The Merciless Rains of Climate Change Hammer Houston, Southeast Texas — 12-18 Inches Accumulation, More Than 1,200 Water Rescues Reported

“I can hear your whisper and distant mutter. I can smell your damp on the breeze and in the sky I see the halo of your violence. Storm I know you are coming.”

*****

The atmospheric ingredients right now are ripe for some serious trouble. Globally, the world is just starting to back away from the hottest temperatures ever recorded. This never-before-seen heat plume, driven on by a fossil-fuel abetted warming not seen in at least 115,000 years and an extreme El Nino combined, has loaded an unprecedented amount of moisture into the Earth’s atmosphere. As El Nino shifts toward La Nina and the Earth marginally cools, a portion of this massive excess of water vapor is bound to fall out as rain — manifesting as terrible extreme precipitation episodes that can result in serious trouble. A seemingly endless procession of freak events that challenge the record books time and time again.

Across the world, we’re starting to see such episodes now. Over the past week, Iran, Yemen, Qatar Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan have experienced flash floods resulting in loss of life. Severe floods spurred a major emergency response effort in Central and Northern Russia this weekend. And in Santiago Chile, streets turned into rivers as a sudden and extraordinary deluge both polluted the water supplies of 1 million people and transformed the world’s largest copper mine into a lake.

(Severe flooding around the world this week includes the Houston area — sections of which have essentially been crippled by 12-18 inches of rainfall over the past 24 hours. In total, more than 1,200 water rescues have been reported throughout the region. Many residents, like the gentleman above, appear to have been shocked and surprised by the flooding’s severity. Video source: Houston ABC News.)

Sudden, Extreme Flooding in Houston Area

In the US, the City of Houston and the region of southeastern Texas experienced its own extreme deluge. There, a stubborn and unyielding high pressure system over the US East Coast, an omega block in the Jet Stream, a cut off upper level low, and a nearly unprecedented amount of moisture streaming in from the Gulf of Mexico and regions to the Equatorial South all conspired to aim a train of powerful storms in the form of an eye-popping mesoscale convective system (MCS) at the Houston region. Since early this morning, between 12-18 inches of rainfall fell over the city’s western suburbs with 6-8 inches inundating the city center. In some places, rates of rainfall accumulation hit a crippling rate of nearly 4 inches per hour.

According to Bob Henson at Weather Underground:

… the Houston area was socked on Monday morning by a huge mesoscale convective system (MCS) that drifted southeast across the area, dumping eye-popping amounts of rain: 6” – 8” over central Houston, with 12” – 18” common over the far western suburbs… While individual thunderstorms often weaken after dark, the large mass of thunderstorms that makes up an MCS will often persist overnight and into the next morning, as the MCS cloud tops radiate heat to space and instability is enhanced.

The record single day rainfall total for Houston before today was 11.25 inches. It appears likely that 11.75 inches recorded at Houston International Airport today will mark a new daily high mark for a city that grew up out of fossil fuel burning but now appears to be drowning in the heat-intensified effluent. More to the point, most of Houston’s western suburbs experienced what amounts to an entire typical season’s worth of rainfall in just one 24 hour period.

Drainage systems, not designed to handle anywhere near so much water over so short a period, were rapidly overwhelmed. By midday, more than 70 subdivisions in the Houston region were reported flooded, more than 1,200 vehicle water rescue operations had been conducted along the inundated region’s streets and highways, and more than 1,000 homes were inundated. Seven hospitals were shut down, airport operations were crippled, and more than 100,000 people were reported to be without power. The Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore, not known for understatement, may have hit a bit below the mark when he noted that “this is a mind boggling situation” earlier this afternoon. CNN, in its summation report of this, most recent, disaster declared that the entire city had been basically shut down.

Extreme Storms Houston Texas

(River of moisture flows up from the Equator and Gulf of Mexico and into the Houston region on Monday — spurring extreme rains that cripple the city. A pair of doggedly persistent weather systems — a blocking high to the east and an upper level low to the north contributed to the extreme weather over Houston. Climate change related features like record atmospheric moisture loading, and persistent ridge and trough generation due to Jet Stream changes likely linked to record low Arctic sea ice levels also likely influenced today’s severe storms. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

As of early this evening, a series of somewhat less intense storms still trailed through the Houston region as heavier rains marched off toward the east over Louisiana and Arkansas. A strong moisture flow is expected to persist over Eastern Texas and the southern Mississippi River Valley region through to at least Thursday as both the upper level low and blocking high complicit in Monday’s extreme flooding in Houston appear reluctant to budge from their current positions. As a result, NOAA is predicting another 4-5 inches of rainfall for areas near and just to the North and East of Houston over the next seven days. To this point, it’s worth noting that NOAA’s precipitation models had ‘only’ predicted about 4 inches of rainfall for the past 24 hour period in the near Houston area — a period that produced about five times that total for some locations. So it appears that weather models may be having a little bit of trouble managing the new and extremely dynamic atmospheric conditions now coming into play.

But One Extreme Event of Many in the Past Five Months

Houston’s likely record rainfall for this time of year comes on the back of hailstorms generating up to a billion dollars worth of damage over Northeastern Texas last week and follows a record March inundation of the Mississippi River region just to the North and East. An event that also followed a freak December flooding of Missouri and Illinois which likewise re-organized the record books. Overall, this represents an extreme spate of severe weather for one localized region.

Consistent trough generation in the Jet Stream over the area (likely influenced by record low Arctic sea ice coverage), consistent above average sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico, a strong moisture flow from a record El Nino, and record global temperatures contributing to high atmospheric moisture loadings all influenced severe storm formation over this area during recent months. Sadly, it’s a spate of severe weather that is likely to continue at least until the end of Spring.

Links:

Widespread Flooding, More than 1,000 Water Rescues in Houston Area

Houston Largely Shut Down Amidst Severe Rainfall, Flooding

Massive Flood in Houston

Houston Texas Average Rainfall

Flash Floods Claim 18 Lives Across Saudia Arabia

Deadly Rains Pound the Middle East

Flash Floods in North Afghanistan Claim 38 Lives Overnight

World’s Largest Copper Mine Shut Down in Santiago Flood

As A Titanic El Nino Begins to Fade, What Fresh Trouble Will Record Warm World Bring?

NOAA Quantitative Predictive Forecasts

Punishing Four Season Storm Grips US

Mangled Jet Stream, River of Moisture Set to Deliver Severe Flooding to Mississippi River Valley

Houston ABC News

Hat Tip to Colorado Bob

Hat Tip to Greg

Hat Tip to DT Lange

Hat Tip to Daniel Hatem

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149 Comments

  1. Jeremy

     /  April 18, 2016

    Reply
  2. – Well said, Robert:
    “… it appears that weather models may be having a little bit of trouble managing the new and extremely dynamic atmospheric conditions now coming into play.”🙂

    Reply
    • 😉

      Well, we identified some risk for this late last week. Held fire due to NOAA models coming into more ‘normal’ ranges. Should have pulled the trigger.

      Reply
      • Loni

         /  April 19, 2016

        One would think that these events would inspire the insurance industry into action, i.e., calling congress telling them to start funding NASA/NOAA again.

        Reply
    • Notable statement!

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      I have noticed this with my local news’ weather forecasts. They tend to underestimate precipitation amounts and high temperatures in a consistent sort of way that makes me think their models need to be adjusted to reflect the properties of our new climate. This is no longer the climate of the 20th century.

      Reply
    • John McCormick

       /  April 19, 2016

      For us humans, it will be death by a million paper cuts.

      Reply
  3. June

     /  April 18, 2016

    Another great post, Robert. It’s so exasperating that the mainstream media won’t make the connections or place these ever increasing events in context, the way you do so well.

    Reply
    • Thanks, June. Will be interested to hear what Dr Masters has to say about it all. It’s a pretty stark context. Worth noting that Houston got hammered pretty hard last Spring as well. I don’t recall rainfall rates hitting four inches an hour. More like 2 inches per hour in those events.

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      Exactly, June! Almost every day the national news leads with stories about record breaking extreme weather events, but they will NEVER point out the reason that unprecedented weather continues to occur at ever greater frequencies. Never. They could easily mention that all of these extreme events were expected, and we were warned by James Hansen (and others) three decades ago that our continued CO2 emissions would cause this exact scenario. And things are only going to get worse. Instead, they play dumb and act as if this latest event is a total mystery, and the other unprecedented events around the world are simply a coincidence.

      Reply
  4. – And just to keep things interesting:

    Reply
  5. Cate

     /  April 18, 2016

    Oh, my heart nearly broke for that poor man. I was yelling at that little twerp to go help him for godssake!

    Reply
  6. Colorado Bob

     /  April 19, 2016

    My image today , …….. The Russians blowing up ice on their Northern Rivers. Because it rained on their snow pack.

    My thinking is correct . Musk Ox , and Caribou can’t scrap aside ice like snow, Ice is not snow.

    These animals don’t have the tools to deal with ice.

    Reply
    • That permafrost is in for a world of hurt this year. Big warm up over the Yamal region by the end of this week. Substantially above freezing temperatures over the Kara, parts of the Laptev and a big chunk of the 80 North pie.

      GFS is predicting +4 C above average readings for above 66 North. For this time of year that’s godawful hot.

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  April 19, 2016

        Non-Linear

        Reply
      • wili

         /  April 19, 2016

        The latest from MacDougall & Knutti is not very happy reading in this regard. The permafrost will contribute up to 54% of cumulative anthropogenic emissions:

        MacDougall, A. H. and Knutti, R.:

        “Projecting the release of carbon from permafrost soils using a perturbed parameter ensemble modelling approach,”

        Biogeosciences, 13, 2123-2136, doi:10.5194/bg-13-2123-2016, 2016

        http://www.biogeosciences.net/13/2123/2016/

        Reply
        • That’s a rough number. Far worse than the 10-30 percent consensus figure for permafrost this Century. However, the paper provides one hell of an uncertainty range:

          “Overall our simulations suggest that the permafrost carbon cycle feedback to climate change will make a significant contribution to climate change over the next centuries and millennia, releasing a quantity of carbon 3 to 54 % of the cumulative anthropogenic total.”

          Basically, a range of 30 to 550 gigatons. That’s a huge uncertainty.

          And:

          “We estimate that by year 2100 the permafrost region may release between 56 (13 to 118) Pg C under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and 102 (27 to 199) Pg C under RCP 8.5, with substantially more to be released under each scenario by the year 2300.”

          For reference, human beings release about 10 Pg of carbon into the atmosphere each year. So these totals are in the range of 5-10 percent of the current human emission over the course of a Century. But we should certainly dig deeper and also not act as if all of history ends in 2100. These longer term estimates are also valid and worth a closer look.

          Thanks for this Wili. I’ll be working on it presently. Looks like I have two papers to take a crack at this week.

      • wili

         /  April 19, 2016

        And of course that’s not the only carbon feedback, much less the only climate feedback.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  April 19, 2016

        You’re welcome. Glad you like it, but sorry to put any burden on you. You might recall that MacDougall was also the lead author on an earlier important paper on permafrost carbon feedback: http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v5/n10/full/ngeo1573.html

        Reply
        • I wrote a bit on these earlier pieces. Glad to see a new update. Wish someone would do some serious assessment regarding other carbon stores/sinks so we could get to work on a global feedback picture.

      • wili

         /  April 19, 2016

        More on the earlier MacDougall paper here: http://www.skepticalscience.com/Macdougall.html (This was part of a pretty good series of articles on permafrost at SkS by Skuce.)

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      There has been a dramatic rise in thaw/refreeze events in that region, and you’re spot on, Bob. The animals that feed on grass and lichen cannot scrape through the ice to access their food source. The ice can be devastating to the herds.

      Reply
  7. Colorado Bob

     /  April 19, 2016

    Once again , “The Energy Capital of the World ” drowns in Climate Change,

    Reply
    • Yeah. And this year worst than last.

      Maybe they should just cut to the chase and call it the climate change capital of the world.

      Reply
      • If I were the emergency management guy dealing with this mess, I’d be looking for a lawyer to sue ExxonMobil Mobil et al for damages. Glad we had the sense to leave Houston 50 odd years ago.

        Reply
        • I agree. Summons worded to the effect of — now what did you know about climate change early on? What did you work through your wide-ranging media and political influence to cover up? How did these activities result in delayed action to prevent climate change? How much in the way of increased damages do we now see as a result?

        • Right. These folks should be bankrupted as soon as legally possible. Would be nice to “claw back” execs’ salaries also.

    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 19, 2016

      And sort of right next door is the Fracking Capital also known as the earthquake capital.

      DERRR

      Reply
    • wili

       /  April 19, 2016

      “Fierce Tropical Cyclone Fantala stormed to Category 5 strength north of Madagascar over the weekend with an impressive burst of strengthening, making the cyclone the most powerful on record anywhere in the Indian Ocean. Fantala’s estimated peak sustained winds of 150 knots (173 mph), averaged over 1 minute by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, topped the previous record holders for the Southwest Indian Ocean (Tropical Cyclone Eunice, Feb-Mar 2015, peak 1-minute winds of 140 knots) and the North Indian Ocean (Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu, June 2007, peak 1-minute winds of 145 knots).”

      Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  April 19, 2016

      Non-Linear

      Reply
  8. Colorado Bob

     /  April 19, 2016

    The best sinking song ever –

    The Tragically Hip – New Orleans Is Sinking

    Reply
  9. Colorado Bob

     /  April 19, 2016

    The is why we are lla here =
    wili / April 19, 2016

    How many Strongest, Hottest…etc. record breaking events do we have to have in a row for some people start wondering whether things have gone seriously awry?

    One must move the the message. I have never answered that problem.

    Reply
  10. wili

     /  April 19, 2016

    “Devastating Floods Rock Texas”

    Reply
    • Jean

       /  April 19, 2016

      What goes on in the mind of the Presidential candidate from Texas re all this??Okla is so lucky we did not get a repeat of flooding last year,,Okla Corporate media not discussing Texas flooding .I had to find out from Robert

      Reply
  11. Thank you for reporting. :~)

    Reply
  12. Jeremy

     /  April 19, 2016

    Flooding in Santiago, Chile.

    Reply
  13. Jeremy

     /  April 19, 2016

    Reply
  14. – NA PNW: NWS Seattle ‏@NWSSeattle 58m58 minutes ago

    Record high in #Seattle today of 89°, 30° above the normal of 59°. This is the biggest difference between record and normal on record

    Reply
  15. – Africa – Mid East – Water – Dams

    Will drought fuel water conflict between Cairo, Addis Ababa?

    Ethiopia’s northern regions have been plagued by one of the worst droughts to face the area in decades…

    The Ethiopian plateau, which is one of the main sources of the Nile River, has faced frequent droughts, the worst of which occurred in 1984 and led to a famine that killed around one million Ethiopians. Meanwhile, climate forecast studies and reports confirmed that such recurrent waves of drought have decreased the Blue Nile flooding by up to 20% during the past years and that Ethiopia is among the countries most vulnerable to increasing rates of drought and lack of rainfall due to climate change.

    The exploitation of the water resources of the Blue Nile, which is behind 85% of the Nile River flow, has topped the Ethiopian government’s political agenda since the inauguration of the Renaissance dam project in April 2011. The project will retain the flow of 79 billion cubic meters of water and has consequently been behind the conflict with Egypt.

    http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2016/04/egypt-ethiopia-drought-renaissance-dam-conflict.html#

    Reply
  16. NZ – SLR – Cheating

    Climate change could swamp significant areas with even modest rises in sea levels, a report by the prestigious Royal Society of New Zealand says…

    Coming from New Zealand’s pre-eminent research body for science, the report confirms the severity of the local threat posed by climate change. Chair of the expert panel which wrote it, Professor James Renwick, said New Zealanders were particularly vulnerable.

    “Many New Zealanders live on the coast and two-thirds of us live in flood-prone areas,” he said.

    In South Dunedin, a high water table meant high tides would lead to frequent surface ponding and a lack of drainage for storm water.

    The report added that the east coasts of both the North and South Islands were sensitive to erosion and inundation caused by climate change.

    The Royal Society’s warnings come just a day after New Zealand was accused of cheating over its main climate change weapon, the Emissions Trading Scheme.
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/301826/sea-level-rise-threat-to-nz-coasts

    Reply
    • Ray Kurzweil, one of the oracles of exponentially expanding computer power and access, last week heralded a similar rate of growth for solar — forecasting solar energy dominance in 12 years. He pointed to two doublings in global solar energy’s share of generation capacity since 2012, with two more doublings likely by 2020.

      To this point, a bit of the mystery of why China is building more coal plants even as its use rate is falling has been cleared up. Essentially, each province is allowed to burn only so much coal, out of a total pie of allotted coal use for the nation, in each coal plant. So there’s a perverse incentive to construct more coal plants to get a bigger piece of a shrinking pie. Eventually, this will be uneconomical. Right now, China is putting construction bans in place to prevent malinvestment shock.

      Reply
  17. – I send this for the strikeout:
    – Also — same day, quite a bit of atmospheric particulate must have colored the sunset as visible from PDX. Vantage point is looking west over a few miles/km of land then nothing but open ocean — that’s the scary part to my mind.

    Reply
    • – Ps I don’t know of any forest fires etc in Siberia. Maybe recent AK volcanic activity played a part? But I’ll post a photo of a few days ago before volcano of dirty sunset in PDX.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  April 19, 2016

        How will people know when the sky above look strange, when the only skies they look at are the photoshopped ones on their screens?

        Reply
      • Cate

         /  April 19, 2016

        ..*looks*…

        Reply
      • The Arctic wildfires have yet to light up. There was a decent eruption in AK over the past couple of weeks — so that may be what you’re seeing at this time.

        Reply
  18. – PAGING LAMAR SMITH OF TEXAS – LAMAR WE KNOW YOU ARE IN THERE – COME OUT AND ACCEPT YOUR SUBPOENA – LAMAR…

    The National Weather Service serving Houston called the event “historic” and “severe” and described it as a “worst case scenario.”

    … National Weather Service warned of a drowning risk and exposure to chemicals and snakes.

    “It is not an overstatement to say this was the Houston region’s worst flooding event in nearly 15 years, since Tropical Storm Allison deluged the upper Texas coast and dumped in excess of 30 inches of rain over parts of the city,” wrote Eric Berger, author of the website SpaceCityWeather.com.

    The event has proven remarkable for both its size and intensity. The flash flood warning declared by the National Weather Service Monday morning covered a region encompassing more than 21,000 square miles, the largest in the last decade, at least.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/04/18/houston-region-swamped-and-shutdown-by-historic-flood/

    Reply
  19. Reply
    • Cate

       /  April 19, 2016

      A couple of years ago, a photo was taken of a polar bear swimming near the Hibernia oil platform on the Grand Banks. Hibernia is 300 km ESE of the closest landfall in Newfoundland.

      Reply
  20. – Robert, I sent this post to my wife.
    Her reply to me:
    “Hat tip to you again I see! This is so well researched and written, isn’t it? I too like the poetic salute to the storm!”

    Reply
  21. – Posting this for linked article — plus photo shows a lot of sky particulate illuminated by low sun.

    ‘Why companies like Google and Walmart are buying so much wind power’

    Reply
    • Jay M

       /  April 19, 2016

      When I was young in the sixties family lived out in the Sunset, SF. Took to walking to the ocean and watching the sun set. Walking back, facing east I noticed that the entire atmosphere turned pink, and then grey as the sun set further. I took to calling this phenomenon the smog set. This was when the atmosphere seemed clear blue sky horizon to horizon.

      Reply
  22. Abel Adamski

     /  April 19, 2016

    The Conservative Government in OZ has just gone one step too far
    http://reneweconomy.com.au/2016/coalition-wants-to-build-1-2gw-coal-plant-using-climate-funds-73755

    Coalition wants to build 1.2GW coal plant, using climate funds
    By Sophie Vorrath on 19 April 2016

    The Turnbull Coalition government has kicked off its informal re-election campaign by repeating its desire to build a massive coal fired power station in north Queensland, only this time it proposes to use climate funds to help pay for the project.
    In confirmation that little has changed in the switch from the Abbott to the Turnbull regimes, Queensland MP Ewan Jones became the latest member of the Coalition to outline the federal government’s plan for future energy innovation: more fossil fuels.
    On the same day as a compelling economic case for shifting Australia to 100 per cent renewable energy is published, and just days ahead of Australia signing the Paris climate agreement, Jones suggested that the government could use funds from Direct Action, as well as the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the northern Australian infrastructure fund, to support development of a 1.2GW coal-fired generator in north Queensland.
    Ignore for a moment the fact that Australia already has a surplus of nearly 7,000MW of coal-fired capacity, and the carbon emissions impact of adding yet more, Jones argued that a coal-fired power station was critical to address unemployment issues around Townsville.
    Meanwhileoff the coast the GBR is in trouble which is going to cost thousands of tourism Jobs and $Billions in Tourism infrastructure.

    Sanity is not a quality on their C.V’s

    Reply
    • This is beyond immorality and corruption, it’s economic and environmental insanity. It’s like the cut off limb of the fossil fuel special interests simply cannot resist the urge to vainly flail about despite the fact that the activity at this time is pointless and destructive.

      Reply
  23. Bob Bingham

     /  April 19, 2016

    Do I have any sympathy for one of the biggest polluting states on the planet. Unfortunately not a lot. When the Pacific Islands become flooded will it make the Texas newspapers? I doubt it.

    Reply
    • Is everyone in Texas a climate change denier? Certainly not. A few of my vegan buddies from the Humane Society of the US live off-grid, using solar to generate electricity, in Austin. They’re as engaged in trying to prevent as much of the coming crisis as anyone in the US.

      And do climate change deniers deserve to be afflicted with terrible weather events, water scarcity, dislocation, diseases expanding from tropical zones, terrible fires, sea level rise, food scarcity and other potential impacts? I would say not. Many are misinformed. Many have made bad choices. But they are human beings and ensuring their suffering along with everyone else is not Justice, it’s just one more marker for a terrible tragedy.

      To be clear, many of these deniers have been mislead by cynical people in power who absolutely do, in my view deserve to be prosecuted for a fraudulent intent to deceive in a manner that puts the public into existential danger of the worst kind. Those deceived into going along with these fools, however, are perhaps the most tragic victims of the crisis. Trapped in failed modes of thinking, they’re doomed to a contracting, hopeless world. One which they were duped into assisting to wreck.

      Hopefully some of these poor numbskulls will wake up. It seems to me that the excuses for climate change deniers have grown thin of late and that the number of vocal ones has diminished a good deal. Good news given that a morally and ideologically bankrupt way of thinking has already inflicted so much harm — a good deal of it self inflicted.

      Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  April 19, 2016

      Sometimes Robert you sound like a saint!

      Reply
      • “Turn back, oh man, forswear thy foolish ways…” Or something like that.

        Don’t get me wrong. I absolutely think we should let climate change deniers know how wrong they are. But many of them have been scared or confused or misinformed into it. These people need to be given a way out. A number of them are members of my family.

        As for the ring leaders. I think that’s a different matter entirely. They should be held to account.

        Reply
  24. dnem

     /  April 19, 2016

    So, we’ve been basking in a unbroken stretch of almost perfect weather here on the east leg of the Omega. A week of cloudless skies, warm days and cool nights. Everybody is loving it, of course. I can’t help thinking what such a stuck pattern would feel like in July, especially if the stubborn high was parked a bit farther to our east (“Bermuda high”).

    We might need that, as I’m coming to believe that no amount of aberrant downpours, ice melt, mild winters, arctic temperature anomalies, etc. etc. is ever going to wake up the rank and file. Only a brutal, record, summer heat wave right here in the DC to NYC corridor, with temps blasting into unambiguous, record territory will do it. The fact is, for most people, mild winters are a plus: lower heating bills and pleasanter temps. Far off weather weirding is far off. A week of 110s in the big east coast cities is another thing altogether.

    Reply
    • We’ve had very little in the way of Spring rains here in Gaithersburg, MD. Even the usually blurry-eyed weather reporters here are talking about how it’s been abnormally dry. Dry Springs have a tendency to set up both drought and heatwave conditions come Summer. Add in the fact that SSTs in the Gulf Stream are extraordinarily and excessively warm and you have an ominous mixture of ingredients in the climate change pot.

      Reply
    • Greg

       /  April 19, 2016

      Monday was not warm, but hot in the Mid-Atlantic. I sat out in the sun for only a couple of minutes before feeling fried and thought this is not right for April. It felt like July.

      Reply
      • It was 81 here in Gaithersburg. That’s a typical high for late June.

        Reply
      • Interesting. Heard a radio program on, I think, WBUR (public) on climate recently, and the host did a nice job of placing a warm day in perspective. He talked about 1) the normal date for the day’s high temperature (not sure of the date, but like, May instead of early March) and 2) a sample location (hundreds of miles to the south) where the day’s high temperature would have been normal for the date.

        I think this is great shorthand to convey the oddness of warm days, and have been inspired to start building a reference base of highs and lows throughout the year for our local long-term weather station. At some point, I may begin posting a daily update to point out to folks that our temperatures are running steadily above what used to be normal.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      I’ve been experiencing the same conditions. Yesterday was 81, which is over 20F above normal. We have a red flag fire warning due to dry conditions and winds.

      Reply
  25. We were in Houston on a house hunting trip the week Allison hit. I left a day early. My wife was on the last plane to leave the airport. She called me and said it was was the heaviest rain she had ever seen, adding the raindrops were the size of quarters. The flooding was terrible. Many of the homes we had looked at were damaged, so we decided to lease a condo in a highrise by Hermann Park. The 2011 drought was so severe some 55 million trees died in Harris County, including a large number of mature trees in Hermann Park. After Allison they built huge drainage tunnels in the hospital district. A major infrastructure effort… wonder if it was overwhelmed?

    Reply
    • Reports are that 9 hospitals were shut down due to flooding in this event.

      Reply
      • – That’s a severe impact.
        (Especially in a ‘modern’ society.)
        Worthy of medical headline — somewhere.

        – Also, hospitals and medical facilities do have an array of biological and radiological specimens etc. which need to be contained at all costs.
        It sounds like many infrastructures are indeed being ‘overwhelmed’.
        Denialism etc has its cruel and unintended consequences. This kind of thing being one of them — I’m sure.
        OUT

        Reply
  26. wili  asks above:
    “How many Strongest, Hottest…etc. record breaking events do we have to have in a row for some people start wondering whether things have gone seriously awry?”

    I think about this question every day . . . the answers are complex —–given the complexity of human nature. Thinking about this question this morning lead me down the good ol’ google path to find THE ANSWER (facetious here)—-as if that will help! 😉

    I did not know that “Climate Change Denial” has its own Wikipedia page —–which is actually very comprehensive: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change_denial)

    Cited in this Wiki page is Professor Kari Norgaard who I had not heard of before. She studies climate change deniers AND those who “get” human induced climate change yet don’t know what to do and find themselves overwhelmed and numb. She poses and researches this question in her 2012 book, “Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life”:
    “Why are so many who are fully aware of the climate crisis, and that it is human caused, staying silent and inactive? Why is there this numbness?”

    Excellent review of her book here by a very interesting man:
    Our generation’s challenge: The “Normality” of Climate Crisis
    By David Oaks on August 4, 2012(http://www.amazon.com/review/R3ABQOJZG80DAN/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0262515857&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books)
    _________________
    Even if we find the answers to why humans are knowingly crushing the life out of this planet and even if we were able do something to change human behavior ——will it be enough at this late date? Perhaps not—- but connecting with other compassionate people who connect the dots (and think critically) does help soothe the intense fear/grief that comes with AGW awareness (hyper awareness for me) and can help one feel less alone . . as Robert’s blog does. For me action helps too . . a la Dylan Thomas.

    Reply
    • Action for humans appears to have an exponential value as well. Things may look rough now, but if you get 7 billion people moving in the right direction, then that’s one hell of a force. To be clear, we’re in trouble and some trouble has certainly been locked in. But positive action can still affect a far, far better outcome than doing nothing at all.

      Reply
    • Carole

       /  April 19, 2016

      Caroline,

      Here is a case in point. Yesterday, I received an e-mail from my Senegalese friend. She wrote: “You know, the media is alarmist. You should not listen to them. There is no drought in Senegal”.

      Hen?!

      She wrote this in answer to an email I had sent to her the day before with a weather map of Africa showing temperatures in the mid-40s C for at least the next 14 days. My friend lives here in Canada but is in daily phone contact with her sister in Dakar. My friend and her husband are both highly educated and their children are in private school.

      Another example. Back in 2012 (I believe), there was a power failure in India during a heat wave (40sC). It affected half the population and lasted for a week I believe. When I heard about this, I told my other friend at work how sorry I was for what was happening in her country. She had just gotten back from a 6 week trip to visit her relatives there. First of all, she was not even aware of it. Secondly, she told me that this happens all the time in India. We are used to it (almost with pride). Anything and everything happens in India.

      I’m going to read the wikipedia entry next. But my own conclusion about **some** of the denialists I know is that people who are highly organized and in control of their environment, tend to see things the way they ought to be rather than the way they are. Above all, they fear losing control. Of course, I may be totally wrong.

      Reply
      • Carole, sometimes it may be misinformation, and at least the first case you’ve commented seems clearly to be that (not much wrigling room to deny drought), but in the case of the black-out… I don’t known, some things that are expected to be functional and working in the 1st world aren’t always true in the 3rd (and India, like my home, Brasil, is in the 3rd world still, however “emergent” it may be).

        There are sometimes “news” that may look like “everyday” for people with different backgrounds. Here in Brasil, for example, we have a huge problem with badly designed sewers and rain collectors, coupled with occupation of slopes with high risk of erosion, and a general disregard for whatever architects or civil enginners should be doing. That means that EVERY year, between november and march, we have a few hundred deaths by “floods and mudslides”, so, that’s “natural”, no? Deaths by ones and twos won’t even be reported in the newspaper (maybe in those very small neighborhood papers), episodes of a few dozen people may be reported in the news. It would be difficult to convince a brasilian that climate change is happening citing “greater risk of flooding” in the wet season in São Paulo, Santa Catarina or Rio de Janeiro or high risks of drought in the Northeast region. There’s probably some climate change influence in the violence in those rainy season rains (this March there was a particulary brutal tempest that seemed unusual even for us here), as there almost surely influence of climate change in the ongoing drought in the Northeast (but it only became news when it spread to the Southeast). But they’re the climate as it has always been, not change. Those things are expected for people here. News of drought in Juazeiro, or deaths by mudslide in Niterói may look shocking to a foreign, but they’re not news here.

        There’s a good chance that the blecaute in India is similarly “not news” there. Eletricity is a fickle thing, not garanted in the 3rd world. I live 20km from the biggest city of South America, in a median-class to rich neighborhood (ok, in a rural area, my nearest neighboor is 500m away), and black-outs every rain are the norm (I don’t have solar power yet, still saving for it). In the two years I’ve lived in my current house, I’ve been without eletricity for a week twice, so that’s losing the shock value. I’ve been in cities in Brasil (Nova Mamoré) where the hotel owner would call everyone in their rooms at 17h30min, reminding of the daily black-out at 18h00min, so that people would take eletronics out of the plugs, keeping them from eletric damage. Depending on where your friend lived her infancy, maybe not having eletricity for a week sometimes isn’t actually strange nor newsworth, however brutal the news may look to an american.

        Reply
      • Carole

         /  April 20, 2016

        Thank you umbrios27. This is useful to me.

        Reply
  27. Abel Adamski

     /  April 19, 2016

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-oil-companies-save-the-world-from-global-warming/
    CO2 capture from coal generators used to pump into old wells and recover the oil, leaving the CO2 in the ground.
    Just delaying the CO2 getting into the atmosphere

    Reply
    • Good article… but they failed to discuss the total NET Energy invested versus the total NET energy Returned…. for the entire process… the mining and transportation of the coal, the coal electric generation, CO 2 capture, CO2 pumping into the ground, the type of oil being recovered… it’s btu content and the refining needed of the recovery oil… the CO 2 emissions from the oil recovered (which will not be captured) also needs to be considered.

      I suspect that in keeping with other projects/processes of the kind it is neg…. ie Total energy input is greater than total energy output….. but it would be interesting to see the numbers if they would share them (when pigs fly!!!!) lol Be mindful that EROEI is not the same as being “profitable”, ie making money…. under a given market condition….

      The first Law of Thermodynamics… The Law of Conservation of Energy… the “ain’t no such thing as a free lunch” law.

      Reply
      • Good points. I’ve seen a score of articles on this subject and not one manages to mention the most obvious fact — carbon capture for enhanced oil and gas recovery results in burning fossil fuels that would have otherwise been left in the ground. As a result, the net carbon emission INCREASES and there is no climate benefit. In other words, these plants are capturing a net smaller amount of carbon and ensuring that a greater amount of carbon is burned in the end.

        The only way that you could reduce carbon emissions from a coal plant is to have closed loop CCS. But the cost is enormous, especially when you consider the fact that solar energy is beating new coal plants on price now and that wind and solar both see declining cost curves on into the future as the cost of building a new coal plant either stays the same or increases in the case of CCS.

        One last point is that CCS does not at all address the terrible water resource impact associated with coal use. In fact, CCS requires more water and pollutes more water. With so many regions seeing increasing water stress due to climate change, it’s another reason why coal CCS is just basically impractical. But this use of coal CCS to extract more oil and attempting to spin it as some kind of carbon solution that it’s not is just plain maniacal.

        Reply
      • RE your other comment… I’m holding that one in reserve due to the fact that statements from the fossil fuel industry to the defect that ‘increasing rates of renewable energy adoption do not reduce emissions’ and ‘you can’t have economic prosperity and rapid renewable energy adoption at the same time’ are a patently false cynical appeal to keep burning the fossil fuels they have a vested economic interest in. In other words, it’s blatant and self serving misinformation.

        Case in point — the current world is cutting coal use, increasing oil and gas use (albeit more slowly) and rapidly increasing wind and solar use. Net global carbon emissions from human sources appear to have plateaued or dropped slightly below peaks in 2013. China carbon emissions, according to preliminary reports, have markedly dropped. This due to curtailment of coal burning and a very rapid rate of renewable energy adoption.

        Furthermore, using solar as the new energy source for the undeveloped world ensures that billions of tons of carbon remain in the ground. And finally, the more renewable energy in the supply chain, the less fossil fuel energy it takes to build each new solar panel or wind turbine — so there’s a declining scale there that the fossil fuel cynics haven’t taken into account.

        To be very clear — the fossil fuel industry is not the authority nor are they to be trusted on matters regarding a renewable energy transition. And to be even more clear — a rapid energy transition at this time is basically the only real chance we’ve got to reduce very harmful climate outcomes.

        Reply
        • Yep, absolutely agree. Note that the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), and WindEurope (formerly the European Wind Energy Association, EWEA) are excellent, trustworthy sources for industry statistics.

    • This actually increases net CO2 emissions by expanding the size of the burn able fossil fuel reserve.

      Reply
      • Ailsa

         /  April 19, 2016

        I have been wondering about the ‘global dimming’ effect of particulates in the atmosphere from coal burning etc. As China and others decrease their use of these particulate-heavy fuels, do we have a good/rough idea how much temperature increase there will be without their dimming/cooling effect?

        Reply
        • 0.3 to 0.6 C warming if all the aerosols drop out. It’s pretty rough, but it’s far better than the approx 8 C warming you get if you burn all the coal that’s left.

      • Ailsa

         /  April 19, 2016

        Thanks. Sooo… take the 1.5 (-ish) C we have already gone past the pre-industrial baseline temp, add this 0.3 – 0.6 C, and that means we have already got to the dangerous 2C rise. And there is still the 30 year time-lagged emissions effects to come. I think I’ve got this right, and its not a pretty picture.

        Reply
  28. climatehawk1

     /  April 19, 2016

    Tweeted.

    Reply
  29. Witchee

     /  April 19, 2016

    Thank you Robert, and all of you, for providing the information and support in this blog. Sometimes I think I can’t stand going day to day doing my job, riding the L, getting up in the morning in a world no one else seems to see. Every time someone comments on how nice it is to have warmer temperatures I want to scream at them, but so far I have managed not to. It isn’t just a warm day, there have always been warm days. It is the context.
    Apologies to the Starks, but threatening me with winter does not work. Winter is NOT coming. Summer is, and I find that much more frightening. It was such a mild winter here in Chicago that it almost feels like there wasn’t one at all, and it has been dry. When they predict precipitation here it seems they are over-estimating it. My garden plots have powdery dirt because it is so dry. Only been here for 8 years, but am native to the Great Lakes region, so the mildness of the winters surprised me. The misery of the summers, well, I am not in the lee of the lake so I expected it would be bad, but this summer? I dread it.
    I moved here from CA because as much as I loved it there, it was not a place where I could picture a long term future, or much of a future at all. Lack of water, unsustainable density of population, utterly inorganic relationship to the land itself- well, it is right in your face there. Not that Chicago is sustainable, but it is not the outright crazy that living in So Cal is. And I didn’t even mind the earthquakes; geology has always fascinated me.
    So thank you. This is a haven, even when it is scary and horrific. At least I know I am not alone.

    Reply
    • I agree. Winter is dying. But it won’t go down without putting up one hell of a fuss.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  April 19, 2016

        “May your feet ever walk in the light of two suns… and may the moonshadow never fall on you… ” Ouch

        Reply
        • Thank you, sir, for helping me to believe again in that benevolent inner light that has kept me going through all these years.

  30. Greg

     /  April 19, 2016

    “Winter is dying, But it won’t go down without putting up one hell of a fuss.” -‘A genius is someone who takes a complex thing and makes it look simple. An academic does the opposite.’ –You sir are a genius.

    Reply
  31. Robert In New Orleans

     /  April 19, 2016

    The images coming out of Houston now are so similar to images of post Katrina New Orleans. It always seams that that those with the least suffer the most.

    http://www.chron.com/news/houston-weather/article/Houston-s-Tax-Day-Floods-cause-Greenspoint-7256285.php

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  April 19, 2016

      That this man took the time to rescue an Armadillo says a lot. We respond well to natural disaster. We respond terribly to resource poverty. Honor and depend on your neighbor when disaster strikes. Be weary when food and fuel are in short supply:

      Reply
      • Well said. I think we tend to be at our finest once we realize the chips are down and there’s not choice but to act.

        The man showing compassion to the Armadillo is exactly the quality we’ll need to survive in the end. Humans remaining as a species depends on us embracing compassion for all life, for those things that may seem less powerful but without which we could not continue. We are a part of our world and we cannot live by cutting our connection with life itself. We must learn to embrace those things the cynical among us view as less important — because I believe that we will find those things to be the most important of all.

        Reply
      • June

         /  April 19, 2016

        Yes, when people are in the midst of a disaster, and have to act, it often brings out the better angels of their nature. The immediacy of it is key, I think. They can do something in the moment, see the results, and feel good about doing it. And it brings a feeling of connection that doesn’t exist in the regular day to day routine. I think it is harder for a lot of people to translate that feeling into the larger context of climate change actions.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  April 19, 2016

        (I won’t mention the possibility that he’s bringing it home for dinner.)

        Reply
      • Robert in New Orleans

         /  April 20, 2016

        I respect the man in the image for wanting to help an innocent creature, on the other hand Armadillos are notorious vectors for Hansen’s disease (aka Leprosy). I would not touch one without gloves or a mask.

        Reply
    • Ken Barrows

       /  April 19, 2016

      Many from New Orleans moved to Houston after Katrina. Don’t think the reverse will happen, though.

      Reply
  32. JPL

     /  April 19, 2016

    I know Cruz doesn’t stand an Inhofe’s chance in hell of becoming president, and I’m glad…

    Calling America, “the Saudi Arabia of coal,” Cruz promised to roll back federal regulations he says hamper coal production.

    “Hillary Clinton promises that if she’s elected, she’s going to finish the task and bankrupt anyone associated with coal,” Cruz said. “I give you my word right now, we are going to lift the federal regulators back, we are going to end the war on coal.”

    ¡Ay, caramba!

    Ted… might be time to go home and take a kayak trip through Houston, you know… check in with your constituents. Good grief.

    Reply
    • JPL

       /  April 19, 2016

      I’d like to add that 89 here in Seattle yesterday was just bananas. 30 degrees above the April average. Supposed to be 86 again today. Bizarre…

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  April 19, 2016

        Not bizarre if you know the physics of the atmosphere and GWG. Just unnerving.

        Reply
      • – A recent Twitter exchange:

        – same with Seattle where is registered 89

        – Yes, It was the hottest April day I remember here in Vancouver. It seemed like July.

        – That’s nothing.🙂 We beat the record in Portland by 7degrees (F)!

        ( As Charlie Brown said. “Good grief…”

        Reply
  33. Cate

     /  April 19, 2016

    Meanwhile, Yellowknife in the NWT experienced an unusual and intense April thunderstorm, declared freakish by local observers. Lightning is one of the main causes of wildfire across the North.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/rare-april-lightning-storm-rocks-northwest-territories-1.3542817

    Reply
    • wili

       /  April 19, 2016

      And lightening strikes are predicted to increase under GW, iirc.

      Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      That’s just nuts. Wild lightning in Yellowknife…in April!? That’s definitely not the atmosphere of the 20th century.

      Reply
  34. I think current weather is worse than could be deduced from IPCC /community climate models. What we are seeing now, is related to the assumption that CH4 decays with a 12.5 year half life, but in 27 years of monitoring, we have not seen such decay. In the real environment, a unit of CH4 is the equivalent of 86 units of CO2. Thus, the IPCC climate models understate current warming by at least 38%. Given that the models compound such mistakes, I greatly fear that in another 15 years, we will see conditions, such as sea level rise, that the climate models projected for 2100. The climate models suggest a meter of SLR by 2100 which is an average of ~13 mm per year, so we know the rate of sea level rise is going up from the current 3 or 4 mm of SLR/yr. And, like icicles falling off the eaves, the effect is likely to be abrupt in the extreme. If the models understate sea level rise by 35%, then we need to be thinking about sea level rise of 20 mm/ year on a routine basis– not in 60 years, but sooner.

    (I suggest that the current concentration of CH4 in the atmosphere is a function of human emissions; and, the stability of sea floor clathrates with temperature, the solubility of CH4 in water with temperature, and the metabolic rates for methanogens as a function of temperature in various ecosystems, minus oxidation of CH4 in the atmosphere. Given the chemistry and current rates of temperature change, evolution of CH4 into the atmosphere will exceed the rate of oxidation of CH4 in the atmosphere. Given current forcing, and time to system equilibrium, the increase in CH4 concentrations in the atmosphere is very likely to be significant. This is not the conventional wisdom. )

    If you want to jack up a refinery, the time to do it is now, while you can still get trucks in and out of the factory just outside of Houston that makes some of the specialized high pressure pipe fittings that refineries use. On the other hand, recent weather tells us that no infrastructure, based on 20th century engineering standards, is safe. Not Houston! Not Santiago! Not Tasmania! Not Uganda! Not Afghanistan! Not New Zealand! (All in the last week!)
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160416094633.htm

    Reply
  35. Reply
    • – Vancouver.
      Notice how thick and mushy the air looks in both the lower and upper atmosphere and in the various contours — thick with heat, moisture, and particulate.
      – This is what I look for in any landscape, or outdoor, photo – or personal observation.
      More, and more, I see what I described above.
      And we do know where most of those components come from — that double F-word that comes after E for Exxon.
      OUT

      Reply
      • Actually, DT. I think we do have a low level of fire activity that’s adding to the soupiness of your air. It’s more in your region than in the Arctic, though.

        Reply
      • Scratch that with a caveat. The closest active fires that are now reported are in Montana. It appears that this is more just haze and particulate trapped in the heat dome affect over your region.

        Reply
      • – OK, but I’m not sure that Vancouver is getting any wind born smoke from any fires.

        Reply
    • Cate

       /  April 19, 2016

      From the Alaskan volcanoes, maybe? I haven’t been watching the winds over there.

      Reply
  36. Reply
  37. Reply
    • wili

       /  April 19, 2016

      “All-time national heat records have been observed in Cambodia, Laos, and (almost) in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Vietnam. Meanwhile extreme heat has resulted in all-time record high temperatures in the Maldives, India, China, and portions of Africa as well. ”

      To paraphrase myself, how many places have to have to break how many all-time national heat records at once for how many times…before some people realize that something has gone horribly, horribly awry with the planet!

      Reply
  38. Jeremy

     /  April 19, 2016

    As if rising temperatures weren’t enough of a bummer!

    “A leak at the Hanford nuclear site in Washington state has prompted warnings of “catastrophic” consequences, as workers attempt to clean up more than eight inches of toxic waste from one of 28 underground tanks holding radioactive materials leftover from plutonium production.”

    http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/04/19/new-leak-hanford-nuclear-waste-site-catastrophic-worker-warns

    Reply
    • I worked on the Hanford Reactors and “Canyons” cleanup. That was very easy compared to the issues with Hanford Tank Waste. (I wrote sections of relevant manuals for both DOE and Bechtel.) The issues with the Hanford Tank Waste are likely much less than the issues from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

      However, when I list risks, on a global basis, I start with global warming as having the most impact, on the greatest number of people, over the longest period of time.

      Then, I draw a line. Nothing else is as certain. Nothing else is as soon. Nothing else comes close. Nothing else is as ignored. Nothing else is as hard to incorporate into a basis of engineering.

      Warm weather is coming. It is not too soon to feel sorry for the folks at Hanford and Fukushima Daiichi that are working in full protective gear to keep those messes from spreading. Nor, is it too soon to worry about AGW. No, I mean the kind of worry that drives you to get a congressman elected that understands the problems.

      Reply
  39. Jeremy

     /  April 19, 2016

    Must watch!
    Makes one think what a super storm hitting a major city would be like.

    “F4 twister footage from inside a store in Uruguay
    This took place a few days ago in the city of Dolores – Uruguay , 4 deaths was the total toll and a city fully destroyed.”

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=cf3_1461051615

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 19, 2016

      That was good footage. Such instant destruction! I was in a tornado when I was a small boy. It went right over my Grandparents’ house while my parents and other relatives were there. No major injuries, but lots of damage. The experience has remained vividly in my memory my entire life. I was scared of any windy days until I was a teenager, when I then became fascinated by extreme weather.

      Reply
  40. Some very hopeful innovation here! This seems legit but early.

    “Physicists have discovered radical new properties in a nanomaterial which opens new possibilities for highly efficient thermophotovoltaic cells, which could one day harvest heat in the dark and turn it into electricity.

    Thermophotovoltaic cells have been predicted to be more than two times more efficient than conventional solar cells. They do not need direct sunlight to generate electricity, and instead can harvest heat from their surroundings in the form of infrared radiation.

    They can also be combined with a burner to produce on-demand power or can recycle heat radiated by hot engines.

    The research is published in Nature Communications.

    Reply
  41. redskylite

     /  April 19, 2016

    Japan getting a battering, after the quakes, now high winds in Tokyo . . . .

    Powerful winds whip through Tokyo, tear down scaffolding on 9-storey building

    Just days after violent earthquakes hit southern Japan, the country’s capital city of Tokyo is dealing with powerful gusts of wind.

    http://mashable.com/2016/04/19/winds-building-fall-tokyo/#eae0gcYuKmqk

    Reply
  42. Forest Die-Offs Predicted in U.S. Southwest New research predicts the loss of nearly all coniferous forests in the American southwest by the end of the century.

    http://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2016/04/forest-die-offs-predicted-in-u-s-southwest/

    Reply
    • Jeremy

       /  April 19, 2016

      That’s funny!

      Worrying about the forests at the end of the century.
      Try to imagine the human condition at the end of the century.

      The state of those forests will be the least of the few survivors concerns.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  April 20, 2016

        Probably true for most. Some of us actually do, though, care more about the state we will leave this planet’s live in when we do finally leave it as a species, than when or how we accomplish that exit.

        Reply
  43. Ryan in New England

     /  April 19, 2016

    Jeff Masters’ blog about the record breaking heat of the past three months…

    March 2016 was by far the planet’s warmest March since record keeping began in 1880, and was also the warmest month relative to average of any month in the historical record, said NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) on Tuesday. In the NOAA database, March 2016 came in a full 1.22°C (2.20°F) warmer than the 20th-century average for March of 12.7°C (54.9°F), as well as 0.32°C (0.58°F) above the previous record for March, set in 2010. This is a huge margin for breaking a monthly global temperature record, as they are typically broken by just a few hundredths of a degree. The margin was just a shade larger than NOAA’s previous record for any month of 1.21°C (2.18°F) above average, set in February 2016. NASA also reported the warmest March in its database, with the departure from average in its analysis slightly less than that for February (1.28°C vs. 1.34°C).

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/warmest-march-in-global-recordkeeping-2016-roars-ahead-of-pack

    Reply
    • That’s a slew of all-time record readings, Ryan. SE Asia is pretty crazy off the charts but I was particularly taken aback by temperatures in Namibia at +43 F above average.

      Reply
  44. Ryan in New England

     /  April 19, 2016

    Chris Burt’s blog post about the extraordinary heatwave sweeping Southeast Asia…

    What is most likely the most intense heat wave ever observed in Southeast Asia has been ongoing for the past several weeks. All-time national heat records have been observed in Cambodia, Laos, and (almost) in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Vietnam. Meanwhile extreme heat has resulted in all-time record high temperatures in the Maldives, India, China, and portions of Africa as well.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/weatherhistorian/extraordinary-heat-wave-sweeps-southeast-asia-and-points-beyond

    Reply
  45. Jeremy

     /  April 19, 2016

    Hot hot hot!

    “Enough emphasis has been provided on how bad the weather conditions of peninsular India and southern India. The country is facing one of the severe droughts in the recent history and the heatwave condition in India is unimaginable. But as we speak of it, there might just be a scale set on how hot the condition of weather in Telangana is.

    A woman from Karimnagar, about 160 kms from Hyderabad in Telangana did the unimaginable. She made an Omelette on the floor!

    Yes, the video shows that it is so hot down there in Telangana that people can actually cook an Omelette on the floor.”

    http://www.skymetweather.com/content/weather-news-and-analysis/heatwave-2016-telangana-is-so-hot-that-a-woman-made-omelette-on-floor/

    Reply
  46. – NA USA – Lyme Disease

    Reply
  47. Reply

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