Hot Winds Fan Massive, Unprecedented March Wildfire Burning 40 Mile Swath Through Kansas and Oklahoma

It’s likely that we’ve never seen a March wildfire like the beast that just ripped through Kansas and Oklahoma over the past day. But in a world that’s now exploring a new peak temperature range near or above 1.5 C warmer than pre-industrial averages, a level of heat not seen in the past 110,000 years, we’d be out of our minds to expect the weather and climate conditions to behave in any kind of manner that could be considered normal.

We’re Probably Looking at the Worst Wildfire on Record for Kansas and Oklahoma

Kansas Oklahoma Wildfire March 2016

(Massive, unprecedented, wildfire burns along a 40 mile swath across Kansas and Oklahoma on Wednesday. Image source: NASA/MODIS.)

And abnormal absolutely describes what happened in Oklahoma and Kansas yesterday and today.

The first sign of trouble was a warning of severe fire risk by weather officials for a multi-state region of the Central US on Wednesday. Extremely dry southwest winds gusting to 60 miles per hour coupled with anomalous temperature readings in the 80s (F) — or about 25 degrees (F) above average for this time of year — spiked fire hazards across a broad swath stretching from New Mexico and Western Texas on into Oklahoma and Kansas. The abnormal heat and dry winds combined to spark one of the worst grass fires on record.

The fire began in Northern Oklahoma at around 5:45 PM and almost immediately leapt northward — following the wind along a 1-2 mile wide swath through the northern portions of the state before roaring across the border into Kansas. It swelled to massive size — spewing out a plume of debris so large that doppler weather radar stations began picking it up. The large cloud, filled with tinders, dropped burning fragments over towns as far as 85 miles away from the blaze. People as far away as Arkansas reported smelling smoke.

During the height of the fire, the City of Medicine Lodge found itself facing an encroaching wall of flame on three sides. The nearby Route 160 had been cut off by the fire and as many as 2,000 structures, including the local hospital, were in danger of being consumed by the flames. Two homes burned, two bridges were destroyed and thousands were urged to evacuate as government officials declared a state of emergency. The American Red Cross scrambled to set up disaster shelters for evacuees.

Anderson Creek Wildfire Enormous Footprint

(Anderson Creek wildfire’s enormous footprint is likely to grow larger over the coming day before the massive fire is finally contained. For reference, 212,000 acres is about 300 square miles. Note that by early afternoon the size of the blaze had jumped to 400,000 acres or more than 600 square miles. Image source: KOCO.)

As of this morning, 800-1000 structures in Medicine Lodge remained under threat. But the fire appeared to have mostly swept around the city. An overnight shift in the wind had caused the blaze to balloon eastward. And, according to the most recent reports, more than 400,000 acres, or about 600 square miles, had burned along a 40 mile swath stretching through Kansas and Oklahoma by early afternoon Thursday.

Conditions in Context

For a single fire to burn so much land in just a single day is absolutely unprecedented for this region. By comparison, the fire season of 2014 was considered to be the worst on record for Kansas — but it took nearly 4,000 fires to burn 110,000 acres during March of that year and here we have a single fire that has now exceeded that record total.

Under the conditions of human-forced climate change, wildfire risk is amplified due to a number of factors. First, overall increased temperatures result in periods of greater and greater fire risk. In addition, the added heat increases rates of moisture loss, facilitating drought, flash drought, and brief periods of intense dryness. Plants, which have adapted over tens of thousands of years to manage an expected range of moisture levels, are unable to compensate for the increased heat and dryness and become more vulnerable to burning.

Hot Winds Blow over Oklahoma and Kansas

(Anomalous heat and dry wind events, like the unseasonable warmth over Oklahoma and Kansas that pushed March temperatures into the mid 80s [F] over Oklahoma and Kansas yesterday become more prevalent as human greenhouse gas emissions force the world to warm. These conditions are a trigger for increasingly severe wildfire events. Earth Nullschool GFS capture at 2100 UTC on March 23, 2016.)

Furthermore, increased prevalence of drought and thawing lands — such a permafrost thaw — provide an increasing volume of fuels to feed the fires that do ignite. Fires under such conditions tend to burn hotter — generating far more destructive and potentially rapidly expanding blazes than the tamer variety of fires both human beings and the lands they inhabit are used to. This is a story that could well be told the world over — from the Arctic to the tropics, to Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the tip of South America.

Pretty much everywhere, increased global heat — now peaking in the range of 1.5 C above preindustrial temperatures — worsens wildfire risk. And it’s just one of the many, many negative impacts of rising global temperatures. But for Kansas and Oklahoma the massive plume of smoke painting the sky in shades of brown, gray and black may as well have spelled out the words — climate change.

UPDATE 2:40 PM Friday — Renewed Fire Hazard

By Friday afternoon, official tallies for total acres burned had remained at near 400,000 acres in Kansas and Oklahoma and included another 50,000 acres in Texas — or about 700 square miles over the three states. New damage estimates included the loss of hundreds and perhaps thousands of cattle along with many hundreds of miles of fence line.

Reports from the Weather Channel, from GFS model summaries, and from local observations indicated strong southerly winds re-emerging over the region and gusting up to 40 mph. Fire officials have indicated that the new strong winds and rising temperatures into the upper seventies (F) coupled with another slot of dry air could re-ignite smoldering flames in the large fire zone. As such, risks for continued burning and expansion of existing fires was on the rise by mid Friday afternoon.

Links:

Wildfire in South-Central Kansas

Wildfire Burns Through Barber County

Massive Wildfire Burns over 200,000 Acres

Real Earth Weather Analysis

NASA/MODIS

Broken Records, Strained Resources

Earth Nullschool

Hat tip to DT Lange

Hat tip to Kevin Jones

 

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674 Comments

  1. The Arctic is thawing much faster than expected, scientists warn

    “permafrost expert Vladimir Romanovsky, also of the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. “The degradation of ice wedges shows that upper part of permafrost is thawing, and thawing of the upper part of permafrost definitely is producing additional greenhouse gases,””

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/03/23/the-arctic-is-thawing-much-faster-than-expected-scientists-warn/?postshare=7671458758679388&tid=ss_tw

    Reply
    • This you tube link is the AGU, 2015 ” Press Conference Alaska’s thawing permafrost Latest results and future projections.”

      It is definitely worth the time to watch…

      Participants:
      Vladimir Romanovsky, Professor of Geophysics, Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, USA;
      Santosh Panda, Research Associate, Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, USA;
      Kevin Schaefer, Research Scientist, National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado, USA.

      Reply
  2. I grew up about 40 miles north of here. This is definitely not normal. Biggest grass fire I ever remember was never more than 5-10 acres and definitely not in March.

    Reply
    • March of 2014 hit 110,000 acres total burned from about 4,000 fires — average being about 27.5 acres per fire. 169,000 acres in Barber County in a single day is just nuts.

      Reply
  3. – Very eloquent, Robert. ” But for Kansas and Oklahoma the massive plume of smoke painting the sky in shades of brown, gray and black may as well have spelled out the words — climate change.”

    – And: ‘flash drought’.
    OUT

    Reply
  4. ack Labe ‏@ZLabe 14h14 hours ago

    Wow, check out some of those dewpoints across #NMwx and #TXwx! Additional wildfire threats likely this weekend…

    Reply
    • -13 in 80-90 degree conditions is about as bone dry as you can get. Ouch!

      Reply
      • – I hope it’s not a harbinger of some future massive grassland firestorm reaching from TX/OK all the way up into the Canadian Prairies.
        – Whew… extreme hot, dry, windy… no thanks.

        Reply
      • – ” some future massive grassland firestorm…” All those Bakken diesel trains and tank cars — and miles of pipelines snaking across the whole area. All are ‘accidents waiting to happen’ .

        Reply
  5. Reply
    • Hold on — there are meteorologists (33% of the AMS) who believe that climate change is not manmade? Who else sees this as a problem? Just goes to show how powerful a disincentive to reason and facts a political ideology can be on the human brain. I wonder how many of that, admittedly significant, minority watch Fox News, for example or happen to be members of the republican party?

      I suspect that intially there was a similar divide among doctors over cancer caused by cigarrettes — but as the evidence piled up the minority grew smaller and smaller. Given the fact that many meteorologists didn’t really get climate change during recent years, this shift is positive. But it’s still a bit mind number to me that a specialist in atmospheric sciences can deny that climate change is caused by humans. That requires a degree of self-deception that I find odd and outrageous.

      Reply
      • – Many AMS are employed by broadcast entities and are basically required to put a positive spin on their output. Also, their forecasts etc are side by side with traffic reports which quickly segue into some sort of corporate car commercial, or health elixir that is often caused by some corporate sponsored environmental insult.

        And, who knows how much corporate influence at universities where meteorology is taught.

        I’m sure it’s the context of training and job security that tends to dilute the ‘profession’.🙂

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  March 24, 2016

        I have seen enough comments from a few prominent meteorologists to not be surprised by that number. There seems to be plenty that like to try and separate climate and weather. With what seems to be almost a chip on their shoulder, they make frequent comments about extreme weather in the past etc. Basically, since home runs have been hit in the past, don’t try to attribute the ones we see today to steroids. And perhaps the temps we have seen over the last few years are impressive, but we are nowhere near the timeframe required to definitively say that the temp rises are man-made etc.
        It is a narrative of the past but still remarkably effective given the ignorance of the target audience. If they keep the air of “superiority in knowledge” perpetuated, they remain popular and ratings will reflect that. We have to remember that climate change is a really horrible topic. Most folks just don’t want to know how bad it really is.
        We are surrounded by those who would rather die in a stupor than face the fear of sobriety.

        Reply
      • This discussion offers some good points about ‘bias’ within mainstream media. My favorite explanation of this is presented in a short, and very funny, video, featuring ‘Pippa the TV weather girl’: https://youtu.be/TmfcJP_0eMc
        This was created in Fall 2012, at the time we hit the record low arctic ice.

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 26, 2016

        Actually a good coverage on Forbes
        http://www.forbes.com/sites/marshallshepherd/2016/03/24/96-of-american-meteorological-society-members-think-climate-change-is-happening-says-new-report/#4b206e9b3935

        You may have seen them. Media reports a few years ago claiming that a survey of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) refutes the consensus position regarding climate change. When I saw how that survey and the results were being twisted and distorted, I realized that people read things with an eye for what they want to believe, so-called confirmation bias. AMS Executive Director Dr. Keith Seitter even wrote on the AMS website clarifying the results and condemning rampant distortion that was being spread. A full statement of the survey authors’ response to the horrific distortion of their findings can be found at this link. With such a mischaracterized response, the AMS felt that a new survey was needed. The preliminary results of that new report were released this week.

        This survey was funded by the National Science Foundation and hopefully provides clarification on a topic that I saw grossly twisted and contorted over the past 3 years. Study lead author Ed Maibach deserves the last word here,

        AMS members’ views about our ability to avert further changes in our climate over the next 50 years are sobering. While nearly all meteorologists feel that some amount of climate change can be prevented, only 18% think a large amount or almost all can be averted. This view highlights the importance of taking prudent adaptive actions as soon as possible.

        Dr. Marshall Shepherd, Dir., Atmospheric Sciences Program/GA Athletic Assoc. Distinguished Professor (Univ of Georgia), Host, Weather Channel’s Sunday Talk Show, Weather (Wx) Geeks, 2013 AMS President

        Worth reading, gives further information and perspective

        Reply
      • Mulga Mumblebrain

         /  March 29, 2016

        In Australia our Bureau of Meteorology rarely dares say ‘climate change’ or any other euphemism. This year’s fire disasters, record temperatures and, now, catastrophic coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef, is always the fault of ‘El Nino’, just as the catastrophic floods of 2011 were caused by ‘La Nina’. Plainly instructions, or very strong hints, have been given. Meanwhile the Murdoch MSM cancer continues 110% denialist, dismissing talk of a ‘climate emergency’ as ‘hysterical rubbish’ in a recent editorial.

        Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  March 24, 2016

      “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” Upton Sinclair

      Reply
      • A bit of a false comparison, I think. The man’s livelihood depends on response at this time. In a hothouse world, fossil fuel jobs are far more destructive than the drug trade and ever less secure.

        Reply
  6. Wendy

     /  March 24, 2016

    Comanche County is in Kansas… fire started in Oklahoma.

    Reply
  7. – Quite a chemical reaction blast excavation in China Aug. 2015.

    ‘A series of explosions at the facility resulted in damage to some 17,000 residences and 8,000 vehicles, killing over 170 people (95 of them firefighters) and injuring hundreds more. Later investigation concluded that the first explosion occurred in an overheated container of dry nitrocellulose, which set off further explosions, including one that involved the detonation of around 800 tons of ammonium nitrate.’

    Reply
  8. Kevin Jones

     /  March 24, 2016

    Latest reports are saying 625 sq. mi. 400,000 acres. Not a good omen for Summer of ’16.

    Reply
  9. Reply
  10. – ‘Once Arctic scientists at NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory put this past January and February into historical perspective, they saw that this unusual warmth is unprecedented. This unprecedented warmth is mainly due to the large positive temperature anomalies in the Arctic Ocean and over the North American continents.’

    Reply
    • We can’t be adding any new coal, gas or oil plants or infrastructure at this time. We are already looking at a 20-30 year window needed to close all the legacy emitting facilities. That’s the challenge we face. These polluting asset holders will fight as hard as they can to keep their carbon emitting infrastructure in play.

      We’ve added 110 gigawatts of renewables in 2015. And that’s pretty amazing. However, based on work I did for Growth Shock, I found that we need to be adding on the order of 250-300 gigawatts of new renewable energy each year to both replace legacy fossil fuel generation and to meet future demand.

      The strides we’ve made are huge. But adding net 80 gw of new coal and new gas each year (after plant closures) will still push the human emissions curve upward over time so long as fossil fuels are supplied for these plants. The number for new carbon emitting plants should be zero. Same with new oil and gas projects. That and the old projects should be put on the shortest possible ramp to closure. That’s the challenge we’re facing now if we want to have much hope of preventing absolutely ridiculous warming.

      To this point, it’s pretty certain we’ll blow through 1.5 C in the annual measure rather soon (5-15 years) and missing 2 C would take an absolutely herculean effort. Current carbon emission reduction commitments from COP 21 would probably lock in 3 C by the end of this Century and that’s without carbon store feedbacks from the Earth system. The gap between current action and what needs to be done is still very, very large.

      Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  March 24, 2016

        “More than 2,400 coal-fired power stations are under construction or being planned around the world, a study has revealed two weeks after Britain pledged to stop burning coal.”

        http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/environment/article4629455.ece

        Reply
        • This total build out rate is already constrained by new policies in places like China where coal plant utilization is already falling:

          http://energydesk.greenpeace.org/2015/11/09/2015-the-year-global-coal-consumption-fell-off-a-cliff/

          The study mentioned but not linked in the news source above notes that high renewable energy build out risks new coal plants being stranded sooner and earlier than expected. In addition the news source you link, like many right wing sources, spins this paper in the most negative manner possible in an apparent attempt to attack global carbon reductions policy.

          This is strike 3,000 for you Jeremy. I’d ask you to get your messaging from someone who doesn’t parrot Watts or Brietbart, but it appears to be a lost cause.

          In any case shipping data show global coal consumption is significantly down in 2015 after also falling in 2014. Given these trends, and in light of accelerating renewable energy adoption, there appears to be a growing bubble of under-utilized coal facilities. With China recently cutting new planned coal plants to around 150, the number drops to 2,000 (net gain of 600 approx through 2030). And in light of recent new policy moves, India’s own coal build out is called into question (huge solar build out ongoing there).

          And we needn’t point out that the global coal corps are in shambles — reduced to penny stocks in most major markets.

      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 24, 2016

        Not necessarily all it seems
        http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2015/8/12/energy-markets/how-china-adding-one-idle-coal-plant-every-week

        Coal-fired capacity expansion in China is largely driven by an outdated market design that ‘guarantees’ each power plant a certain amount of operating hours. The system creates false investment security in an overcapacity situation, and has led to the absurd outcome that grid operators are failing to feed in electricity from wind and solar power plants to the grid in order to give coal-fired power plants their promised operating hours and revenue.

        As coal power overcapacity has worsened rapidly in the past year, wind and solar power wastage rates have shot up to 15% — even as many analysts expected electricity market reforms to have the opposite effect.

        Furthermore, the regulators are now seeking to make the system more market-oriented by granting more hours to power plants with higher efficiency. This makes sense in principle as it reduces the coal consumption and air pollution emissions of coal-fired power generation, but at the same time it increases the perverse incentive to build new coal power plants.

        Reply
        • Overcapacity and utilization rates are an issue across China’s power sector. And we get a better idea of what’s really going on once we have all the facts in hand. Overall, it appears renewables are winning the utilization battle with coal plant utilization in China falling to less than 50 percent:

          http://energydesk.greenpeace.org/2015/11/11/chinas-coal-bubble-155-new-overcapacity/

          So though renewables are not fully utilized, coal utilization rates are falling as well. This is primarily due to a policy preference for burning less polluting coal. A new standard that appears to be pushing the heavier polluters out of the market.

        • Furthermore, China policy is now driving a move to much cleaner air by, among other things, implementing bans on coal energy use by coal power plant operators:

          https://www.greenbiz.com/article/chinas-unveils-plan-low-carbon-growth

          In any case, if you look at the larger trends, China coal burning rates are falling along with global rates of coal burning even as net total energy produced from renewables is rising. These are the underlying figures of a larger ongoing trend that the utilization figures you posted above don’t seem to take into account. And it’s pretty clear that this is the case because many of the major coal suppliers are staring falling prices and bankruptcies in the face.

      • Mblanc

         /  March 25, 2016

        I’ve also seen a few commentators pointing that many of the planned coal stations will not go ahead, although it would take me an age to find a reference.

        I remember the days when the talk was of ‘one coal fired power station a week in China’, and I think we can be confident those days are over, but every one that does get built is small part of a bigger disaster

        I can only hope that the current collapse of coal means they will not run for their planned lifetimes. Here in the UK, the Govt is struggling to keep the coal power we still have in business.

        http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/2446189/coal-sector-crisis-continues-as-latest-early-plant-closure-confirmed

        Reply
      • Mblanc

         /  March 25, 2016

        I’ve just realised Adams link says they are still building one a week, directly contradicting what I thought to be the case, but it is also clear this will not carry on for much longer.

        And at least they don’t appear to be firing them up very much. My impression was that coal was on the back foot in China, and that does appear to be the case, but not quite in the way I thought.

        Note to self, read every link before posting!

        Reply
        • More to the point, China and global coal use is declining. Slow decline in 2014. Far more rapid decline in 2015. That and the data in Abel’s 2015 article link is a bit old. China’s current plan includes 150 coal plants through 2030 which is more on the order of one coal plant every month, not one per week. About 420 other projects could go forward, but these are increasingly uncertain.

          More to the point, China today announced that it would be cancelling 250 coal projects in 15 provinces:

          http://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-power-coal-idUSKCN0WQ0ZD

          It’s possible that China may have its back against the wall RE air quality and water use. Recent reports indicate that China’s coal facilities consume enough water to care for the typical water needs of 1 billion people. By contrast, renewables like wind and solar require almost zero water use for their operation.

          As you note below, there is some political defense of these coal plants from the usual fossil fuel backers. However, this is more a case of attempting to circle the wagons around an industry that is undergoing collapse. The U.K., as a whole has a policy to shut down all coal plants and the last coal plant in Scotland was shuttered this week. The fate of US coal rests now with the Supreme Court and the CPP. However, coal in the US is undergoing a slow death due to a variety of forces — renewables and focused campaign action by the Sierra Club and others.

          In Australia, the high price of electricity is leaving wide the door for solar + storage to re-ramp in the residential market. The falling price of batteries due to synergies between home storage and electric vehicles is driving this trend as well.

          In any case, it’s energy wars on every level. And it’s a conflict we cannot afford to lose.

  11. Syd Bridges

     /  March 24, 2016

    I was evacuated from the High Park Fire in June, 2012. It was huge, ending at 87,000 acres. I saw smoke all the way from Loveland to Red Feather, a distance of 75 miles. The fire was 3,000 acres at the end of day 1, and, IIRC, 20,000 by the end of day 2.

    But this fire dwarfs that in area and speed of spread. True, it’s mainly burning grass rather than pine trees, but the area is staggering. And the potential for igniting other wildfires from embers is horrifying with so much tinder.

    We are now in a new world with a much more savage climate. And, I’m sure Gov. Brownback has paid heed and ensured that his state is fully prepared. I expect Sen. Snowball can single-handedly extinguish the Oklahoma fires with his supersnowballs. We have spare snow here in Colorado, should he need more.

    Reply
    • Yes. He should probably fill up on snowballs in Denver. He’s got a lot of climate change induced firefighting to do and a few more snowballs might help😉

      Reply
  12. The Latest on the Great Plains Wildfire: wildfires now in Texas Panhandle

    10:45 a.m.

    Authorities say wildfires have burned about 85 square miles of grassland in the Texas Panhandle.

    No one has been hurt in the fires that began Wednesday. They are partially contained Thursday.

    The Texas A&M Forest Service said Thursday that the largest wildfire has burned about 70 square miles in rural areas in Carson, Hutchinson, Roberts and Gray counties.

    Agency spokeswoman Linda Moon says some people were evacuated Wednesday from their homes in Skellytown, about 45 miles northeast of Amarillo, but were allowed to return after a few hours.

    A smaller fire has burned about 15 square miles of grassland in Wheeler County.

    http://www.wibw.com/content/news/The-Latest-on-the-Crews-fight-wildfires-in-Texas-Panhandle-373378101.html

    Reply
    • Looks like we have more than 700 square miles from the wildfire outbreak altogether. If a 15 square mile fire is ‘small,’ then we are really living in a new world.

      Reply
  13. Ailsa

     /  March 24, 2016

    We’ve all got to get involved with local projects it seems to me. They are inexplicable under threat by councils – so incredible short sighted and counter to the spirit of COP21.

    Two local to me in Devon England are Steward Wood, which is under threat of eviction after 16 yrs of low-impact living, and Hillyfield on Dartmoor, a sustainable farm and woodland management project, which has recently been refused permission for new works structures and is threatened with having to remove existing wood-drying barns, compost toilets etc.

    Outrageous stupidity. Support your local attempt to develop the essential new🙂

    Reply
  14. climatehawk1

     /  March 24, 2016

    Tweeted.

    Reply
  15. – Millions of lives are at stake but money gets the attention. At least it is attention:

    21/03/2016
    Bank of England regulator warns of growing climate risks

    The financial impacts of climate change could hit global markets hard and at any time, a senior Bank of England official has warned.

    Vulnerable companies include those holding long term high-carbon assets and businesses who could face legal action for their contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions

    “As climate change evolves those responsible for causing it or not mitigating it are likely to get sued,” said Paul Fisher, deputy head of the Bank’s regulatory body.

    http://www.climatechangenews.com/2016/03/21/bank-of-england-regulator-warns-of-growing-climate-risks/

    Reply
  16. – ‘Pancakes Not Pipelines’

    Sandra Steingraber ‏@ssteingraber1 1h1 hour ago

    The world needs maple syrup, not climate chaos: 7 Arrested at ‘Pancakes Not Pipelines’ Protest at FERC http://ecowatch.com/2016/03/24/arrested-at-ferc/ … via @ecowatch

    Reply
  17. – PNW Snowpack/melt and rain cycle during climate change.
    – PS Columbia Ice Field/Glaciers in BC are the points of origin for the river.

    Study looks at water’s future in Columbia River Basin

    SPOKANE — Warming temperatures in the future will produce changes in the Columbia River Basin, with more precipitation in winter months and less during the summer, according to a new study released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

    The assessment projected impacts on water resources in the states of Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Oregon and Washington over the next seven decades.

    Three areas were specifically studied, the Columbia River above The Dalles, Snake River at Brownlee Dam and the Yakima River at Parker. At these three points, the mean snow water equivalent is projected to decline at all locations. The assessment projected a trend that indicated there would be an increase in runoff from December to March and a decrease in runoff from April to July.
    http://www.columbian.com/news/2016/mar/23/study-looks-at-waters-future-in-columbia-river-basin/?utm_source=Sightline%20Institute&utm_medium=web-email&utm_campaign=Sightline%20News%20Selections

    Reply
  18. Ryan in New England

     /  March 24, 2016

    Another sad sign that Winter is starting to vanish as a season.

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/mar/24/iditarod-climate-change-sled-dogs-winter-alaska

    Reply
  19. 1992… I think we should all listen at least one more time

    Reply
  20. Rob,

    Excellent post and a riveting topic, but I have to admit that the thing I was most taken with on this post was your writing style, which was more machine-gun like and less measured. Your normal writing is quite good, but this was truly excellent. Maybe you did this one without a filter and more emotion came through? Anyway, thanks (as ever) for your work.

    Reply
    • Thanks, Scott. I think the narrative style is better suited to event prediction and event coverage as it happens. It gels with the science intuitively and relies less on deep analytics.

      In any case, this event got my hackles up and I think it came through in the writing. I am not looking forward to Arctic fire season — which will probably be starting in 1-4 weeks.

      Reply
  21. JPL

     /  March 24, 2016

    Dueling climate cycles may increase sea level swings

    “From 1990 to 2000, the magnitude of these sea level swings averaged about 6 inches (16 centimeters) – five times the height of global sea level rise during the same period. Asia is currently on the high side of the sea level seesaw, while coastlines in the Americas as far north as Southern California are benefiting from a lower sea level. For communities threatened by rising seas, predicting when the seesaw will swing the other way is critical.

    The two phases of the PDO and the two phases of ENSO can combine in four different ways, just as when you flip a dime and a nickel together you can get four different combinations of heads and tails. Song and his colleagues made a 60-year record of when each of the four combinations prevailed in the tropical Pacific and compared that record with the observed east-west swings in sea level over the same period.

    Correlations jumped out between two of the four combinations and sea levels: El Niño plus positive PDO correlated with high sea levels in the Americas, and La Niña plus negative PDO correlated with high Asian sea levels.”

    Reply
  22. Griffin

     /  March 24, 2016

    The Plains were not alone with the early fires. Nantucket, March and Fire just doesn’t seem right.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 25, 2016

      Somewhat related, here in Ct a contractor I know recently had a mishap. They had a “burn barrel” to burn debris on a lot that was being cleared, and dumped water on it like they had done hundreds of times before. A few hours later every firetruck in town was on the site, because somehow the woods caught fire and five acres went up in smoke. I realize it was a man made mistake, but in Ct at the end of March we should be seeing wet ground from snow melt, and rainstorms as Spring develops. You shouldn’t be able to light the woods on fire if you tried. The woods are dry, and a man made fire that normally wouldn’t ignite a blaze that consumes the entire forest did just that.

      Reply
  23. I’m in NW Arkansas. I stepped out the door this morning and could smell it. Watched the local news to see if there were grass fires close to town No word about this, glad this was shared to reddit or I’d never have seen it. The winds having been getting stronger here and more and more constant.

    Reply
  24. Cate

     /  March 25, 2016

    Current Weather Network temps, Thursday night:
    my central Newfoundland town -9 C
    Narsarsuaq, Greenland 5 C

    Reply
  25. The Harbinger of another Dustbowl?

    Reply
  26. Andy in SD

     /  March 25, 2016

    Could this be a prelude to the fires in Alaska / Yukon / NWT this year? Remember, Alaska had a terrible year for snow so the ground will dry out quicker.

    Reply
  27. After reading and rereading and visiting the sites quoted in the posts above regarding China’s Coal fired power generation and the impact of renewable on China’s decreasing coal consumption… ( and the give and take regarding “unbiased data” always an issue!! lol..). I went to the EIA’s web site to get away from the “spins” and look at some hard production numbers that are well cited.

    I believe the best data to be had is at the EIA’s web site… the current report that summarized China’s energy usages and electrical power generation is linked below.

    https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.cfm?iso=CHN

    “Because of the large amount of domestic reserves, coal will continue to lead the fuel slate for power generation, even as China diversifies its fuel supply and uses cleaner fuels. Coal serves as the primary source of fuel for power, although plant utilization rates have declined slightly from 60% in 2011 to 56% in 2014. (cite130) As happened with coal mining, the Chinese government is closing small and inefficient plants to modernize the coal fleet in favor of larger, more efficient units as well as technologically advanced ultra-supercritical units, which operate at the highest levels of pressure and temperature for a coal plant. Also, China has prohibited companies from building new coal-fired power plants around three major cities—Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou—as air pollution rates have become a problem in recent years. China is building more coal-fired capacity closer to the inland coal-producing centers and expanding electricity transmission to alleviate air pollution from major urban areas along the coast.”

    “The Chinese government has a stated goal to produce at least 15% of overall energy consumption by 2020 from non-fossil fuel sources as the government addresses environmental issues.” (the cites are embedded in the report for all these quotes)

    “Because of its cost-effectiveness and sizeable resource potential, hydroelectricity has become China’s key source of renewable energy generation. China was the world’s largest producer of hydroelectric power in 2013. The country generated about 894 TWh of net electricity from hydroelectricity, representing 18% of the country’s total net electricity generation, according to EIA estimates”

    “In 2013, China was the world’s second-largest wind producer, generating about 132 TWh, a level about 38% higher than in 2012. China’s installed on-grid wind capacity was 76 GW at the end of 2013 and has grown exponentially since 2005. However, absolute wind power capacity stood at about 91 GW, representing a shortage of transmission infrastructure to connect wind farms to the electric grid.”

    “China is also aggressively investing in solar power and hopes to increase capacity from 15 GW at the end of 2013 to 100 GW by the end of 2020.”

    While these renewable numbers sound huge… you need to consider that China’s total Electrical Generating Capacity is in excess of 6,000 Terawatthours…. of which 77% is produced using fossil fuels…

    I leave you all to draw your own conclusions….

    Reply
    • EIA is a conservative (cautious, not politically conservative) agency that tends to provide projections along rather mild trend lines. For years, they have underestimated the rate of renewable energy adoption in the US, and they continue to fail to count residential solar as part of the renewable generating structure. As an agency, they have tended to have a moderate but notable institutional fossil fuel bias. And considering the fact that this data is two years old and does not incorporate the 2015 drop off in coal use, which was much swifter than the 2014 drop, I’d call these projections more than a little bit musty.

      As for the size of China’s renewable energy build — apparently a pace of renewable energy adoption that is now larger than any other power segment by leaps and bounds is still not enough to make an impression upon the more traditionally-minded. China can reduce its emissions with this build rate. And with the policies in place it can absolutely constrain its coal use as it already has over the past two years. The question is will it continue to leap ahead and do it? I hope so.

      News out today is that China plans to drop 250 coal projects:

      http://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-power-coal-idUSKCN0WQ0ZD

      Reply
      • – A good phrase to add to the quiver: “fossil fuel bias.”

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 25, 2016

        One point that struck me above was the one about China moving the coal plants farther from areas plagued by air quality issues and closer to coal production regions. The further you have to transmit electricity the more is lost during transmission. Simply moving the plants further away would automatically require an increase in electrical production, and coal consumption, just to maintain available electric supply. Am is wrong?

        Reply
        • Individually, yes. However, the net reduction in coal plant utilization for all of China’s coal plants below 50 percent is resulting in less coal consumption for China. To this point, China’s total coal consumption fell in 2014 and 2015.

          China is placing bans on coal use by coal operators, placing limits on the kinds of coal that can be used and is now canceling coal projects. These actions appear to be reinforcing actions in that it puts a continued downward pressure on coal consumption.

          And to your point, moving some coal plants closer to production is not moving all coal plants closer to production. Implied is that some of the coal plants that can’t be move will be under utilized or shut down early.

        • climatehawk1

           /  March 25, 2016

          Only small amounts of electricity are lost during transmission. Higher voltage lines can be used to compensate for longer distances.

      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 25, 2016

        What i described above is the “holy grail” of development of superconductors, right? A way of transmitting electricity with zero resistance?

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  March 26, 2016

        Thanks for the clarification, Robert and Climatehawk🙂

        Reply
  28. Colorado Bob

     /  March 25, 2016

    Great Barrier Reef: aerial survey reveals extent of coral bleaching

    James Cook University professor Terry Hughes says he flew over 600km of reef and more than 60% was bleached

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/25/great-barrier-reef-aerial-survey-reveals-extent-of-coral-bleaching

    Reply
  29. Colorado Bob

     /  March 25, 2016

    Global warming hits rice bowls

    A recent study by the Nanyang Technological University’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS) noted that variations in food production around the world due to climate shocks are likely to become more intense and frequent.

    The report said that by 2030, for example, rice production in north-eastern Thailand could be reduced by up to 17.8 per cent due to flooding and storm surges.

    Fish catch potential in the waters of South-east Asia could also shrink by up to 60 per cent, as fish migrate away from the Equator to escape warmer oceans and increasingly acidic waters.

    Climate change has already hit some farmers.

    Vietnam’s southern Mekong delta – the rice basket of the country – is reeling from the worst drought to hit the country in nearly a century, and it is expected to hit rice harvests hard.

    Link

    Reply
  30. Colorado Bob

     /  March 25, 2016

    Unaccounted for Arctic microbes appear to be speeding up glacier melting

    The research, led by Dr Arwyn Edwards from Aberystwyth University, focuses on a grainy, soil-like substance found on the surface of Arctic ice known as cryoconite, which is made of dust and industrial soot glued together by photosynthetic bacteria. Working on Greenland’s ice sheet, the team showed that cryoconite darkens the surface of the ice, causing it to melt and make small water-filled holes. The bacterially-made granules self-regulate the depth and shape of these holes to maximise their exposure to sunlight, which in turn further melts the glacier’s surface ice. In summer, cryoconite holes pockmark the surface of the biologically productive region of the Greenland ice sheet, an area ten times the size of Wales (200,000 square kilometres), which is expanding as the climate warms.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  March 25, 2016

      Too bad we’re not half as clever as these little buggers. When it comes to rate of adaptation, they’ve got us by the short hairs.

      Reply
      • The pace of evolution quickens as lifespans shorten and become more brutal. At these times and for these organisms, the process of natural selection becomes quite keen indeed.

        Reply
    • Good catch, Bob. We’ve IDs for strong feedbacks in the basal zone. I’m less convinced we’ve nailed down the potential strength of the amplifying feedback at the surface and on throughout the ice as well. Greenland is particularly vulnerable to a top to bottom rapid melt due to its lack of overall insulation from the influences of nearby warming airs and waters. All sides are vulnerable to warm air and warm water incursions. Lack of a retrograde bed in most cases does provide some structural inertia. But its lower latitude offset, the likelihood for a high degree of ocean warming in the CAB, Greenland and Barents Seas, and in Baffin Bay, create the impression of an ice mass that is overall more vulnerable to combined forcings than Antarctica.

      Reply
    • – “cryoconite, which is made of dust and industrial soot glued together by photosynthetic bacteria.”
      – Some form of this organic chemical/petrochemical matrix is likely taking place in all of our neighborhoods. I would add to this the influence of radiant heat from the sun.

      Reply
  31. dnem

     /  March 25, 2016

    Let’s not forget that other billion pound gorilla in the room, India. Here’s an unsettling look at at the impacts of coal on life there, from the always excellent e360:
    http://e360.yale.edu/feature/on_burning_ground_human_cost_indias_push_produce_more_coal/2972/

    Reply
    • India is one of a shrinking group of nations that is still expanding net coal use while building more coal fired power plants. This presents serious challenges to continued draw-down of global coal use. However, rate of build for India is not equal to China at peak rates, financing for new coal plants is growing more meager by the year, and India, at an early stage, is showing healthy renewables growth. There is an opportunity over the next five years for India to also begin to curtail its coal use. Like China, air quality and limits to local water supplies will likely be a major driver. In addition, India is facing increasing pressure from international groups to find alternatives to coal even as the local populace favors renewables — wind and solar — over coal.

      We certainly should continue to push for coal constraints in India as this market provides a heightened risk for expanding fossil fuel emissions that impact the global total. However, there are more and more opportunities for coal curtailment even there.

      Reply
  32. Andy in SD

     /  March 25, 2016

    The west coast of Greenland appears to be heading into shedding mode quicker than the past couple of years.

    If you look here at Disco Bay and select the previous years (keep the date the same) you’ll see that it is much closer to shedding mode than previously.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8/2016-03-24/9-N69.05875-W52.05718

    Reply
  33. Greg

     /  March 25, 2016

    Peter Sinclair’s take on the Kansas/Oklahoma fires and a shout-out to Robert:
    http://climatecrocks.com/2016/03/25/kansas-youre-not-in-oklahoma-anymore/

    Reply
  34. Reblogged this on GarryRogers Nature Conservation and commented:
    In arid and semi-arid environments, introduced invasive plants fill openings left by fires. In the Great Plains, perennial grasses tolerate fires well. Where livestock grazing and other disturbances have broken soil surfaces, however, the fire increases the opportunities for invasive plants to establish. Fine fuel builds up. Shortened fire recurrence intervals can overcome the resistance of perennial grasses and lead to weedlands of little value for wildlife, wildlife, or soil stability.

    Reply
  35. rustj2015

     /  March 25, 2016

    Fear this! and keep typing…
    or
    Fight this! Meaning: get your message to our representatives!

    We’ve to get together to overturn these “trade agreements”
    http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/03/24/how-worlds-biggest-polluters-are-two-trade-deals-away-steamrolling-climate

    Reply
    • We should be using our influence through trade to limit the power of fossil fuel based corporations to extraction more oil, gas, and coal and to dump it into the Earth system through their various captive markets. These trade deals as they are written are anethema to the hope of preventing the most horrid impacts of climate change. Those who drafted these unequal and likely to harm the American people policies should be ashamed of what they’ve done. No public figure or American citizen should support these deals as they give up far too much American sovereignty to the fossil fuel special interests who would degrade our climate, kill many domestic jobs, and force captive consumerism to destructive fuels.

      Reply
  36. Greg

     /  March 25, 2016

    Article yesterday in Miami Herald. Includes a well done video of all the engineering work they are already doing to deal with “king tides” and sea level rise🙂. It all sounds so matter of fact but it is the kind of reporting that should move local minds. Will be seeing a lot of this kind of stop gap engineering in the years ahead and its impacts/costs. Note the disappearing stairs and the kid wading to his Angel school bus.
    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fred-grimm/article68092452.html

    Reply
  37. Zack Labe ‏@ZLabe 4h4 hours ago

    Do you see the omega block next week? (*hint: Ω)

    Reply
  38. – In parallel to the earlier item re: “American Meteorological Society” and climate change:
    I keep noting, or harping, that ‘commerce’ is the prime guiding force in such matters as the health and welfare of the citizenry.
    Here’s another about the US National Weather Service:

    The National Weather Service is a component of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA is an Operating Unit of the U.S. Department of Commerce.
    Our Mission

    Provide weather, water, and climate data, forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and enhancement of the national economy.

    http://www.weather.gov/about

    Reply
    • – ROLL COMMERCIAL…🙂

      Reply
      • Same with FAA: derivative of the Dept of Commerce a century ago. Stuck in the same mode of promoting industry while creating unmanaged impacts upon people and places. These agencies are commonly serving science/data/safety purposes on paper, but tend to be fully captured so as to protect industry/commerce from being accountable.

        Put in a slightly different context, and somewhat simplified, a full century ago, when we still had sweeping lands filled with tappable resources, and when we could easily completely ignore the finite capacity of our air and our oceans (which was then an absurd idea), it was not at all problematic to have a young government focused on growing commerce. But now, our immoderate exploitation is coming back to haunt us. It is a Ponzi scheme built on hyperconsumption of finite resources.

        Reply
  39. wili

     /  March 25, 2016

    https://www.skepticalscience.com/dangerous-gw-sooner-than-thought.html

    “Dangerous global warming will happen sooner than thought”

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 25, 2016

      “When you think about statements like ‘coal is good for humanity’ because we’re pulling people out of poverty, it’s just not true”.

      This is something that I find many people who are otherwise informed and well intentioned don’t seem to get.

      It’s actually not only ignorant but rather insulting that they assume that those of us concerned about the consequences of GW (which will fall/are already falling most heavily on the poorest, generally) are somehow less concerned about the global poor, but that the unimaginably wealthy fossil fuel companies are somehow the great friend and best hope for the global poor!

      Reply
      • The global poor would do far, far better with wind and solar — which are more easily democratic and distributed energy sources. Sources that are less likely to face market manipulation and more likely to see greater and greater levels of access. Sources that are far more equal than fossil fuels which vast accumulations of capital enable to be piled into a kind of global wealth hoard for the heartless few. Fossil fuels are income inequality, political instability, and economic exploitation writ large. Even without the impending devastating impacts of climate change — which will hit the poor first and hardest — the poor of the world would do far, far better with renewables than with the fossil fuels that have helped to enable such outrageous levels of excess to transfer into so few hands in the first place.

        Reply
  40. Jeremy

     /  March 25, 2016

    Geophysical Research Letters:

    “The global burden of atmospheric methane has been increasing over the past decade, but the causes are not well understood. National inventory estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency indicate no significant trend in U.S. anthropogenic methane emissions from 2002 to present. Here we use satellite retrievals and surface observations of atmospheric methane to suggest that U.S. methane emissions have increased by more than 30% over the 2002–2014 period. The trend is largest in the central part of the country, but we cannot readily attribute it to any specific source type. This large increase in U.S. methane emissions could account for 30–60% of the global growth of atmospheric methane seen in the past decade.”

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL067987/abstract

    Reply
    • The paper was already amazingly controversial in its earlier draft. I’m pretty sure the science is going have a fit over it. I can already see the modeling bias creeping in. This annoys me in that modeling for ice sheet response and sea ice response has been rather inaccurate in contrast to modeled atmospheric response and SST response which has been pretty on the ball so far.

      I take issue with this individual’s tone and find the assumption that Greenland and Antarctica are stable to be somewhat nonsensical once you consider paleoclimate — i.e. much higher sea levels during the Eemian under only mildly greater peak temperatures and CO2 levels at around 280 ppm (which is far less than current levels pushing 405 ppm).

      To this point, it’s worth noting that in our best understanding of paleoclimate history a maintained 405 ppm atmospheric CO2 concentration is enough to melt all of West Antarctica, all of Greenland, and a good chunk of East Antarctica as well. Implied is a great degree of ice sheet instability until sea levels rise by 75 to 150 feet.

      I find it a bit ironic that the responder assumes ice sheet instability for Laurentide and other ice age ice sheets at 1-2 C warming — which was enough to bring about their collapse after warming out of a stability period that was 1-2 C cooler — but for some reason thinks that Greenland and Antarctica are stable at 1-2 C warming from baseline Holocene temperatures.

      The notion that Greenland and Antarctica are stable is pretty obviously refuted, in any case, by current growing melt rates from both Antarctica and Greenland with observed doubling times of 5-10 and 8-18 years respectively. And though the criticism of Hansen’s curve fitting exercise is a worthwhile response, it is also worth noting the ice sheet melt models (except those experimental few that have included greater resolutions and added in more physical variables) have not produced accurate results or results that jibe convincingly with what we know about paleoclimate.

      As such, and ironically, even the seemingly less accurate curve fitting and meta-analysis (when appropriatedly considering related paleoclimate contexts) conducted by Hansen may prove to produce the more accurate results at this time.

      Reply
  41. Jeremy

     /  March 25, 2016

    “It’s worth taking a minute to appreciate the sheer scale of what China is doing in solar right now. In 2015, the country added more than 15 gigawatts of new solar capacity, surpassing Germany as the world’s largest solar power market. China now has 43.2 gigawatts of solar capacity, compared with38.4 gigawatts in Germany and 27.8 in the United States.

    According to new projections, it seems that trend is going to continue. Under its 13th Five Year Plan, China will nearly triple solar capacity by 2020, adding 15 to 20 gigawatts of solar capacity each year for the next five years, according to Nur Bekri, director of the National Energy Administration. That will bring the country’s installed solar power to more than 140 gigawatts. To put that in context, world solar capacity topped 200 gigawatts last year and is expected to reach 321 gigawatts by the end of 2016.”

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601093/china-is-on-an-epic-solar-power-binge/

    Reply
    • Adding 120 gw of solar globally in 2016 is a huge expected build-out. We’d expect wind to hit 70 GW in 2016. The total of 190 GW in one year is closing in on the 250-300 GW needed to actively replace old fossil fuel generation and to meet all new projected generation demand on an annual basis.

      Thanks for this, Jeremy.

      Reply
  42. Jeremy

     /  March 25, 2016

    Reply
  43. Jeremy

     /  March 25, 2016

    UK:

    “Dyson is developing an electric car at its headquarters in Wiltshire with help from public money, according to government documents.

    The company, which makes a range of products that utilise the sort of highly efficient motors needed for an electric car such as vacuum cleaners, hand dryers and bladeless fans, last year refused to rule out rumours it was building one.

    But on Wednesday, the government appeared to have accidentally disclosed Dyson is working on one, along with other big companies outside of the automotive industry, such as Apple.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/23/dyson-developing-electric-car-government-documents

    Reply
    • Mblanc

       /  March 26, 2016

      Room for a joke here surely… If it’s a Dyson car, it’s bound to suck!🙂

      Reply
  44. Colorado Bob

     /  March 25, 2016

    You’re on a roll there Jeremy.

    One of items that came out of Belgium this week was that 2 of the bombers had 12 hours of recordings of a nuclear engineer ‘s comings and goings. My personal thinking they were up to kidnapping, and extortion. But who knows what they were thinking .

    But your two excellent articles on solar reminded me once again that not one solar plant will ever explode , melt down, and have to have a priesthood for thousands of years watching over it, and spending God’ knows how much money.

    And as the Temple of Karnak shows, when the money dries up the priests stop coming to work.

    Reply
  45. Jeremy

     /  March 26, 2016

    Never ending …..

    “Storm Katie is set to hit on Easter Monday with gales of up to 70mph, the Met Office said, bringing a risk of “fallen trees and disruption to power supplies” leading to travel disruption.
    A national severe weather warning for strong winds has been issued for Monday, with southern England and south Wales likely to bear the brunt.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/mar/25/travel-warning-issued-as-storm-katie-set-to-hit-over-easter-weekend

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 26, 2016

      Wales ……. The Atlantic shooting gallery.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  March 26, 2016

      Southern England and N France look most likely to be in the crosshairs. We are getting the storms of our children – those of our grandchildren can perhaps be imagined.

      Reply
  46. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    The Rolling Stones are about to play for 500,000 Cubans. If anyone under estimates the power of art, and music think again.

    Reply
  47. Jeremy

     /  March 26, 2016

    Reply
  48. Kevin Jones

     /  March 26, 2016

    National Interagency Fire Center reports 887,920 acres burned since January 1. Average year to date for prior 10 years, 423,075 acres.
    https://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.htm

    Reply
  49. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    No edit sorry. Wrong link.

    Reply
  50. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    Isis did not play before 500,000 people , the west did The Rollings Stones did.

    Reply
  51. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    Cruz denies tabloid’s adultery allegations, blames ‘garbage’ on Trump
    Washington Post – ‎3 hours ago

    Reply
  52. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    The right wing is so sick they think this shit matters.

    Reply
  53. Jay M

     /  March 26, 2016

    dry pattern coming up in PNW
    forecast clear Tuesday thru Sunday

    Reply
  54. Abel Adamski

     /  March 26, 2016

    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article68353677.html

    Interesting, maybe shift conservative opinions somewhat – the magic words, Dollars and Profit

    Reply
  55. – Addendum to: Jay M / March 26, 2016
    ‘dry pattern coming up in PNW
    forecast clear Tuesday thru Sunday’

    – Offshore another big system is holding court:
    NWS OPC ‏@NWSOPC 1h1 hour ago

    Spectacular 0140 UTC 03/26/16 Himawari-8 visible image with mature storm force system in the W Pacific.

    Reply
    • – Left third of frame N&S: is that an atmospheric river — or it’s tributaries (🙂 )? The jet stream is basically absent.

      WS Seattle ‏@NWSSeattle 46m46 minutes ago

      Satellite shot from this afternoon showing billowing cumulus forming over land in W WA warmed by spring sun.

      Reply
  56. Abel Adamski

     /  March 26, 2016

    Interesting but with a scary component. Injecting tiny bubbles into the sea to remove CO2 into the air to save coral reefs

    http://www.azocleantech.com/news.aspx?newsID=23248

    Reply
  57. Abel Adamski

     /  March 26, 2016

    http://www.azocleantech.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=580

    Solar power from “clear” glass windows, maybe even spray on paint

    Reply
  58. – Canada Boreal Forests $$$ — US Demand

    Reply
    • – medium.com/@joshua.e.axelrod/why-a-proposal-to-build-45-miles-of-new-logging-roads-in-quebec-s-boreal-forest-is-a-big-deal

      ‘Why new logging roads in Quebec must be stopped

      In Central Quebec, a small Cree community is anxiously monitoring a proposal by 5 logging companies that would bring logging to the doorstep of the last untouched segment of the forest that makes up their ancestral homeland.
      …Sadly, the cutting of these forests is largely being driven by U.S. demand for forests products[4]— a reality that should open the eyes of U.S. consumers to the impacts our purchasing habits are having on our neighbors to the north.

      – Natural Resources Canada – Statistical data
      – $$$ from Exports
      https://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/statsprofile/trade/qc

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  March 26, 2016

      From the now defunct Climate Spectator post News Ltd’s investment in the Business Spectator Online Media group

      http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/9/9/science-environment/oh-canada-north-americans-alarming-forestry-fall

      Oh, Canada: The North American’s alarming forestry fall

      Katie Valentine 9 Sep 2014, 4:40 PM

      Climate Science & Environment

      ClimateProgress

      Canada leads the world in forest degradation, according to a new mapping project.

      The project, put together by World Resources Institute, Greenpeace and multiple other groups, uses interactive maps to display forest degradation and destruction around the world between 2000 and 2013. According to WRI, more than 104 million hectares – a chunk of land the group notes is three times the size of Germany – of the world’s remaining large, undisturbed forests, or Intact Forest Landscapes, were degraded in the last 13 years. The Northern boreal region of Canada, Russia and Alaska had some of the largest area of degraded forests, with the Amazon having the second-largest and the Congo basin the third.

      In Canada’s tar sands region, forest fires and industrial development have destroyed or degraded almost two million acres of boreal forest since 2000, according to Peter Lee, director of Global Forest Watch Canada. Lee told ClimateProgress in an email that Canada’s main driver of forest destruction is an “increased frequency and extent of forest fires” driven by climate change. These fires are likely converting areas that were once heavily forested into shrublands. Logging and road-building are the second-biggest causes of forest destruction and degradation, Lee said, and “massive increases in the pace and scale of energy developments, especially non-conventional oil and gas developments in northern Alberta’s tar sands region and also in north-eastern British Columbia with the shale plays,” is the third.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  March 26, 2016

        So boreal degradation is worse than the Amazon—yet another reason to shame Canada’s policies and practices wrt natural resources. Just when I think we can’t be any more irrepsonsible…..So thanks so much for these links, will be shoving this out all over FB.

        Reply
  59. – Photography for the public good:

    – omaha.com/news/metro/omaha-native-gary-braasch-

    Omaha native Gary Braasch pioneered photographing climate change’s effects on planet

    … Braasch was among the first to show how the planet is changing, and his work includes the pairing of modern-day images of glaciers with archival images. His use of “repeat photography” — returning time and again to the same spot — helped chart a path for others to photograph the effects of global warming.

    James Hansen, the former NASA climate scientist who was among the first in the 1980s to sound the alarm about global warming, described Braasch as exceptional for his ability to communicate the changes occurring.

    “He was a totally dedicated, selfless person, said Hansen, a Denison, Iowa, native. “It is a tragedy that his life was cut short — he still had so much to give.”

    Reply
  60. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    I’m still trying to get over the death Brain Jones.

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  March 26, 2016

      CB, you too huh? When they stepped out of that plane, Brian was the first thought in my mind. I was 13 and Brian was the first one I loved who went so soon. Rave magazine, a UK Tiger-Beatish fan mag, did a tribute that included the complete 39th stanza of Shelley’s elegy, Adonais, written on the death of John Keats….”Peace, peace! He is not dead, he doth not sleep, he has awakened from the dream of life….etc.”—–imagine teen fan mags printing such stuff today– and at 13 I was impressionable and eventually chose an English major because of that, of him. The smallest touch can transform. Brian Jones. Rock on in peace.

      Reply
  61. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    Nearly 18 percent of our country believes if you can pee up pole. You can be the most powerful man on the planet.

    Reply
  62. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    This mindless call for a dictator. Needs a response. For that’s what we are seeing.

    I have my 2,000 dollar comments, not just 2 cents.

    Reply
  63. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    He needs this –

    3 Signs of Narcissists – That Will Save You From Their Abuse ?

    https://www.understandingnarcissists.com/3-signs-of-a-narcissist.html?gclid=CNDl4JDb3csCFZWMaQodQMgGmA

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 26, 2016

      Unlike other abusers, narcissists work behind the scenes and never in the open. They emotionally threaten and scare you into doing what they want.

      They use fear, guilt, and shame to weaken you and force you under their control

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  March 26, 2016

        If that ain’t a pop corn wagon in the past, read up on Nero.

        Reply
  64. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    You don’t like Hillary, fine.

    Plan “B” is pathological narcissists liars .

    Reply
  65. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    What Bernie did was to drive her our way. Good. she can change .

    But remember these are pathological narcissists liars next fall.

    Get everyone you know to the poles next fall.

    Reply
  66. Abel Adamski

     /  March 26, 2016

    http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/article/2000196096/change-tact-farmers-told-as-global-warming-bites?articleID=2000196096&story_title=change-tact-farmers-told-as-global-warming-bites&pageNo=1

    Change tact, farmers told as global warming bites

    Many farmers may not understand what is happening, but scientists like Felister Makini of Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (Kalro) minces no words: adducing it to the climate change phenomenon. Climate change, Felister says, is exhibited by the changing patterns of weather that has left farmers prone to unexpected occurrences and led to crop failure. “Traditionally, it has been easy predicting rainfall,” Felister says. “In fact, farmers in the olden days accurately synchronised their planting with rainfall season. It worked that time. The reason why it is less possible to predict rain and drought now is because the planet is warming and causing climate change.” Generally, it is argued, that global warming is riding on high carbon footprint as the world exploits fossil fuels. According to Felister, farmers should care about climate change and start adopting better farming practices and using seed varieties that can withstand erratic climatic conditions.

    Reply
  67. Jeremy

     /  March 26, 2016

    We had to destroy the forest in order to save the forest.

    “Poland has approved large-scale logging in Europe’s last primeval woodland in a bid to combat a beetle infestation despite protests from scientists, ecologists and the European Union.

    The action in the Bialowieza forest is intended to fight the spread of the spruce bark beetle.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/26/poland-approves-large-scale-logging-in-europes-last-primeval-forest

    Can anyone quests why the Bark Beetle is spreading? *Wink, wink*

    Reply
    • – Spruce Beetle NA

      U. S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service

      Forest Insect & Disease
      Leaflet 127

      – barkbeetles.org/spruce/sbfidl127

      Reply
  68. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    These are the pathological narcissists liars next fall.

    If Ted Cruz fails, he will endorse Trump. As will all the other pathological narcissists liars next fall. They will all run on ” Principled Conservationism “, which is an never ending death march, They plan to run on “old white men” , I’m a “old white man”, I hate their guts.

    These are stupidest people in the history of the world. But they could win. Vote next fall. Drag your friends to the polls. Vote next fall. Drag your friends to the polls.

    Vote next fall. If you sit home, you vote for bat shit crazy. Hillary may be the most flawed woman since Medusa , but she ain’t bat shit crazy.

    Reply
    • LAM78

       /  March 26, 2016

      Someone who is such a huge fan of GMOs despite all their problems and refuse to see the problem with them must be bat shit crazy! Let’s hope that Sanders win the dem race and Kasich the Rep race…

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 26, 2016

      You’re right Bob. The Republicans have become the most dangerous people on Earth. They are set on committing us to as much catastrophic climate change as possible, as if it’s their goal to make the Earth uninhabitable. They are more of danger than ISIS or any terrorist. Their inaction on climate change is more important than the economy, gay rights, abortion rights, etc. Climate change is THE issue, and it will affect every last one of us, and our progeny even more so, yet Republicans have chosen to pretend it doesn’t even exist. Hence, they have become the biggest threat to life on this planet.

      Reply
    • While I hope you’re right about HRC, can’t imagine how she will do enough given her ties to and money she receives from the fossil fuel industry.

      We don’t have time to “push” (and hope that works—- exhibit A: Obama) someone to do the right thing anymore unless I’m missing something in the climate data that Robert has presented here.

      We need a leader (and millions working with said leader) who is not beholden to greedy, murderous, corporate entities and someone who finally calls a spade a spade.

      Differences between Sanders and Clinton are climate change are substantial—and yes, contrary to what MSM is telling everyone, he still has a shot of winning. And all the polls (for what they’re worth) point to Sanders as the one who can defeat Trump.

      Article by Eric Holthaus:
      http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2016/02/12/bernie_sanders_and_hillary_clinton_differ_on_climate_change.html
      “Sanders’ climate plan is much more comprehensive than Clinton’s and will reduce greenhouse gas emissions at a faster rate. He’s forcefully linked climate change and terrorism. He’s staunchly opposed to continued fossil fuel exploration on public lands and has vowed to ban fracking outright, a stance Clinton doesn’t share. His focus on ridding politics of corporate lobbyists is a swipe against Clinton, whose campaign has taken money from fossil fuel companies. On the flip side, unlike Clinton, Sanders wants to phase out nuclear energy, a position that many scientists and environmentalists increasingly don’t share, given the need to transition toward a zero carbon economy as quickly as possible.
      As for Clinton, though her presidential campaign was launched with a historic focus on climate, when she talks about climate change, it often feels like she’s playing catch-up. In recent months, Clinton has shifted her position to be more hawkish on Arctic drilling, the Keystone pipeline and on restricting fossil fuel exploration on public lands, likely in response to pressure from Sanders and voters.
      When Sanders won New Hampshire this week, he devoted a big chunk of his victory speech to climate change. When Clinton conceded, she didn’t mention it once. Meanwhile, on the Republican side, the New Hampshire winner (Donald Trump) is a climate conspiracy theorist. People often ask me if I feel hopeless about climate. Only when it’s not taken seriously.”

      Reply
  69. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    Rolling Stones tell giant crowd ‘times are changing’ at Cuba debut

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-cuba-rollingstones-show-idUSKCN0WR1B7

    Reply
  70. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    “I love Mick Jagger so much. I’ve always dreamed about this. I couldn’t sleep knowing he would be here,” said Angela Menendez, who cleans floors in a hospital.

    Security was low key and there was a noticeable absence of would-be entrepreneurs selling T-shirts or memorabilia.

    Reply
  71. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    The Rolling Stones – 2000 Light Years From Home [Video original]

    Reply
  72. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    Flight 505

    Reply
  73. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    The Rolling stones – It’s Not Easy

    Reply
  74. Colorado Bob

     /  March 26, 2016

    The Rolling stones – It’s Not Easy

    A guy on NPR said tonight that Satisfaction is cha- cha. , he was right .

    God I miss Brian Jones those clean, bright, crisp licks.

    Reply
    • redskylite

       /  March 26, 2016

      Rolling Stones – heroes from my adolescence, heroes in my old age, still looking good, still going strong . . . brilliant group, irreplaceable.

      http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-35901988

      Reply
    • – rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-rolling-stones-songs1968-19691231

      “No Expectations” (1968)

      ones’ mournful slide guitar on this quiet masterpiece would be one of his final major contributions. “We were sitting around in a circle on the floor . . . recording with open mics,” Jagger said in 1995. “That was the last time I remember Brian really being totally involved.” “No Expectations” was also an early, vital result of the Stones turning to rock’s deeper roots – pre-war blues and country music…

      Reply
      • Jones’

        Reply
      • – Pianist of note, Nicky Hopkins:
        Much of the Rolling Stones’ classic album Beggars Banquet has an early Sunday morning, hung-over feel. “No Expectations” has Brian Jones’ lazy slide guitar and the honky tonk ballad piano of Nicky Hopkins assisting Keith Richards on an acoustic guitar…

        Hopkins was a real power. He made the Airplane’s Volunteers album rock. At one time, he played with Quicksilver too.

        Reply
      • – allmusic.com/song/no-expectations

        Reply
  75. Ryan in New England

     /  March 26, 2016

    I found this to be an encouraging piece of news. Scotland shut down its last remaining coal plant on Thursday. The video of the moment was so encouraging to me. It was like a glimpse of the future, or the present that we should be experiencing. Everyone is gathered around, and they push the button to shut it down and just like that, there is no more coal being burned for the first time in 115 years. It can and must be done everywhere else.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/24/3763158/scotland-closes-last-coal-plant/

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 26, 2016

      Oh no! I apologize to everybody, I just noticed Robert posted this link in a comment above. Sorry folks

      Reply
    • Cate

       /  March 26, 2016

      When we lived in Scotland for a few years recently, I was really impressed with the Scottish govt’s emphasis on going to green energy—-windfarms were sprouting up everywhere, wave and tidal power were in active development, and folks were installing rooftop solar everywhere, under a govt program that let you sell any excess back to the grid. All the stores were eliminating plastic bags by various schemes and people were cheerfully switching to bring-your-own-bags, no fuss about it.

      There wasn’t a lot of discussion and no controversy–folks were just getting on with getting into renewables. It was common sense, more or less, a good thing to do. So when we came back to Canada, it was like going back in time to the glory days of the 1960s when the Car was King, and oil flowed like milk and honey and the more plastic the better! To this lay-person’s eye, Big Oil clearly rules the roost here in North America in extents and ways that it doesn’t appear to in Scotland, and maybe in the rest of Europe for all I know.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 27, 2016

        The Scots have always been hard headed practical people, prudent with their money and Scotland is renowned for their high calibre of engineers and technical experts, to the extent it is almost a meme
        Beam me up Scotty

        Reply
  76. Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release

    “Results from this expert opinion survey indicate that tundra and boreal biomass might not offset much of permafrost carbon release when considering the different warming scenarios and that the only way to keep permafrost carbon in the ground is to reduce human emissions,” Schaedel said.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160325093847.htm

    Reply
  77. Thermal trouble in the tropics

    “species found in environments such as the tropics have lower tolerances to climate change. With greater amounts of thermally sensitive species than environments found at higher latitudes, the threat of global climate change puts tropical species at a greater risk of extinction than their temperate counterparts. ”

    http://news.fiu.edu/2016/03/thermal-trouble-in-the-tropics/98547

    Reply
  78. Spike

     /  March 26, 2016

    Getting pretty windy over the pond, next few days look tricky

    Reply
    • METJEFFUK ‏@metjeffuk Mar 25 Redruth, England

      Hurricane force winds Monday: Deep low expected late Sunday /Monday with strongest winds will be in channel ???

      Reply
  79. Good interview on Radio Eco Shock with Bob Hensen…
    http://www.ecoshock.org/

    Reply
  80. utoutback

     /  March 26, 2016

    The Guardian continues to do it’s part…… explaining why climate change gets no traction in the political debate.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/mar/26/climate-change-may-be-a-burning-issue-but-election-campaign-tells-another-story

    “Unless a problem becomes a crisis most American don’t want to think about it. The only way our country deals with problems is when they become absolutely critical, that’s the way government is set up. Everything gets blocked otherwise.”

    Well, IT IS CRITICAL!

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  March 26, 2016

      Americans Will Always Do the Right Thing — After Exhausting All the Alternatives

      Winston Churchill

      Reply
    • Wharf Rat

       /  April 1, 2016

      “We have only two modes—complacency and panic”

      James R. Schlesinger, the first U.S. Dept. of Energy secretary, in 1977, on the country’s approach to energy

      Reply
  81. Cate

     /  March 26, 2016

    FILE UNDER: The Planet as Playground for the Privileged

    Crystal Serenity, Anchorage to New York via the Northwest Passage, 16 August – 17 September. Taking bookings for 2016 and 2017. From about $22,000.

    “Climate change is opening the Arctic so fast it’s hard for environmental protection and safety measures to keep pace.”.

    http://blogs.dw.com/ice/

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  March 26, 2016

      Crystal Serenity NW Passage “expedition” cruise, FAQ page.

      Some of this makes for pretty hilarious reading—when it’s not surreal.

      And I can’t help wondering what the “experts” and “prominent luminaries” who will be “offering enrichment” to these highly-privileged passengers will be saying about climate change in the Arctic.

      Whatever yarns they offer will no doubt be well-spun.

      http://www.crystalcruises.com/ContentPage.aspx?ID=191

      Reply
  82. Reply
  83. – FILE UNDER: BIZARRE PRIORITIES USA
    Of course, certain fossil fuel intensive enterprises will get a paycheck for the construction. Kickbacks are usually part of the process as well.

    -duluthnewstribune.com/news/politics

    ST. PAUL – Separating streets from railroads that carry oil trains could save lives in Minnesota communities, a House committee heard Thursday.

    Moorhead, Red Wing and Coon Rapids leaders argued for millions of dollars their communities would use to build bridges so busy railroad crossings would not be at the same level as roads.

    Stand ‏@standearth 52m52 minutes ago

    Orrrrrr, they could just #StopOilTrains: ‘MN towns seek millions of dollars in rail safety.’

    Reply
  84. – Politics USA – I don’t like the look of this. Not one bit.

    More than 21,000 gun lovers sign petition to allow firearms at Republican National Convention in Cleveland

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/gun-lovers-sign-petition-firearms-rnc-article-1.2578616

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  March 26, 2016

      Natural selection.

      Reply
    • utoutback

       /  March 26, 2016

      I saw this headline and laughed. What could possibly go wrong?

      Reply
    • Give ’em free ammo, too, for same-day use. Let me know the dates, too, please, just to make sure I am thousands of miles away.

      Reply
      • – They have plenty of ammo — just no wisdom.

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 27, 2016

        dt, the rifle association has trained them very well.

        The US’s own terrorist training and equipping organisation

        Reply
    • – Well, guess what?:
      – I’m not sure the ‘humorous’ effort was worth it. Nope – not with so much disinformation and mean spirited blatherings from the GOP political spectrum.

      ‘Thousands sign satirical petition to allow guns at Republican Convention’

      Technically Incorrect: An online petition on Change.org claims that constitutional rights are being denied to those who want to bring a gun to the fight for the Republican Party’s future. Except the petition is surely humorous.

      Except that the petition is surely fine satirical commentary. A blog called Hyperationalist has claimed responsibility.

      http://www.cnet.com/news/25000-sign-satirical-petition-to-allow-guns-at-republican-convention/

      Reply
  85. – USA – Air Pollution – Republican malfeasance

    Colorado Republicans, Upset Over Clean Power Plan, Target Air Pollution Monitors

    …On Thursday, the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee finished hashing out the details of a $27 billion spending plan. In one of their last moves, Republican committee members zeroed out funding for the state’s air pollution control division.
    https://www.cpr.org/news/newsbeat/colorado-republicans-upset-over-clean-power-plan-target-air-pollution-monitors

    Reply
  86. – Atmospheric Rivers?

    Flash flood watch issued for Oahu, Maui County, Big Island

    Radar at 8:15 p.m. indicated very heavy rainfall just offshore of north Kona and north and south Kohala districts with rainfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per hour.
    http://www.staradvertiser.com/breaking-news/severe-weather-over-kauai-moving-toward-oahu/

    Reply
  87. – USA 2016 -‘ Politics In Our Time’ — but much mirrors ‘Climate Change… Running Out of Time…’

    – Note the sponsors of these spectacles — the inane messages meant to induce nonsensical behaviors. None of which promote public good or safety.
    Repugnance at ‘warp’ speed — the destruction of the democratic impulse its primary goal.
    All of which reinforces the absolute value of robertscribbler, et al.

    ‘Donald Trump Triggers a Media Civil War’

    … CBS head Les Moonves was mercenary enough to crow over how much money Trump coverage was pouring into his network’s coffers. Trump is a veritable gold-mine, which is one reason why the media have given him so much free coverage — by one account $1.9 billion worth…

    Yet amid the glut of Trump coverage, here is something that has gotten far too little attention in the media, for obvious reasons. According to Kyle Blaine at BuzzFeed, Trump not only gets uncritical coverage; he has actually negotiated with the networks as to how they shoot his rallies. If you want to know why the press is kept in a pen and not allowed to mingle at Trump events, it is, according to Blaine, because the press conceded that to Trump. They are not even allowed to provide cutaways of the crowd’s reaction.

    … “Conversations with more than a dozen reporters, producers, and executives across the major networks reveal internal tensions about the wall-to-wall coverage Trump has received and the degree to which the Republican frontrunner has — or hasn’t — been challenged on their air.”

    http://www.nationofchange.org/news/2016/03/25/donald-trump-triggers-media-civil-war/?platform=hootsuite

    Reply
    • Glenn Greenwald ‏@ggreenwald 14m14 minutes ago

      CNN: Sanders wins Washington: his 14th state victory overall and 4th out of the last 5.

      Reply
      • Arun Gupta ‏@arunindy 1h1 hour ago

        Even as Sanders beats Clinton in 2 states by yuge margins, w/ 3rd to go, @nytimes lede story is still Donald Trump.

        Reply
  88. Ryan in New England

     /  March 26, 2016

    Some good news for the climate since Bernie is the only candidate speaking honestly about climate change. Bernie crushed Hillary by huge margins in Alaska and Washington. Yuge.

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/mar/26/sanders-wins-washington-alaska-caucus-election-results-delegates-clinton

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  March 27, 2016

      And Hawaii sends a Yuge Aloha!

      Reply
      • June

         /  March 27, 2016

        “Meet Climate Hawks Vote, a plucky California group that is seeking to make climate change a defining electoral issue.”

        …”It has also attracted some big names: Pennsylvania State University climatologist Michael Mann, of “hockey stick” graph fame, is an adviser, and Bill McKibben, a leading opponent of the Keystone XL pipeline and founder of 350.org, sits on the group’s board.”

        ” In the last week, it has endorsed Vermont independent Sen. Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign and released its first scorecard on Senate Democrats — ranking members on not only their votes but also their climate change activism.”

        http://www.eenews.net/stories/1060034391

        Reply
  89. – Best to download jpg and view at largcer size.
    I see the name Coors on the list. Golden, Co is my boyhood home town. Coors makes a lot of high end ceramics besides beer. The CO School of Mines (geology) is there too

    #BoycottKoch ‏@GoodbyeKoch 11h11 hours ago

    Graph of the money behind #climatedenial #globalwarming #climatechange

    Reply
  90. Jeremy

     /  March 27, 2016

    “Feb, 2016 the atmospheric CO2 level was 404.16 ppm, or 4 ppm larger than just a year ago. Mar 25, 2016 hit 405.81 ppm, almost 5 ppm larger than only one year ago. Average levels rose a record 3.09 ppm in 2015, slightly less in 2014 and a record (then) 2.90 in 2013.”

    Reply
  91. redskylite

     /  March 27, 2016

    This is a difficult topic but is worthy of our thoughts, was the Ex-Chair of the IPPC framed by deniers ? possibly, will we ever know the truth beyond a shadow of doubt ? Hope the truth comes out. If he is innocent it is so sad for him, just hope the legal process can sort it all out.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/26/rajendra-pachauri-hits-back-harassed-female-colleague-claims

    Reply
  92. Spike

     /  March 27, 2016

    A nice article here about the tendency of some to throw up their hands and cry that it is all too difficult, too expensive, too damaging to preserve a habitable climate (although often these voices sound sanguine about adapting to a Cretaceous climate!) Sensible and pragmatic, indicating that the barriers stand largely in our own psyche.

    “The point is that this is nothing to be afraid of. It is sometimes made out that revamping global energy systems is a task of monumental proportions, but in fact global energy expenditures are only 10 percent of world GDP and falling, as more and more of the economy becomes based on information rather than energy. This is not a small task, but it is not intrinsically worse than the other major challenges that society has faced and surmounted. And meeting this challenge does not require doing without, or suffering in the cold and dark. It does not require any terrifying revamping of the world economic order. What it does require is a whole lot of boring, unfrightening, and largely routine engineering and construction. It is time to stop quivering in our boots in pointless fear of the future and just roll up our sleeves and build it.”

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00963402.2016.1145908

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 27, 2016

      “global energy expenditures are only 10 percent of world GDP”

      Interesting, I guess. But isn’t that a bit like saying, “The heart is less than 10% of the body’s weight,” implying that somehow the rest of the body would get on just fine without it?

      Reply
      • Hi wili-

        I think it means that even if we spend twice as much on energy in the future, we can live and do just fine that way. Likely the transition to clean energy will cost less than that. Concentrating solar plants built in the 1980s are now producing some of the cheapest power around, now that they have paid off their loans.

        What we can’t live with, and what will almost certainly cost much more in the long run, is abrupt climate change, of course.

        Reply
  93. Abel Adamski

     /  March 27, 2016

    An interesting side factor, the priceless climate and atmospheric and volcanic record locked up in the ice cores is at risk as the glaciers melt at increasing rates
    How to save that record for future scientists.?

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/27/saving-glaciers-ice-cores-shipped-mont-blanc-antarctica-climate-change#comment-71341978

    Scientists fly glacial ice to south pole to unlock secrets of global warming
    High on Mont Blanc, huge ice cores are being extracted to help researchers study the alarming rate of glacial melt

    n a few weeks, researchers will begin work on a remarkable scientific project. They will drill deep into the Col du Dôme glacier on Mont Blanc and remove a 130 metre core of ice. Then they will fly it, in sections, by helicopter to a laboratory in Grenoble before shipping it to Antarctica. There the ice core will be placed in a specially constructed vault at the French-Italian Concordia research base, 1,000 miles from the south pole.

    The Col du Dôme ice will become the first of several dozen other cores, extracted from glaciers around the world, that will be added to the repository over the next few years. The idea of importing ice to the south pole may seem odd – the polar equivalent of taking coals to Newcastle – but the project has a very serious aim, researchers insist.

    Earth’s glaciers are now melting at a unprecedented rate as a result of global warming – and that poses a serious scientific problem. As ice forms on a glacier, it encloses small bubbles of air that contain a sample of the atmosphere at that time. From these samples, scientists can measure atmospheric concentrations of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane over periods that range from hundreds to tens of thousands of years into the past.

    Reply
  94. utoutback

     /  March 27, 2016

    Doonesbury comment – climate
    http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/strip

    Reply
  95. Spike

     /  March 27, 2016

    Dramatic drone footage of Kansas fire

    Reply
  96. – Still building — Katie is.
    Joint Cyclone Center ‏@JointCyclone 6h6 hours ago

    ⚠️ #StormKatie is heading toward Southern Britain with hurricane force winds warning for SE England on Monday

    Reply
  97. NWS Seattle ‏@NWSSeattle 13h13 hours ago

    Fascinating satellite image of the day. “Vortex street” of low clouds downwind of Guadalupe Island, Mexico. #wawx

    Reply
  98. Kees van der Leun ‏@Sustainable2050 20h20 hours ago

    Global cumulative solar PV capacity grew 1,000-fold in just 20 years: from 200 MW in 1995 to 200,000 MW last year!

    Reply
  99. – USA Wind in the grid:

    The $2.5 Billion U.S. Power Line That No State Can Stop

    On Friday, the U.S. Energy Department used a decade-old statute to clear Clean Line Energy Partners LLC’s 705-mile (1,134-kilometer) power line for construction over any objections from the states involved.

    The Energy Department’s approval of the line, proposed to carry 4,000 megawatts of power from the wind-rich Oklahoma panhandle through Arkansas and into Tennessee, marks the first time the 2005 statute has been used to bypass state approval and push through an interstate transmission project.
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-25/the-2-5-billion-u-s-transmission-line-that-no-state-can-stop

    Reply
  100. Jeremy

     /  March 27, 2016

    “China’s coal use is forecast to fall a third year as industrial output slows, adding force to President Xi Jinping’s drive to cut overcapacity and dimming the hopes of global miners for an uptick in demand by the world’s biggest consumer. Demand will slide 2% this year and prices will remain at a low level, according to the state-run Xinhua News Agency, citing Xu Liang, deputy secretary general of the China Coal Industry Association. Output by the world’s largest producer will also fall by 2%. Consumption has weakened amid a push to use cleaner fuels and shift a slowing economy away from heavy industry. Demand for coal, which accounted for 64% of the country’s total energy use last year, contracted 3.7% last year, following a 2.9% decline in 2014, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

    “This year’s coal situation is equally bleak,” Xinhua quoted Xu as saying. China’s easing coal appetite has helped push prices in Asia to their lowest since 2006, punishing mining companies and prompting the government to propose capacity cuts that threaten the jobs of 1.3 million coal miners. By cutting capacity in the next two to three years, production could fall to about 3.5 billion to 3.6 billion tons, balancing supply and demand, Xu said. The country aims to eliminate as much as 500 million metric tons of coal capacity by 2020, almost 9% of its total. Coal output dropped 3.3% to 3.75 billion metric tons last year, while consumption slipped to 3.965 billion tons, both sliding from record highs in 2013, according to Xu. Use of the fuel in power generation dropped 6.2% last year, while demand from industries including steel, cement and glass making declined.”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-25/china-coal-use-seen-sliding-further-on-weak-industrial-demand

    Reply
  101. Yet another coal ship catastrophe in Sundarbans

    Third major disaster in recent years highlights the menace of commercial shipping in the fragile mangrove forest and the government’s failure to regulate the industry

    Pollution in the largest mangrove forest in the world became front page news yet again in Bangladesh as a large ship carrying over 1,200 tonnes of coal sank in the southern Shela River on Sunday.

    Rescuers from the Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority have traced the sunken vessel 35 feet deep under water, but they have not been able to salvage the ship.

    This is the third vessel to have capsized in less than two years in the ecologically sensitive region…

    http://www.thethirdpole.net/2016/03/21/yet-another-coal-ship-catastrophe-in-sundarbans/?utm_content=buffere882c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    Reply
  102. – Well, Hello there…

    Brian Lada ‏@wxlada 41m41 minutes ago

    Record-challenging warmth will close out March in British Columbia/S Alaska. Monster ridge +3SDs from climatology

    Reply
  103. Colorado Bob

     /  March 28, 2016

    2015/2016 Winter analysis

    I think this winter is going to get studied like crazy,
    for quite a while. It’s a very interesting time.
    Jennifer Francis, Washington Post

    http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2016/03/20152016-winter-analysis.html

    Reply
    • – Neven’s post: It’s packed with data and analysis — very good.

      I like part of his preamble.: ” … and I apologize for not having joined the fray of actuality. On the other hand, context trumps actuality…”.

      Like Robert, and myself, and others tend to reinforce: context is essential.
      It gives perspective, among other things.

      Reply
  104. Met Office ‏@metoffice 51m51 minutes ago

    #StormKatie is continuing to push steadily northeastwards. Here are the latest highest wind gusts

    Reply
  105. Jeremy

     /  March 28, 2016

    Unthinkable – until it happens!

    “The three-month-long summer is barely weeks away but water availability in India’s 91 reservoirs is at its lowest in a decade, with stocks at a paltry 29% of their total storage capacity, according to the Central Water Commission. Some 85% of the country’s drinking water comes from aquifers, but their levels are falling, according to WaterAid.”

    We are being told that water levels in the Ganges have declined by a fourth. Being located on the banks of one of the world’s largest rivers, we never thought we would face a scarcity of water. The unthinkable is happening.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-35888535

    Reply
  106. Abel Adamski

     /  March 28, 2016

    As bad as the fires are, there will be recovery, however bad news on the coral reefs for which recovery is questionable at this level of destruction
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-28/great-barrier-reef-coral-bleaching-95-per-cent-north-section/7279338

    An aerial survey of the northern Great Barrier Reef has shown that 95 per cent of the reefs are now severely bleached — far worse than previously thought.
    Key points:

    95 per cent of the Great Barrier Reef’s northern reefs rated as severely bleached
    Only 4 out of 520 reefs surveyed were found to be unaffected by bleaching
    Third global coral bleaching event since 1998

    Professor Terry Hughes, a coral reef expert based at James Cook University in Townsville who led the survey team, said the situation is now critical.

    “This will change the Great Barrier Reef forever,” Professor Hughes told 7.30.

    “We’re seeing huge levels of bleaching in the northern thousand-kilometre stretch of the Great Barrier Reef.”

    Of the 520 reefs he surveyed, only four showed no evidence of bleaching.

    From Cairns to the Torres Strait, the once colourful ribbons of reef are a ghostly white.

    “It’s too early to tell precisely how many of the bleached coral will die, but judging from the extreme level even the most robust corals are snow white, I’d expect to see about half of those corals die in the coming month or so,” Professor Hughes said.

    This is the third global coral bleaching since 1998, and scientists have found no evidence of these disasters before the late 20th century.

    “We have coral cores that provide 400 years of annual growth,” explains Dr Neal Cantin from the Australian Institute of Marine Science.

    “We don’t see the signatures of bleaching in reduced growth following a bleaching event until the recent 1998/2000 events.”

    Reply
    • ” This is the third global coral bleaching since 1998, and scientists have found no evidence of these disasters before the late 20th century.”

      – I think a major ‘tipping point’ was reached in 1997-98. That dating has come up quite a bit in various studied circumstances of major changes..
      Of course, the driving forces had to have been put into play somewhat earlier.

      OUT

      Reply
  107. Climate Change: Greenland Melting Tied to Shrinking Arctic Sea Ice

    “I think this study does a good job of pinning down the fact that the [Arctic sea] ice is disappearing for a whole bunch of reasons – and that is causing the surface of Greenland’s melt area to increase,” Francis said.

    http://news.rutgers.edu/news/climate-change-greenland-melting-tied-shrinking-arctic-sea-ice/20160327#.VvjEkjEcYoJ

    Reply
  108. Jeremy

     /  March 28, 2016

    We got whacked in the UK last night!

    “Storm Katie has battered large parts of England, leaving flights cancelled, property damaged and thousands of people without power.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-35909651

    Reply
  109. Jeremy

     /  March 28, 2016

    More …

    “Gusts of up to 105mph have hit parts of Britain as Storm Katie wreaked havoc on Easter Monday, with the winds and heavy rain disrupting rail, road, air and sea networks in England and Wales. Tens of thousands of households have also been left without electricity.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/mar/28/storm-katie-flight-diversions-wind-rain-batter-southern-england-and-wales

    Reply
    • oint Cyclone Center ‏@JointCyclone 2h2 hours ago

      The aftermath of #HurricaneKatie had been affect to some fallen trees down across the Southern UK with 105mph winds

      Reply
  110. Abel Adamski

     /  March 28, 2016

    Forgive me Robert , a little OT, but these are the people that make up Alec and the think tanks and the puppet string pullers and funders

    http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2016/3/25/markets/how-executive-ignorance-brought-global-financial-system-its-knees

    Among the nearly 250 cubic feet of paper documents and 13 terabytes of electronic records recently released from the US government’s 2010 Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission — including previously confidential interviews with key financial players from Warren Buffett to Alan Greenspan — one of the most striking testimonies comes from a relative outsider.

    US author Michael Lewis, who had just written The Big Short, his account of the bursting of the housing and credit bubbles, was asked by the FCIC for advice on how to run congressional hearings into the 2008 crash, according to a summary of his March, 2010 interview.

    Talking to CEOs is “a next-to-totally-useless activity,” he told them. “To tell the story you have to talk to the mid-level people who actually understood the business.”

    Reply
    • “To tell the story you have to talk to the mid-level people who actually understood the business.”
      – Made me think of shipping clerk Edmund Morel who watched over King Leopold’s cruel business in the Congo.

      – noglory.org/index.php/articles/235-how-anti-slavery-hero-became-public-enemy-

      ‘ … While working as a shipping clerk in Liverpool and Belgium, he studied the cargoes coming in and out of Antwerp and had deduced that something terrible was happening in the Congo, from which somebody else was skimming vast profits. His campaign to expose slavery and corruption in the land that Joseph Conrad called the Heart of Darkness earned ED Morel international renown and the respect of the British authorities.’

      Reply
      • – Ps During WW I (The Great war), EM became “public enemy no.1 “.

        How anti-slavery hero ED Morel became public enemy no.1 in the first world war

        No Glory 25 June 2014 Featured Articles
        The acclaim ED morel received for exposing slavery and corruption in the Congo changed when in 1914 he became Britain’s most effective anti-war campaigner

        – noglory.org/index.php/articles/235-how-anti-slavery-hero-became-public-enemy-

        Reply
      • Tsar Nicholas

         /  March 29, 2016

        I would recommend “King Leopold’s Ghost” by Adam Hochschild – a great book.

        Reply
  111. Colorado Bob

     /  March 28, 2016

    U.S. Warm Records are Crushing Cold Records This Year By Over 7 to 1

    https://www.wunderground.com/news/warm-records-top-cold-records-march2016

    Reply
  112. Great Barrier Reef bleaching worse than first thought

    “An aerial survey of the northern Great Barrier Reef has shown that 95 per cent of the reefs are now severely bleached – far worse than previously thought.

    Professor Terry Hughes, a coral reef expert based at James Cook University in Townsville who led the survey team, said the situation is now critical.

    “This will change for Great Barrier Reef forever,” Professor Hughes

    Professor Justin Marshall, a reef scientist from the University of Queensland, said the reason for these bleaching events was clear.

    “What we’re seeing now is unequivocally to do with climate change,” he told 7.30.”

    http://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2016/03/28/devastating-great-barrier-reef-bleaching-worse-first-thought/

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 28, 2016

      That’s just devastating. Considering a bleaching event never occurred before 1998, and this is the third since then, and the strongest one yet, it’s likely we are witnessing the extinction of many species of coral. The seas will be remarkably different in another generation or so, just as they are a far cry from what they were when my parents were born.

      Reply
  113. Colorado Bob

     /  March 28, 2016

    The Wall Street Journal, Climate Change Denial and the Galileo Gambit

    Michael Mann

    Fossil fuel companies have been misleading the public and policymakers about the risks of their products for decades. These corporations should obviously be held accountable.

    It’s odd that we aren’t able to discuss this straightforwardly. After all, accountability is common for other industries. When companies mislead the public about the health effects of the drugs they market, for instance, we hold them accountable.

    Link

    Reply
  114. Robert . . . anyone . . is this recent Jason Box 2 minute clip an explanation for the severity of the U.K. storms in Jeremy’s posts above?

    Reply
  115. Jacque

     /  March 28, 2016

    KANSAS UPDATE: Firefighters making headway in trying to snuff the biggest wildfire in Kansas history may not get much help from the weather in coming days.

    Forestry officials in Kansas and Oklahoma say the fires that have scorched 620 square miles in the two states are 45 percent contained. That includes the roughly one-third of the fire in hardest-hit Barber County in south-central Kansas.

    But the National Weather Service says shifting, stiffer winds are looming, potentially reigniting hot spots or extending flames beyond the fire line.

    Around Barber County, winds on Monday could gust to 15 to 25 mph, then increase to 30 to 45 mph the next day. Any chance of precipitation in that area could come Tuesday night, but that moisture is expected to be very isolated.

    A sobering image of a farmer in Kansas plowing a firebreak: http://media.graytvinc.com/images/barber+wildfire.jpg

    Reply
    • Anybody else out there in Scribbler land tired of frequent, seemingly incessant high winds?

      It used to be that plans would be altered due to excessive snow, rain, ice etc. (I’m in the Midwest) Now it seems there isn’t a week that goes by without wind warnings——it’s downright dangerous to be in the vicinity of trees!
      The forests are suffering from multiple assaults due to AGW which include windstorms. In Wisconsin (where I am now) the forests look apocalyptic. Painful to see.

      p.s. thanks dnem—-pretty obvious, I know! Nice to hear from Jason Box even if it’s more bad news.

      Reply
    • That image left me breathless with stomach bottoming out . . . . too much to bear in conjunction with the latest on the coral bleaching event (among countless other realities). Turning away . . . . escaping through work/poetry/music/fiction/activism . . . . may assuage the difficult feelings ever so slightly . . . . but the terror/sadness/anger/confusion is always there, muddled together— just under the surface of phantom composure.

      Reply
      • June

         /  March 28, 2016

        Totally agree, Caroline. Because of fossil fuel industry influence most people just don’t get the concept of warming already in the pipeline, which gets worse every year we delay action. And the uncertainty of the timing and strength of feedbacks creates tremendous anxiety. I’m grateful for the presence of the Scribbler community!

        Reply
  116. Colorado Bob

     /  March 28, 2016

    Longest Coral Bleaching Event on Record Continues to Hammer Reefs
    By: Bob Henson

    Even as the El Niño of 2015-16 winds down, coral reefs remain threatened by the longest episode of global-scale bleaching on record. NOAA announced in October 2015 that the third global bleaching event had begun, with reefs from the Florida Keys to Fiji suffering widespread damage over the past year. In February, NOAA scientists announced that the bleaching event was the longest on record. The event is a result of widespread ocean warming related to long-term climate change as well as regional warmings triggered by El Niño, which began in early 2015. The prolonged nature of the bleaching event is especially worrisome because it allows for multiple years of damage during seasonal peaks in upper-ocean temperature, giving the reefs less time to recover. “We may be looking at a 2- to 2½-year-long event,” said Mark Eakin, coordinator of NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch program. “Some areas have already seen bleaching two years in a row.”

    Link

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 28, 2016

      This doesn’t concern bleaching, but one thing I noticed in the sea-surface temp anomaly 2016 vs 98 image was the cool pool south of Greenland. It was completely absent in 98.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 29, 2016

        Yes as has been said before, the old norms are history, we face constant change, this is one of many aspects sneaking up on us and we have to work out the consequences from first principles and hurried research.

        Expect the unexpected, a difficult state of mind for Conservative mind sets i.e constant accelerated change and variabilty, but one we must handle rather than try to sweep under the carpet

        Reply
  117. “Thresholds and Closing Windows: Risks of Irreversible Climate Change,”

    A recent report by the International Cryosphere Initiative

    http://iccinet.org/thresholds

    Reply
  118. Reply
  119. Andy in SD

     /  March 28, 2016

    Wow,

    check out the cloud trails in this satellite image from yesterday.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8/2016-03-27/7-N61.5976-W57.15677

    Reply
    • – Spooky cloud streamers like teeth in a comb.

      – A reminder: a cloudy Arctic, Greenland, and polar regions is also of concern:

      Clouds as a night-time warmer

      This week, a study led by the University of Leuven in Belgium was published in Nature Communications that suggests that clouds are playing a greater role in this whole process than previously thought. The study concludes that clouds could be enhancing meltwater runoff by about a third relative to clear skies. The scientists used a combination of satellite observations, ground observations, climate model data and snow model simulations.

      The impact is not just because the radiative effect of the clouds directly increases surface melt, but because the clouds actually reduce meltwater refreezing at night. They trap heat like a kind of blanket.
      http://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/2016/01/18/ice-blog-cloudy-skies-speed-up-greenland-melt/

      Reply
      • Cloudy with a Chance of Warming

        Clouds can increase warming in the changing Arctic region…

        “As the Arctic atmosphere warms and moistens, it better insulates the surface. While we expected this to reduce the insulating influence of clouds, we found that Arctic clouds forming in these conditions appear to further warm the surface, especially in the fall and winter,”…

        Clouds are a complicated character in the climate change story: Sometimes they cool the planet’s surface by reflecting sunlight, sometimes they insulate it and keep it warm.
        https://cires.colorado.edu/news/press/warmingclouds/

        Reply
  120. Reply
  121. – USA – USGS – Earthquakes Natural and Otherwise

    First-Ever Maps to Show Induced and Natural Earthquake Hazards — Press Conference

    On March 28, USGS scientists will release a report and the first-ever maps showing potential ground-shaking hazards from both human-induced and natural earthquakes. In the past, USGS maps only identified natural earthquake hazards.

    This will also be the first one-year outlook for the nation’s earthquake hazards, and is a supplement to existing USGS assessments that forecast earthquake shaking over 50 years.
    http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=4486&from=rss#.Vvl7S3pWiSq

    Reply
    • – USA – WaPo

      7 million Americans at risk of man-made earthquakes, USGS says


      Some 7 million people live in places vulnerable to these induced tremors, the USGS concluded. The list of places at highest risk of man-made earthquakes includes Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Ohio and Alabama. Most of these earthquakes are relatively small, in the range of magnitude 3, but some have been more powerful, including a magnitude 5.6 earthquake in 2011 in Oklahoma that was linked to wastewater injection. Scientists said Monday they do not know if there is an upper limit on the magnitude of induced earthquakes and that this is an area of active research.

      The most dramatic feature on the map is the dark red blob in north-central Oklahoma, which has already had a magnitude 5.1 earthquake this year.

      “My first thought was actually holy crap, Oklahoma is redder than California,” USGS geologist Susan Hough said in an email to The Post after she saw her agency’s map Monday for the first time.

      Reply
  122. – Dahr Jamail — a fan of Robert, has a new article out:

    Climate Disruption in Overdrive: Submerged Cities and Melting That “Feeds on Itself”

    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/35398-climate-disruption-in-overdrive-submerged-cities-and-melting-that-feeds-on-itself

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 28, 2016

      Good article. Among the many disturbing numbers in there is this one, which particularly jumped out at me.

      Pieter Tans, lead scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network, said the new record accompanied four straight years of increases of over 2 parts per million in the atmosphere. Of this, Trans said, “We’ve never seen that. That’s unprecedented.”

      So at a time when we need to be reducing emissions a quickly as humanly possible, atmospheric CO2 is increasing faster than ever before.

      Reply
  123. The Arctic sets yet another record low maximum extent

    “Arctic sea ice was at a record low maximum extent for the second straight year, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA.

    “I’ve never seen such a warm, crazy winter in the Arctic,” said NSIDC director Mark Serreze. “The heat was relentless.” Air temperatures over the Arctic Ocean for the months of December, January and February were 2 to 6 degrees Celsius (4 to 11 degrees Fahrenheit) above average in nearly every region.”

    https://nsidc.org/news/newsroom/arctic-sets-yet-another-record-low-maximum-extent

    Reply
  124. Syd Bridges

     /  March 28, 2016

    It looks as though El Nino is transitioning from strong to moderate at last, as the Nino 3.4 region is now showing as 1.5 deg C.

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/lanina/enso_evolution-status-fcsts-web.pdf

    But I suspect the effects of all that heat it has dumped into the atmosphere and the Arctic will hang around and probably haunt us for several months to come.

    Reply
  125. June

     /  March 28, 2016

    “This week, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre — a government-funded program that creates dietary guidelines — issued a recommendation that people eat no more than two servings of meat per week.

    …Both the Netherlands and the U.K. are years behind Sweden, however, in including sustainability concerns in their dietary guidelines. In 2009, Sweden became the first country to recommend that residents take environmental concerns into account when making food choices.

    …Still, both environmental groups and the scientific community seem to be ramping up the pressure on meat-heavy diets. In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at Oxford University found that the world could cut greenhouse gas emissions by 29 percent, and save 5.1 million lives annually, if meat consumption globally were reduced by half by the end of the century.”

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/25/3763481/netherlands-cut-meat-consumption-climate/

    The article notes that in the US, the Meat Industry quashed a recommendation by the scientific advisory committee to take sustainability into account when developing dietary guidelines.

    Reply
  126. June

     /  March 28, 2016

    The past, present and future of African dust

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160323142521.htm

    “The scientists have also developed a new predictive model showing that emissions of Saharan dust will decline over the next hundred years.

    Although this could have beneficial effects on the health of human populations, it might also increase warming of the tropical North Atlantic, making it more suitable for hurricane formation and growth.

    Reply
  127. Colorado Bob

     /  March 28, 2016

    Is global warming causing marine diseases to spread?

    Global climate change is altering the world’s oceans in many ways. Some impacts have received wide coverage, such as shrinking Arctic sea ice, rising sea levels and ocean warming. However, as the oceans warm, marine scientists are observing other forms of damage.

    My research focuses on diseases in marine ecosystems. Humans, animals and plants are all susceptible to diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi. Marine diseases, however, are an emerging field.

    Warming waters promote marine diseases

    Recent studies show that for some marine species diseases are spreading and increasing. Climate change may also promote the spread of infectious agents in oceans. Notably, warming water temperatures can expand these agents’ ranges and introduce diseases to areas where they were previously unknown.

    Many diseases of marine species are secondary opportunist infections that take advantage when a host organism is stressed by other conditions, such as changes in pH, salinity or temperature. A bacterium that is dormant (and therefore noninfective) at a certain temperature may thrive at a slightly higher temperature.

    Reply
  128. Zack Labe ‏@ZLabe 2h2 hours ago

    High SSTA especially in the Greenland, Barents, & Norwegian Seas are also contributing to record low sea ice loss

    Reply
  129. Reply
    • Alaska News – March 28, 2016
      Volcanic eruption covers Alaska village in ash, launches lava into sky

      Pavlof Volcano, on the remote Alaska Peninsula 600 miles southwest of Anchorage, is sending up a huge column of ash that has covered the tiny village of Nelson Lagoon with a blanket of black grit and canceled some flights across the state.

      The Pavlof eruption began at 4 p.m. Sunday and is generating seismic tremors at very high levels, lightning and a 400-mile-long ash plume to the northeast rising 37,000 feet, according to a Monday morning update on the Alaska Volcano Observatory’s website.

      adn.com/article/20160328/lava-show-pavlof-eruption-covering-alaska-village

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 28, 2016

        The only “benefit” will be the cooling effect of that ash cloud and aerosols, especially over the Arctic region, may reduce forest fire severity even if the lightning strikes may trigger some or many

        Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  March 28, 2016

        Top left of that cloud, is that Thor waking from a nap. ???

        Reply
      • Reply
      • – I think Thor was tapping me on the shoulder a week ago…

        dtlange / March 21, 2016

        – 0320 01:35 UTC Some of today’s headlines of Pacific Rim earthquakes:

        Magnitude 4.6 earthquake shakes Big Island of Hawaiʻi
        Earthquake: 3.3 quake strikes near Sonoma, Calif.
        Russia earthquake: Strong tremor strikes off Kamchatka Peninsula
        – 0318
        Earthquake Near Port Hardy, B.C. Registers 5.2 Magnitude

        Reply
  130. Ryan in New England

     /  March 28, 2016

    The Arctic set a record low sea ice maximum this Winter.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/28/arctic-sea-ice-record-low-winter

    Reply
  131. Reply
  132. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    Communication is the key, one that Trump has mastered as highlighted in Peter’s latest post. (saving my one link for the main point)

    The National assessment is focussing on just that communication in a manner officials and the public can relate to

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-to-talk-global-warming-in-plain-english/

    “It’s time, many of its past authors say, to consider shifting the assessment away from being a document that tells people what scientists do and do not know about climate change and its risks, and toward something more interactive. Something, many scientists said last week, that explicitly lays out how much time people have to plan, prepare and even pay for the inevitable adaptation.

    “We could make the goal that it should change the public discourse,” said Susanne Moser, a California-based scientist who worked on the coastal chapter of the last assessment and who studies ways of helping people understand the challenges and risks of climate change. “Do not tell me just how high the sea-level rise is going to get. Tell me how much time I have to solve a very tough problem.”

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  March 29, 2016

      Peter’s article on communication. Excellent, but no longer last article

      http://climatecrocks.com/2016/03/28/john-oliver-on-internet-conspiracy-videos/

      ““An emotional speaker always makes his audience feel with him, even when there is nothing in his arguments; which is why many speakers try to overwhelm their audience by mere noise.” — Aristotle, Rhetoric.

      Donald Trump is a master of classical rhetoric — what Plato called “the art of winning the soul by discourse.”

      Did you know that there is a rhetorical device, a figure of speech, that allows you to lie and exaggerate and say the most absurd things — “Mexico must pay for the wall” or “the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese” — while actually making lots of people believe you are a genuine and truthful person? Donald Trump does.

      Yes, while Donald Trump may seem to be a clown or buffoon, he is in fact one of the most effective practitioners of persuasive rhetoric the political world has seen in a long time. If he wins the GOP nomination it will be in large part because of his mastery of rhetoric.”

      Reply
  133. Chuck Hughes

     /  March 29, 2016

    Professor Kevin Anderson interviewed. As an aid to navigation, the first 10 minutes or so deal with Kevin’s observations on Ireland’s response to climate change. The next five minutes deal with the aftermath of the Paris Agreement, then he moves to address the growth paradox; then, he deals with his own decision not to fly. From there, he deals with climate sensitivity and extreme events. Next, he deals with the relative merits of carbon taxes versus rationing. From here, he examines the fitness for purpose of the neoliberal economic and political model. He also discusses the ‘new normal’ of life in a climate-changed world, where human impacts have already wrought disastrous changes to much of the natural world upon which we depend. The interview concludes by placing a moral framework on humanity’s relationship with the world. He remains deeply concerned that society, despite the overwhelming evidence of the need to act, that “we will choose to fail”.

    March 21, 2016

    http://www.thinkorswim.ie/choosing-to-fail-prof-kevin-anderson-interviewed/

    Reply
  134. Reply
  135. Jeremy

     /  March 29, 2016

    Advancing scientific knowledge – Japan’s Institute of Cetacean Research – is that a joke?

    “Japan’s whaling fleet has returned with more than 300 whales harvested from Antarctic waters, according to the country’s Fisheries Agency.

    A four-ship fleet from Japan’s Institute of Cetacean Research traveled to the Antarctic Ocean and killed 333 minke whales. Some 230 were female; about 90% of these were pregnant, according to the report.”

    http://edition.cnn.com/2016/03/24/world/japan-minke-whale-333-irpt/index.html

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  March 31, 2016

      As someone said on Twitter you may as well call your local butcher the Institute of Pork and Beef Research.

      Reply
  136. Colorado Bob

     /  March 29, 2016

    DTL –

    Atmospheric nitrogen leads to loss of plant diversity in sites across US

    Rising levels of atmospheric nitrogen pollution threaten plant diversity at nearly one-quarter of sites across a widespread portion of the U.S., according a new study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers.

    The findings, which were published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, are the first to examine ecosystem-specific vulnerabilities to atmospheric nitrogen pollution on a continental scale.

    Nitrogen plays an important role in biological processes and makes up a key element of fertilizer, but previous research has shown that it is possible for plants to get too much of a good thing. Global emissions of nitrogen to the atmosphere have tripled in the last century due to agriculture and industry, and elevated levels of nitrogen have been shown to cause environmental damage, including decreased plant species richness in experimental plots.

    The study examined more than 15,000 forest, woodland, shrubland and grassland sites across the country, measuring the threshold at which nitrogen inputs become harmful to plants while also taking other environmental factors such as climate and soil conditions into account.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-atmospheric-nitrogen-loss-diversity-sites.html#jCp

    Reply
    • Tom

       /  March 29, 2016

      Ozone too, CO Bob, as per Wit’s End blog.

      http://witsendnj.blogspot.com/p/basic-premise.html

      Reply
      • – Yeah, Tom. I know Wits End.
        Thanks

        The best summation of the effects of ozone is that it destroys biotic tissue. You know, all things biotic like trees, plants and children.
        Peace

        Reply
    • – Many thanks for the link, Bob.
      Glad to see the effort to study the effects of N as it so prevalent in some form or another in all FF emissions that encircle the globe. And it is already the major component of the atmosphere at about 78%. And that plants breathe, or respirate, the contents of this same atmosphere. Just as we do.
      Urban plants get a major dose of everything that falls out of the air.

      Reply
  137. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    Interesting article on climate and tea
    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/climate-change-altering-tea-industry-19071

    Comments are also good

    Reply
  138. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    An overall view of the Maple Syrup industry and Climate Change
    http://news.discovery.com/earth/climate-change-is-coming-for-your-maple-syrup-160328.htm

    Reply
  139. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    Education, children and climate change
    https://www.romper.com/p/how-to-explain-climate-change-to-your-kids-because-its-become-a-parenting-necessity-7894

    As the earth continues to warm and the polar ice caps continue to melt, the question of how to explain climate change to your kids has become a real parenting issue. On the one hand, being real about climate change is an important aspect of raising a responsible, knowledgable citizen of the world. On the other hand, though, no parent wants to scare their child with doomsday scenarios.

    It’s important that information about climate change comes from you, the parent, because—much as with that other big talk—if they don’t hear it from you, you can only guess what they’ll hear in the schoolyard. Yes, your precious child will likely attend school with children who have been told by their parents that climate change isn’t real. After all, according to recent numbers from a University of Michigan study, 16 percent of Americans don’t believe in climate change. (This is actually an all-time low, though, so the good news is that more and more Americans are taking climate change seriously.)

    Reply
  140. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    CB and DT
    http://e360.yale.edu/feature/is_climate_change_putting_world_microbiomes_at_risk/2977/

    In 1994, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory moved soil from moist, high-altitude sites to warmer and drier places lower in altitude, and vice versa. In 2011, they returned to the sites and looked again at the soil microbes and found that they had done little to adapt functionally to their new home. That’s a bad sign, experts say, for a world convulsed by a changing climate.

    “These microbes have somehow lost the capacity to adapt to the new conditions,” said Vanessa Bailey, one of the authors of the study, published this month in PLOS One. That not what scientists anticipated, and it “calls into question the resilience of the overall environment to climate change,” she said. “Soil is the major buffer for environmental changes, and the microbial community is the basis for that resilience.”

    Yet it is far more important, for microbes run the world. They are key players that perpetuate life on the planet, provide numerous ecosystem services, and serve as a major bulwark against environmental changes.

    As vital as they are, we are only beginning to understand microbes and the role they play in the world’s ecosystems. The problem is that these fungi, archaea, and bacteria are so small that in a gram of soil (about a teaspoon), there are a billion or so, with many thousands of species. Perhaps 10 percent of the species are known. The Lilliputian communities that these microorganisms create are enormously complex, and their functions difficult to tease out. But in the last decade, new tools have been developed that have begun to change the research game.

    “Soil was a black box,” said Janet Jansson, chief scientist for Biology Earth and Biological Sciences at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and president of the International Society for Microbial Ecology. “I have been working in microbial ecology for decades, and it has been difficult, if not impossible, to study them. Now we have these new molecular processes, and suddenly the whole field is exploding.”

    There is a Manhattan Project-like urgency to sussing out these secrets. A paper in the journal Science last year called for a Unified Microbiome Initiative, and experts have held a series of meetings about it at the White House. The Earth Microbiome Project is a massive global effort to collect samples of microbial communities from thousands of ecosystems around the world. Meanwhile, the Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative got underway in 2011 — one-third of the world’s biodiversity lives beneath our feet — and it’s focused on preserving the services that healthy soil ecosystems provide, such as a place for plants to grow, the breakdown of waste, and the natural filtration of water. The TerraGenome Project is sequencing the metagenome of soil microbes.

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  March 29, 2016

      An absolutely must read article.

      Reply
      • – Very good. Thanks
        All that springs forth from the microbial zone feeds and sustains us and other terrestrial life forms.
        Above he the microbes are the insect populations that chew and excrete all manner of nutrients. They add a buffering and insulating layer of leaf litter etc to the microbes that maintain nutrient cycles. And much more.
        So glad of the attention by the study. I hope it gains traction.

        Reply
  141. wili

     /  March 29, 2016

    This El Nino has contributed to massive, widespread bleaching of the far northern Great Barrier reef.

    http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2015/s4432792.htm

    “Exclusive footage of the Great Barrier Reef shows what could be the most severe and extensive coral bleaching on record.

    A leading coral researcher has just returned from a four-day aerial survey of reefs off Australia’s far north coast, and of the 520 reefs his team flew over, all but four were damaged.

    The extreme bleaching event is likely to kill some of the world’s most pristine coral, as Peter McCutcheon reports.

    TERRY HUGHES, JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY: This will change the Great Barrier Reef forever. We’re seeing huge levels of bleaching in the northern 1,000-kilometre stretch of the Great Barrier Reef.

    PETER MCCUTCHEON, REPORTER: The sheer scale of coral bleaching is revealed in footage shot for a scientific survey last week. For over 1,000 kilometres from Cairns to the Torres Strait, the once-colourful ribbons of reef are a ghostly white. Leading this expedition is one of Australia’s most eminent coral scientists, Professor Terry Hughes.

    TERRY HUGHES: For me personally, it was devastating to look at out of the chopper window and see reef after reef destroyed by bleaching. But really my emotion is not so much sadness as anger. I’m really angry that the Government isn’t listening to the evidence that we’re providing them since 1998.

    PETER MCCUTCHEON: Terry Hughes and his team rated a staggering 95 per cent of the reefs they flew over in the most severely bleached categories. That’s considerably more severe than past bleaching events, where the figure was under 20 per cent.

    TERRY HUGHES: It’s too early yet to tell precisely how many of the bleached corals will die, but judging from the extreme level of bleaching, even the most robust corals are snow white. I’d expect to see about half of those corals die in the coming month or so. We’re already seeing mortality beginning in our underwater surveys near Cairns and Port Douglas.

    PETER MCCUTCHEON: Coral bleaching is caused by abnormally high sea temperatures that kill the tiny marine algae essential to coral health.”

    Thanks to Stephen at neven’s forum for this link and text.

    Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  March 29, 2016

      Aerial surveys of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef have revealed the worst bleaching on record in the icon’s pristine north, scientists said Tuesday, with few corals escaping damage. Researchers said the view was devastating after surveying some 520 reefs via plane and helicopter between Cairns and the Torres Strait in the north of Queensland state. “This will change the Great Barrier Reef forever,” Terry Hughes, an expert on coral reefs from James Cook University, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. “We’re seeing huge levels of bleaching in the northern thousand kilometre stretch of the Great Barrier Reef.” Just over a week ago, the Australian government revealed bleaching at the World Heritage-listed site was “severe” but noted that the southern area had escaped the worst.

      Bleaching occurs when abnormal environmental conditions, such as warmer sea temperatures, cause corals to expel tiny photosynthetic algae, draining them of their colour. Hughes, convener of Australia’s National Coral Bleaching Taskforce, agreed in a statement that the southern reef had “dodged a bullet due to cloudy weather that cooled the water temperatures down”. But he said in the far north – the most remote and pristine areas – almost without exception, every reef showed consistently high levels of bleaching. “We flew for 4,000 kilometres in the most pristine parts of the Great Barrier Reef and saw only four reefs that had no bleaching,” he said. “The severity is much greater than in earlier bleaching events in 2002 or 1998.” Fellow James Cook University expert James Kerry said more surveys were to follow, but the damage seen from the air in the north was severe, often falling into the highest category of level four, meaning 60% of the coral was bleached.

      http://finance.yahoo.com/news/worst-bleaching-record-great-barrier-reef-scientists-021438874.html

      Reply
  142. NCAR/UCAR AtmosNews: Ocean temps predict U.S. heat waves 50 days out, study finds

    BOULDER — The formation of a distinct pattern of sea surface temperatures in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean can predict an increased chance of summertime heat waves in the eastern half of the United States up to 50 days in advance, according to a new study led by a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

    The pattern is a contrast of warmer-than-average water butting up against cooler-than-average seas. When it appears, the odds that extreme heat will strike during a particular week—or even on a particular day—can more than triple, depending on how well-formed the pattern is.

    The research is being published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

    Reply
  143. A indigenous tribe in Peru (the Wampis) is trying to expel Petroperu from their lands after the third massive oil spill in their pipeline (in this year). Oil spills there are flowing to the Morona river, which is used for drinking water and fishing by the indian communities. Petroperu is a state owed petrol industry, and the Wampis people fight to get ready of it will be big.

    This time, I did found an article in English, not Portuguese:
    http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_round_up/2987336/peru_amazon_tribe_orders_oil_company_out_after_devastating_spills.html

    Reply
  144. Greg

     /  March 29, 2016

    China– In 2012, the last of the turbines in the Three Gorges Dam began generating electricity at rated power. Construction of the 22.5-gigawatt dam — again, the biggest power station anywhere the world — took 18 years. It exacted a large social and environmental toll: more than 1 million people were displaced and ecosystems were destroyed.

    Now consider that by the end of 2016, China will have installed one Three Gorges Dam worth of low-cost, low-impact wind energy every year for the past three years.

    http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/china-is-adding-a-three-gorges-dam-worth-of-wind-every-year

    Reply
  145. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    Hey man I dig the music we often have, but don’t forget the rap
    https://www.inverse.com/article/13223-baba-brinkman-unleashes-rap-s-fury-on-climate-change-deniers

    For Baba Brinkman, the world’s only peer-reviewed rapper, the term “climate change sounds so benign.” The world is not facing a smooth transition to warmer, longer summers. We’re looking at the destruction of our planet as we know it. This is climate chaos.

    And maybe if we can’t convey the drama of the situation in a name, we need a whole set of new tactics. Baba’s suggestion: How about rap? His Rap Guide to Climate Chaos just hit its funding goal on Indiegogo. And coming off performances at those 2015 UN climate talks in Paris, Baba is ready to spread the gospel of climatology and excite a global response.

    With songs like “Laudato Si,” based on Pope Francis’ encyclical on our environmental crisis, and “Make It Hot,” Baba’s unrelenting flow focusses on understanding and criticizing our current inaction.

    I ain’t got not spare change to donate to carbon offsetting.

    I don’t even want to calculate my footprint, I find it upsetting.

    Polemics on climate change don’t have to come in verse, but Baba does more than just use his flow to entertain supporters and berate deniers. He channels the energy and aggression of rap to confront the comfortable: Those who say they can’t make a difference and those who think they do enough. Art has long been a tool to expose social hypocrisy, and the Rap Guide to Climate Chaos has a little something for everybody.

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 29, 2016

      Love him! Thanks. Spot on lyrics and delivery. He will move many many souls that would not have been moved otherwise. Try to rap this: “I’m willing to pay a tax, a fee that’s calculated against my carbon impacts/ and globally harmonized to switch incentives around/ and make sure most of the carbon stores safely under the ground/ but I’m not going to pay it unless you all pay it too/ that way I can be sure you’ll be sure to do what you say you’ll do/ How about everyone has to pay it, no freeriders allowed/ No international pact with India and China left out/ You can either invest it in social programs or dividend it back to me/ but either way I won’t be happy til the day they’re carbon taxing me/ ’cause then I can make it hot without ever feelin’ a chill/ I’m just sick of that feelin’ of guilt killin’ my high when I’m feelin’ a thrill.”

      Reply
  146. Abel Adamski

     /  March 29, 2016

    The plants are not going to deliver the goods as far as moderating heat waves

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep23418

    Impact of the representation of stomatal conductance on model projections of heatwave intensity

    We note that our revised parameterization of gs had no impact on the frequency or duration of heatwaves, since these are primarily driven by larger-scale synoptic-scale processes such as blocking highs57 and changing patterns of circulation58. However, our results do show that gs strongly affects the intensity of heatwaves over Eurasia and is therefore further evidence that land-atmosphere interactions are an important driver of extreme temperature events.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 29, 2016

      “gs” apparently means “stomatal conductance” for those who were wondering.

      Reply
  147. Greg

     /  March 29, 2016

    Public survey data shows that the public thinks of TV weathercasters as a trusted source of information about global warming. [Weathercasters] have incredible access to the public, unlike climate scientists. Some 99 percent of U.S. weathercasters — those who communicate weather forecasts on TV or radio, but who aren’t always trained meteorologists — accept the fact that climate change is happening, according to preliminary findings from a George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication study released Thursday.The study, which has yet to go through the peer review process, comes days after George Mason University released a similar survey that shows that some 96 percent of American Meteorological Society members think climate change is real.The belief system is “moving in the right direction, and it seems to be moving relatively quickly,” The surveys are good news, especially for public education on climate change.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/25/3763395/most-weathercasters-meteorologists-think-climate-change-is-real/

    Reply

  148. Massachusetts joins in investigating Exxon on climate

    Massachusetts is joining the multi-state effort to investigate whether Exxon Mobil Corp. lied to the public and investors about what it knew about climate change.

    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced the probe Tuesday in New York City at a meeting with 20 other Democratic attorneys general or their staff who together agreed to cooperate on climate change related matters.
    http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/274566-massachusetts-joins-in-investigating-exxon-on-climate

    Reply
  149. Jeremy

     /  March 29, 2016

    “Last year was a record year for the solar industry and the momentum is set to continue. In 2016, the EIA expects the U.S. electricity market to see 26 gigawatts of new capacity installed. Utility-scale solar is expected to capture 9.5 GW of that total, or more than one-third. If that comes to pass, it would be triple the rate of installations of utility-scale solar compared to 2015, and would also equate to more than the combined total of installations from 2013 to 2015.”

    http://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Solar-Energy/Even-Utilities-Are-Starting-To-Get-Behind-Community-Solar.html

    Reply
  150. – Anthropogenic Insult of the Day: An unjust cruelty that is beyond the scope of morality and decency. How do we do it?! This has perplexed me for years.

    ‘Even before they start breathing, babies can be harmed by air pollution, scientists say’

    Air pollution in the U.S. may be causing thousands of premature births each year, a new study suggests — costing the nation billions of dollars along the way. The study, published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, lends support to a growing body of research pointing to the grim health consequences of air pollution all over the world and its spectacular economic burdens.

    The new study focuses on a type of pollution known as fine particulate matter — tiny particles, less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, that can be emitted by traffic, factories and other industrial activities.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/03/29/even-before-they-start-breathing-babies-are-harmed-by-air-pollution-scientists-say/

    Reply
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  152. Reply
  153. dnem

     /  March 29, 2016

    Just another thumbs up for the Kevin Anderson interview that Chuck Hughes linked to above. Really an excellent, wide-ranging, very integrative discussion. Very worthwhile and worth sharing with open-minded but unaware friends and family.

    http://www.thinkorswim.ie/choosing-to-fail-prof-kevin-anderson-interviewed/

    Reply
  154. Colorado Bob

     /  March 29, 2016

    The top attorneys from Massachusetts and the U.S. Virgin Islands said on Tuesday they will investigate whether Exxon Mobil Corp (XOM.N) misled investors and the public about the risks of climate change.

    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and Virgin Islands Attorney General Claude Earl Walker announced their probes at a news conference in New York, flanked by New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and top attorneys from other states.

    They said their probes into Exxon will be similar to ones launched by New York and California.

    Link

    Reply
  155. Jeremy

     /  March 29, 2016

    “In a move many are hailing as a “turning point” in the climate fight, 20 state Attorneys General on Tuesday launched an unprecedented, multi-state effort to investigate and prosecute the “high-funded and morally vacant forces” that have stymied attempts to combat global warming—starting with holding ExxonMobil and other industry giants accountable for fraud and suppression of key climate science.”

    http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/03/29/turning-point-climate-fight-ags-unite-target-exxon-crimes

    Reply
  156. Ryan in New England

     /  March 29, 2016

    Thanks to fracking, parts of Oklahoma and Kansas now face the same risk for earthquakes as California.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/mar/29/oklahoma-kansas-earthquake-risk-california-oil-gas-production

    Reply
  157. Arctic winter sees sluggish sea-ice growth

    The most up-to-date data from Europe’s Cryosat spacecraft suggests sea-ice thickness is tracking close to a “minimum maximum” – but there may still be some growth left in the season.

    It will be April before a definitive statement on ice volume can be given.

    “Once Arctic sea-ice has reached its maximum area for the year it continues to thicken for about a month as seawater beneath the ice freezes to the under-ice surface. We expect the ice to reach its maximum amount towards the end of March or start of April,” explained Rachel Tilling, a Cryosat researcher at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) at University College London, UK.

    “But the ice has only thickened by about 8cm since February, when usually it thickens by twice this amount.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35918082

    Reply
  158. Abel Adamski

     /  March 30, 2016

    One of the geoengineering favourites is falling over
    http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/03/30/2003642783

    A study by a National Taiwan University (NTU) researcher overturned a hypothesis that fertilizing oceans with iron to increase the growth of greenhouse gas-absorbing algae might help slow global warming.

    Proposed in the 1990s, iron fertilization — seeding oceans with iron to boost the growth of algae to capture carbon dioxide via photosynthesis — has been conducted a dozen times around the world as a way to reduce atmospheric carbon.

    However, an international team joined by NTU assistant professor of geology Ren Hao-jia (任昊佳) found that while iron fertilization can stimulate algae bloom in one region, it could inversely prohibit the growth of algae in other regions.

    The findings were published on the journal Nature in January.

    “We also understand some other side effects of iron fertilization. The algae boom it stimulates might cause the ocean to run out of oxygen and lead to massive death of marine animals. It is not to say iron fertilization is useless, but we have to be cautious,” Ren said.

    “It was generally believed that iron fertilization was a practical approach to capture greenhouse gases, but Ren dared to challenge a well-received theory and succeeded,” NTU vice president Chen Liang-gee (陳良基) said.

    Reply
  159. Abel Adamski

     /  March 30, 2016

    And a sad reminder of what could have been, except for the MSM

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/29/3764068/time-global-warming-worried/

    Ten years ago this week, Time magazine published a landmark cover on global warming with the headline,
    “Be Worried. Be Very Worried.”

    The main story was a very solid, even prescient, piece of reporting — warning about polar ice loss, sea level rise, severe drought, and other extreme weather:

    Indeed, Time warned that “global climate systems are booby-trapped with tipping points and feedback loops, thresholds past which the slow creep of environmental decay gives way to sudden and self-perpetuating collapse” — tipping points that a decade of inaction has brought us right to the edge of. The article even warns of the possible ramifications if warming shuts down the Gulf Stream or if our dawdling locks in multi-meter sea level rise — much the same concerns that James Hansen and 18 leading climatologists warned of in their recent bombshell peer-reviewed paper.

    Reply
  160. – Car Engine Cover, Fishing Net and Plastic Bucket Found in Stomachs of Dead Sperm Whales

    Reply
  161. – Interesting take by Sam Carana on cold water lid in NE Pacific. I have been watching with concern the amount of moisture and other aerosols in the air over the PNW, and from my POV as I look west – over the open Pacific.

    ‘Cold Freshwater Lid Over North Pacific?’

    The sea surface of the North Pacific is much colder than it was in 1971-2000. What could be causing this?

    One explanation is that stronger winds and evaporation off the coast of East Asia are resulting in more moisture getting carried by stronger winds to the north-east, where it precipitates, settling as freshwater on the surface of the North Pacific. More moisture is a worry, since water vapor can have a strong greenhouse effect.

    Reply
  162. Jeremy

     /  March 30, 2016

    US Coal use shrinking !

    “As coal stockpiles at power plants rise, shippers are reducing coal railcar loadings”
    http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=25452

    Reply
  163. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    The Guardian continues to follow-up on the Great Barrier Reef bleaching event –

    Link between fossil fuels and Great Barrier Reef bleaching clear and incontrovertible

    According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Coral Sea region have been the highest on record for this most recent summer wet season.

    The BoM’s ocean temperature record goes back to the year 1900. As this chart shows, SSTs overlapping the northern parts of the reef have been the highest of any summer (December to February) on record.

    Link

    Reply
  164. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    Ineffective Resolution: Middle East and Climate Change
    By: Dr. Ricky Rood ,

    I was interested, therefore, in learning from some experts in the field. The conference featured political scientists Jeannie Sowers and Hannu Juusola. Both of these experts study the role of water in Middle East politics and crises. There was a panel of Rosina Bierbaum, Sam White, and me. Perrin Selcer moderated the event.

    There were several items brought forth by Drs. Sower and Juusola. There is no doubt that there has been extensive drought in the Middle East, and it has been especially intense in Syria. The drought has been going on for nearly a decade, so it, in fact, precedes much of the current conflict. Though no one claimed that drought is the “cause” of the current Syrian conflict and refuge crisis, the drought has definitely increased the stress on local agriculture and all things associated with water. What was especially interesting was the fact that the population of the Middle East and Northern Africa has far exceeded that that can be supported with local water. Therefore, water is essentially imported as food. Such importation requires cash to support the purchase, and much of that cash is related to oil production and oil export. Therefore, the calculation of climate change, fossil fuel use reduction, water scarcity, economic success, and nation stability does not suggest an easy future.

    Link

    Reply
  165. wili

     /  March 30, 2016

    i’ve got a feeling
    that it’s later
    than it seems…

    https://www.google.com/search?q=doctor+my+eyes&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

    Reply
  166. wili

     /  March 30, 2016

    I’ve got a feeling in my oceans
    blood underneath my skin
    into your bright fields this prison is opening

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 30, 2016

      Our shadows wake each day though they don’t know why
      They hope and try – live and die

      So leave them in their frozen world
      Come and be my lover
      If only for one stolen moment
      We will live forever

      Reply
  167. Jeremy

     /  March 30, 2016

    “Almost $1tn of investment in new coal-fired power stations could be wasted if growing concerns about climate change and air pollution leave the plants unused, according to a new report.

    About 1,500 new coal plants are in construction or planning stages around the world but electricity generation from the fossil fuel has fallen in recent years, the detailed report from the Sierra Club, Greenpeace and CoalSwarm found. In China, existing plants are now used just 50% of the time, coal use is falling and new permits and construction have been halted in half of the nation’s provinces, affecting about 250 plants.”

    “A second new report has found that China, India, Indonesia and Vietnam – seen as big growth areas by the coal industry – are likely to build far less than half of their planned coal plants. However, 84GW of plants (about 85 stations) were built in 2015 and new plants are being commissioned at five times the rate that old plants, such as those in the UK, are being retired.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/30/1tn-could-be-wasted-on-unneeded-new-coal-plants-report-warns

    Reply
  168. wili

     /  March 30, 2016

    Oh people, look around you
    The signs are everywhere
    You’ve left it for somebody other than you
    To be the one to care
    You’re lost inside your houses
    There’s no time to find you now
    Your walls are burning

    Reply
  169. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    New catalyst is three times better at splitting water

    The research, published today in the journal Science, outlines a potential way to make a future generation of water-splitting catalysts from three abundant metals — iron, cobalt and tungsten — rather than the rare, costly metals that many of today’s catalysts rely on.

    “The good things about this catalyst are that it’s easy to make, its production can be very easily scaled up without any super-advanced tools, it’s consistent, and it’s very robust,” said Aleksandra Vojvodic, a SLAC staff scientist with the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis who led the theoretical side of the work.

    Link

    Reply
  170. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    October’s floods having impact on SC farms’ production rate

    Farmers lost nearly $375 million dollars in crops from the flooding; a big hit to one of South Carolina’s top industries that has an estimated $41 billion impact in South Carolina each year.

    Agriculture economists like Dr. Nathan Smith say nearly a third of the state’s crops were lost last fall.

    Link

    Reply
  171. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    Cities affected by flood often keep economic activity in the vulnerable areas

    They may be locking in exposure to flood risk for a long time, writes a CEP team

    The recent events in the British Isles are just one example of a major global problem. According to media reports collated by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory, between 1985 and 2014, floods worldwide killed more than half a million people, displaced over 650 million people and caused damage in excess of $500 billion (Brakenridge, 2016).

    Other datasets tell of even farther reaching impacts: according to the International Disaster Database, in 2010 alone, 178 million people were affected by floods and total losses exceeded $40 billion (Guha-Sapir et al, 2016). To these direct costs we should add longer-term costs of disruptions to schooling, increased health risks and reduced incentives to invest.

    So it seems important to understand why so much is lost to floods. One might argue that the private risks of floods are balanced by the private gains from living in flood-prone areas. But in fact, flood plains tend to be overpopulated because the cost of building and maintaining flood defences is often borne by governments and not by private developers. This problem of an inadvertent subsidy to build on flood plains is made worse because the costs of flood recovery are also borne by governments and non-governmental organisations. This situation creates potential for misallocation of resources, and forces society to answer difficult distributional questions.

    Link

    Reply
  172. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    Extreme Weather Conditions effects U.S. cereal production – New Orleans Science Centre

    The findings are based on an analysis of 2,800 weather events recorded between 1964 and 2007 in the Emergency Events Database and national production data on 16 cereal crops from 177 countries from the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.
    “Across the breadbaskets of North America, the crops and methods of farming are very uniform across huge areas, so if a drought hits in a way that is damaging to those crops, they will all suffer,” said lead author Corey Lesk, a recent graduate of McGill’s Department of Geography.
    Farming in the developing world is more often a patchwork of different crops, grown with a variety of management practices. That way, when conditions are bad for one crop, they have others to fall back on.
    “They are not putting all their eggs in one basket,” said Ramankutty.
    In the West, access to crop insurance allows farmers to focus on maximizing profits, rather than diversifying for safety.
    However, when drought or extreme heat hit more than one part of the western world, the results can be catastrophic, leading to shortages and instability.

    Link

    Reply
    • – It’s so much like the situation that preceded the Dust Bowl — the mono-culture in tandem with mechanized farming.

      – With the flooding and flooded fields, mentioned earlier, we get major nitrogen runoff into the waterways.

      Reply
  173. Anne

     /  March 30, 2016

    British health systems ‘unprepared for devastating effects of climate change’

    Quote: As extreme weather events such as flooding or heatwaves become more common, the UK Health Alliance on Climate Change urged ministers not to “wait for disaster” before acting.

    The new alliance, made up of leading health bodies including royal colleges, medical faculties, medical publications and doctors’ organisations, called on the government to be “properly prepared”.

    The group, launched on Wednesday, said the health service is ill-prepared for dealing with the effects of climate change such as the extreme weather seen this winter.

    In a letter to the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, the alliance wrote: “More work is urgently needed to prepare the personnel, the systems and the facilities of the NHS, as well as other institutions involved in health care, for the implications of climate change.”

    It points out that only a minority of local health bodies have plans in place which “adequately prepare their organisation to respond to climate change”, adding that almost one in 10 healthcare buildings in England are currently operating in flood risk zones.

    John Ashton, president of the Faculty of Public Health, said: “Ensuring that our NHS doesn’t fail as a result of the threats we face is vital.

    “The Zika virus epidemic in South America and the impact of heatwaves in Europe, including in the UK, clearly demonstrate the devastating effects that result when the public and the health systems they rely on are unprepared for and overwhelmed by new challenges.

    “Let’s not wait for disaster on this scale to strike the UK before we are properly prepared.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/30/british-health-systems-unprepared-for-devastating-effects-of-climate-change

    Reply
  174. Colorado Bob

     /  March 30, 2016

    Vietnam hit by worst drought in nearly a century

    Months of below-average rainfall have conspired to produce the worst drought in Vietnam in the best part of 100 years. It has been reported that the Mekong River is at its lowest level since 1926.

    The ongoing El Nino weather pattern is thought to be the main cause of the lack of rainfall affecting the country.

    Vietnam is not alone in suffering drought. Neighbouring Cambodia, and Laos, as well as Thailand and Myanmar, have been experiencing water shortages as a result of the weather phenomenon.

    Link

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 30, 2016

      Thailand hit by its worst drought in decades

      Thailand is in the grip of its worst drought for more than 20 years, with water levels in the country’s biggest dams lower than 10 percent.

      The current drought has hit the north hardest, with 22 of Thailand’s 76 provinces affected.

      Agriculture has been severely affected, and there are genuine fears that taps could run dry within a matter of weeks. Several major reservoirs in the country are below 50 percent of their water capacity.

      Link

      Reply
  175. June

     /  March 30, 2016

    For those of you wanting to explain the climate-as-loaded-dice analogy to friends and family, Tamino has a great post explaining in detail but very plainly.

    Global Warming Basics: Loaded Dice

    https://tamino.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/global-warming-basics-loaded-dice/#more-8315

    Reply
  176. June

     /  March 30, 2016

    “This new transmission line will help unleash wind energy in the Great Plains. One down, dozens to go”

    http://www.vox.com/2016/3/29/11322600/plains-eastern-transmission-line

    There are several other projects at various stages of the approval process, but as Dave Roberts points out:

    “Assuming it’s completed on schedule, the Plains and Eastern Clean Line will have taken 11 years from proposal to reality. All the processes and reviews, the multiple overlapping regulatory authorities, the varying and unpredictable timelines — they create substantial uncertainty for investors…

    Something needs to be done to streamline the process. If every piece of the US supergrid takes 11 years to build, it’s going to be a long time before American wind power reaches its potential.”

    This is why we need to stop subsidizing fossil fuels and start a Manhattan Project for rapid development of renewables. Time is not on our side.

    Reply
  177. Reply
  178. – Dahr Jamail’s latest post on OK/KS wildfires:

    Climate Disruption Brings Record Wildfire to Kansas — and It’s Only Spring

    What we are seeing in Kansas is simply the micro of the macro, a symptom of a world that is increasingly susceptible to burning. We live on a planet that is approaching a global temperature increase of 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial average temperatures: a level not seen in the last 110,000 years.

    The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), a group that describes itself as putting “rigorous, independent science to work to solve our planet’s most pressing problems,” provides a sobering overview of how anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) is contributing to wildfires. UCS research shows that wildfires in the Western United States are increasing in number, and wildfire season is becoming longer, due to ACD.
    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/35413-climate-disruption-brings-record-wildfire-to-kansas-and-it-s-only-spring

    Reply
  179. Jeremy

     /  March 30, 2016

    “The UN’s climate science body had predicted up to a metre of sea level rise this century – but it did not anticipate any significant contribution from Antarctica, where increasing snowfall was expected to keep the ice sheet in balance.

    According a study, published in the journal Nature, collapsing Antarctic ice sheets are expected to double sea-level rise to two metres by 2100, if carbon emissions are not cut.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/30/sea-levels-set-to-rise-far-more-rapidly-than-expected

    Reply
  180. – UK but applies elsewhere. Mass Casualty Events will certainly unfold, and to degrees thought unimaginable.
    Civil governments are running out of time.
    – Also applies to mental health issues to deal with fear, panic reactions, emotional trauma etc.

    30.03.16
    NHS must do more to prepare for health threat of climate change

    Climate change risks causing a health crisis for the UK population in the coming decades unless the NHS does more to prepare for it, a new alliance have warned.

    The UK Health Alliance on Climate Change say that the risks of climate change to the UK population include flooding, heatwaves such as the one which killed 15,000 people in France in 2003, and increased mosquito populations and air pollution.

    The most recent analysis suggests that only a third of NHS providers and 18% of CCGs have adequate plans to adapt to climate change.

    http://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/Health-Care-News/nhs-must-do-more-to-prepare-for-health-threat-of-climate-change?dorewrite=false

    Reply
  181. Joint Cyclone Center ‏@JointCyclone 2h2 hours ago

    An tropical heatwave (29-38C) will turn increasing hot across the Australia with heatwave warning early next week

    Reply
  182. Reply
  183. Mark from OZ

     /  March 31, 2016

    There really is nothing redeeming about FF’s anymore. I accept that 100 years ago ‘they’ did not know better or understand the risks, but we are well past that now. Isn’t it always that the most sinister things require the most sinister human behaviours to exist?

    THE COMPANY THAT BRIBED THE WORLD
    “Corruption in oil production – one of the world’s richest industries and one that touches us all through our reliance on petrol – fuels inequality, robs people of their basic needs and causes social unrest in some of the world’s poorest countries. It was among the factors that prompted the Arab Spring.”

    http://www.theage.com.au/interactive/2016/the-bribe-factory/day-1/the-company-that-bribed-the-world.html

    Reply
  184. Jay M

     /  March 31, 2016

    Wed.evening jet stream large inverted U over Gulf of Alaska, bringing fair weather to PNW
    looks like driving the meridianal N/ S flow that Robert mentions (warm to arctic)

    Reply
  185. Jay M

     /  March 31, 2016

    there is a block in place, driving the system north:
    http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/nepac/flash-wv.html

    Reply
  186. Eric Thurston

     /  March 31, 2016

    My son-in-law who works for the BLM sent me this NOAA early version of the fire season outlook for (mostly) the Western US. It is a Power Point and I’m not sure it will come across in a post, but I’ll give it a try.

    https://snt153.mail.live.com/mail/ViewOfficePreview.aspx?messageid=mg5IZXkC725RGQk9idZ1x5vA2&folderid=flinbox&attindex=0&cp=-1&attdepth=0&n=97214729

    Some highlights:
    Here are some highlights from the outlook:

    – Lots of damaged and downed brush and trees from 2+ years of drought stress and periods of heavy snowfall this winter will increase dead fuel load this summer

    – Healthy snowpack and expected warm and periodically wet weather this spring is likely to mean healthy grass and brush crop = more material to carry fire once it dries out (probably not until July)

    – Current vegetative and snowpack conditions as well as expected periodically wet spring likely to keep large fires from being a problem, so large fires unlikely before July

    – Last week of March expected to be warmer and drier than normal, then first half of April looks to be VERY abnormally warm and mostly dry (west side valley highs 70s and 80s)

    – CPC and other forecasts hint at “snap back” to cooler and wetter more likely for latter half of April. Uncertainty high for April precip, most likely to be near normal. Temps warmer than normal for the month.

    – Previous very strong El Ninos yielded wet and cool springs. Forecast is for warmer than normal, but also near to above avg precip favored through May. Due to difference in analog years from forecast for temperatures, not expecting temperatures to highly anomalous this spring except early April.

    – Summer analogs show enhanced SW monsoon, esp in Sierras and our east side. Models also showing this. Appears more lightning than long term avg again expected. Could very well “wash out” season on east side again.

    – Summer temperatures most likely warmer than normal, esp west of Cascades.

    – Fire season not likely to start early in our area. Fire season not likely to be abnormal in our area.

    – Preliminary National areas of concern: Northern Rockies for a longer and above normal season, SW US for an active late spring-early summer, and the Great Lakes Region for a longer and more severe season.

    Reply
  187. – Via climatehawk1:
    – USA CA Is On The March:

    Thirty Years of Climate ‘Deception’ Could Become Offense Under New Calif. Law

    By extending an existing law’s statute of limitations to 30 years, the new legislation would expose fossil fuel companies like Exxon to greater liability.

    The Climate Science Truth & Accountability Act would extend the statute of limitations under California’s Unfair Competition Law from four to 30 years, giving greater leverage to state and local prosecutors to file civil charges in connection with the conduct of fossil fuel companies going back decades.

    The legislation, introduced by Sen. Ben Allen (D-Santa Monica), would give prosecutors authority to delve into the issues dating to the heart of the denial era.
    http://insideclimatenews.org/news/29032016/climate-change-deception-oil-companies-exxon-california-legislation

    Reply
    • – USA CO:

      Colorado Springs Utilities Put on Notice of Clean Air Violations

      Coal-fired Power Plant in Downtown Colorado Springs Threatens Public Health

      Colorado Springs, CO—Moving to safeguard public health and clean air, WildEarth Guardians today put Colorado Springs Utilities on notice of an impending lawsuit over thousands of violations of the Clean Air Act at the Martin Drake coal-fired power plant.

      “This massive coal-fired power plant is taking a tremendous toll on the health of the community,”
      http://www.wildearthguardians.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=12422&news_iv_ctrl=1194#.VvyzMnpWiSp

      Reply
  188. Hi Everyone-

    Nature Geoscience, December 2014:

    Two massive, rapid releases of carbon during the onset of the Palaeocene–Eocene thermal maximum

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/William_Clyde/publication/269764608_Two_massive_rapid_releases_of_carbon_during_the_onset_of_the_PalaeoceneEocene_thermal_maximum/links/54beb7b70cf28ad7e7194a0e.pdf

    The duration of the PETM seems to be an active area of scientific debate. The above Nature Geoscience December 2014 paper claims a rapid onset to the PETM, with rates of carbon release comparable to the Anthropocene. This paper seems to have thick sediment beds, providing a high resolution time record, and is based on carbonate nodules in terrestrial soils, so it is not perturbed by species population crashes. The results in this paper are compatible with two positive feedback driven rapid massive releases of methane from the methane hydrates.

    The authors claim that these carbonate nodules are obviously formed in-situ, and therefore do not suffer from any physical mixing problems. With their higher resolution record, covering tens of meters in depth, they claim a previously unrecognized Pre-Onset Excursion (POE) in the C13 ratios, with the first rapid onset lasting no more than 1500 years followed by a decline, a hiatus, and then a rapid jump to the full blown PETM, with the jump to the PETM lasting no more than 1500 years.

    “Thus, the BBCP record suggests that rates of release during the PETM were probably within an order of magnitude of, and may have approached, the 9.5 Pg yr−1 associated with modern anthropogenic carbon emissions 5.

    The rates and pattern of release inferred here are consistent with evidence from single-specimen analysis of foraminiferal tests 28, but contrast with much lower rates (<0.3 Pg yr−1) and continuous release inferred from methane-release simulations tuned to marine-margin records 4 that may be affected by time-averaging 9.

    Thus, our findings re-establish the possibility that the PETM may be a strong analogue
    for anthropogenic global change in terms of both magnitude and rates of change."

    The authors speculate that the Pre-Onset Excursion may have set off the PETM, as a pulse of heat from the first event worked its way down into the hydrates:

    "If this is the case, the PETM may provide geologic evidence for a strong clathrate feedback to global warming at∼103 -year [1000 year – LP] timescales, meaning that the long-term response of clathrates to anthropogenic warming deserves further consideration 27."

    The authors' approach to finding and using thick sediments to make a higher resolution record of the PETM seems good. There is plenty of carbonate to take large samples, I think, and that is good, and many data points can be gathered. This paper samples the atmospheric carbon reservoir, and that is more certainly linked to hothouse extinction events than is the oceanic carbon reservoir.

    But in their data showing the onset of the full blown PETM, there are also no intermediate C13 ratio values, between the baseline and the post excursion values. So 1500 years may still not be a short enough time scale for the abrupt main isotope excursion. They do say that there may be a discontinuity in the records, right at the time of the rapid excursions. But single shell foraminifer C13 records show a comparable sudden jump with no intermediate C13 values between a pre-onset baseline and a new post-onset baseline. It is possible that the PETM and POE events created discontinuities both in the terrestrial record (acid rain?) and in the marine fossil record (carbonate dissolution due to ocean acidification?) Or it is possible that the initial carbon isotope excursions occurred geologically instantaneously, perhaps due to sudden positive feedback driven methane releases from the methane hydrates.

    The reason that some of us focus on possible methane releases is that really abrupt methane releases like these might have been could kill human society as we know it. Certainly there were other things going on, during the PETM- volcanism and so on. But if a strong positive feedback driven methane release from the clathrates occurs during the Anthropocene very little else might matter.

    Reply
    • High-resolution carbon isotope record for the Paleocene-Eocene
      thermal maximum from the Nanyang Basin, Central China

      http://sourcedb.cas.cn/sourcedb_igg_cas/cn/zjrck/200907/W020120622356922954237.pdf

      The paper linked to above claimed the highest resolution carbon isotope record of any location in the world as of 2010, with the sediments from the PETM covering at least 15 meters in depth. This compares with typical marine PETM strata of only 1-2 meters in depth, many of them suffering from time-averaging problems due to sediment mixing.

      Their measurements show that the first rapid negative carbon isotope excursion of the PETM took only about 210 years. They calculate that this excursion would correspond to roughly 1100 Gt (1.1 trillion tons) of carbon as methane injected into the atmosphere in only about 210 years or less.

      This value (or faster) seems about right, considering that the marine carbon isotope records show no intermediate values in individual foraminifer skeletons, and that terrestrial carbonate values from carbonate nodules in the soil also show no intermediate values for the first rapid excursion of the PETM.

      The higher the resolution of the record, it seems, the shorter the calculated interval for the first rapid carbon release of the PETM.

      While no intermediate values in the marine foraminifer individual shell data could be explained by a species population crash, and soil carbonate nodule data could be explained by some sort of depositional discontinuity, it seems hard to explain how a discontinuity could appear in this data as well. This data is not very dependent on individual species extinctions, for example.

      A short time for the initial excursion could explain all three data sets.

      If a rapid release of 1.1 trillion tons of carbon as methane were to occur within 210 years in our near future, it is hard to see how the majority of the human race could survive. There would likely be hothouse humidity events covering most of the globe, for example, and quite possibly hurricanes with winds of hundreds of miles per hour.

      Reply
    • Structure of the carbon isotope excursion in a high-resolution lacustrine Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum record from central China

      http://www.cge.ac.cn/kyxx/fblw/201507/W020150724602943625637.pdf

      Adding to the confusion, this paper has a high resolution record that appears to show that the first rapid excursion of the PETM took on the order of 20,000 years. They appear to have intermediate C13 values in lake sediments for the first rapid C13 ratio excursion. It’s hard to see how their high resolution record could show the time averaging bias that some of the thinner strata records might have. Some of the authors are the same people who made the earlier (2010) claim of 210 years for the first rapid C13 ratio excursion of the PETM.

      They say that their data is compatible with a pre-onset warming of around 4 degrees C, with the carbon coming from volcanic sources with a C13 ratio very close to that of the atmosphere at the time. Then the carbon isotope excursion occurs, consistent with a large methane release over several thousand years.

      I have to admit that this high resolution record seems to show a relatively slow methane release over thousands of years.

      Even if that is true, and the PETM excursion took thousands of years, that does not mean that a future Anthropocene methane release needs to take that long, though. We are coming out of a series of ice ages, and the ice-albedo feedback might lead to more rapid change. Our stocks of methane hydrate could be greater than those of the PETM. And this paper is consistent with a triggering event setting off methane hydrate release.

      Reply
      • I was happy with this post…for about an hour.

        Then it occurred to me that if the lake these deposits came from a lake that included a peat bog, the thick strata could show a time averaged C13 ratio response, due to the slow rate of decay of the peat – thousands of years.

        It’s probably not likely, the peat bog idea. Peat bogs tend to be acidic, and it seems likely that carbonate deposition and peat bogs are mutually exclusive. But it seems possible, which is why we need lots of data, and lots of parallel efforts to determine how rapidly the first rapid carbon isotope excursion of the PETM occurred.

        Reply
  189. Jeremy

     /  March 31, 2016

    What a story!

    “A massive leak of confidential documents has for the first time exposed the true extent of corruption within the oil industry, implicating dozens of leading companies, bureaucrats and politicians in a sophisticated global web of bribery and graft.”

    “The investigation centres on a Monaco company called Unaoil, run by the jet-setting Ahsani clan. Following a coded ad in a French newspaper, a series of clandestine meetings and midnight phone calls led to our reporters obtaining hundreds of thousands of the Ahsanis’ leaked emails and documents.

    The trove reveals how they rub shoulders with royalty, party in style, mock anti-corruption agencies and operate a secret network of fixers and middlemen throughout the world’s oil producing nations.”

    http://www.theage.com.au/interactive/2016/the-bribe-factory/day-1/the-company-that-bribed-the-world.html

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 31, 2016

      I love that deniers think that every scientist, every scientific body and nature itself have all conspired to fool the world about global warming, and the poor oil companies are just victims in all this. Yet the more we learn, the more it is clear that deniers have it not just wrong, but as wrong as it is possible to be. Scientists are not getting rich off of grant money, they actually lead quite a humble existence. And they certainly are not colluding with one another to execute some vast conspiracy. But the oil companies, the most profitable enterprise in the history of human beings, actually are involved in a global conspiracy to ensure vast sums of money accumulate in their coffers. It takes a special kind of ignorance and stupidity to be a denier in 2016.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  March 31, 2016

        Amen –
        That greedy grant grubbing trope has always chapped chapped my beacon.

        Reply
    • – From its inception the entire fossil fuel and petrochemical industry has been ruthless, reckless, and corrupt.
      Top to bottom, it is the most highly organized criminal enterprise in the history of humankind. It now has tentacles that infect almost every facet of ‘modern’ civic life.
      And, as we are seeing, it is proving to have a very short ‘shelf life’.
      It needn’t have happened this way.
      But here it is — and we must now deal with it.
      OUT

      Reply
    • Bill H

       /  April 1, 2016

      Thanks for this. This paper is an important adjunct to the recent paper of Hansen, Sato, Rignot, Velicogna et al. The evidence on the vulnerability of ice sheets builds and builds. Idiots like Watts have been attempting a serengeti strategy job on Hansen, delighting in purported disagreements (“schisms on the left”) between Hansen and other leading climate scientists. However, Hansen is becoming less and less of an outlier as time passes.

      Reply
  190. Colorado Bob

     /  March 31, 2016

    Rivers turn to dust as drought bites Somalia

    Somalia’s bread basket has become a dust bowl as the life-giving waters of the mighty Shabelle river run dry amid intense drought in the war-torn country.

    River-fed farmlands have become parched playgrounds for children who kick footballs beneath a cloudless sky, as one sign among many of the failed rains that the United Nations warns has put more than a million people at risk.

    Elders in the Lower and Middle Shabelle regions, where most people rely on farming for survival, said it is the first time in decades they have seen such water shortages in the river.

    “I have never dreamt of finding myself walking inside the river,” said Adow Amin, a resident in Afgoye town, just outside the capital Mogadishu, an area famous for its banana production.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
    • “I have never dreamt of finding myself walking inside the river,”

      Reply
    • Jean

       /  April 1, 2016

      I am reading a great book re Somalia by a Nobel Prize Nominee,Dr. Hawa Abdi “Keeping Hope Alive”(bought at Dollar Tree store for $!)…The author loves farming and the Shabelle River ”and she is a fearless defender of Peace

      Reply
  191. Colorado Bob

     /  March 31, 2016

    Scientists say Antarctic melting could double sea level rise. Here’s what that looks like.

    Instead, this study published in the journal Nature suggests that we should actually double that forecast when we include melting in Antarctica: approximately six feet of sea level rise by 2100. Just as alarming is the projection that Antarctica by itself could add 50 feet of sea level rise by 2500.

    What does that even look like?

    Link

    Reply
  192. Colorado Bob

     /  March 31, 2016

    Tracking ‘marine heatwaves’ since 1950: How the ‘blob’ stacks up

    Date:
    March 30, 2016
    Source:
    University of Washington
    Summary:
    A tally of Northern Hemisphere marine heatwaves since 1950 shows that prolonged warm periods have recurred regularly in the past, but are being pushed into new territory by climate change.

    Link

    Reply
  193. Jeremy

     /  March 31, 2016

    “After some 115 years, Scotland has burned its last lump of coal for electricity.
    The Longannet power station, the last and largest coal-fired power plant in Scotland, ceased operations Thursday. What once was the largest coal plant in Europe shut down after 46 years before the eyes of workers and journalists, who gathered in the main control room.”

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/24/3763158/scotland-closes-last-coal-plant/

    Reply
  194. Greg

     /  March 31, 2016

    People are queuing in the rain the cold and for more than 24 hours if not more all over the world to reserve a car (Tesla’s model III) that hasn’t been revealed yet (as of 12:00 pm EST today). And they are willing to part with their money ($1000) to be the first to buy it and still wait more than 24 months time to get it. What does all that tell you? Would you wake up early in the morning and camp for TWO days AND pay $1000 for something that you haven’t even seen? I think it’s not just gadget freaks, its something about hope, about the future and people wanting to be part of something collectively that seems exciting. After humanity finally come to terms with the devastation we face from climate change, we will have to tap this kind of energy to collectively move us in a completely different direction, or fail. Yes, it will likely still involve massive consumption and be consumer driven. It will require massive amounts of energy just to remove all the energy we have now stored in the atmosphere and seas, but it will be a future with a completely different set of choices in what and how we consume, to build things made from carbon waste, to eat things from land that sequesters carbon, to run our lives on electrons derived from the energy of the sun and moon…

    http://insideevs.com/tesla-model-3-impressive-lines-forming-at-tesla-stores-around-the-globe/

    Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  March 31, 2016

      Sorry Greg, it’s got nothing to do with hope.
      It’s all about greeeeed – and being rich enough to afford to be the first to own the latest cult product.

      These are a wealthier version of the very same type of people who queue for days to buy the latest model iPhone.

      These gadget freaks jet around in a lifestyle bubble that is shameful.
      If they really gave a damn about the climate they’d buy a second hand economically efficient vehicle. It’s just what makes Kunstler puke!

      Reply
      • Paul PNW

         /  March 31, 2016

        Very much disagree with your assessment, but you’re welcome to it I suppose.

        Reply
      • utoutback

         /  April 1, 2016

        Ah Jeremy is back with another nay saying, negative comment. What a surprise. Where is Robert when we need him?
        Jeremy, do you have any constructive ideas to add to the discussion?

        Reply
      • Hi Jeremy-

        Strongly disagree. If electric cars and solar cells on the roof is the latest fad, that’s a good thing, IMO. We can use energy in the future- just not energy from fossil fuels, I think.

        Reply
      • i have to say that i strongly disagree with jeremy too. (well said greg!)

        no it’s not a fad, any more than smart phones are fads. we can’t instantly convert all our cities into copenhagens where cycling, transit and walkability are prioritized, considering the amount of car culture sprawl we have in north america. so while we fix our urban designs, we’re going to need electric cars to cut our emissions now, and this is what makes tesla’s effort so important and so great, because it gives people a way to make a difference. that is hopeful. no, it’s not enough to solve CC on it’s own, but it’s a huge step in the right direction, and for pretty much everyone who plunked their $1000 down, it very much is about hope.

        other reasons this is overall a great thing:
        1) all the other manufacturers can no longer ignore tesla and the coming ev revolution, and if they’re smart they’ll know they’re up against a kodak moment. the game is on now for real.
        3) the people who are pre ordering are early adopters, and this will go really far to pushing the ev revolution out into the mainstream. they know they’re helping to push this.
        4) once the model 3s start hitting the road, along with all the competing ev and phev vehicles the other manufacturers put out as they scramble to catch up, oil demand will drop, which will a) reduce oil co profitability, and b) reduce capital investment in difficult to extract oil, such as fracking, oilsands, deep water, etc. I think they ev revolution will help drive oil co destruction much like the coal companies have been going down recently.

        i’ve been following tesla since they were trying to figure out the software for the traction control on the roadster, so seeing tesla get 150,000 model 3 preorders on the first day is f*cking awesome.

        Reply
  195. – Upon seeing this piece from Boston, I am reminded of past instances of urban trees being killed by localized natural gas leaks — usually from leaky pipes.
    Methane releases were not in the equation…
    – Somewhere in my crowded Santa Barbara files are photos etc of a couple of dying trees I was watching that were found to be the victims of gas leaks.

    Methane Hazard Lurks in Boston’s Aging, Leaking Gas Pipes, Study Says

    Study of 100 randomly selected pipeline leaks revealed the existence of ‘superemitters’ and potential explosion hazards.

    http://insideclimatenews.org/news/30032016/boston-natural-gas-pipelines-leaking-methane-climate-change-explosion

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 31, 2016

      It’s like as we proceed to “better” fuels, they just get more dangerous. From coal, to oil, to invisible explosive natural gas. We need to move beyond this destructive fuel and on to renewables.

      Reply
  196. – USA Straight out of Florida:

    March 31, 2016
    Tallahassee, FL —

    The Florida Supreme Court decision today is a blow to the future of rooftop solar power in Florida.

    “This dirty political trick perpetrated by the giant utility corporations will now be on the ballot in November,” said Earthjustice attorney David Guest. “This amendment hoodwinks voters by giving the impression that it will encourage the use of rooftop solar when, in fact, it would do the opposite. If the Constitutional amendment passes, people who install rooftop solar could end up with higher utility bills than if they did not have solar.
    http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2016/florida-supreme-court-decision-on-citizen-challenge-to-utility-backed-solar-power-amendment-disappoints?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ejprtw+%28Twitter%3A+Press+Releases%29

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 31, 2016

      This attack on solar is total bullshit! It drives me crazy that fossil fuel companies and utilities have a monopoly on the energy market, and refuse to even allow people to generate their own electricity. It’s like a tax on electrons. You are only allowed to obtain your electrons from certified sources! And it’s led by the politicians on the right, who always crow about free-markets and individual rights. Total bullshit!!

      Reply
  197. Greg

     /  March 31, 2016

    Big idea coming from China, It would be the world’s largest infrastructure project
    :
    http://www.nbcnews.com/business/energy/china-unveils-proposal-50-trillion-global-electricity-network-n548376

    Reply
  198. Jeremy

     /  March 31, 2016

    “In 1994, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory moved soil from moist, high-altitude sites to warmer and drier places lower in altitude, and vice versa. In 2011, they returned to the sites and looked again at the soil microbes and found that they had done little to adapt functionally to their new home. That’s a bad sign, experts say, for a world convulsed by a changing climate.

    “These microbes have somehow lost the capacity to adapt to the new conditions,” said Vanessa Bailey, one of the authors of the study, published this month in PLOS One. That not what scientists anticipated, and it “calls into question the resilience of the overall environment to climate change,” she said. “Soil is the major buffer for environmental changes, and the microbial community is the basis for that resilience.” ”

    http://e360.yale.edu/feature/is_climate_change_putting_world_microbiomes_at_risk/2977/

    Reply
    • utoutback

       /  April 1, 2016

      Sorry about my earlier snarky comment. I see you are trying to provide useful information.
      Mea Culpa.

      Reply
  199. – ‘nobody had a solid handle on what’s in the air…’

    – The late Charles David Keeling — A very good narrative of his early and tenacious work measuring atmospheric CO2, etc.

    – Spring is in the air, but what is it? The blossoms blossoming? The vernal equinox?

    Yes to both, and one more: It’s how a young American chemist named Charles David Keeling stumbled upon proof of a climate problem way back in 1959.

    … he realized, that nobody had a solid handle on what’s in the air. Specifically, the amount of carbon dioxide, a gas that was known since 1859 to absorb heat.

    Keeling started recording CO2 at the Mauna Loa facility in March 1958. Scientists think of atmospheric carbon not as a percentage but as “parts” of CO2 for every million parts of air, or parts per million (ppm). Keeling’s first monthly average came in at 313.4 ppm.

    “He figured the system wasn’t working, and he didn’t know what was wrong,” Ralph Keeling said. “And then, at some point, about a year into it, he realized: Oh my god, it’s a seasonal cycle.”

    He wrote in the journal Tellus that the Mauna Loa measurement and another on Antarctica showed that the CO2 levels weren’t the same year-on-year. They were rising.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-31/this-stunning-chart-helped-uncover-climate-change-in-1959

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  March 31, 2016

      One of the most important charts in human history.

      Reply
  200. Abel Adamski

     /  March 31, 2016

    Notehttp://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-31/this-stunning-chart-helped-uncover-climate-change-in-1959 the abrupt drop

    Let the article and the next link speak for themselves

    Reply
  201. Reply
  202. Ryan in New England

     /  March 31, 2016

    Just a personal observation on my local weather here in Connecticut. After a record warm Winter, the weather has really been all over the place. It’s 20F above average one day, then 20F below average just a couple days later. For example, today’s temperature should be 54F, and it was 73 today, with a forecast for a high of 34 on Sunday with snow. Spring is typically a highly variable time of year in New England, but it seems like the swings in weather are more extreme. And I’ve also noticed that it has been extremely windy very often. I work outside so I pay close attention to the weather and notice changes far more than the average person.

    Reply
  203. Colorado Bob

     /  March 31, 2016

    “I have never dreamt of finding myself walking inside the river,”

    That one got me too.

    Reply
  204. Ailsa

     /  March 31, 2016

    Are You Ready for 300 MPH Super Storms? Short accessible and shareable – Thom Hartmann shares a piece by Jim Hansen on HuffPost Green which talks about ice melting off Greenland that is causing fresh water to invade the North Atlantic, threatening to shut down the Great Conveyor Belt and what that means for our future.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  April 1, 2016

      Ailsa –

      This jackass is right , sort of. But he doesn’t know the terms.
      It’s the Thermohaline Circulation , and it’s a young touchy balance. This showed up about 35 million years ago, when the Drake Passage really opened enough to set up the ACC, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. AND the link between North and South America was closed at Panama.

      Then Antarctica became the land we know today. There are dozens of reasons why the climate changes, but over the long haul. It’s where the oceans and the land are.

      Go to the Dinosaur National Monument on the Colorado – Utah border on Highway 40. Hundreds of huge animals bones are encased in sandstone. That was a real flood . In a hot world where the water cycle was running at full speed. My personal thinking is that hail stones where the size of basketballs.

      The Earth has done some amazing things , it popped out us, 7.5 Billion and counting

      “It’s a Wild Time. I’m doing things that don’t have a name yet.”

      Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 1, 2016

        Colorado Bob – I agree, from my perspective as a barely climate-science-wannabe-literate layperson, TH does sort of come across as a bit of a ‘jackass’. But he does seem to be trying! I’m UK based, and don’t know how he is viewed in the US. I’m trying to work out how this incredibly important message could be spread to a public intimidated by science-speak and scared of the implications of the message, and he kinda makes it accessible. Am I wrong to encourage newbies to take a look at this clip?

        This is a serious question for me. I’m very alone in my concern most of the time, and want to point people to stuff they can grasp, which is helpful and framed in a familiar (almost chat-show style) way, but still close to scientifically accurate. If he’s really off-base, then please do help me out and point me in another direction.

        Reply
      • JPL

         /  April 1, 2016

        Hartmann is a progressive radio talk show host in the US and I believe has a show on RT as well. He is definitely trying to raise awareness. Here’s a site that he and some others are presenting with a few short films on the climate crisis.

        http://www.greenworldrising.org/

        Have a look. See what you think.

        He’s had Bernie Sanders on his radio show for an hour or so every Friday for the last decade taking calls and answering questions. I think all of the positive support he got from callers influenced, at least to some degree, his decision to run for president.

        John

        Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 2, 2016

        John, very useful. Thank you.

        Reply
  205. Colorado Bob

     /  March 31, 2016

    Someone posted the GOES WEST loop up thread, (forgive me I forget who), showing the jet swinging way up into Alaska. So , I started looking at Fairbanks. The stats say they should be between :
    34F and 8F

    It’s 52.9 °F there right now –

    Link
    Be sure to look at their 10 day forecast.
    This fits a larger pattern that Ryan in New England just commented on. And that I am seeing here. But here we are doing the following :

    10F to 20F above average during the day, testing the daily records, and every now and then cracking one. When a front comes through, it just drives us back down near our old averages. Then a the day or two, and right back to this new pattern.

    These spring cold fronts don’t have teeth anymore, just lots of dry wind.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  March 31, 2016

      That would be –

      Jay M / March 31, 2016

      there is a block in place, driving the system north:
      http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/nepac/flash-wv.html

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  April 1, 2016

        This water vapor link is always current , now it is showing a retrograde pattern pointing West of due North . Right into the belly of Alaska.

        A real can of worms. The jet seems to be picking on Alaska.

        Reply
      • Brian Brettschneider ‏@Climatologist49 5h5 hours ago

        And there it is. The first 70°F reading in Alaska during March in any year! #akwx #StateRecord

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  April 1, 2016

        70 in Alaska in March!? That is just nuts!

        Reply
  206. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    RS –

    We need some proof of life. Yet again. This thread is rich , but I still need proof of life.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 1, 2016

      I always worry a little when we haven’t heard from Robert in a while. Hope everything is ok, Robert!

      Reply
      • Yes, I miss Robert. He provides a wonderful public service with this blog, which actually seems to make an impact on this terrible intractable global warming problem.

        I don’t always agree with him…only about 99% of the time. But I miss his insight and in depth knowledge of the problem and his wonderful gift at communicating his knowledge.

        Reply
  207. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    There’s yer problem .

    Reply
  208. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    The Saudi Arabian , Pakistan, and American right wing all thought they were in control. Now their hornets are lose.

    Get ready little lady , Hell is coming to breakfast.

    Reply
  209. Vic

     /  April 1, 2016

    A new report by Greenpeace points the fossil fuel finger at Hillary Clinton…

    http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/campaign-updates/hillary-clintons-connection-oil-gas-industry/

    “All told, the campaign to elect Hillary Clinton for president in 2016 has received more than $4.5 million from lobbyists, bundlers, and large donors connected the fossil fuel industry.”

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  April 1, 2016

      Hillary not happy – accuses Sanders’ campaign of lying.

      Reply
  210. Andy in SD

     /  April 1, 2016

    Ice melt, sea level rise and superstorms: the threat of irreparable harm
    Jim Hansen
    24th March 2016

    http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2987458/ice_melt_sea_level_rise_and_superstorms_the_threat_of_irreparable_harm.html

    Reply
  211. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    It’s A or B . She has the math . Don’t like her ? Vote for Ted .

    He”ll do what you what.

    It’s a crazy hellish world . Bernie changed it. But he cannot win. The right wing will peel him like an onion . They have doing that to Hillary for 20 years.

    Reply
    • utoutback

       /  April 1, 2016

      Sad to say – yer right Bob. I like Bernie, but he is not in the mainstream and runs into the same problem as those on the far right in the general election. Good for the left of the democratic party, but the “socialist” label will kill him if he’s running in September.

      Reply
      • June

         /  April 1, 2016

        As a Bernie supporter, I feel I should point out that all the national polls show that Bernie would have a bigger winning margin than Hillary over either Trump or Cruz. The meme that he is unelectable comes from the mainstream media, which have all been minimizing him from the beginning, and from the Democratic party establishment itself. The numbers and enthusiasm of the young people he has engaged are wonderful to see.

        But I digress 🙂. Back to the climate…

        There is a new documentary that will come to the US soon on Claude Lorius, the French glaciologist. It is called “Ice and the Sky”. He is now in his 80’s and has been studying Antarctica since the mid 1950s. He is the one who realized that the air bubbles in ice could be used to sample the atmosphere from the past. He also analyzed the Vostok ice core and came up with the graph showing how temperature and CO2 levels changed together.

        http://www.eenews.net/stories/1060034791

        Reply
      • JPL

         /  April 1, 2016

        Nonsense. No offense.

        John

        Reply
      • JPL

         /  April 1, 2016

        To clarify, nonsense that ‘Bernie can’t win’. Totally disagree.

        Reply
      • utoutback

         /  April 2, 2016

        I will be voting for Bernie if he is on the ballot in November.

        Reply
      • June—-thanks for your post and for pointing out the (tiresome) Bernie Sanders is “unelectable” meme. After which you state:
        “But I digress 🙂. Back to the climate…”

        I don’t think talking about this presidential campaign, the role the MSM and the DNC play in determining who is elected and the involvement of youth in the Sander’s movement is digression from the issues that are discussed on this blog. Quite the contrary.

        Robert’s main point, which he has resoundingly stated over and over and over again: fossil fuel extraction and burning must stop now—-(should have stopped yesterday)

        My belief: we don’t have time for this (seemingly endless) “transitioning to clean energy via bridge fuels” (i.e. fracking) Clinton CLEARLY support this.

        We, who follow this blog know that humans cannot keep extracting fossil fuels and burning them. I believe this is our last chance for a movement—–even if it is a hail Mary movement (which I believe would be the case)——-to get corporate money out of politics and keep fossil fuels in the ground.

        It is unacceptable for the Clinton campaign to take money from lobbyists from the FF industry. It is unacceptable for her NOT to sign the pledge to refuse $$ from those tied to the fossil fuel industry. I cannot reconcile voting for someone with that much oil, frack sand/bitumin on their hands along with the environmentally harmful trade agreements (and wars).

        I agree with Bernie Sanders when he states:
        “ you cannot take on an industry if you take their money”

        It is a relief and an inspiration to see that he is not backing down on this—– the most important issue that we face today.

        It is shameful of the DNC to minimize the realities that Greenpeace AND the Sanders campaign are bringing into the light: the fossil fuel corporations links with and control over politicians.

        Anyone who supports HRC should be calling her on this NOW instead of shifting the focus to Bernie Sanders—— childishly calling him a liar with an inappropriate “tone”. Keep the focus where it should be: fossil fuel industry buying off politicians and the politicians who take their money choosing greed over a habitable planet.

        https://berniesanders.com/press-release/clintons-close-ties-to-the-oil-coal-and-gas-industry/

        Reply
  212. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    It`s Not Easy

    Reply
    • Ailsa

       /  April 1, 2016

      It ain’t easy – RIP David

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  April 1, 2016

        Ailsa –

        Good lick girl, God how I miss him.

        Where is Buddy Holly now that we really need him?

        Reply
  213. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    The Battle of Britain Soundtrack

    “We fight them on the beaches.”

    Reply
  214. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Courage and guts.

    Reply
  215. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Never have so many , known so little , about so much.

    Reply
  216. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Ailsa –

    Why would I kid you?

    I am an American , that knows the “Battle of Britain” , it began on August 10, 1940.

    The world hung in the balance.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  April 1, 2016

      Ailsa –

      If Hitler had just kept his plan , he would have won. But the bombing of London unraveled all of it.

      The world hung in the balance.

      Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 2, 2016

        Sorry Bob, its just I have a personal recoil when it comes to Last Night of the Proms flag waving-type music. Nothing personal meant.

        Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 3, 2016

        Like Billy Bragg, ‘I used to wanna plant bombs, at the last night of the proms’!

        Reply
  217. – Heat up north — There’s more here Bob.

    Reply
  218. – NASA – Antarctica — A succinct little video here:

    Reply
  219. – Sea Level News | March 31, 2016
    A NASA first: Computer model links glaciers, global sea level

    – The “fingerprints” of sea level rise revealed by a new computer modeling method that links changes in glaciers, ice sheets, and continental water storage to relative sea levels worldwide. Bluer areas, near Greenland, reflect a loss of ice mass, counterintuitively resulting in a sea level drop. In redder areas, sea levels are rising faster than global-mean rates. This map shows the linear trend in sea-level change and covers the period from 2003 to 2015. Image courtesy Surendra Adhikari, JPL.

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 1, 2016

      Greenlands gravity trick, as ice mass decreases the gravitic pull on the ocean decreases allowing the height to fall back

      Reply
  220. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    DTL

    “We’re not in Kansas anymore”.

    This is why I crawl between the old music, and the facts that pour in here everyday.

    This is why we are all like Dorthy in the tornado, spinning ever up ward, never knowing where we all land.

    Reply
  221. Robert Wilson ‏@CountCarbon 12h12 hours ago

    Fossil fuel consumption by fuel of the average American over the last 150 years.

    Reply
    • – Oil – I still look to 1930 as a turning, or tipping, point.
      It frames the American car, truck, and tractor culture.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  April 1, 2016

        The Texas Rail Road Commission set the price of oil until the oil shock of 74′.

        There was so much oil in East Texas, it was down to pennies on the barrel. We won WW II on this one oil field.

        Reply
  222. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    I have read a lot about oil, I hunted for oil .

    My great story about oil –

    Long before Col, Drake drilled his hole. We had killed nearly every whale every where we could find them. The price of oil was dear.
    Whale oil had changed the world. It did not smoke, or smell. It was not fat.

    Young men flocked to whaling, The world needed light.

    Call me Ishmael. When Drake found oil. The theory was this oil was dead whales from the flood.

    That is our modern world.

    Reply
  223. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    I joke , these are the most ruthless people on Earth.

    Reply
  224. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Battle of Britain 27. Scramble / Battle in the Air

    Reply
  225. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    These are the most ruthless people on Earth.

    Reply
  226. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Reply
  227. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Pure Prairie League Kansas City Southern

    Reply
  228. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    Once I said I would jump off the edge of the world, now my toes are over the line.

    Life is a funny old dog.

    Reply
  229. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    The Doors – Break On Through (Official Video)

    Reply
  230. Colorado Bob

     /  April 1, 2016

    The Doors – Roadhouse Blues

    Reply
  231. Jeremy

     /  April 1, 2016

    “While thousands of Americans fought against fascism in the Spanish Civil War, some chose to back Franco’s fascist regime. The most notable was the CEO of the American oil giant Texaco. He violated U.S. law by selling Franco’s regime discounted oil on credit. Also in violation of U.S. law, the oil was transported to Spain on U.S. ships.”

    Reply
  232. Jason Box’s recent blog entry: More Greenland melt under cloudy conditions.

    The study decomposes the ice melt energy into contributions. Together, atmospheric heat and condensation delivered more energy to the lower elevations of the ice sheet than absorbed sunlight during pulses in July and August 2012. It’s counterintuitive that under cloudy conditions there can be more melting, especially because the surface is so dark in this lower 1/3 of the ice sheet elevations. It goes to show that the ice sheet melt does not get a break just because the sun is blocked.

    Climate models under-represent this effect, by our estimate by a factor of two, and with the frequency of warmer air masses driven over Greenland expected to increase with climate change (Collins et al., 2013), the impact of atmospheric heat and condensation will probably bring Greenland ice melt loss faster than forecast.

    Prefaced by “This is not an April 1 joke”…

    Reply
    • – “atmospheric heat and condensation”: Terms usually associated with ‘tropical’, sub-tropical, or steamy conditions.
      Sounds like a nice warm thermal blanket. Something you don’t want in the polar regions or upper latitudes.

      Reply
      • no, definitely not something you’d want. once the summer arctic sea ice melts out in the next few years, arctic amplification will really set in, and once that happens i’d guess it’ll bring this warm thermal blanket to much higher elevations on the ice sheet, further accelerating ice loss.

        Reply
    • Tweet scheduled on this, thanks.

      Reply
  233. Jeremy

     /  April 1, 2016

    When I read this :

    “So few people in Norway want to eat whale meat that it’s ending up in the feed manufactured for animals on fur farms, according to a new document released by the Environmental Investigation Agency, a London-based nonprofit, and the U.S.-based Animal Welfare Institute. The document shows that more than 113 metric tons of minke whale products—equivalent to about 75 whales—was bought or used by Rogaland Pelsdyrfôrlaget, the largest manufacturer of animal feed for Norway’s fur industry.”

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160331-norway-minke-whaling-fur-farms/

    I realised tha this was true:

    Reply
    • DrFog

       /  April 2, 2016

      Great animation video, epitomises the destructive aspects of anthropomorphism or what it is usually called “progress”, i.e, the apparent bettering of the human condition without any regards whatsoever for other animals and plants habitats.

      The final image of the hubristic and conceited human, ended up having nothing else to contemplate but his own detritus, can probably be already experienced in many places around the Earth.

      I will just change the ending to showing the man profusely sweating in a hothouse world, surrounded by a swarm of flies and mosquitoes and without any any aliens coming here to put an end to all its misery.

      Reply
  234. Jeremy

     /  April 1, 2016

    “There are so many calamities – fish kills in Florida and birds falling out of the skies, epic floods and droughts, the slowing of the ocean currents – that when I prepared the 26th Dispatch From The Endocene I left out a major incident I had intended to include – the abrupt and near total coral bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The fact that it is just one item on the roster of grotesque environmental disasters that will catalyze NO change whatsoever in the engine of human civilization – even though it has to be the most egregious, most atrocious, most stunningly heinous example of anthropogenic ecocide – is astonishing. It is proof, were any to be needed, that nothing – nothing, not an ice free Arctic, not a huge ice shelf breaking off Antarctica raising sea levels a foot in a week, not thousands of deaths in a heat wave, not storms so violent they lift boulders from the bottom of the sea – NOTHING will stop people from availing themselves blindly and greedily to the bounteous largess of Earth…until it is all gone, and there is none left. The debacle in the reef is the latest example of humanity ceaselessly rendering the biosphere into a morgue. It’s as awful as though all the forests were dying, and we managed to ignore it.

    Oh, wait.”

    http://witsendnj.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/earth-embalmed.html

    Reply
  235. Jeremy

     /  April 1, 2016

    Explains why the natural world will die and nobody will notice, or even care.
    Watch from 12:45 min.

    “In the second half, Max continues his talk with Michael Betancourt about his new book, The Critique of Digital Capitalism. Michael suggests we are evolving into our pocket calculators as the submerged costs of social networks bite. They also discuss ‘the aura of information’ – everything can become data; once it becomes information, it can become a tool; but that fantasy implodes when we start having to take account of physical costs.”

    Reply
  236. Reply
  237. Reply
  238. Jeremy

     /  April 1, 2016

    Richard Heinberg spells it out.

    Reply
  239. – Hot flashes for Siberia and AK/BC coastal zones:

    Reply
  240. – USA OK Anthropogenic Earthquake Central – The Totally Mad Pursuit of Fossil Fuels

    ODOT has new earthquake bridge inspection process

    OKLAHOMA – Some big news about earthquakes in Oklahoma – a yearlong study took a hard look at how strong an earthquake would need to be in our state to damage transportation infrastructure, like bridges.

    The magic number appears to be 4.7, and knowing this number is supposed to help the Oklahoma Department of Transportation with their inspection and repair efforts.

    When it comes to earthquakes, Oklahoma won’t be getting a break anytime soon.

    Just this week, the USGS released a survey that found our state has a 1 in 8 chance of experiencing damaging quakes this year.

    That beats California, the state that typically has the highest probability.

    “Ideally, we’d like to not worry about earthquakes, but it’s a fact that we’re living with now…”
    http://kfor.com/2016/04/01/odot-has-new-earthquake-bridge-inspection-process/

    Reply
  241. – Hey Andy in SD:
    NWS Seattle ‏@NWSSeattle 4h4 hours ago

    A little perspective on the current weather. 2 PM temperature in Seattle is the same as San Diego. #wawx

    Reply
  242. Vic

     /  April 2, 2016

    Saudi Arabia is planning to establish a $2tn (£1.4tn) sovereign wealth fund by selling off its state petroleum assets in preparation for a world beyond oil.

    The sale of a first tranche of shares to private investors via an initial public offering (IPO) in the state-owned Saudi Aramco could start as soon as next year, with the eventual aim of being big enough to potentially buy some of the world’s largest companies such as Apple and Google’s parent, Alphabet.

    http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/apr/01/saudi-arabia-plans-to-sell-state-oil-assets-to-create-2tn-wealth-fund

    Reply
  243. – Meanwhile there are other pressing struggles:

    Reply
  244. Andy in SD

     /  April 2, 2016

    Here is to hoping that Robert has been scarce due to great luck, good health and fantastic successes.

    Besides that, hope he’s ok!

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 2, 2016

      He did have that Hansen 2 article he was planning, and so much has happened.
      I too hope he is OK

      Reply
  245. Jeremy

     /  April 2, 2016

    “In one of the largest financial collapses in recent years, Sun Edison, valued at $10 billion in July, now prepares for bankruptcy.”

    “Solar-energy company SunEdison Inc. plans to file for bankruptcy protection in coming weeks, a dramatic about-face for a company whose market value stood at nearly $10 billion in July.”

    For the mathematically challenged, $10 billion is ten thousand million dollars!

    http://mishtalk.com/2016/04/01/from-10-billion-to-worthless-in-8-months-solar-hype-financial-engineering-at-its-finest/#more-36634

    Reply
  246. Ryan in New England

     /  April 2, 2016

    This is big news. Saudi Arabia will sell assets of its state owned oil company to create a 2 trillion dollar wealth fund in an effort to move away from depending on oil for the majority of Saudi Arabia’s income.

    http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/apr/01/saudi-arabia-plans-to-sell-state-oil-assets-to-create-2tn-wealth-fund

    Reply
  247. utoutback

     /  April 2, 2016

    In the face of the latest news – an editorial in the Guardian:

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/02/does-climate-change-make-it-immoral-to-have-kids

    Is hope dying?

    Reply
    • I have a daughter who just turned 18. Through my relationship with
      her I have learned about the human capacity for love. My love for her is infinite and cannot be described in words. This love brings joy and meaning to life. On the flip side, the greatest suffering I have known is the reality that she is 18 in a world whose life support system is dying at the hands of human beings.

      I would not bring another child into this world knowing what I know now.

      The author concludes the opposite—-he says:

      “I come down on the side of advocating reproduction. It gets back to the power we have, we humans. Such devastating power, with which we’ve already changed our world so dramatically. Maybe we can change it back, or at least innovate to survive. What if, and this is obviously a huge “if”, some young person, perhaps a certain 11-year-old in a Black Sabbath T-shirt (I highly doubt it, he can rarely remember to take his lunchbox out of his knapsack at the end of the day), perhaps someone who is not yet born, perhaps not yet conceived, is the one super-genius to figure out the invention that could save the planet?”

      The words that jump out at me in the above paragraph is “figure out the invention that could save the planet”.

      IMO—–the planet —-or I should say the biosphere of this planet—-will not be saved by an “invention” as long as homo not so sapiens are the dominant species.

      Unless the “invention” includes deleting the part of the human brain where greed, ego and short term thinking rule our actions.

      If human beings can’t collectively move in the direction of greater compassion and empathy for all of life on earth, no “invention” will save us.

      Reply
      • The last of my three kids finishes high school next month. In comparison to what I saw at their age, in the late 70s, the opportunities they face and the burden of concerns about the future (climate change, entrenched fascism slant crony capitalism in their country, the insanely widening wealth gap, etc.) make me wonder how they can even consider starting families. It has become as if you have to be insanely wealthy AND scarily oblivious to the realities of the planet to be anything but scared about or angry at what has happened.

        IMHO, the angle that some baby born today will incredibly conceptualize a new invention that solves our problems is just absurd. It is irresponsible. Imagine you are in your home with a fire and the room is filling with smoke. Your life is in imminent danger; why not ease your concern by rationalizing that ‘all fires eventually go out, so I will be fine’.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 2, 2016

      The global crisis we face is the primary reason that I don’t have, and won’t have, children. The secondary reason is that I live in America, a very rich country that more and more resembles the third world.

      Reply
  248. rustj2015

     /  April 2, 2016

    And this, an updated version of The Limits of Growth:
    “A challenging lesson from the [Limits to Growth] scenarios is that global environmental issues are typically intertwined and should not be treated as isolated problems. Another lesson is the importance of taking pre-emptive action well ahead of problems becoming entrenched. Regrettably, the alignment of data trends with the [Limits to Growth] dynamics indicates that the early stages of collapse could occur within a decade, or might even be underway. This suggests, from a rational risk-based perspective, that we have squandered the past decades, and that preparing for a collapsing global system could be even more important than trying to avoid collapse.”
    http://espas.eu/orbis/sites/default/files/generated/document/en/MSSI-ResearchPaper-4_Turner_2014.pdf

    Reply
    • Very powerful (and depressing) article. Thanks for posting rustj2015.

      Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  April 2, 2016

        Don’t panic Caroline.
        Collapse is now a given, just a question of when.

        To be forewarned is to be forearmed!

        I have an 11 year old, yikes!

        Reply
  249. Dry climate squeezing city’s water supply

    The water supply to Karachi from one of the sources has stopped, after which the supply situation has aggravated further, an official of Karachi Water and Sewerage Board (KWSB) said on Tuesday.

    There are two sources of water to Karachi, Hub Dam and River Indus. Due to climate change there has been no precipitation. Hub Dam has almost dried and in result water supply is almost become zero to city, said Ayub Sheikh, official KWSB.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/sindh/23-Mar-2016/dry-climate-squeezing-city-s-water-supply

    Reply
  250. Reply
  251. Reply
  252. Colorado Bob

     /  April 2, 2016

    New cause of exceptional Greenland melt revealed

    As Robert Fausto of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, lead author of the study, says, “When we were analysing our weather station data, we were quite surprised, that the exceptional melt rates we observed were primarily caused by warm and moist air, because ice sheet wide melt is usually dominated by radiant energy from sunlight. ”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160401130828.htm

    Reply
    • – This is the fourth (?) independent reference in the comment string that reinforces this conclusion for Greenland, or the Arctic. Posts by Sam Carana, Jason Box, and CIRES — all pointed to this as well — pretty convincing.

      – I think about this sort of thing every time I look up at a white moisture and aerosol laden sky above the PNW.

      Reply
  253. Colorado Bob

     /  April 2, 2016

    March temperatures sets record as hottest ever, Bureau of Meteorology says

    Information released by the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) indicated it was the hottest March on record, reaching 1.7 degrees Celsius above the long-term average.

    This eclipsed the 1986 record of 1.67 degrees above the average, BoM said in its monthly climate report. ……………………………..
    March 2 became Australia’s hottest day on record.

    Averaged across the country, it reached a top of 38 degrees Celsius.

    There was no relief overnight either with minimum overnight temperatures the warmest ever, smashing the 1983 record by 0.83 degrees.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-01/march-temperatures-sets-record-as-hottest-ever,-bom-says/7293500

    Reply
  254. Colorado Bob

     /  April 2, 2016

    China’s Yangtze River to face catastrophic spring floods as near record El Nino strikes

    Water levels may swell up to 80 per cent and could result in flooding as severe as 1998 disaster when the worst El Nino in history killed thousands and affected 220 million across 24 provinces, says flood control official

    http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/1932867/chinas-yangtze-river-face-massive-flooding-water-levels

    Reply
  255. Colorado Bob

     /  April 2, 2016

    Dying dolphins on Gulf Coast puzzle scientists

    Something is happening on the Mississippi Gulf Coast that has marine biologists and veterinarians concerned.

    “These animals are the canary in the mine. They reflect what’s going on in the environment and they are mammals like you and I, so whatever happens to them, will ultimately happen to us,” explained Dr. Moby Solangi, a marine biologist and Director for the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport.

    So far this year, 47 dolphins have been found dead on beaches. That’s already more than the 35 total in 2015, and the 45 total in 2014.

    http://www.wwltv.com/news/local/dying-dolphins-on-gulf-coast-puzzle-scientists/114780344

    Reply
  256. Excerpts (paraphrased) from new Paul Beckwith video regarding the abrupt climate change:

    “We have an emergency situation on our hands.
    We’re now reaching a point where the public will go from not caring/tuning out to going into mode of sheer panic”

    We know we have a serious problem when:
    “scientists start calling things blobs because they don’t really know what is going on”.

    He closes with his consistent opinion on arctic cooling—-he feels it is necessary for survival.
    While I am opposed to geoengineering, it is hard to dismiss Beckwith’s concerns about methane release as the arctic warms/melts—-along with the inevitable (?) blue ocean event wreaking unimaginable havoc on all life systems.

    Reply
  257. – More quaking in AK:

    Magnitude-6.2 earthquake rocks Alaskan Peninsula
    Chignik Lake, Alaska Hit By M6 Earthquake

    http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/breaking-magnitude62-earthquak-1/56439375

    Reply
  258. – Russia SHUTS DOWN border with Europe amid fears over new migrant route through the ARCTIC

    A SURGE in migrants sneaking into Europe and Russia through the ARCTIC has prompted unprecedented border closures.

    The number of people applying for aslyum at the freezing Arctic crossings has already doubled from what it was for the entirety of last year.

    Russia and Finland have now agreed to temporarily close their Arctic border to migrants.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin decided to tighten controls at the joint Arctic border in a move to halt the illegal crossing of migrants.
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/657646/Russia-SHUTS-DOWN-border-Europe-fears-new-migrant-route-ARCTIC

    Reply
  259. – NA USA PA DC – Strong winds

    Reply
    • – The weather — it is active.
      Restless?

      Zack Labe ‏@ZLabe 41m41 minutes ago

      Active convective season to-date for NWS PHL office w/ 2016 leading in number of severe thunderstorm warnings so far

      Reply
      • Ian Livingston ‏@islivingston 52m52 minutes ago

        DC/Balt region comparison of tonight’s gusts to the other big wind events recently. Bottom two are not official.

        Reply
    • – How’s the weather in your area Robert? Any of this energy your way?

      – Two texts – one w gif image:

      Anthony Sagliani ‏@anthonywx
      -These may look like mere showers, but any of these are capable of transferring tremendous wind momentum to surface.

      Reply
      • dnem

         /  April 3, 2016

        I live about 30 miles northeast of RS. Very energetic! Temp dropped about 30 deg F overnight with winds gusting over 40, perhaps touching 50. We had some unusual lightning at about 9 pm and a brief burst of sideways wind-driven rain. Dog was not happy with conditions! Starting to slowly calm down now. Probably highest winds at my house since the derecho, which was the most energetic weather event I’ve ever witnessed.

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  April 3, 2016

        I’m a couple hundred miles north of Robert, and the weather has been crazy. It was warm, humid and in the 70s on Friday. Last night started with a thunderstorm, that turned to vicious winds and heavy snow. Today is extremely windy (30 mph with much higher gusts) with highs 40 degrees cooler than 48 hours ago. We had wind chills in the single digits this morning and temps in the teens.

        Reply
  260. Hilary

     /  April 3, 2016

    Here in NZ were are going backwards on solar! Depressing:
    Friday, 1 April, 2016 – 10:56
    A group of organisations today expressed shock at the fact that a New Zealand energy company is introducing a tax of up to 26% on solar power and batteries from today, April 1.

    North Island energy provider Unison Energy will quietly introduce higher user lines and electricity charges on any new rooftop solar or battery system in the Hawkes Bay, Rotorua and Taupo area installed from 1 April. The tax will be extended to all solar power users on April 1, 2019. It will increase customers’ bills by up to 26%, increasing them by between $128 and $258 a year.

    Unison has held private, one-on-one meetings with solar energy companies, informing them of the move.

    “Solar customers have already suffered after the power companies slashed the rate they pay for solar energy fed back into the grid. People are saving money and energy by installing solar power, doing their bit for the climate,” said Kevin Hunter of local Hawkes Bay solar business Cellpower. “Isn’t this what we should all be working towards to limit climate change and reduce electricity costs?”

    “Today might be April 1, but this is no joke,” said Executive Director of Greenpeace New Zealand, Russel Norman. “That, in 2016, only months after the world agreed in Paris to reduce emissions to stop climate change, a New Zealand company is specifically taxing solar energy users is extraordinary – and wrong.”

    In the US, the solar industry now employs more people than Facebook, Google and Amazon combined and is growing nearly 12 times faster than the overall economy. Here in New Zealand this clean technology industry is raidly growing, creating high value new jobs.

    “In virtually every other nation in the OECD, solar power is subsidised to encourage uptake and clean tech job creation, yet here in New Zealand our monopoly power companies are taxing the technology to kill the industry at birth,” said Brendan Winitana, Chairman of the Sustainable Electricity Association New Zealand (SEANZ).

    Reply
  261. Jeremy

     /  April 3, 2016

    Bye bye Great Barrier Reef (and so much more, forests, glaciers, fish …)
    Hello 500,000 Tesla cars (and so much more, tires, roads, batteries …)

    We are in so much trouble going forward if people think that Tesla cars are going to be our salvation.

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 3, 2016

      One step at a time Jeremy, we can and are reducing CO2 for the Electricity grid, but CO2 for transportation is still a huge issue, actually a key factor in the pollution issue as well

      Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  April 3, 2016

        Indeed Abel, but we’re taking tiny steps at a time when giant leaps are required.
        Unfortunately, and excuse the pun, we’ve run out of road!

        And I think that most people, deep down, actually know this.

        Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  April 3, 2016

        And, there’s an approximate 40 year lag between CO2 release and the effects it causes.
        Today’s climate changes are based on CO2 releases of the 1980’s !

        Reply
    • DrFog

       /  April 3, 2016

      Jeremy’s cynicism regarding all this “green” euphoria around the new affordable electric Tesla car is fully justified, in my opinion.

      Just look at the parts needed to assemble that car, the mineral extraction of the raw materials (even though some might come from recycling), the transportation to many factories around the world to process and transform those raw materials, the production of the thousands of parts needed to produce each car, probably as in many factories, and one can have an idea of the huge amount of CO2 that will be needed to produce just one electric car.

      Of course, this claim should be properly quantified and referenced.

      Some months ago someone posted on this blog a link to an excellent AGW related documentary: “The Cross of the Moment”

      In it, you can hear Prof. David Klein, a mathematical physicist, California State University, Northridge, saying this between 49m40s to 50m39s

      “It is true that electric cars are less polluting when you drive them, much more efficient, specially if you supply the electricity from renewable energy sources, but it turns out that half of the total carbon footprint of a car, i.e. the amount of carbon released to the atmosphere by the existence of the car, comes at the point of *manufacturing the car*

      So, electric cars have a carbon footprint too, through the manufacturing, better than the gasoline cars, true, but, because of the nature of Capitalism, because its need to expand and find expanding markets, the selling of these cars to China, India, all [other countries] around the world, is likely to make things worse rather than better.

      What we really need is first-rate mass transportation systems.”

      Reply
      • DrFog

         /  April 3, 2016

        Couldn’t post two links above, so here is the other link I wanted to post:

        Prof. David Klein

        Reply
      • Jeremy

         /  April 3, 2016

        We need to create society where people don’t need to spend their time moving so many miles every day.
        Modern society is a heat engine.
        We need to localize.

        Unfortunately, we have neither the inclination to do this, or the time.
        The Great Barrier Reef is dying right in front of our eyes and not even a mention in the main stream media. Few know, fewer care.

        Once the Arctic Ice is gone, we can expect very rapid runaway global temperature rise.

        Reply
  262. Abel Adamski

     /  April 3, 2016

    Food for thought
    http://climatecrocks.com/2016/04/02/the-weekend-wonk-what-this-weeks-antarctic-study-means/

    A new climate change study “jolts sea-rise predictions,” according to The Washington Post, with sea levels projected to increase so much that The New York Times says they would “likely provoke a profound crisis within the lifetimes of children being born today.” This disturbing news made the top-foldfront pages of the Post and the Times, but it was completely ignored by the broadcast television networks’ nightly news programs.


    The nightly newscasts’ failure to cover this study follows a paltry year of climate change coverage on the broadcast networks in 2015. A Media Matters study found that ABC, CBS, and NBC collectively devoted less time to covering climate change during their nightly news and Sunday show broadcasts than they did in the previous year, even though 2015 was a landmark year for climate-related news that included the EPA finalizing the Clean Power Plan, Pope Francis issuing a climate change encyclical, President Obama rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline, and 195 countries around the world reaching a historic climate agreement in Paris.

    The good news, he says, is that it projects little or no sea-level rise from Antarctic melt if greenhouse-gas emissions are reduced quickly enough to limit the average global temperature rise to about 2 °C.

    The findings add to a growing body of research that suggests that Antarctic ice is less stable than once thought. In its 2013 report2, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that Antarctic melting would contribute just a few centimetres to sea-level rise by 2100. But as scientists develop a better understanding of how the ocean and atmosphere affect the ice sheet, their projections of the continent’s future are growing more dire.

    Reply
  263. Colorado Bob

     /  April 3, 2016

    Oil spill tests on ice prove Arctic quests risky

    The skimmer is lowered from the rear of the icebreaker, its weight pushing massive pieces of ice under the water and forcing the spilt oil up to the surface, where the sticky black goo can be sucked up.

    Luckily, this is just a test: as the world’s superpowers eye the lucrative Arctic region with growing interest, unprecedented oil spill clean-up tests in icy Finnish conditions reveal just how hazardous and challenging an accident in the Arctic’s pristine sea ice could be.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-oil-ice-arctic-quests-risky.html#jCp

    Reply
  264. Ailsa

     /  April 3, 2016

    Vote Trump, Get Dumped – asking people to pledge that they won’t “date, sleep with or canoodle with” anyone who supports Donald Trump.

    In Ohio a couple have started a movement called Vote Trump, Get Dumped. Alongside a selection of his quotes (including “26,000 unreported sexual assaults in the military – only 238 convictions. What did these geniuses expect when they put men & women together?” and “If Hillary Clinton can’t satisfy her husband, what makes her think she can satisfy America?”), they lay out their plan for an anti-Trump sex strike.

    http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/apr/03/voting-trump-is-so-unsexy-eva-wiseman

    Reply
  265. Tom

     /  April 3, 2016

    70 mph gusts last night. Over 45,000 homes without power in the county in which I reside (fortunately, I’m not one of them . . . yet). The wind is still howling out there, and with it the temp has dropped significantly.

    Reply
  266. Jeremy

     /  April 3, 2016

    We had to destroy the forest to save it.
    It all has to go folks.

    Poland is destroying Europe’s most precious forest.

    “Local communities were permitted to harvest 48,000 cubic metres of timber each year but the government is to allow at least 180,000 cubic metres.”
    Local communities were permitted to harvest 48,000 cubic metres of timber each year but the government is to allow at least 180,000 cubic metres. The new environment minister, Jan Szyszko, claims that the forest is “rotting away” because spruce trees are being killed by the spruce bark beetle. But scientists say such intervention will do more harm than good.

    “Unhappy is not a good word – we are devastated,” says Rafal Kowalczyk, director of the Mammal Research Institute inside Białowieża. “If we allow it to become a managed forest, its value and its biodiversity will be lost. It will take hundreds of years to reverse this kind of destruction.”

    “As Kowalczyk explains, the shallow-rooted spruce is suffering because of drier soils and climate change.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/03/poland-europe-bialowieza-forest-eu

    Reply
  267. John McCormick

     /  April 3, 2016

    Robert, Like so many of us, I hope you are well and productive.

    It started for me at 324 ppm. My spirit was raised and smashed many time but the pessimism kept hold. Now, the Gulf Stream is measurably slowing down. There is no possible way to change this. We are witnessing our ability to change the earth’s heat transfer.

    It has always been the thermo-haline circulation that brought tropical heat to that place in North Atlantic where the current sank to the depth and travelled around the globe. It takes about 200 years for that parcel of ocean to return to the same spot.

    This is the turning point we feared.

    Meltwater will expand that blob of fresh water and prevent tropical heat to submerge. Marine life knew this a few years ago and are migrating to the North’s colder water. The ‘cool pool’ was not evident in 1998.

    This is abrupt climate change! Storms, erratic weather and precipitation, marine life absolutely disrupted. We have a window seat.

    Lets say we collectively understand this changes everything and cannot be changed. From here on out, we adapt while throwing everything into slowing the global temperature increase. For us individuals, business owners, homeowners and children, all we can politicaly do is watch the fire trucks go by.

    And, we have only one realistic response. We can use less energy by weatherizing, replacing and retrofitting everything whenState governments finally tax carbon fuels and use that tens of millions to provide rebates, etc. to efficiency customers. We are going to do that in Vermont. That is all we can do; use less energy.

    Reply
    • Ditto to all you said John.

      “Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth” Buddha

      Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 3, 2016

        You are all so brilliant here, facing our predicament with such clear eyes and care. I honour you all, and exhort you to keep faith:

        Reply
  268. The future is here.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  April 3, 2016

      Actions, not policies needed to address water crisis: speakers

      Former secretary irrigation Sindh and water expert Muhammad Idris Rajput while delivering his presentation on “inter-provincial water issues of Pakistan” said that water disputes between Sindh and Punjab dated back to British Rule when new canals, barrages and dams were planned, constructed or envisioned.

      He said various commissions and committees were formed to resolve the water dispute but failed since Anderson Committee 1935 to Haleem Commission in 1983 because of three main reasons of the dispute including shortage of water, injustice in distribution and fear of future impact.

      http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2016/04/02/city/karachi/actions-not-polices-needed-to-address-water-crisis-speakers/

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  April 3, 2016

        Apex court observes that problems plaguing KWSB can be done away with only if the administration decides to do so.

        The Supreme Court’s (SC) three-member bench hearing applications with respect to operation of illegal water hydrants in the city, on Thursday, observed that ill-governance and corruption had destroyed the port city’s water supply system.

        The bench, headed by Justice Amir Hani Muslim, also heard applications pertaining to illegal water supply connections and tampering of water lines of the Karachi Water and Sewerage Board (KWSB) in different areas of the city.
        http://www.thenews.com.pk/print/104287-SC-blames-corruption-for-citys-water-crisis

        Reply
      • – “ill-governance and corruption” – An understated condition of most civil governments and their agencies. Though many are staffed by capable and caring people — they are often overwhelmed with corrupting influences.
        – “Negative Civics”

        Reply
      • – Related subject: Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

        Reply
  269. @BernieSanders
    Follow
    Climate change is already having devastating effects across the world. It’s too late for incremental change. We must act boldly.
    8:30 AM – 3 Apr 2016

    Reply
  270. Zack Labe ‏@ZLabe 1h1 hour ago

    Record high temperatures are possible this week across the West with 90’s even in parts of #NorCal

    Reply
  271. – BREAKING — But don’t know what it portends — but it is Putin’s Russia… in a time of global crisis(s).

    Reply
    • – Q: No sprinklers in the Defense Ministry?

      Reply
    • – Maybe it’s nothing but old wiring…

      – reuters.com/article/us-russia-fire-defenceministry

      “Major-General Igor Konashenkov, on the scene, told the Interfax news agency that the flames had been put out, but that work was continuing to extinguish parts of the building that were still generating smoke and smoldering.

      A source told Interfax the fire may have started as a result of a short circuit involving old electrical wiring. The Emergency Situations Ministry said the fire had covered an area of at least 50 square meters.

      Reply
  272. Ailsa

     /  April 3, 2016

    The EPA’s Clean Power Plan Just Got A Huge Influx Of Support

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/04/01/3765689/clean-power-plan-lawmakers-amicus-brief/

    More than 200 current and former members of Congress are coming to the aid of the Clean Power Plan, the Obama administration’s rule for reducing carbon emissions from power plants that’s currently embroiled in a legal fight.

    Reply
  273. Colorado Bob

     /  April 4, 2016

    KARACHI:

    The fate of the country’s first-ever privately installed power generation and water desalination plant hangs in limbo, as the Defence Housing Authority (DHA) and the money-lending bank continue to fight over its assets instead of making it operational.

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/1077296/delayed-development-dha-desalination-plant-yet-to-start-working-as-legal-battle-continues/

    Reply
  274. Colorado Bob

     /  April 4, 2016

    Risk of Once-in-100-Year Drought Means One More India Rate Cut

    Two years of back-to-back drought have meant India’s reservoirs are three-quarters of the past decade’s average. Water scarcity could hurt crops, worsen price pressures and dent growth in Asia’s third-biggest economy. …………………….. History shows that India hasn’t had three back-to-back droughts in at least 100 years, ………………… The lowest rainfall since 2009 parched vast tracts of farm land, hurting rice, corn, sugar cane and oilseed crops last year. About half of India’s 1.3 billion population is employed in agriculture, which accounts for roughly 18 percent of the nation’s $2 trillion gross domestic product.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-03/risk-of-once-in-100-year-drought-means-one-more-india-rate-cut

    Reply
  275. Colorado Bob

     /  April 4, 2016

    Rains, floods kills 57 in NW Pakistan, PoK
    Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province was worst-hit in the downpour that began last night and caused flash floods in several districts, a Pakistani national disaster management official said.

    Shangla district was most affected where 14 people were killed while 12 people died in Kohistan and eight in Swat, the official said.

    At least eight people, including five children, were killed in Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK) and Gilgit Baltistan regions where land slides buried houses.

    http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/rains-floods-kills-57-in-nw-pakistan-pok-116040400016_1.html

    Reply
  276. Reply
  277. dtlange

     /