Republican Climate Change Denial is Blinding Our Ability to Observe the Arctic

Denial.

It’s all-too-often what happens to the powerful when they are confronted with the consequences of their own bad actions. It can best be said that denial is blindness — the willful inability to open one’s eyes to the tough reality of the world. In literature, we can see denial in the tragic sin of hubris and in the metaphor of Oedipus the King gouging his own eyes out as a result of his failure to come to terms with the warnings of prophecy.

In the psychological sense, denial involves the inability to cope with reality such that a person will act in an irrational fashion to the point of generating fantasies that the object of said denial does not exist. Behaviorally, this results in an increasing degradation of a person’s ability to confront or cope with the object of denial — to the point of ardent, irrational, and possibly destructive outbursts when faced with it.

Arctic sea ice loss.

Ever since 1979 an array of satellite sensors has allowed our scientists to directly observe the sea ice in the Arctic. Since that time, and as a human-forced warming of the world ramped up, the area which that ice covers has dramatically shrunken. So much so that by this year, 2016, there’s a risk that not only will a new all-time record low be reached, but that by the end of this summer almost all the ice in the Arctic Ocean will be melted out entirely. A risk that a new climate change related event will start to take shape in the Arctic. The blue ocean events.

Arctic Sea Ice Area

(Arctic sea ice area as measured by observational satellites and most recently by  F17. The bottom line of the graph measures days of the year. The left side of the graph measures sea ice area. The corresponding intersections determine sea ice area on any given day of a year in the record. The up and downward swoop of each line on the graph shows the seasonal variation of sea ice area for that given year. The blue line on the graph represents 1980 sea ice area. The dark gray line represents the 1979 to 2000 average. The red line represents the 2012 record low year. 2016, in black, shows a squiggle as F17 begins to fail in early March of this year — a year that could significantly beat 2012 as the worst melt year on record. The sensor is failing because it is old and needs replacement. A replacement that is now sitting in a warehouse due to republican-led satellite research funding cuts. Data source: NSIDC. Image source: Pogoda i Klimat.)

We will know whether or not such an event took place because there are satellites giving us an accurate picture of this critical and sensitive part of our world in real-time. In effect, these satellites grant us the gifts of sight, of foresight, and of forewarning too. They give us the ability to catch a glimpse of what waits over the horizon and affords us with the opportunity to act to avoid an ever-worsening catastrophe — should we have the wisdom to choose to do so.

Willful Blindness

Where does denial meet with Arctic sea ice loss? In the form of climate change denying republicans attempting again and again to cut and with-hold funding to NASA and NSIDC instruments that track what is an unprecedented and historic melt now ongoing. For ever since their coming to power in Congress in 2010, republicans have done everything they can to remove funding for the devices that provide a direct observation of the changes coming as a result of a human-forced warming of our world.

You can read about the recent history of republican attempts to blind the satellite eyes of science here in this comprehensive article by The Atlantic. Attempts that have finally played out in the increasing degradation of the National Snow and Ice Data Center’s ability to track sea ice area and extent during this crucial year. For as the critical Arctic sea ice observation sensor called F 17 begins to fail, a sensor that could replace it sits grounded — lacking funding to operate or launch it during a year in which the Arctic is likely to experience historic and wrenching changes. A year that has already experienced both record Arctic heat and record low sea ice coverage throughout both Winter and Spring with more records likely on the way.

What’s happened now, due to republican ties to fossil fuel industry and a related push to obliviate climate science that observes changes in the Earth, the atmosphere, the world’s ice and the oceans, is a degradation of climate and weather disaster preparedness. For the fossil fuel industry — which has come to completely dominate republican policy-making since at least the years of the Bush administration and which is the cause of pretty much all the harmful changes we now see in the world due to human-forced warming — the degradation of these sensors may help confuse the science and perhaps allow these dirty and dangerous interests to dump carbon into the atmosphere for a few more years or decades. Extending dirty industry profits and what has been a deleterious and corrupting political influence for a little while longer.

Beaufort Sea Ice Early Melt

(Beaufort sea ice in the Arctic is now melting and breaking up at least one month faster than it does during a typical year. Republicans and their fossil fuel allies may not want to hear or see this happening as it’s direct observational proof that the policies they’ve been pushing — drilling, fracking, coal burning, and suppression of renewable energy — are resulting in increasingly dramatic and dangerous changes to the Earth system and environment. So much so that they want to shut off the satellites that provide us with such critical observational data of what’s happening to our Earth and oceans in real time. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

For the rest of us, the loss of these sensors means the loss of a key piece of infrastructure — one that is critical to our climate resiliency. For if we cannot observe and predict trends in the Arctic, then we will come to be more and more at the mercy of dangerous changes now going on there. We will be increasingly caught by surprise by the changes that are now almost certainly bound to happen. And a growing number of us will fall into risk of being caught off guard. Of suffering from loss of property and, perhaps, injury or loss of life.

Willful and destructive blindness. That’s what happens when hubris rules in Washington. And for too long now we’ve suffered this republican climate change denial and its all-too-related fossil fuel based hubris. A plague that is now not only wrecking the world’s climate, but is degrading our ability to observe and respond to the dangerous and Earth-altering changes that are now taking place.

Links:

NOAA Says GOP Funding Cuts Would Halve The Performance of Severe Weather Forecasts

The Republican Push to Cut Climate Change Observational Research

The Arctic is Melting and Scientists Just Lost a Key Tool to Observe it

Republicans Slash Climate Funds

Satellite Data in Support of Climate Resilience

NSIDC

Pogoda i Klimat

Expanding Exxon Mobile Climate Change Denial Investigation

Hat Tip to Redsky

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102 Comments

  1. wili

     /  April 26, 2016

    I prefer your “willful and destructive blindness” to mere “denial,” but somehow language seems to fail us in getting across just how horrifically nasty their stance is. They clearly know what is actually going on, so I tend to call them ‘pseudo-skeptics’ but that doesn’t have quite the requisite force of the repugnance I feel for their behavior.

    Of course, we can also just call them the liars they are.

    It’s not been about arguing about facts to come to some collective truth…not for them…not for a long time.

    As McKibben pointed out, it’s a power struggle, a fight…one they are determined to win by whatever means necessary, including blatantly and repetedly lying about fundamentally important truths, and including willfully stabbing out our collective ‘eyes’ so that we will all be flying ever more blind into this dark and terrifyingly ever-more-violent storm.

    Reply
    • It is kinda like flying into a terrible storm when there’s a bunch of saboteurs crawling all over the plane. First they sabotaged the rudder so that the plane would be forced to fly into the storm. Now they’re attempting to put the pilot’s eyes out. All because actually landing the plane and avoiding the storm would cut off their momentarily available supply of first class accommodations.

      Reply
      • labmonkey2

         /  April 26, 2016

        ‘A first class ticket to Hell’ isn’t the kind of ride I was hoping for here, but the more I read your well articulated synopsis, the more I am convinced we will see even more marked changes in the weather OUR lifetimes.
        And I agree with everyone on here: sticking your head in the sand only leaves your ass exposed. Not a good thing.

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  April 26, 2016

        Damn good analogy Robert. Considering that Senator “Snowball” Inhofe once landed his own airplane on a closed runway, (a moronic move of the highest order) the irony of the fit to your analogy hit me hard.
        When I see the things that men like Lamar Smith are doing to the citizens of this country, I get infuriated. These oil puppets are getting awful close to blatant treason against the best interests of our nation. I wish there were a real way that they could be held accountable for stalling climate action that would certainly save lives. It’s a damn shame that they are untouchable.

        Reply
  2. climatehawk1

     /  April 26, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  3. The EOSDIS images of the Beaufort are some of the most beautiful and unsettling images of climate change in action I’ve seen in years. It’s not just the large gap from the coast that isn’t refreezing as it normally would, or the fractured, swirling pattern of the gyre, but the remarkably low cloud coverage (and inevitable increase in solar radiation) that allows for such a stunning an ominous sight.

    Might not be a bad idea to post an image showing just how big that area is in the context of the Arctic sea ice, as I can imagine it may be hard for others to judge just exactly what they’re looking at there. For the record, that image of the coastline spans hundreds of miles, and the entire swirl is nearly 1000 miles across.

    Reply
    • Thanks Oliver. Good point.

      I’m working on a related article for later this week so will see if I can provide a better sense of scale there.

      For reference, bottom edge of frame in the above image is about 600 miles. The current gap of open water pulling away from the Mackenzie Delta and the CAA in the above image is now in the range of 50-100 miles wide. The large cracks are 10-20 miles wide. And, yes, we have a big plume of heat and water vapor ventilating out from the gaps. The ocean surface there appears to be rather warmer than the ice and is impacting/accelerating warming in this region.

      Reply
  4. DrFog

     /  April 26, 2016

    If our hunter-gatherers ancestors tried to deny reality, what would happen? “There is a lion/tiger/bear over there!”, “No there isn’t, we can go there and pick those fruits, no danger”. Well, probably those people didn’t produce too many offspring.

    Meanwhile, science&technology + imperialism + politics managed to produce a very powerful Western world that was also supposed to be “enlightened”. What happens if people now deny reality? Probably they’ll win elections and become even more powerful. And call themselves “Homo Sapiens”, hubris indeed.

    Reply
    • Steven Blaisdell

       /  April 27, 2016

      More like, “No there isn’t, YOU can go there and pick those fruits, no danger. We’ll wait here and watch out for you, promise [and when you’re torn to bloody shreds and the predators are satiated we’ll gather the spoils, including your entrails].” Twentieth century German and Soviet totalitarians were pikers compared to modern capitalists – amoral, nihilistic, sociopathic murder and destruction on a global scale, decentralized in structure and asymmetrical in application….hmm, sounds familiar…..

      Reply
      • DrFog

         /  April 27, 2016

        Good point Steven, maybe today there are far too many descendants from the few of those stone age people that denied reality but instead forced others to bear the consequences of their unwise decisions. Nevertheless, I read a good book describing how hunter-gatherer communities were organised and they seemed far more enlightened and far less violent than many people today:
        <a href="https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stone-Age-Economics-Marshall-Sahlins/dp/0202010996"Stone-Age-Economics-Marshall-Sahlins

        Of course, with the invention of the microscope and and after Louis Pasteur humans now know what causes diseases, but with the invention of the surplus value exploitation, AKA capitalism, the total destruction inflicted on the various Earth ecosystems is probably already dwarfing that inflicted by the two world wars and the Soviet regime.

        Reply
      • DrFog

         /  April 27, 2016

        Sorry, the link above is a bit garbled, hopefully this one will be OK:
        Stone-Age-Economics-Marshall-Sahlins

        Reply
  5. Abel Adamski

     /  April 26, 2016

    Even Forbes is commenting on the business view
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/mindylubber/2016/04/26/lawmakers-take-note-business-community-eager-to-tackle-climate-change/#5d47a9e9d842

    Two days before the United Nations event, 110 companies – including iconic brands like DuPont, Johnson & Johnson, Kellogg’s and Nike – heralded the climate deal and called for strong policies such as EPA’s Clean Power Plan aimed at reducing carbon pollution from the electric power sector. More than 400 investors managing $24 trillion in assets also praised the accord in a letter to world leaders.

    This solidarity from the business and financial communities illustrates the core of what businesses and investors care about: averting risks, operating with clear, stable policies, and creating opportunities.

    Businesses are surely concerned about climate risks, which are already causing wide-ranging disruptions to their operations and supply chains. Consumer giants IKEA, and Mars Inc. made this exact point in a recent legal brief filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals supporting the Clean Power Plan. “The economic risks faced by domestic businesses are staggering,” they wrote. Apple, Google and other tech giants made similar arguments in a second legal brief filed with the federal appeals court.

    Investors also are worried about climate risks. A rapidly warming planet means economic instability, which, in turn, means weaker investment portfolios. A new study by the London School of Economics estimates that climate change could cut the value of the world’s financial assets by $2.5 trillion. Under worst-case scenarios, losses could be 10 times higher, a virtual wrecking ball to the global economy.

    Reply
  6. Ryan in New England

     /  April 26, 2016

    This situation is infuriating! Repugnant Republicans have been denying reality for too long, and reality was becoming undeniable…so they cut out our eyes. It really hurts to think that just a couple generations ago we were the height of technological and scientific enlightenment, respecting scientists and intelligence, instead of being hostile to knowledge. We blazed a trail into orbit, and created a new age of global communications and Earth systems observations. Now we hitch rides to space with the Russians, let Elon Musk deliver supplies to the ISS and allow our scientific satellites to deteriorate, break down and leave us with no alternative. All while we spend trillions destroying other countries, seizing resources and enriching the defense companies.

    This is how Empires die.

    Reply
    • Privatization bites, doesn’t it? Government serving corporate interests to the detriment of her people is our version of Nero fiddling while Rome burns. I’d be more comfortable with Elon doing what he does best — building out solar and EVs — and leaving rocketry to the people who got us to the moon. You know — the American scientists.

      Reply
      • Weir Bohnd

         /  April 27, 2016

        Well, what I know, because I was there, is that it was German scientists and American technicians and American money.

        The Germans are dead now. The technicians are retired or dead and as everyone must know by now American money is better spent on city-block-long yachts for 1%’ers. I have no doubt that some of them must drool at the thought of sipping champagne on the poop deck at 90 north. In other words, we don’t live in that country anymore. They did things differently there.

        Reply
        • They came here, lived here and became Americans. People from some far off land immigrating and doing something great for this country. What a novel idea.

      • Weir Bohnd

         /  April 27, 2016

        It might be gilding the lily just a bit to call them immigrants. Captives might be a slightly better descriptive. They were war booty, brought here to keep them away from the Russians, Brits, French, whoever. They had done for Hitler things we hadn’t even come close to. We paid them to do what they loved and were pretty well rewarded for success. It’s always about the power Robert.

        The main reason we don’t do much satellite launching anymore is because we eventually used up the supply of obsolete military missiles, which DoD was not willing to keep buying and NASA could never get a budget for. The current heavy lifter is called an Atlas, but bears no relationship to the ICBM of yesteryear and uses a Russian engine. So, I guess if it wasn’t for Elon and his ilk, we might have to let feriners launch just about everything. Those poly ticks (many blood sucking insects) you so rightly castigate, like that arrangement because Elon can pump some of that money back over to them.

        I think it is too early to say if what von Braun and his team accomplished was great for this country. It may be that it filled us with more hubris than can ever be good for any society. For me personally, it worked out quite well and led to a career I could not have imagined as a boy. Actually seeing von Braun face to face not ten feet away is one of those things that a boy who grew up on war stories could never forget.

        Reply
        • Weir —

          I find this notion that the US currently has no rocket scientists of any real weight and that Elon Musk is some kind of savior to be highly contrived. Elon got his tech for his vehicles from NASA, he stands on the shoulders of giants and yet people praise him for basically what amounts to re-inventing the wheel for profit. His launch systems have been prone to failure and have limped along while other systems have done just fine.

          Current US launch systems include:

          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minotaur_V

          The Delta which is absolutely a heavy lift vehicle:

          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_IV

          The Taurus and the Pegasus.

          Privatizing space flight to serve government operations is about as wise as privatized healthcare or a deregulated defense industry — likely to cost more due to the for profit requirement and likely to generate every form of moral hazard. Neil Armstrong appeared to agree.

          To this point, the Space Launch System should be viewed as what the US is capable of with even the most basic support of public rocket science. A support we should absolutely provide as opposed to giving more money to for-profit endeavors of high risk and very low likelihood of public reward.

      • – Robert, here’s a comment from dtlange2 that I’ve been meaning to send you. It applies to the value your blog provides — and is relevant to this comment string.
        It is form the brother of my late friend Helmut who used to camp/live on the beach below UCSB — but which is now underwater due to SLR.
        I’m not sure how to send a link to it — so I will show the text here next:

        Reply
      • Hi, DTLange2,

        I’ll keep this short since, without a website, I’m not sure the system will accept my message. I was checking the web to see what new information I could find about my father Hermann W. Ehrenspeck and his backfire antenna invention, an example of which is on the moon vehicle. I came across your message, in part, about my brother, Helmut on the RobertScribbler blog site and tried to leave a brief response. Not sure I succeeded, not having a website ( all this is new to me). Just wanted to say it was interesting to learn of your memories about Helmut. My sister, Eva, and I still visit his place in Goleta and explore the changes in the local beaches and hills, looking at the environmental changes (often negative) from year to year, driving is old Jeep. Your memory of him is of a time, when my knowledge of his life is the haziest, learning more primarily through his many friends that knew him those days. Eva and I will check out the beach areas you mentioned. Rather ignorant about all this, I need to find out how to set up a free website to write more about my father’s and brother’s accomplishments and history.
        Thank you. Gerhard

        Reply
      • – Ps the Ehrenspecks are from Germany. Helmut used to tell of the days when they waited for food to arrive during the days of the Berlin Airlift when the (DC-3s?) would cord-screw in to land Tempelhof Airport.

        Reply
  7. Ryan in New England

     /  April 26, 2016

    I forgot to mention…wonderful post, Robert! Losing eyes on the Arctic during a potentially record breaking melt year is like some kind of cruel joke. The worst part is that it’s totally preventable, and as you point out, a Republican created disaster.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind sentiments, Ryan. I can always count on you to give some jets when I’m feeling a bit down. Good to know that all the literary elbow grease works out in the end sometimes.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  April 26, 2016

        The elbow grease works😉 You always take complicated subjects and numerous data points and distill them down to a thoroughly enjoyable read. Despite the grim subject matter, you deliver it in a way that is engaging and riveting. To me, your writing is similar to Bill McKibben’s in the way that I am fascinated by the story being told, disturbed by the reality being presented, and want nothing more than to keep reading on.

        Great, great stuff, Robert! If you’re ever feeling down, just remember that you have a lot of friends here, and are an important part of many readers’ days. You provide an important and essential service, and disseminate information via this blog that is crucial is raising awareness, and ultimately winning the fight for a livable climate. You matter. And you definitely make a difference.

        Reply
  8. Ryan in New England

     /  April 26, 2016

    Here’s a great interview. Chris Hedges speaks with Tim DeChristopher about climate change and the world’s inability to come to terms with just how serious the situation.

    http://www.truthdig.com/avbooth/item/days_of_revolt_chris_hedges_tim_dechristopher_discuss_20160426

    Reply
  9. entropicman

     /  April 26, 2016

    The full name of the satellite in question is Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-17.It’s primary purpose is to produce weather and ice data for the US military.

    The Russians and Chinese are rapidly expanding their influence in the Arctic. It seems perverse of the Republican Party, usually so supportive of the military, to deliberately reduce the US military capability in the Arctic at a time of increasing threat.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 26, 2016

      They hate “liberal” science more than they love the military.

      Reply
      • entropicman

         /  April 26, 2016

        So it would seem. By the way, more information here.

        http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/dmsp-5d3.htm

        Reply
      • Weir Bohnd

         /  April 27, 2016

        I would question the idea they love the military at all. They certainly don’t want their kids getting too close to it. It’s military contractors they love. No doubt the satellite has been paid for, their job is done.

        Reply
      • Steven Blaisdell

         /  April 27, 2016

        “They hate “liberal” science more than they love the military.”
        I live in Texas, and the level of aggressive ignorance here (and elsewhere, I’m sure) is only getting more aggressive and more ignorant. It’s astounding, kind of like Dark Ages Europe, but these folks are digging in like you wouldn’t believe. Many and varied reasons for it, but certainly a changing world, declining empire and dwindling wealth, a sense of promise abrogated; these folks know they’re getting screwed but centuries of folkways and decades of propaganda leave only socio-cultural collapse inward. So the divide between some kind of generally accepted, reality based consensus (which we had for much of the 20th century) and increasingly, aggressively, ignorantly batshit crazy (definitively crazy, not just off-beat) is getting logarithmically greater, to the point where I’m not sure if it can be meaningfully broached.

        Reply
  10. mfranklin

     /  April 26, 2016

    I hope that all the Repugs are on record as being opposed to Obama’s clean power plan so that voters may have a clear guide as to which political party to leave on the ash heap of history during the next election.
    When did running melt water in Antarctica become a thing?
    I’m 60, and have been reading accounts of polar exploration and science since I got started in 4th grade with a “My Weekly Reader” and an article about the IGY. Never once, then, or in the following Fifty years, did I ever see any mention at all of melted water on the surface or pouring out from the side of an ice sheet.
    What would one of those polar scientists from the 50s think if they could time travel to see what was happening now?
    I think they would be fascinated and then , after thinking about it for a few minutes, they would be horrified and want to return to the 50s, to an America run by Republicans who hadn’t yet made the transition to full-on sociopathy and fascism.

    Reply
    • Yeah. I’d say that’s about the gist of it. More to the point, that melt water was flowing off an ice shelf in East Antarctica.

      Reply
  11. Loni

     /  April 27, 2016

    Great article, Robert, and please allow me to expand on it somewhat. Not to name names, but some of the most outspoken Republicans are also Chairman of influential committees, and their initials begin with Lamar Smith, Tex. (R), James Inhofe, Tex. (R), Joe Barton, Tex. (R). Inhofe and Smith are both Chairman, with Smith being the one withholding funding for NASA’s Earth Sciences research.

    These gentlemen along with the entire U.S. House/Senate can be reached at 202-224-3121, which is the combined House/Senate switchboard. I, in fact, called all three of their offices this morning, and talked to their staff, which is becoming more increasingly rare, as the representatives are starting to use an answering machine for those who want to leave comments.

    For those new at calling their representatives, let me first say this; Congratulations, your opinion now will go much farther than at the local barber shop. Keep in mind, that these people are YOUR employees, (and actually, we’ve done a piss poor job at being their bosses), so you not only have the RIGHT to call them, but it’s your DUTY as their employer.

    Remember, whatever you say, or how long it takes to say it, your thoughts will be reduced to either ‘For’ or ‘Against’ something………UNLESS, you get through and make a connection with the staff person. Let me explain what I mean. I used to call when I was inspired by anger, now I don’t. I collect my thoughts first, then it goes something like this;
    “The Capital switchboard, can I help you?”
    “Lamar Smith’s office, please.”
    “Hello, Lamar Smith’s office, can I help you?”
    “Yes, I’d like to leave a comment for your boss, now he’s a powerful man, and chairman of a very important committee, now my question and comment is this, why is he withholding funding from NASA’s earth science programs? We desperately need these tools to tell us what is going on with our climate. Now I’m an old guy, I’ll be dead and gone by the time this stuff hits the fan, but you kids are going to take it on the chin. You sound as though your my daughter’s age, 20’s, early 30’s, it’s for you guys that I’m calling, because this is going to make your lives miserable. The world that we are handing you folks is going to be a huge mess…..” etc. etc.

    So when you say that you want to leave a comment, don’t stop talking, or they can send you to a ‘comment recording machine’, and within the first quarter to a third of the way into your spiel, hit them with the “you sound as though you’re the age of my….”, because at that point, you’ve told them that you are calling FOR THEM!!! Now, they’re not just going to log your vote ‘For’ or ‘Against’, but your comment is going to sit in the back of their mind.

    Not to put to fine a point on this, but the call to James Inhofe went like this;

    “Mr. Inhofe’s office, can I help you?”
    “Yes, I’d like to leave a comment for your boss. He’s not a military man, I take it?”
    “Oh yes, he is, Army in fact.”
    “Well, I would not have guessed that due to his aversion for information. You see, when dealing with National Security, information is everything. If there is a danger, or perceived threat, then the military gathers all of the information on that threat or danger that it can to prepare for the possibility. Failure to do that invites disaster, that’s how Pearl Harbor happened, that’s how you lose wars. Now there is enough credibility behind climate change to make it a formidable……..”

    Robert, I hope I haven’t overstayed my welcome, but your point is right on the mark, and we need to swamp their offices with phone calls……they’ll get the hint. Make contact with that staff person, get out of the ‘nay’ or ‘yea’ columns and into their heads. Talk to the congress, not just your friends at the barber shop, call the store where you buy your meats, and ask them their criteria for buying meat, i.e. factory farmed vs. ethically raised. We need to change the world as fast as possible, and exchanging ideas on the ways and means to do so is imperative.
    The phone can be a powerful tool if enough of us know how to use it and use it.

    Reply
    • Loni —

      I really appreciate this comment. And you’re absolutely right, we should be ringing their phones off the hook.

      Reply
    • Steven Blaisdell

       /  April 27, 2016

      Loni, those are some powerful rhetorical devices. Hang ’em by their own petard. Well done.

      Reply
    • – Thanks, Loni. That’s valuable info and insight. A good strategy.
      From what I know:
      – The late President LBJ would put his arm around you and sweet talk and flatter you — then and in the next breath ask for your help — or see that coming around his POV is really the only reasonable thing to do.
      He got a lot things done that way.
      – The late Nelson Mandela used tactics similar to yours.🙂

      Reply
      • wili

         /  April 27, 2016

        Yeah, we really need a whole separate blog, or set of blogs, or international movement !!! just on this issue–the fight against defunding science should be something that even some scientifically oriented die hard republicans can get behind!

        Reply
      • Loni

         /  April 27, 2016

        I’m delighted to be of service.

        dtlange, here in California years back we had a state representative named Jesse Unruh, who used to say about lobbyists, “If you can’t drink their booze, eat their meals, dance with their women, then get up the next day and vote against ’em, you don’t belong in politics.”

        I’m afraid that today, we don’t have representatives with such backbone.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  April 27, 2016

      Wonderful comment, Loni. Thank you!

      Reply
  12. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    Evidence Of Global Warming Revealed In Climate Data Spanning Back To Industrial Revolution
    Scientists have used data spanning back to the industrial revolution to reveal early evidence of the existence of global warming.

    http://www.hngn.com/articles/198174/20160426/evidence-global-warming-revealed-climate-data-spanning-back-industrial-revolution.htm

    Reply
    • mlparrish

       /  April 27, 2016

      From the article:
      “The study reveals that from 1443 to 1683, Lake Suwa’s annual freeze data was moving to later in the year at a rate of 0.19 days per decade, a trend that eventually grew 24 times faster to 4.6 days per decade. Meanwhile, on the Torne River, similar findings revealed earlier ice breakup in the spring and a double in the speed that the river experienced earlier thaw dates.”
      A rate of 24 times in 200 years!

      Reply
  13. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    Pangnirtung, Nunavut melted a 90-year-old heat record Tuesday as temperatures climbed to 10 C, according to Environment Canada.

    The community is located almost 300 kilometres northeast of Iqaluit on Baffin Island, just south of the Arctic Circle. It is known as the ‘Switzerland of the Arctic’ for its steep mountains and fiords.

    Pangnirtung’s previous heat record for April 26 was set in 1926 with a high of 6.7 C, said Dave Phillips, Environment Canada’s senior climatologist. Seasonal temperatures are usually closer to —7 C.

    “I mean, these would be warm days even for the dog days of summer,” said Phillips.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/pangnirtung-heat-record-1.3553971

    Reply
  14. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    Heat wave continued to sweep central and southern states of the country with Malampuzha in Kerala recording the highest temperature in 29 years at 41.8 degrees Celsius, though thundershowers in parts of Telangana gave some respite to the residents braving searing heat.

    The western Odisha town of Sonepur was the hottest place in the country, recording the maximum temperature at 46.5 degrees Celsius. Bolangir in the state recorded 46 degrees Celsius and Titlagarh 45.5 degrees.

    http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-killer-heat-wave-kerala-breaks-29-year-old-record-with-418-degrees-celsius-temperature-2206456

    Reply
  15. Ryan in New England

     /  April 27, 2016

    Japanese and Finnish monks have kept climate records for hundreds of years, providing insights into today’s changing climate.

    “The results of their study, published today in Nature Scientific Reports, show that since the Industrial Revolution, changes in the timing of freeze and thaw have accelerated, and suggest that the yearly rhythm of the ice in both places has become more closely tied to the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Extreme events have become more common, too: In the first 250 years that Shinto priests recorded the appearance of the ice ridge on Lake Suwa, for instance, there were only three years during which the lake did not freeze. Between 1955 and 2004, there were 12 freeze-free years on Lake Suwa; between 2005 and 2014, there were five. (Magnuson reports that the lake did not freeze during the winters of 2015 or 2016, either.)”

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/04/ice-lake-suwa-japan-torne-river-climate-change-monk-shinto/

    Reply
  16. Reblogged this on Move for Change and the Brooklyn Culture Jam and commented:
    From Robertscribbler’s blog. The latest NASA satellite pictures indicate we might have an ice-free Arctic by the end of the summer. So what do the GOP-controlled House and Senate do? they cut funding for NASA’s new satellites to take measurements of the ice.

    Reply
  17. Andy in SD

     /  April 27, 2016

    Reminds me of the attempt to defund the keeling CO2 sensor a couple of years ago.

    Reply
  18. Jay M

     /  April 27, 2016

    bloom over mid continent

    Reply
  19. Jay M

     /  April 27, 2016

    view more overhead:

    Reply
  20. What’s even stranger is that the satellite sitting in storage (DMSP-F20) at a cost of $500 million to date is a military weather satellite, and microwave emissivity measurements of polar ice is only one of its capabilities. The launch costs were going to be borne by the USAF, with a rescheduled launch after the premature failure of F19 justified in order to keep a closer weather eye on the Middle East and Indian Ocean.

    The program’s budget was cut in bills from both the House and Senate. I’m not going to bother to look up who voted for them, but I can guess Republicans dominated the count.

    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/dmsp-tempest-tracker-for-the-us-military-06140/

    http://spaceflight101.com/re-entry/dmsp-f19-military-weather-satellite-declared-lost-after-communications-failure/

    http://spacenews.com/senate-spending-bill-backs-house-recommendation-to-shelve-dmsp-f20/

    Reply
  21. Abel Adamski

     /  April 27, 2016

    East Antarctica Dynamics
    http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/stories/huge-subglacial-lake-discovered-underneath-antarcticas-ice

    The lake was discovered after researchers noticed that ice at the surface was unusually grooved on a large scale, indicating the potential presence of liquid water below. It appears connected to a massive canyon– now considered the largest canyon system on Earth– which was recently discovered using the same method. Subterranean channels leading away from the lake might still funnel flowing water into the ocean many miles away.

    A point of ingress for warmer ocean waters ?

    Reply
  22. Abel Adamski

     /  April 27, 2016

    Reinforcing Roberts analysis over the years

    New research, led by Professor Edward Hanna from the University’s Department of Geography, has identified changes in weather systems over Greenland that have dragged unusually warm air up over the western flank of Greenland’s Ice Sheet.

    These weather systems are also linked to extreme weather patterns over northwest Europe, such as the unusually wet conditions in the UK in the summers of 2007 and 2012.

    The study analysed changes in weather systems over Greenland since 1851, using a measure called the Greenland Blocking Index (GBI). The index measures the occurrence and strength of atmospheric high pressure systems, which tend to remain stationary when they occur, causing long runs of relatively stable and calm weather conditions. The high pressure also blocks storm systems from moving in on the region. The previous available version of the GBI only extended back to 1948.

    Professor Hanna and his team have found an increase in the occurrence of atmospheric high pressure ‘blocking’ systems over Greenland since the 1980s throughout all seasons, which relates to a significantly strong warming of the Greenland and wider Arctic region compared with the rest of the world.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-climate-extreme-weather-linked-high.html#jCp

    Reply
  23. redskylite

     /  April 27, 2016

    Robert, many thanks for the Hat tip, it is an honour and appreciated. Also many thanks for the very detailed commentary on the sad situation. Empirical evidence and detailed observations are badly needed at this very late hour. The last very low sea ice incident in 2012 was not associated with El Nino, and previously El Nino (to my limited knowledge) has had little effect so far North, it is vital we know how the sea ice is performing. In utopia it would be a joint responsibility of an international body and science and politics would be well separated, alas we are not there. We need to know what is happening while the Northern Hemisphere’s air conditioning is slowly being dismantled season by season.

    This from the University of Sheffield . . . .

    Climate change and extreme weather linked to high pressure over Greenland

    Professor Hanna and his team have found an increase in the occurrence of atmospheric high pressure ‘blocking’ systems over Greenland since the 1980s throughout all seasons, which relates to a significantly strong warming of the Greenland and wider Arctic region compared with the rest of the world.

    The Sheffield-led team also found an especially strong recent increase in the occurrence of Greenland ‘blocking’ weather systems in summer, which is linked to a more northward-meandering branch of the atmospheric jet stream. This has resulted in warmer air more often moving north into the region in recent years.

    http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/climate-change-arctic-extreme-weather-uk-study-1.571126

    Reply
  24. Reply
  25. – USA – TX – KS 70-90 mph winds:
    Anthony Sagliani ‏@anthonywx 2h2 hours ago

    Scattered 70-90 mph wind gusts w/ this squall line from NE TX to E KS.

    Reply
  26. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    In the western state of Maharashtra, one of the worst-hit regions, 9 million farmers have little or no access to water. This year, at least 216 farmers have committed suicide in the state.

    The government’s response has been slow and inefficient. After weeks of waiting, trains carrying thousands of litres of water reached the region of Marathwada this week, where rivers have dried up and dams are holding about 3% of their capacity. Many other drought-hit regions are still waiting for deliveries.

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/apr/27/india-drought-migrants-head-to-cities-in-desperate-search-for-water

    Reply
  27. Well said. Great post.

    Reply
  28. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    Researchers from St. Petersburg State University (SPbU), and the Institute of Physico-chemical and Biological Problems of Soil Science, have revived several species of pre-historic amoebae discovered in the Arctic permafrost.

    This research was conducted from 2012 to 2016. A team of researchers investigated samples of different ages and locations in the Arctic, in total finding 26 strains of viable amoebae. This included two new species belonging to the Flamella genus. Eight of the isolated strains are still impossible to classify with certainty. The age of the microorganisms is estimated at 30,000-60,000 years.

    http://rbth.com/science_and_tech/2016/04/21/back-from-the-dead-russians-revive-pre-historic-amoebae_586965

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  April 27, 2016

      A Gaian mechanism for ganging up on an unruly renegade species? Reminds me of a friends’ freezer full of deer meat that her pet bunny had unplugged with its’ teeth. She asked me to haul it, freezer and contents, to the dump. DO NOT OPEN,,,,,,

      Reply
  29. NASA is coming to call out here on The Rock. Using planes and ships, they will focus on phytoplankton off the coast of Newfoundland over the next 5 years. The purpose of the study is to understand how changes in the ocean ecosystem might aftect the atmosphere and climate change.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/nasa-climate-change-contest-nl-1.3551890

    Interesting that this study will run for roughly the same time period as NASA’s current OMG project up in Greenland, just across the Labrador Sea from Newfoundland. Both studies involve lots of flight surveillance, and in the case of the Newfoundland study, ships as well….In effect, NASA will be effectively keeping close tabs on this major northern gateway…..right at the time when Russia and China are apparently gearing up to occupy the Arctic.😀

    Reply
  30. The information coming from ExxonMobil and the Rockefeller funded Council on Foreign Relations seems to depend on the target audience.

    For angry white low information Republican voters, there is the denial generated by the global warming denial think tanks, and the confusion generated by this denial.

    For decision makers and the rich, there is the information generated by the Council on Foreign Relations – that acknowledges that he Arctic is melting with stunning speed, and looks upon it as a financial opportunity to improve access to Arctic “resources” – fossil fuels.

    It’s been apparent for a long time that this is cynical or profit seeking – or actively genocidal. So, by their deed and ethics shall we know them – and what we see in these streams of information tells us that the true plutocratic decision makers in our disguised democracy are pathological.

    So, yes, we need a peaceful revolution to break their power, before they kill us all with their damned lying. But, things in the real world are seldom that neat, unfortunately.

    On another subject, looking at earth.nullschool CO2 data, it all seems pretty reasonable to me, except for Africa. We’ve got the light areas corresponding to industrial areas and population centers that are high in CO2 concentration, and the dark areas in the Amazon and Africa corresponding to the great CO2 sinks – the tropical forests.

    But what is that light band of high CO2 emissions in Sub-saharan Africa? Is this due to wildfires, cooking fires, gas flaring from oil production, or something else?

    http://earth.nullschool.net/#2016/04/17/0130Z/chem/surface/level/overlay=co2sc/orthographic=22.32,22.00,1024/loc=-30.657,27.688

    Reply
    • Wildfires have been burning in that area for months now. Drought related due to climate change + El Nino.

      Reply
      • Oh, thanks, Robert.🙂

        Yes, I should have checked the carbon monoxide readings myself from earth nullschool and the NASA earthwiew fires and thermal anomalies data product.

        I guess there are also elevated CO2 readings in Russia, up to about 425 ppm, and carbon monoxide from what appear to be wildfires in that area. I guess Russia is sandwiched between two high CO2 production areas, with Europe on one side and China on the other, plus CO2 output from their own fires and industry. I just found out that it is possible to manually alter the date in the earth.nullschool URL, to skip back in time, for example to July of 2015, when CO2 readings in the area looked much more reassuring, with readings down to about 365 ppm.

        http://earth.nullschool.net/#2015/07/28/1800Z/chem/surface/level/overlay=co2sc/orthographic=95.06,53.38,540/loc=98.738,58.697

        I guess the boreal forest growing season has not really started yet, but it really is scary to watch the CO2 plumes from Europe and China overwhelm the Siberian boreal forests’ capacity to take up CO2, at this time of year.

        If we could just get rid of the fossil fuels, the forests and oceans would save us. We can look at the satellite data and see it happening. But here we are, saddled with the disinformation from the fossil fuel industry funded and super rich funded climate change denier think tanks, unable to act decisively.

        Reply
  31. Reply
  32. – UK – Fossil Fuel – Diesel – Air pollution — It must be getting harder and harder to ignore the seriousness of a very chronic problem. PDX has big problem with diesel pollution as well. Efforts are being made to curtail.
    – There must be some way to taylor a message to the individual driver/operators that prompts them to cease their damaging behavior. One would hope.
    – 40-50 k per annum fatalities should suggest a calamity. One would think. These are ‘preventable’ deaths — yet they are allowed.

    MPs: UK air pollution is a ‘public health emergency’

    Cross-party committee of MPs says the government needs to do much more to tackle the crisis, including a scrappage scheme for dirty old diesel cars

    Air pollution in the UK is a “public health emergency”, according to a cross-party committee of MPs, who say the government needs to do much more including introducing a scrappage scheme for old, dirty diesel vehicles.

    The government’s own data shows air pollution causes 40,000-50,000 early deaths a year and ministers were forced to produce a new action plan after losing a supreme court case in 2015.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/27/uk-air-pollution-public-health-emergency-crisis-diesel-cars

    Reply
    • – More evidence of air pollution damage.

      Even a little air pollution may have long-term health effects on developing fetus

      Date:
      April 27, 2016
      Source:
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
      Summary:
      Even small amounts of air pollution appear to raise the risk of a condition in pregnant women linked to premature births and lifelong neurological and respiratory disorders in their children, new research suggests.

      Fine particles from car exhaust, power plants and other industrial sources are breathed into the lungs, but the scientists have now found evidence of the effects of that pollution in the pregnant women’s placentas, the organ that connects her to her fetus and provides blood, oxygen and nutrition. They found that the greater the maternal exposure to air pollution, the more likely the pregnant women suffered from a condition called intrauterine inflammation, which can increase the risk of a number of health problems for her child from the fetal stage well into childhood.
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160427095207.htm

      Reply
  33. – Every day Republicans seem to accept reality far more readily than those in power.

    Many More Republicans Now Believe in Climate Change
    Poll shows a big leap from two years ago

    Forty-seven percent of conservatives now say the climate is changing, a leap of 19 points since the midterm elections of 2014, according to the survey released yesterday by Yale and George Mason universities. The poll did not ask respondents whether climate change is caused by people.

    A number of things might have affected people’s attitudes, including Pope Francis’ encyclical calling for climate action, a record-warm winter and media coverage around the international agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/many-more-republicans-now-believe-in-climate-change/

    Reply
  34. PlazaRed

     /  April 27, 2016

    In my opinion, it was almost inevitable that some sort of interference would happen with Arctic ice monitoring.
    The images were available to the public on the Internet and in a US election year the powers that be or would like to BE? want no unwelcome interference to their campaigns!

    Meanwhile in Venezuela the government have introduced a 2 day week in some areas due to power shortages, there will no doubt be a lot of heated problems and demonstrations over this in the near future.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/venezuela-energy-crisis-millions-of-public-sector-employees-given-five-day-weekend-as-power-cuts-a7003081.html

    Reply
  35. – The Gap is is the area in Mexico’s Sierra Madre between the Gulf of Mexico and the SE Pacific.

    Reply
  36. Shawn Redmond

     /  April 27, 2016

    Looking at arctic.io the ice cap is well fractured all the way to the pole from the Fram Strait and somewhat from there to the Beaufort Gyre. If those two brakes work themselves together above Greenland will that not allow an enormous berg to float off in any direction the winds and current please? With all the wind and warmth in the north this year I don’t see much hope it’ll stay frozen. Another great blog entry in a seemingly unending run. RS have a beer you deserve one.

    Reply
    • PlazaRed

       /  April 27, 2016

      The main of the Arctic surface ice is not very thick, so the term “Berg,” may not be relevant in this case but large pieces of sheet surface ice will certainly be moving around.
      Surface winds and currents will tend to break these up into smaller pieces quite quickly and with the wave actions they then will in turn melt away.
      The chances of icebergs in the Arctic seas are mainly from carving of glaciers rather than sea bound floating ice.
      What is very disturbing about the whole Artic scenario this year, is that with such an early season melt, there is going to be a lot more solar heat absorbing into the Arctic seas, leading to the waters warming beyond normal historic levels.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  April 27, 2016

        Thanks for the catch, Freudian slip, spent too much time as a kid jumping the broken ice in local coves. ” Lets go jumpin’ icebergs”. Almost drown a couple of times. Some not so lucky!

        Reply
      • Cate

         /  April 27, 2016

        Shawn….jumping ice…? you from Newfoundland??😉 Copying, we called it…..used to be a time-honoured if risky sport among the young lads in all the coves here. Not sure if it’s still pursued in the age of helicopter parenting, though.

        Reply
  37. Colorado Bob

     /  April 27, 2016

    “This unprecedented event has now happened twice”: Massive seagrass die-off hits Florida Bay

    EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida — The shallow coastal waters of Florida Bay are famed for their crystal clear views of thick green seagrass – part of the largest stretch of these grasses in the world.

    But since mid-2015, a massive 40,000-acre die off here has clouded waters and at times coated shores with floating dead grasses. The event, which has coincided with occasional fish kills, recalls a prior die-off from 1987 through the early 1990s, which spurred major momentum for the still incomplete task of Everglades restoration.

    Link

    Reply
  38. JPL

     /  April 27, 2016

    Great piece, Robert. Thanks again for your tireless efforts!

    Meanwhile, California weighs sharing ‘pain’ of Colorado River cuts

    “The water level in Lake Mead stood above 1,077 feet elevation on Monday. But water managers predict that a shortage is increasingly likely in the coming years. The Bureau of Reclamation could declare a shortage during the summer if it projects Lake Mead’s elevation would sink to 1,075 feet or lower at the beginning of next year. The U.S. Department of the Interior would take charge of water allocation if the reservoir’s level were to sink to an elevation of 1,025 feet.”

    Reply
  39. Oldhippie

     /  April 27, 2016

    The second image in the original post is a photograph. A visible light, natural color photograph. Anyone with eyes can interpret a photograph.

    What I see. Every crack, every lead, every floe has soft rounded contours. If you go through the entire set of photos in the Arctic mosaic it is all rounded and smooth. Going back to the 2015 archive you can see hints of this, mostly the lines are sharp and jagged. Before then it would be hard to find anything but jagged lines, even at the end of summer.

    I can find more jagged fractures in the schmaltz on top of my chicken soup. This is soft ice. This ice is different from anything seen before. The change is apparent across the entire Arctic with no exceptions.

    Reply
  40. redskylite

     /  April 27, 2016

    This morning’s news from NCAR fills me with apprehension and fear for our near term future – low oxygen in the Oceans i- its here and getting worse . Pray Trump doesn’t win 2016 elections.

    Under a green sky getting closer . .

    Widespread loss of ocean oxygen to become noticeable in 2030s

    “Loss of oxygen in the ocean is one of the serious side effects of a warming atmosphere, and a major threat to marine life,” said NCAR scientist Matthew Long, lead author of the study. “Since oxygen concentrations in the ocean naturally vary depending on variations in winds and temperature at the surface, it’s been challenging to attribute any deoxygenation to climate change. This new study tells us when we can expect the impact from climate change to overwhelm the natural variability.”

    https://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/news/20721/widespread-loss-of-ocean-oxygen-become-noticeable-in-2030s

    Reply
  41. redskylite

     /  April 27, 2016

    and another independent study by Scripps on similar lines . . (low oxygen, rising temperature and ph levels )

    Climate change is often thought of as a single environmental threat from increases in atmospheric CO2. However, multiple climate stressors, from ocean warming and acidification to low oxygen levels, are expected to result in cumulative impacts on marine life. The deep ocean, which covers more than 60 percent of Earth’s surface, is a biodiversity hotspot at increased risk from climate change.

    https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/deep-sea-biodiversity-impacted-climate-changes-triple-threat

    Reply
  42. Skip

     /  April 27, 2016

    Some of your language almost sounds like an intentional allusion to Margaret Heffernan’s book “Willful Blindness”, … I didn’t see any mention of the book outright. I’m not a spammer or anything like that, but if you would like to expand your tool set for understanding why people and organizations fail to act on the obvious, you might have a look at it. It is a well written, easily read, excellently crafted essay by a world class business consultant, and while conscious evil (for lack of a better term) may be part of the problem in a case like this, there are actually strategically useful ways to view things, that offer methods as to how to think about pathways to solutions, without spending time and resources on blame or fingerpointing.

    Lover your work RS, it is the most accessible that I have seen on the topic.

    SK

    Reply
    • I’ve actually not read this particular work, but I will certainly take a look. As for holding bad actors accountable for wrongdoing — it has become necessary at this time given their own proven ability to delay and hamper an action that was necessary two to three decades ago. One that is just starting to gather steam now.

      Warmest regards and best wishes,

      –R

      Reply
  43. JAXA data show a continuous decline.There is still a record. I guess it will not change f until September.
    2016 – 12,5 mln km2
    2012 – 13,34 mln km2

    Reply
    • Yeah. We’ve got a few major monitors left. But NSIDC is one of the best, most reliable, clearest sources of this information.

      Reply
  44. entropicman

     /  April 30, 2016

    Good news, I think.

    The USAF plan to put F20 only orbit, perhaps as early as this year.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/usa-military-weather-idUSKBN0NK2LH20150429

    Reply
  45. After looking intensively at the global warming catastrophe unfolding these days and the way politicians continue to RESIST reality has me question whose interests they represent. Do they not have any children? I don’t and I still scream ever day that nothing really useful is being done fast enough to save humanity. Texas gets flooded in December and all Ted Cruz does is deny that there’s a problem in Huston. Miami is flooded with every high tide and Florida’s Governor allows fracking to be done in his state. There are tornadoes in December & January and oh yeah that’s like it’s always been. I know they do occur in those months but really the pace has dramatically increased. All I hear is how jobs will be lost or unemployment will increase so they start selling resources to foreign states. Arizona uses water to grow hay foe the rich Arabs because they don’t have water to grow their own hay for their cows and horses. There’s something really wrong here and I can’t believe I’m one of a few that doesn’t see what’s going on. I read a book called Hyperobjects by Timothy Morton that describes in a very literate way the problems we’re all facing confronting global warming. He describes why seeing what’s in our faces is so hard to see. I’ve been watching the disaster unfold my whole life since the first Earth Day and here IT is, the hyperobject,(global warming), in all it’s glory and people don’t see it. I’m sorry to say I think it’s too late to avoid disaster but maybe enough time to save some humans. Times running out though and maybe there can be something done but the way denial works I’m not holding my breath. I will cry though for all the children and their offspring and apologize for the last generation that maybe could have done SOMETHING to avoid the disaster that’s here right in front of all our eyes, eyes that are open but just cannot see.

    Reply
    • They basically represent wealthy interests who hold vast concentrations of perceived wealth in the form of huge piles of carbon whose burning is necessary for them to continue to retain wealth and power and whose burning would basically inflict upon us what would ultimately be (if all those carbons stores are burned) the worst extinction crisis the Earth has ever faced.

      Reply
  46. Jack Polonka

     /  May 4, 2016

    Robertscibbler, et al.

    Quick question, is there a petition campaign or any campaign to get Congress to fund the program and get the new satellite up in orbit??

    Thanks and regards,

    Jack Polonka

    Reply
  1. Republican Climate Change Denial is Blinding Our Ability to Observe the Arctic | 2rhoeas3

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