceptions.

    SCOTUS Battle
    Environmental groups call on Senate to hold Supreme Court hearings

    Seventeen major environmental groups are calling on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) to hold prompt confirmation hearings and a vote on President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court.

    In a brief but pointed letter to be sent to the offices of McConnell and Reid on Tuesday, leaders of the groups argue that Obama has the right to fill Supreme Court vacancies during the entirety of his term, and that it is the Senate’s duty to move the process forward. The letter is signed by leaders of the Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, Greenpeace USA, Friends of the Earth, Earthjustice and others.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2016/03/08/environmental-groups-call-on-senate-to-hold-supreme-court-hearings/

    Reply
    • – VA USA Supreme Court;

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  March 10, 2016

        Big petition had gone out to stop his appointment. We are far better off without him.

        Reply
      • Steven Blaisdell

         /  March 10, 2016

        If the Kochs, Exxon, and Coal Inc are the ‘bosses,’ Cuccinelli is their ‘muscle.’ He’s a straight up thug. There is little I would consider truly human about him.

        Reply
      • Thank goodness. We should give props to Dr. Mann for calling Cuccinelli out and raising public awareness over his destructive FF industry ties.

        Reply
    • Republicans show complete disrespect to both the court and the American people. The most recent in a long chain of politically-charged lock-downs of the functioning of the US government. It would be one thing if republicans decided to do this now after being helpful and cooperative for the last 8 years. It would be one thing if the court did not need to rule on some of the most critical issues ever to face the American people — such as an energy transition and climate change. However, what we see here is just the latest attempt to sabotage the US political system.

      Reply
  20. NOAA Satellites ‏@NOAASatellites 2h2 hours ago

    NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite captures image of storm systems moving through the Pacific Northwest and Gulf Coast.

    Reply
  21. Reply
    • Thanks for the link dt (even though it turned my stomach!).

      Another excerpt from the article:
      “On Wednesday, Clinton will appear at a $575-a-head fundraising lunch at a Ritz-Carlton Hotel on the Northern California coast hosted by Alisa Wood, a partner at the international private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. (KKR).”

      This is sickening and speaks volumes.

      Heck, we could throw in a “W” quote here that would apply to the gathering at The Ritz—- when speaking at a white tie charity event George W. Bush said:
      “This is an impressive crowd — the haves and the have mores. Some people call you the elite — I call you my base.” -GWB 2000

      Reply
      • Lunch in NorCal, then debating in Miami that night? Pretty zippy bizjet to pull that off. Hello, Hillary; have you heard about our CO2 problem?

        Reply
    • I think Hillary needs to not accept these donations. Big conflict of interest here.

      Reply
  22. Scientists Trace Climate-Heat Link Back to 1930s
    Published: March 9th, 2016

    The world endured a warm year as President Roosevelt wrangled with crippling drought during the first year of his second term. Scientists now say global temperatures that year, in 1937, were record-breaking for the time. The heat record fell again two years later. More records were set in 1940, 1941 and 1944.

    For the first time, climate scientists have identified greenhouse gas pollution’s role in global temperatures measured during record-breaking years back to 1937, as industrialized cities and nations continued burning coal to power factories and trains.

    -“What we found was that we could actually detect human influence on extreme events a lot earlier than we’d thought,” said Daniel Mitchell, an Oxford University physicist who researches climate change. He was part of an international team of scientists that published the findings this week in Geophysical Research Letters.

    Reply
  23. – Whew.. I feel like someone in the ‘old days’, grabbing stories off the teletype wire and shuffling them off to the appropriate ‘beat’ desk.

    Reply
  24. wili

     /  March 9, 2016

    Excerpts from Jim White’s AGU presentation on abrupt CC. Ice cores show that temperatures in parts of Greenland rose one degree C per year for five years in a row. Elsewhere on Greenland there is evidence of a 10 degree C rise in just year or two! He also points out that sea level has risen in the past as fast as a meter every 20-30 years.

    (Thanks to Chuck Hughes at RC for this link.)

    Reply
  25. -Click Click Bing! … PDX USA

    – NWS
    …STORM WARNING NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM PST THIS EVENING…
    …HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM TO 11 PM PST
    THIS EVENING…

    THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN PORTLAND HAS ISSUED A HURRICANE
    FORCE WIND WARNING…WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM TO 11 PM PST
    THIS EVENING. THIS IS IN ADDITION TO THE STORM WARNING WHICH IS IN
    EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM PST THIS EVENING.

    – Stuart Tomlinson ‏@ORweather 32m32 minutes ago

    Hurricane force wind warning just one of a handful since @NWSPortland was authorized to issue in Dec. 2007.

    Reply
  26. climatehawk1

     /  March 9, 2016

    Tweeted.

    Reply
  27. Very cool web-site: http://www.lightningmaps.org/realtime

    As of 12:00 PST, a large area of Arkansas, Mississippi, and Lousiana is lighting up like a pinball-machine.

    Reply
  28. Colorado Bob

     /  March 9, 2016

    A Flash Flood Emergency has been declared in Northwest Louisiana, including the city of Shreveport, where over a foot of rain fell in just 24 hours, from Tuesday morning through Wednesday morning. At Shreveports’s Barksdale Air Force Base, 13.16″ had fallen as of 10 am EST Wednesday, and over 14 inches of rain fell just to the southeast of Shreveport near Bossier City.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/flash-flood-emergency-in-northern-lousiana-over-a-foot-of-rain-in-24-

    Reply
  29. Kevin Jones

     /  March 9, 2016

    34F this a.m. at Dillant-Hopkins Airport.. 75 now. nuts everywhere.

    Reply
  30. Colorado Bob

     /  March 9, 2016

    You can’t male this stuff up –

    Water-poor Saudi Arabia moves farming venture to drought-stricken California

    Almarai, the largest dairy business in Saudi Arabia, has purchased land in California to grow alfalfa for its cattle – and it’s rubbing some people the wrong way

    If you are the largest dairy producer in Saudi Arabia and you are running out of water to grow cattle feed, there’s only one thing to do if you want to stay in business: go shopping.

    Which is exactly what dairy giant Almarai has done, undertaking a global search for land and water to grow alfalfa to feed its dairy cows. The search brought Almarai to a most surprising place: California, which is suffering its worst drought in recorded history.

    Earlier this year, the company announced that it had paid $31.8m for 1,790 acres of land near Blythe, in the southeastern corner of California, for the sole purpose of growing alfalfa. Known as lucerne in some parts of the world, alfalfa is a member of the pea family, growing up to 1 meter high with small purple flowers and leaves that resemble clover. Almarai will grow the crop using water diverted from the Colorado River, then ship it back to Saudi Arabia to feed Almarai’s estimated 1m dairy cows, helping to ensure it remains the number one dairy producer in a nation of 30 million people.

    http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/mar/08/saudi-arabia-alfalfa-california-drought-almarai

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 9, 2016

      ” It’s a fiction to believe that globalization is this unqualified good thing for the world.”

      Reply
    • wili

       /  March 9, 2016

      When a major sink turns into a source, we are dealing with a huge tipping point.

      Reply
    • – February 13, 2013
      Hidden Billionaire Milking Saudi Dairy Fortune in Desert

      At a sprawling complex in the Saudi desert, 90 miles southeast of Riyadh, dozens of black and white Holstein cows amble from their sandy surroundings into air-conditioned milking halls. Inside, they take their places on a motorized, rotating corral and are milked by machines while munching on shredded alfalfa and being misted with water.

      The herd is one of hundreds owned by Almarai Co., the biggest food producer in the Persian Gulf, which processed about 235 million gallons of milk in 2012. The Riyadh-based company’s revenue has almost tripled in the past five years to 7.95 billion riyals ($2.12 billion) as demand for its products — milk, cheese, processed chicken, baked goods and juices — has surged with the nation’s population.
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-01-14/hidden-billionaire-milking-saudi-dairy-fortune-in-desert

      Reply
    • – Much of California (and USA) and its resources are for sale — sad but true. Saudi oil wealth is used to buy American land and water. Box it up and ship it home..

      Reply
      • It’s all well and good so long as resources are abundant. But what happens when food prices skyrocket in the US as a result of a combined global warming impact and a good portion of our arable land being owned by overseas interests? Does the US government deny food exports and put a lock down on foreign agricultural holdings to prevent unrest here? And if so, what happens to the global geopolitical environment. This particular policy has unintended consequences written all over it.

        Reply
  31. Colorado Bob

     /  March 9, 2016

    Greenhouse gas ‘bookkeeping’ turned on its head

    For the first time scientists have looked at the net balance of the three major greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide—for every region of Earth’s landmasses. They found surprisingly, that human-induced emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from ecosystems overwhelmingly surpass the ability of the land to soak up carbon dioxide emissions, which makes the terrestrial biosphere a contributor to climate change. The results published in the March 10, 2016, Nature, revises our understanding of how human activity contributes to global warming.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-greenhouse-gas-bookkeeping.html#jCp

    Reply
  32. – Monitoring the NWS monitors:

    Chad G ‏@DrWxologist 7h7 hours ago

    Evaluating different water vapor color curves for the GOES-R era this morning at the @nwsopg

    Reply
  33. Ryan in New England

     /  March 9, 2016

    This mangled jet stream has done its part in delivering outrageous temperatures to my home state. In Connecticut we had an official high today of 81 degrees. 81 degrees on March 9th sets a few records. It beats our previous high by 11 degrees. This is also our warmest March day overall. And another record, this is the earliest in the year we have ever hit the 80 degree mark. This temperature is our normal daytime high for the first day of astronomical Summer, but today it isn’t even Spring yet. We completely skipped an entire season.

    And the local news is treating this as the greatest gift ever and the most wonderful thing one could ask for. It makes me nuts! This warm day is like a heroin addict’s first high, it’s the first step in a life destroying downward spiral that ends in total disaster.

    Reply
    • – Today I saw some MSM political bit with the reporter on some college campus in Ohio.
      All the coeds and others were walking around in summer type shorts.

      Reply
    • Mark in New England

       /  March 9, 2016

      78 in Nashua, NH – not quite as warm, but strange.

      Reply
  34. Reply
  35. Ryan in New England

     /  March 9, 2016

    The world’s largest coal company teeters on the edge of bankruptcy, as the entire market for coal has crumbled in recent years.

    http://desmogblog.com/2016/03/09/even-world-s-largest-coal-company-teetering-bankruptcy

    Reply
    • Worth noting that China coal use appears to have fallen for two consecutive years. Global coal use is also down. This is generally good news. But the changes need to happen faster.

      Reply
  36. Ryan in New England

     /  March 9, 2016

    A US court will decide whether 21 young people can sue the US government over the failure to address climate change. Predictably, all the major corporations who stand to lose have lined up against these brave kids, who are joined by the courageous Dr James Hansen.

    http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/climate-change/young-people-are-suing-governments-over-climate-change/news-story/e327a797ab048ba2013f7f96c2d3ffbc

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 10, 2016

      Dr. Hansen’s statement:
      http://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/mailings/2016/20160309_OurChildrensRightToAViableFuture.pdf

      …Continued delay in implementing serious climate remedies challenges the vision of our Founders, eviscerating fundamental constitutional guarantees. Congress and the President manifestly lack the requisite resolve. Accordingly, the Court should immediately order the government to develop and implement a climate recovery plan. Effective measures, in my view, should include a rising fee on carbon emissions to ensure that fossil fuel industry
      costs now imposed on our health and our children’s future are accounted for in energy purchase and investment decisions. Such a plan could pave the way for deep decarbonization of our industrial system, and guide effective international action.
      It will take such a court order to extricate our nation from the looming danger that our
      government’s actions have done so much to bring about. Our children’s lives, their prospects, and the Blessings of Liberty we are obliged to secure for them, hang in
      the balance.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 10, 2016

        Thanks Greg🙂 Hansen is amazing, and he should be celebrated and known by every person in this country. Sadly, far more Americans are concerned with the Kardashians than the currently unfolding catastrophe that will make their futures very uncertain, and likely far worse in every measure than what they experience today. Our culture in America is disgusting and embarrassing.

        Reply
    • This bit is another one for the history books. A real David and Goliath story here.

      Reply
  37. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    Here’s some news that, after the crazy year we’ve had, all of us here kind of knew in our gut. It looks like we are on track to hit 2C sooner than previously thought.

    University of Queensland and Griffith University researchers have developed a “global energy tracker” which predicts average world temperatures could climb 1.5C above pre-industrial levels by 2020.

    That forecast, based on new modelling using long-term average projections on economic growth, population growth and energy use per person, points to a 2C rise by 2030.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/10/dangerous-global-warming-will-happen-sooner-than-thought-study

    Reply
  38. Syd Bridges

     /  March 10, 2016

    Yet another vindication for Francis and Varvus. If one thinks of the jet stream as a river on a floodplain, then I guess the cut-off low is the equivalent of an oxbow lake. But the dip to Mexico is staggering. With so much warmth still coming off the Pacific, and the Atlantic circulation backing up off the eastern seaboard, we may see much more wild weather this summer.

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 10, 2016

      Great analogy Syd, an oxbow, only it never gets cut off into a calm lake but instead becomes a nightmare for those caught in its winding path.

      Reply
  39. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    A piece by Bill McKibben about us crossing the 2C threshold (on a daily timescale), the seriousness of our situation juxtapositioned with the lack of seriousness among the Presidential debates (particularly the Republicans).

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2016/03/04/why-degree-temperature-jump-more-important-than-trump-hands/lCyz5MHZkH8aD0HIDJrcYJ/story.html?event=event25

    Reply
    • Bill, as ever, writes on this subject beautifully and eloquently. The lack of urgency on this issue among republicans is probably the greatest political crime of our time. It is just sick all the effort put in to protect fossil fuels from a necessary energy transition that is now happening far too late.

      Reply
  40. Griffin

     /  March 10, 2016

    Let’s not overlook the snow in Mexico! I walked past snow piles today as I was sweating with 80F in Massachusetts. Things are way beyond crazy now.

    Reply
  41. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    There are people in my apartment complex with their air conditioners on right now, in CT, in the beginning of March. This is totally unreal! Robert, I’m sure you’re seeing some crazy temperatures in your neck of the woods as well, right?

    Reply
    • 81 degrees yesterday. Looks like another 80 degree day here today.

      I had a case of the spring directly into summer crud yesterday. So my apologies for the no article day. Will try to make up today and tomorrow.

      Reply
  42. Mark from OZ

     /  March 10, 2016

    Slightly OT, but a related development in the ‘critter’ world who often get overlooked.

    European wasps in Australia (like other introduced species) can create some ‘issues’; stinging issues to be precise. Normally, their populations are moderated by freezing temps ( Euro heritage) and although Canberra can occasionally go sub-freezing, the overall rise in average temps here is being matched by a rise in the # of nests.

    “They’ll also hunt you down for a couple of hundred metres if you threaten their nest, as CoreEnviro Solutions senior pest and weed officer, Jim Bariesheff was reminded on Wednesday.”

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/animals/canberrans-urged-to-keep-an-eye-out-for-european-wasp-nests-20160308-gne1im.html

    Unsurprisingly, not a mention as to the ‘why’ the increase’ in numbers–SMH is owned by Fairfax. Like so many ‘developments’, the e-wasp will be categorized as a ‘pest’ and dealt with suitably; extermination being the preferred pathway.

    Reply
  43. Andy in SD

     /  March 10, 2016

    Reading through the Colorado basin projections. It appears calculations and forecasts indicate a 60+% chance of shortage in Lake Mead starting in 2018. 17 to 37% chance for 2017. That would be the 1050′ to 1075′ tier.

    http://www.usbr.gov/lc/region/g4000/crss-5year.pdf

    Reply
  44. Vic

     /  March 10, 2016

    Australia’s Autumn missing in action.

    The country is experiencing warm weather as the mercury climbs above average in most areas, during a month usually reserved for a cool change, the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) has said.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-09/unusually-hot-weather-breaking-records-around-australia/7231896

    Reply
  45. Jay M

     /  March 10, 2016

    Had another day of soaking rain in Portland, OR. Again, it looks to me like the energy pushed towards PNW and less so to California. Looks like CA will get more as this series of pulses of energy develop over the next few days. Kind of confusing,trying to translate the mass media, which is currently convinced that the atmospheric river is ready to hit CA. If so, might get a deluge. I’m a former SF resident and think if is an important area because it is a large economic zone.

    Reply
  46. Reply
  47. – Hawthorne, CA – Something for Bob:
    – I saw the young BB at one of the first Surf Fair’s at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium (across the street from the Rand Corp.) in 1962 (3).

    Hawthorne approves makeover for sagging Hawthorne Boulevard where Beach Boys once cruised

    City leaders have previously thrown up their hands at the decrepit downtown, claiming they’re at the whim of developers and business owners who have shown little interest. But this plan, linked with new zoning and land-use strategies…
    http://www.dailybreeze.com/government-and-politics/20160309/hawthorne-approves-makeover-for-sagging-hawthorne-boulevard-where-beach-boys-once-cruised

    Reply
    • Mark from OZ

       /  March 10, 2016

      One for you, dt.
      Seems like just about everything we know deteriorates over time. Exceptions might include our fondest memories, veneration of great people and ideas, and cherished music.

      And despite what is occurring now, don’t we all still marvel at the unrelenting power and beauty and source of all energy;and in our own personal way, that permanent, but seemingly temporary, ‘connection’ to the sun?

      Reply
  48. Colorado Bob

     /  March 10, 2016

    Hell comes to breakfast –

    Storm Total Precipitation
    NWS Shreveport, LA
    http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?product=NTP&rid=SHV&loop=yes

    Reply
  49. Abel Adamski

     /  March 10, 2016

    The media weather segments are being commented on elsewhere also
    http://www.recordonline.com/news/20160309/ken-hall-heed-pogos-advice-dont-ignore-global-warming#ReaderReaction

    Walt Kelly, the cartoonist who created Pogo, used the phrase in a couple of ways, none more memorable than a 1970 poster for the first Earth Day. Pogo, having tripped over debris in his home swamp, paused to look back at all the trash and said his famous saying. It hit home at the time, reminding people that they were responsible for the state of the earth, that they could make a difference and that they could multiply that difference if they all worked together.

    Today, we need to apply that attitude to what we say as well as what we do. If we keep talking about the icy grip of winter when it has provided more of a lukewarm hug, we miss the chance to confront the reality that is manmade climate change.

    Imagine if every unseasonably warm forecast by a TV meteorologist was framed in the reality of the annual increase in temperatures. Imagine if instead of falling back on their faded wintry cliches, more anchors greeted the prospect of a 70-degree day in March by saying, “Well, that’s about what you can expect with all this global warming.”

    It’s a small step but one that could help frame the conversation we need to have, one way to provide a constant reminder about what is happening, why it is happening and how important it is we start to do things to stop it from happening.

    Reply
  50. Kevin Jones

     /  March 10, 2016

    climatehawksvote.com asked folks to endorse Clinton or Bernie. 22,156 votes cast. Bernie received 92.2%.

    Reply
  51. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    A leaked European commission proposal would “open the gates to over-fishing”. I would point out that over-fishing is already occurring and allowing increased fishing is simply suicidal. It’s like the world is doing everything it can to guarantee that our society collapses this century.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/10/leaked-european-commission-plan-would-open-gates-to-overfishing

    Reply
  52. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    In an agreement with Canada, the Obama administration announced that the EPA will limit methane emissions from exiting oil and gas facilities, in an effort to reduce methane emissions from oil and gas 40-45% below 2012 levels by 2025.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/10/3758507/methane-new-rule-existing-sources/

    Reply
  53. Ryan in New England

     /  March 10, 2016

    Here’s a good article by Dr. Larry P.Atkinson (a professor of oceanography and fairly new blogger at Wunderground) about the Gulf Stream, how we measure it, and what a slowdown would mean for sea level. Something I didn’t know prior is that we measure the current off of Florida thanks to abandoned phone lines on the ocean floor between the U.S. and the Bahamas. Very interesting.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/lpaocean/us-east-coast-sea-level-and-the-gulf-stream

    Reply
  54. Abel Adamski

     /  March 10, 2016

    A good article on WaPo
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/03/09/the-hidden-driver-of-climate-change-that-we-too-often-ignore/

    “Human actions not only are emitting greenhouse gases based on our own activities, but also are causing plants and animals and microbes to be net emitters of greenhouse gases as well,” said Anna Michalak, a co-author of the study with the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, Calif.

    Reply
  55. State Dinner tonight for Canadian Prime Minister:
    WASHINGTON — Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, met with President Obama on Thursday for the first state visit by a Canadian leader in 19 years, a diplomatic honor made possible in part by new pledges of cooperation on combating climate change.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/11/us/politics/obama-and-justin-trudeau-of-canada-unveil-efforts-to-fight-climate-change.html

    I wonder if the Media will break away from the “Trump Show”….to actually report on something as important as Climate Change?

    Reply
  56. Whoa, a first! Sitting waiting for my car at the local garage and one of the customers and a garage guy started talking about the extremely hot weather yesterday (Vermont) and agreeing how weird it is that people still deny global warming. Extraordinary. Unfortunately.

    Reply
    • mlparrish

       /  March 10, 2016

      Same, a first for me yesterday. Reading a book in the hospital waiting room. Old, grizzled veteran asked what, and when he found out it was Fred Pearce’s “With Speed and Violence” went on to say, unprompted – paraphrased but he covered it tersely in about 4 sentences – ‘Anyone who grew up and looks outside can see that, it is a disaster happening, how can people deny it and not do anything’!

      Reply
    • The thing is that this issue has been suppressed for so long that when it breaks out, it will break out with a vengeance. My sense is that it will be a huge, huge deal this election. And the republicans well get creamed if we can just manage to communicate how much damage they’ve done.

      Reply
  57. Greg

     /  March 10, 2016

    An excellent new piece in the Atlantic monthly :”The Obama Doctrine–The U.S. president talks through his hardest decisions about America’s role in the world. By Jeffrey Goldberg

    RS- it’s right up your alley. One thought I have is whether historians will accurately, or not, consider the American tilt away from the Middle East as shown in this article about the Obama Doctrine, a defining chapter to the story of the end of the age of oil.

    Lots of foreign policy here but also some climate change thinking. ““Climate change is a potential existential threat to the entire world if we don’t do something about it.” Obama explained that climate change worries him in particular because “it is a political problem perfectly designed to repel government intervention. It involves every single country, and it is a comparatively slow-moving emergency, so there is always something seemingly more urgent on the agenda.”

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/04/the-obama-doctrine/471525/?utm_source=huffingtonpost.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=pubexchange

    Reply
  58. Colorado Bob

     /  March 10, 2016

    Masters and Henson updated –

    A remarkably rare atmospheric event is unfolding over Mexico and the Southern U.S., where an upper-level low pressure system of unprecedented strength in the historical record for that location has stalled out, bringing multiple days of torrential rain to the Southern U.S. and snow to the mountains of Mexico. The upper low tapped into an atmospheric river of moisture from both the Western Caribbean and the Eastern Pacific, bringing rainfall amounts one would expect to occur only once every 200 years (a 0.5% chance of occurrence in a given year) over portions of northern Louisiana. According to the latest NOAA Storm Summary, as of 9 am EST Thursday, the city of Monroe, Louisiana had received 17.25″ of rain since Monday, and Shreveport had picked up 16.70″ at Barksdale Air Force Base. The heavy rains led to numerous high water rescues, evacuation of at least 3,500 homes, and closures of hundred of roads. Portions of two interstate highways in northern Louisiana–I-20 and I-49–were closed on Thursday morning due to flooding, according to KSLA.com. Three drownings have been reported since Monday from the storm system–one each in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/recordstrength-upper-low-brings-extreme-rains-to-south-us-thunders

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 10, 2016

      Thanks CB. Drone Video footage included:

      Reply
      • JPL

         /  March 10, 2016

        My heart really goes out to all of the folks whose houses are affected by flooding. The toll it takes on you mentally, emotionally, financially trying to deal with the aftermath is so tough. It can be one of those setbacks in life that is extraordinarily difficult to recover from, especially if you were already in a precarious financial position, and with each degree C of temp rise it’s only going to get worse.

        John

        Reply
  59. Greg

     /  March 10, 2016

    Norway raises the bar with its National Transport Plan. All new passenger vehicles zero emissions in 9 years. $1 billion for bicycle highways and much more. Considering its size, this serves as a guide for cities/population centers of 5 or so million and less throughout the industrialized world.
    http://www.hybridcars.com/norway-aiming-for-100-percent-zero-emission-vehicle-sales-by-2025/

    Reply
  60. NWS OPC ‏@NWSOPC 9m9 minutes ago

    CIRA layered PW (total in image) helps visualize #AtmosphericRiver into Northern California and the Deep South

    Reply
    • The deep south flow is just insane…

      Reply
      • – Does that long finger at frame right and reaching up towards UK and Greenland also add warm moisture to the Arctic? Tie in the half loop going through US South and up and out into the Atlantic — it looks like a huge fish hook. Can the two combine?
        (Just thinking about what I’m seeing — and trying to make sense of it.)

        Reply
        • That’s the downstream implication I was mentioning earlier. You get a big dip in one spot, you’re bound to get a big northward drive somewhere else.

          They don’t really combine as such. Think of the El Nino related moisture and heat as throwing a big bolder into the stream that increases atmospheric heat and moisture flow along the Equator. Now think of polar warming as another big bolder that produces these eddies running down toward that added heat and moisture. The two converge and bam — you’ve got a problem.

          Now the big dip over NA had aided in pushing up the amplitude of the Barents meridional flow for the next few days. And that’s another warm air train wreck for the Arctic.

  61. – Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania:

    Jury awards two Dimock Twp. couples $4.24 million

    A federal jury awarded two Dimock Twp. couples $4.24 million today after finding Cabot Oil & Gas responsible for contaminating their well water.

    The verdict comes following 8.5 hours of deliberations over two days.

    The decision following the 14-day trial is a huge victory for Nolen Scott Ely, his wife, Monica-Marta Ely and Raymond and Victoria Hubert, who pursued the case for six years after rejecting a settlement offer in 2012.

    The Elys and Huberts sued Cabot in 2009, accusing the Houston-based company of negligence in drilling two natural gas wells near the Susquehanna County homes, which they say contaminated their wells with high levels of methane. Cabot maintains the methane is naturally occurring.
    http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/jury-awards-two-dimock-twp-couples-4-24-million-cabot-plans-appeal-1.2017316

    Reply
  62. – Bolivia’s Second-Largest Lake Dries Up: Is Utah’s Great Salt Lake Next?

    Researchers from Utah State University found that the Beehive State’s Great Salt Lake has shrunk by 48 percent since 1847. Meanwhile, Lake Poopó, Bolivia’s second-largest lake, is died up and may be beyond recovery.

    “There’s no doubt about it, Great Salt Lake is shrinking,” Wayne Wurtsbaugh, lead author on the paper, said. “Though we’ve witnessed droughts and floods in recent decades, impacts of water diversions have decreased the lake’s level by 11 feet.”

    Reply
  63. EcoWatch ‏@EcoWatch 3h3 hours ago

    #Fukushima [Add all human induced climate catastrophes] Should Have Served as Wake-Up Call for NRC [All]
    [Photo of petrol refinery and petrochemical facility damaged by earthquake and water surge]

    Reply
  64. – Canada

    Canada’s Unmuzzled Scientists Call for Protection From Future Muzzling

    “Science should never be silenced again,” Debi Daviau, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC), a union representing more than 15,000 federal scientists, said in a statement released Wednesday.

    PIPSC, as well as the science-advocacy group Evidence for Democracy (E4D), released an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as well as ­to science ministers Kirsty Duncan and Navdeep Bains, requesting policies be put in place to protect the scientific integrity of Canada’s public employees.
    http://desmog.ca/2016/03/09/canada-s-unmuzzled-scientists-call-protection-future-muzzling

    Reply
    • The scientists are merely pointing out the facts. Muzzling them just prevents people from understanding the truth of what’s happening in our world. It’s just wrong.

      To this point, what should be clear here is that there’s a moral difference. One set of fuels is amoral and harmful. The other set is not. That’s what should be distinguished here. It’s like the difference between cigarrettes and healthy foods and exercise. One product is harmful, the other is beneficial. This should be clear to pretty much everyone with half a brain.

      Reply
  65. – Oil industry pushes back against Exxon climate accusations

    The oil industry is coming to defense of Exxon Mobil Corp. and pushing back against accusations that the company lied to the public and shareholders about climate change.

    In its most forceful response yet, the industry-funded Energy In Depth project is accusing the news organizations behind the allegations of being funded by fossil fuel opponents and cherry-picking information to back their causes.
    http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/272509-oil-industry-pushes-back-against-exxon-climate-accusations

    Reply
    • Oh how rich. This entire industry has funded organizations and think tanks in an effort to deny climate change. Now they want to say the shoe is on the other foot. So what if it is. Solar energy certainly isn’t going to wreck the climate. But burning oil, gas and coal absolutely will.

      Reply
  1. links | keep resisting!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: