Fire in the Sky — More Than 330,000 Lightning Strikes Hit Europe in Just Eight Hours

“Whatever happened to normal weather? Earth has always experienced epic storms, debilitating drought, and biblical floods. But lately it seems the treadmill of disruptive weather has been set to fast-forward.”Paul Douglas.

*****

A cold, unstable air mass aloft. A record atmospheric moisture load due to human-caused climate change. Add in 80 degree or warmer surface temperatures and these three ingredients can spark some seriously epic thunderstorms. Such was the case across Europe today as towering thunderheads exploded into the skies, raining more than 330,000 bolts of lightning down upon the continent.

Lightning Strikes Europe

(Extreme lightning strikes in excess of 330,000 impacts were recorded over the course of 8 hours on Friday. The strikes resulted in numerous extreme weather related casualty events across Europe. Image source: Simon Cardy.)

The blasts of nature’s fury hammered a wide region stretching from Portugal through France and the UK, into the Alps, Italy, Germany and Denmark and on through Southwestern Poland. A rash that has injured dozens across Europe resulting in at least one death.

In Poland, a mountain hiker lost his life to one strike. Three more people were injured by lightning in the same region. A nearby flash flood related to the storms also resulted in a drowning.

In Germany, a bolt from the blue sky — likely coming from a towering storm in the area — injured 30 people at a soccer field. Three were listed as seriously injured including the referee who had to be revived in the helicopter en-route to the hospital.

In Paris, 8 children and 3 adults were struck by lightning in the midst of a birthday celebration at a park in northwest Paris. As the thunderstorm rolled in, children sheltered under a nearby tree whose higher branches attracted a lightning strike. According to a report from The Guardian, one child from this group remained in serious condition.

Conditions in Context — Global Warming Expected to Increase Lightning Strikes

A widespread storm outbreak of this kind generating such a high number of lightning strikes and related casualties in a single day is not a normal event for the European Continent. That said, this type of event is likely to become more frequent due to a greenhouse gas related warming of our world.

Lightning Strikes to Increase with Global Warming

(Lightning strikes are expected to increase as a result of global warming according to a 2014 study in Science.)

Added atmospheric moisture content — which increases by about 7 to 8 percent per degree Celsius of global temperature rise — generates more storm clouds with higher tops. These clouds, in turn, produce an increase in the number of overall lightning strikes. According to a Science study published during 2014, lightning strikes are expected to increase by 50 percent in the United States alone due to the human-forced warming of our world. Europe, which sits between numerous unstable air masses — the Arctic Ocean air mass to the north, the Greenland air mass to the northwest, and the rapidly changing North Atlantic air mass — is likely to see ramping climate instability even as overall atmospheric moisture levels and storm-generating potentials increase.

Links:

Lightning Strikes Kill One Injure Dozens Across Europe

Lightning Strikes Projected to Increase Due to Global Warming

Simon Cardy’s Twitter Feed

Meteorologists are Seeing Global Warming’s Effect on Weather

Hat tip to Spike

Hat tip to DT Lange

 

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96 Comments

  1. And Bonnie has now officially become the second named storm to form before start of hurricane season in the North Atlantic…

    http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

    Reply
  2. Syd Bridges

     /  May 29, 2016

    There are a series of ultras low frequency radio signals (between about 3 and 60Hz) in the Earth;s atmosphere generated by lightning worldwide. They are known as the Schumann Resonances. The gap between the Earth and the ionosphere acts as an imperfect spherical waveguide, amplifying certain frequencies. The exact values depend on a number of factors.

    See for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schumann_resonances

    I remember, many years ago, someone suggesting that the Schumann Resonances could be used as a very sensitive thermometer for the Earth, as lightning frequency rises rapidly with global temperature. It would be interesting to know whether this storm caused a very high spike in Schumann resonance. With about 50 lightning strikes a second worldwide, most not coming from Europe, this storm had the potential to increase that number by abot 25 percent.

    Yet again, the predictions of the warmists are vindicated by the facts, but it was unusually cold in Little Nowhere Wyoming, so that disproves it all. The extra lightning was just God angry with European gays. And there’s no drought in California!

    Reply
  3. redskylite

     /  May 29, 2016

    RS – Thanks for the narrative and reminding us all that more lightening strikes are anticipated/projected as global warming increases. Flooding in Texas and Bonnie taking aim at South Carolina, and here is a bunch of folks who are struggling, sparse and remote, and often forgotten in the frightening pace of change that our revolution has induced.

    Watching Worlds Sink — Witnessing Climate Change In The Pacific

    Over the past three years photographer Vlad Sokhin has seen graves sink into the sea and cultures endangered as villages and islands become flooded by high tides.

    It’s what happens when you document the end of someone’s world.

    For the past three years Sokhin has been travelling the pacific, photographing Pacific Ocean communities facing the reality of climate change.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/05/28/watching-worlds-sink-witnessing-climate-change-in-the-pacific/

    Reply
  4. – OT – Europe – Zika

    Reply
    • redskylite

       /  May 29, 2016

      Thanks for sharing that, adds an element to the recommendation on doctors that the Olympics should be postponed or moved. I’m not qualified to takes sides, but seems a good isuggestion me, it’s only sport after all.

      Doctors: Postpone or move Olympics due to Zika

      The summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro should be postponed or moved “in the name of public health” due to the widening Zika outbreak in Brazil, more than 100 prominent doctors and professors said Friday in an open letter to the World Health Organization.
      “We make this call despite the widespread fatalism that the Rio 2016 Games are inevitable or ‘too big to fail,’

      http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/27/health/zika-virus-olympic-games-health-officials-postpone/

      Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  May 29, 2016

      My concern is when it hits high density populations that have stretched healthcare, and portions of the population without it. I am thinking Manila, Mumbai etc…

      Reply
  5. Anne

     /  May 29, 2016

    Thank you for another eloquent and timely post, Robert – and to all the commenters here who make this place essential reading. (Schumann Resonances – see what I mean?)

    In the latest London Review of Books Naomi Klein’s article ‘Let Them Drown’ is a compelling read. She draws attention to Weizman’s ‘aridity line’, along which resource conflicts explode. She describes the mind-set common to the exploitation of fossil fuels (and the sacrifice of the land and people necessary to do that) and collective unwillingness to act on climate change because it’s not yet, and over there. It’s not ‘human nature’, she argues, but a failure of systems. Here’s a quote from near the end (sorry I haven’t worked out how to code things on your comments):
    Quote:
    “…climate change isn’t just about things getting hotter and wetter: under our current economic and political model, it’s about things getting meaner and uglier.

    “The most important lesson to take from all this is that there is no way to confront the climate crisis as a technocratic problem, in isolation. It must be seen in the context of austerity and privatisation, of colonialism and militarism, and of the various systems of othering needed to sustain them all. The connections and intersections between them are glaring, and yet so often resistance to them is highly compartmentalised. The anti-austerity people rarely talk about climate change, the climate change people rarely talk about war or occupation. We rarely make the connection between the guns that take black lives on the streets of US cities and in police custody and the much larger forces that annihilate so many black lives on arid land and in precarious boats around the world.

    “Overcoming these disconnections – strengthening the threads tying together our various issues and movements – is, I would argue, the most pressing task of anyone concerned with social and economic justice. It is the only way to build a counterpower sufficiently robust to win against the forces protecting the highly profitable but increasingly untenable status quo. Climate change acts as an accelerant to many of our social ills – inequality, wars, racism – but it can also be an accelerant for the opposite, for the forces working for economic and social justice and against militarism. Indeed the climate crisis – by presenting our species with an existential threat and putting us on a firm and unyielding science-based deadline – might just be the catalyst we need to knit together a great many powerful movements, bound together by a belief in the inherent worth and value of all people and united by a rejection of the sacrifice zone mentality, whether it applies to peoples or places. We face so many overlapping and intersecting crises that we can’t afford to fix them one at a time. We need integrated solutions, solutions that radically bring down emissions, while creating huge numbers of good, unionised jobs and delivering meaningful justice to those who have been most abused and excluded under the current extractive economy.”
    http://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n11/naomi-klein/let-them-drown

    Reply
    • Loni

       /  May 29, 2016

      Thanks for the post, Anne.

      My take on our log jam is this; We’ve let the financiers run this world into the ground for several hundreds of years now, and what has their stewardship brought us but endless wars, institutionalized ignorance, earth environmental systems in collapse or near collapse, etc. They have raped the resources of the earth, horded the wealth, and created an army to protect and promote their agenda’s.

      We need to retire the financiers, (and the accompanying paradigms that go along with them, i.e. the military industrial complex, factory farming, etc.) and replace them with social engineers and environmental scientists.

      You make a good point, Anne, in as much as when people are placed in a do or die situation, they generally DO start to function. If you put a soldier in a landing craft, he’s going to fight like hell to get to the beach.

      “The gallows doth wonderfully concentrate the mind.” Dr. Johnson.
      “We would rather be ruined than changed. We would rather die in our dread than climb the cross of the moment and let our illusions die.” W.H. Auden, ‘The Age of Anxiety.”

      Reply
      • Anne

         /  May 29, 2016

        Thanks, Loni. I can’t take any credit for the insight though: the quote is from Naomi Klein. (I’m sorry I haven’t worked out to embed quotes on these comment boxes, or the protocol for coding here generally.) Her article is well worth reading, particularly if like me you haven’t yet got round to reading “This Changes Everything”. The analysis is astute but where I thought her article weakest was in solutions: *how* we get from here to there. How we rid societies of what’s harming us all. I guess that’s the problem. People won’t agree on how we dismantle all these oppressive systems. It can’t be done painlessly. It’s not just rich financiers who benefit from them: millions upon millions are dependent on the whole integrated system for income and pensions, paying the mortgage, trucking the food and clothing to local shops. ‘Finance’ pays for highways and hospitals, schools and fire stations, capital things that can’t funded directly out of one year’s tax income. (I haven’t even mentioned those labyrinthine structures of health care and defence.) I don’t know how all that gets untangled. But it must.

        Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  May 30, 2016

      My impression is that the ruling Western elites see climate destabilisation and ecological collapse as means to the end of culling billions of ‘useless eaters’ in the poor world, and ‘bringing down’ rivals like China, Russia and India.

      Reply
  6. – Aerosols and lightning.

    – I’m always looking for a aerosol angle to any newsworthy atmospheric event.
    My naturalist concerns have been biased towards the physical aspects of aerosols in the air/atmosphere. Properties like static charges, positive charged aerosols, dry particulate matter, and the acoustic properties of lightning usually laced with intuition and observation have my attention. (A long winded way of saying that I think that the following states something near to the above — but would like someone to restate the piece in simpler terms. Thx. It may or not be relevant to this post.)
    Robert, you covered many moisture related lightning components. Is there also a dry aerosol influence?

    – Aerosol effects on the enhancement of cloud-to-ground lightning over major urban areas of South Korea

    Abstract

    A long term (1989–1999) investigation has been made using the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data collected to study the aerosol effect on lightning activity over five major urban areas of South Korea. The cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data were collected from the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA) of South Korea. The results reveal that an enhancement of around 40–64% in the negative flash density and 26–49% in the positive flash density is observed over the urban areas compared to their surroundings. On the other hand a percentage decrease of around 7–19% in positive flashes occurs over the urban area. The results are in good agreement with those available in the literature. The enhancement of lightning is examined in relation to the PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and SO2 concentrations. The PM10 and SO2 concentrations exhibit a positive linear correlation with the number of cloud-to-ground flashes, while a negative correlation is observed between those concentrations and the percentage of positive flashes. Positive correlations of 0.795 and 0.801 are found for the PM10 and SO2 concentrations, respectively, when compared separately with the number of CG flashes, establishing the effect of aerosols on urban CG lightning enhancement. However, negative correlations of − 0.577 and − 0.548 are obtained for the PM10 and SO2 concentrations, respectively, when compared separately with the percentage of positive flashes.
    Keywords

    CG lightning; Aerosol; Urban areas

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169809508002408

    Reply
    • – Ps the atmosphere is rather full of wet and dry aerosols the days. (My wee brain can get a bit dyslexic with some negative/positive terms and contexts.
      – Here’s another possible helpful link?

      Do aerosols affect lightning?: A global study of a relation between aerosol optical depth and cloud to ground lightning

      Conference: International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity, At Norman, Oklahoma
      ABSTRACT
      The effects of aerosol particles on precipitation have been studied for several decades and it was shown that aerosols can either increase or decrease precipitation, depending on local thermodynamical, dynamical and microphysical conditions. The effect of aerosol particles on the electrification of storms and lightning production is less known; however, since precipitation and lightning in deep convective clouds are generated by the same physical processes, it can be expected that aerosol particles would also influence lightning. Recent local analyses of several regions of the earth indicate that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is positively correlated with lightning density. Here, we explore this relationship globally for the four seasons of the year 2012. We use AOD data derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. Cloud to ground lightning events (those with the strongest peak currents) were recorded by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN); the flashes were summed between 12:00 and 18:00 local time. The relation between lightning and AOD was studied separately for several ranges of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the vertical velocity in pressure coordinates (ω). The CAPE and ω values were provided by NCEP Climate Forecast System. We show that over most of the continents the increase in AOD is related to an increase in lightning density for all the seasons. There are some large regions of the planet (Amazonian forest, southern Africa, Mexico, USA, northern Australia, Europe) where this correlation is evident. For these regions up to 500% more lightning flashes were registered on moderately polluted days compared to clean days. Also some coastal oceanic regions exhibit high correlations between both variables. The data over the oceanic regions located far away from the coastlines are scarce and no clear relationship between AOD and lightning is observed. A possible reason for the observed correlation between AOD and lightning densities could be meteorological conditions that can influence both variables in a similar way (such as instability conditions). However, the analysis of the correlation between lightning and AOD for different CAPE and ω ranges indicates that, independently of instability conditions, there are more lightning flashes registered on polluted days than on clean days. These results point toward a positive influence of aerosol loading on lightning production for moderately polluted atmosphere.

      https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263350811_Do_aerosols_affect_lightning_A_global_study_of_a_relation_between_aerosol_optical_depth_and_cloud_to_ground_lightning

      Reply
      • Syd Bridges

         /  May 29, 2016

        Thanks, dt,for an interesting article. I would have been surprised had there not been a correlation as the aerosols can act as CCNs. As I read the article, I wondered whether there might also be an inverse correlation between aerosols and the size of hail-more CCNs leading to more and smaller ice particles.

        Reply
  7. – OT
    – Too much heavier-than-air water in the atmosphere. H2O that should be in the oceans.

    Reply
    • NWS WPC ‏@NWSWPC 2h2 hours ago

      Here’s a look at WPC’s QPF forecast for #TSBonnie

      Reply
      • NWS OPC ‏@NWSOPC 2h2 hours ago

        1905 UTC 05/28/16 VIIRS high resolution true-color satellite image of Tropical Storm #Bonnie in the W Atlantic #GRPG

        Reply
    • Reply
    • Technically, the molecular weight of water vapor is less than N2 and O2. However, water’s lower threshold for phase change into heavier water and solid ice by volume makes it an often temporary resident in the global atmosphere. DT’s reference was to a portion of the heavier (technically denser) liquid water in the oceans entering a temporary vapor state in the atmosphere and resulting in increased weather instability. Too much of the world ocean in the air indeed.

      Reply
  8. Abel Adamski

     /  May 29, 2016

    Scares the bejesus out of me
    http://trueviralnews.com/?p=178534

    Harvard Scientist Engineers Superbug That Inhales CO2, Produces Power

    The chemist who gave us the unreal leaf has genetically engineered micro organism to soak up hydrogen and carbon dioxide and convert them into alcohol gasoline.

    When Harvard Professor of Power Daniel G. Nocera introduced he was working with micro organism final yr, different scientists cautioned it could be troublesome to attain a productive degree of effectivity. On the time, Nocera was aiming for five % effectivity—about 5 instances higher than vegetation. This month on the College of Chicago, he introduced his bug converts daylight ten occasions extra effectively than vegetation.

    “Proper now we’re making isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol,” he mentioned in a lecture to the Vitality Coverage Institute at Chicago. “These are all alcohols you possibly can burn straight. And it’s coming from hydrogen from break up water, and it’s inhaling CO2. That’s what this bug’s doing.”

    Nocera’s synthetic leaf, developed whereas he was at MIT, made a splash 5 years in the past as a result of the wafer of silicon and different components may be dropped in water, uncovered to daylight, and it’ll constantly cut up the water into hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen, a clear burning gas, is often comprised of pure gasoline in a course of that emits greenhouse gases.

    The leaf hasn’t lived as much as its promise, Nocera mentioned, as a result of the world isn’t prepared for hydrogen gasoline.

    The English needs work, but the scope for unintended consequences is horrific

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  May 29, 2016

      A better version
      http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffmcmahon/2016/05/29/harvard-scientist-engineers-a-superbug-that-inhales-co2-produces-energy/#39d6aeff5a9d

      Nocera expects his bacteria to make a big splash, like his leaf, because they produce energy far more efficiently than plants do on their own. Plants convert sunlight to biomass at about 1 percent efficiency, he said, after using most of their energy to survive. Nocera’s bacteria produce biomass at 10.6 percent and alcohol at 6.4 percent efficiency. The alcohol can be burned directly. The biomass can be made into fuel.

      “I can just let the bugs grow exponentially. They’re eating hydrogen, that’s their only food source, and then they breathe in CO2, and they keep multiplying. They procreate, and that goes into an exponential growth curve.”

      The news will appear soon in an issue of the journal Science.

      “The proofs just came in yesterday. So you guys are getting it hot off the press,” he said on May 18. “And it’s going to be embargoed in Science, and two weeks from now you’re going to hear a lot.”

      A one-liter reactor full of Nocera’s bacteria can capture 500 liters of atmospheric CO2 per day, he said. For every kilowatt hour of energy they produce, they’ll remove 237 liters of CO2 from the air.

      But much of that will return to the air when the alcohol is burned.

      “This isn’t solving your CO2 problem,” he said. ”I’m taking CO2 out of the air, you burn it and you put the CO2 back. So it’s carbon neutral. I’m not going to reverse 400 ppm of CO2. But you’re not going to use any more stuff out of the ground.”

      Because the leaf can make hydrogen from any water—dirty water, even urine—and CO2 is present to excess in the atmosphere, the technology has promise as a local renewable energy source in areas that lack an electric grid. So Nocera wants to develop it where distributed renewables could have the biggest impact—in India.

      Where India lacks grid infrastructure, about 300 million of its people lack access to electricity. But that also means new energy sources can develop without having to compete with established industry.

      Nothing like a runaway GHG free iceball is possible is it?

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  May 29, 2016

        I want a picture. What does it look like? He talks about biomass, so is it, like, goopy?

        Could this be the miracle Bill Gates told us would come to save us all?

        Ah I didn’t mean that, I’m just goofin’ around, as Babe Bennett says.

        Reply
  9. wili

     /  May 29, 2016

    OK, somebody’s gotta do it…it may as well be me: Smoke on the water…(and fire in the sky!)

    Reply
  10. climatehawk1

     /  May 29, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  11. DrFog

     /  May 29, 2016

    The Swiss national radio and TV service (SRF) has some nice illustrations on what people might do to avoid being hit by a lightning strike, in itself a very unlikely event.

    Even if you don’t know German, these pictures should be very easy to understand:

    http://www.srf.ch/meteo/meteo-news/so-reagieren-sie-richtig-bei-blitzgefahr

    Basically, if one is out and about in a forest with many trees, that should be safe.

    Reply
  12. Griffin

     /  May 29, 2016

    Fascinating post Robert!
    Over the past two summers we have occasionally had discussions on your blog regarding events with extreme levels of lightning. I can specifically remember a vivid storm with incredible CG lightning that happened in my area two years ago, and another storm (7/1/2015) in Washington D.C. that was particularly intense that we had discussed the possibility of an influence from smoke that was present at the time. For the D.C. event, there was a significant amount of smoke from Canada all across the Mid-Atlantic at the time (EOSDIS Worldview from then provides a great view).
    We would have no way of determining in any real scientific manner if there is a correlation between atmospheric smoke particles and these tragic events in Europe but it does give us another opportunity to wonder if there is any connection between the two. As soon as I read this I wondered if the smoke from Alberta that was over New England last week has made it’s way over to Europe. While there are a multitude of other factors that influence thunderstorms and lighting development within them, the question of smoke as a factor has been studied before.
    The study that I found is however, far from conclusive. Food for thought!
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1256/qj.02.175/pdf

    Reply
  13. I think we know the answer to this question:

    “As May turns to June, CO2 levels will come down from their fever pitch, and the question is: How low will they go? Will they dip below 400 ppm one more time, or are we now in an over-400 ppm world”

    http://www.seeker.com/co2-nears-peak-are-we-permanently-above-400-ppm-1801780027.html

    May 28: 408.09
    May 27: 407.99
    May 26: 407.84
    May 25: 408.09

    Reply
    • From Joe Romm in 2012 (I remember this article—-was disturbing then is even more disturbing now):

      “We have passed a critical threshold – not once since 1950 has the world achieved that rate of decarbonisation in a single year, but the task now confronting us is to achieve it for 39 consecutive years….
      Even to have a reasonable prospect of getting to a 4°C scenario would imply nearly quadrupling the current rate of decarbonization.”

      http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/11/06/1144431/study-were-headed-to-11f-warming-and-even-7f-requires-nearly-quadrupling-the-current-rate-of-decarbonisation/

      This is when Joe’s pieces were followed by productive commentary (worth reading)including some accurate insights from Mulga M.

      Reply
      • Mulga Mumblebrain

         /  May 30, 2016

        Caroline, need I say that in the four years since those utterances, the Rightwing in Australia and the Murdoch MSM apparatus in particular have grown even more fanatical, zealous and unhinged in denying anthropogenic climate destabilisation, and attacking renewable energy and our short-lived carbon tax. Today, even as the Great Barrier Reef dies before our eyes, as was predicted for forty years, they still live in total denial. They lie that the damage is reversible, as if there will be no more bleachings. They lie that the reef is not dead, when the northern third is being covered in algae already. They lie that the damage is caused by poor water quality or crown-of-thorns star-fish, not climate destabilisation, and they continue to ABSOLUTELY insist on mining and selling as much coal and gas as possible. As I predicted, with no great clairvoyance but decades of watching the Right in action, these creatures will NEVER change their behaviour, even as the world crumbles around them.

        Reply
  14. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    Climate change: Winters shrinking by one day every year

    ISLAMABAD (APP) – Global warming and subsequent climate change, caused by multiple environmental hazards, has started shrinking cold weather conditions in Pakistan bit-by-bit.
    In a startling revelation, a weather expert has said the climate change is causing one-day addition in summer season of the country every year. “Around 15 years ago, the summer season in Pakistan was spanning over 145 days (almost five months), but now it is reaching about 170 days, which means more or less one-day addition per year in hot days,” Dr Muhammad Hanif said.

    http://en.dailypakistan.com.pk/pakistan/climate-change-winters-shrinking-by-one-day-every-year/

    Reply
  15. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    Forests on fire: ‘no attempt will be made to extinguish 219 million hectares of burning trees’

    These vast tracts of forest have been labelled ‘distant and hard-to-reach territories’, and as such it is officially permitted not to extinguish forest fires if they do not constitute a threat to settlements or if a fire fighting operation is extremely expensive.

    At the same time, there is official recognition that some regions in Siberia are underreporting the extent of forest fires for ‘political reasons’, an accusation long made by environmental campaigners.

    Some 86% of forest in Sakha – also known as Yakutia, and the largest constituent of the Russian Federation – is deemed to fall into the category of ‘distant and hard-to-reach territories’, according to reports.

    http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/others/news/n0688-forests-on-fire-no-attempt-will-be-made-to-extinguish-219-million-hectares-of-burning-trees/

    Reply
  16. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    More Locally Heavy Rain For Flood-Weary Texas This Week

    As we move into the new week, a dip in the jet stream, or trough, will move into the southwestern U.S. This pattern has repeated itself several times in recent months resulting in many heavy rain and flooding events for parts of Texas.

    By midweek the trough will slide into western Texas. Plenty of moisture will once more be transported into Texas from the Pacific Ocean aloft and from the Gulf of Mexico at the surface. The result will be more locally heavy rain and thunderstorms for a significant portion of the Lone Star State.

    Link

    Reply
  17. Sean

     /  May 29, 2016

    Listening to the thunder as I type here in Southern Ireland.

    Reply
  18. Reply
  19. – OT:

    Reply
  20. – Atmospheric contamination — Burn Pits — Health consequences — US foreign policy – Interventions: Vietnam to Iraq/Afghanistan – Congressional/DOD derelictions.

    Burn Pits: US Government Ignores 60,000 Suffering US War Vets

    The open-air burn pits were massive in size — some as large as 10 acres — and many were built in close proximity to where military members were housed. They burned 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with each pit incinerating as much as 50 tons of trash a day. Soldiers stationed on these bases grew accustomed to the black plumes that filled the sky and the clouds of ash that sometimes enveloped them. The noxious pollutants wafted everywhere in these camps. In a desperate effort to block the foul-smelling fallout, some soldiers blocked the vents in their barracks with towels when they went to sleep, waking in the morning to see the once-white towels blackened with soot.

    The burn pits were built and operated by KBR, which was then a subsidiary of Halliburton, the huge energy services company once headed by former Vice President Dick Cheney. For seven years, the pits went completely unregulated, seemingly exempt from all government oversight. Only after service members barraged their representatives in the Senate and Congress with complaints did the Government Accountability Office launch an investigation into the burn pits, finally prompting the Defense Department to put in place pollution-control measures in 2009. During that investigation, the GAO discovered that the burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan were releasing over 1,000 toxins and carcinogens into the air.

    http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/36223-burn-pits-us-government-ignores-60-000-us-war-veterans-suffering-from-health-problems

    Reply
    • – Burn Pits were used extensively in SE Asia. All waste — human and otherwise were consumed (many just partially combusted) and released as aerosols via fires with diesel fuel as accelerant.

      Reply
  21. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    Drought and ‘Rice First’ Policy Imperil Vietnamese Farmers

    SOC TRANG, Vietnam — When the rice shoots began to wither on Lam Thi Loi’s farm in the heart of the Mekong Delta, a usually verdant region of Vietnam, she faced a hard choice: Let them die in the parched earth, or pump salty water from the river to give them a chance.

    Like many seasoned farmers here, she risked the saline water. The crop perished within days.

    The Mekong Delta, Vietnam’s premier rice growing region, is suffering its worst drought since French colonial administrators began recording statistics in 1926. Giant cracks, some a foot deep, gouge the hard earth; brown stalks of dead rice litter the fields; and the dryness is so severe even the pests lie shriveled on the ground.

    “I’ve been planting rice since I was 13, and I have never seen anything like this,” Ms. Loi, 38, said as she sat in her neat living room. “In February I got one bag of rice. Last year we harvested 1.4 tons.”

    Link

    Reply
  22. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    BANK HOLIDAY WASHOUT: Two week’s rain to fall in HOURS as gales batter Britain

    Millions heading home after the long weekend face flash floods and chaos on the roads and transport networks.

    A violent low-pressure system currently causing chaos across Europe is due to hit UK shores tomorrow.

    Parts of the country are braced for a fortnight’s rain in a matter of hours, while winds are tipped to reach gale-force.

    Forecasts had originally timed the stormy weather to hit tomorrow, although some now point to an earlier arrival.

    Link

    Reply
    • Anne

       /  May 29, 2016

      I shouldn’t trivialise this, but Bank Holiday washouts are totally normal in the UK, so normal that they are a tired joke. What’s not normal is the scale of it. A fortnight’s rain – not normal.

      Reply
      • Syd Bridges

         /  May 29, 2016

        I remember the English drought of 1976 and how it ended in spectacular fashion on August Bank Holiday Monday that year. Everything was parched and Dennis Howell had been appointed Minister for the Drought. He was brilliantly successful, so much so that we had 37 straight days of rain and before that ended, he had been appointed the Minister for Floods. Much more successful than Rick Perry’s “Day of Prayer” for rain in Texas in 2012. Though I’m not sure many in Texas want another one of those at present.

        At the time, the 1976 drought appeared to be a flash in the pan, but I did wonder at the time whether it was a harbinger of weather to come. Now these extremes are much more commonplace, with droughts in the early years of this decade, followed quickly by record rainfall and floods.

        Reply
  23. Colorado Bob

     /  May 29, 2016

    Mandatory Evacuation Issued for Rosenberg, Texas, As Floods Turn Deadly

    A second Texas city will force residents to evacuate their homes on Sunday, as rising flood waters from the Brazos River turned deadly over the weekend.

    Surging water levels prompted officials in Rosenberg, a town in Fort Bend county, approximately 35 miles south of Houston, to issue a mandatory evacuation starting today at 2 p.m. local time. According to the 2010 census, 31,676 people live in the area.

    Link

    Reply
  24. Cate

     /  May 30, 2016

    Yikes. Flash flooding in Baden Wurtemburg, Germany, this evening.

    From Severe Weather Europe FB page.

    Reply
  25. Andy in SD

     /  May 30, 2016

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  May 30, 2016

      Image from this article that discusses education cuts during the oil boom times with a huge “now what?” in Senator Snowballs state.

      When the oil boom went bust, Oklahoma protected drillers and squeezed schools

      Oilmen won a big victory when legislators made permanent one of the juiciest tax breaks in the United States. Schools, meanwhile, are having to cut classes, administrators and teachers to make up a growing revenue shortfall.

      http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-oklahoma-bust/

      Reply
  26. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    Syd Bridges –

    Funny thing about 1976 . The love of my life left me. (With good reason) We were at Estes Park. She drove down the Big Thompson Canyon just hours before the flood. That was the last day of July. That winter she had moved to Steamboat Springs , to work the winter season. One of the first of the snow droughts came . They were hauling snow out of the woods on to the slopes. This was before snow guns. In fact, the snow world took off from that winter in Colorado.

    After 1976, things went back to “normal” . I spent the next 4 years up to my ass in snow on the Wasatch Mountains. Snow flakes in Wasatch Mountains used to fall as big as cotton balls from Johnson and Johnson. And it was still cold there. When winter came, it didn’t back off. Come the first of the year, it was -40 degrees easy every night for weeks on end.

    All of that is gone in the mountain West . And at very high altitudes . This is happening in every high place on the planet. The :Arctic Ice Blog needs a “High Ice Blog”.

    That;s not a bad idea. Don’t wait on me , I’m a failing old fool with the motor skills of an experimental monkey. I just happened to feed on some ripe fruit.

    Reply
  27. Xerxes Zorgon

     /  May 30, 2016

    Increasing atmospheric moisture content 7-8% may not sound like so much to some, but it’s not the mean so much as the variance that’s the killer. Just in the last few days we’ve seen local extremes rarely seen before in Texas, Europe and now possibly South Carolina. No doubt I’m leaving something out, as well. That video Cate posted above is astounding and horrifying.

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  May 30, 2016

      Xerxes Zorgon

      Welcome to the 7% party, Have a fine white wine that is being driven from France.

      Reply
      • Xerxes Zorgon

         /  May 30, 2016

        Thanks Bob, but I might need something that’s 80 proof.😉

        Reply
    • Greg

       /  May 30, 2016

      “It’s not the mean, it’s the variance”. Profound advice going forward.

      Reply
  28. Jay M

     /  May 30, 2016

    U-turn in the NE Pacific:

    Reply
  29. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    I watched the 100th Indy $00 today , The last 50 laps ,

    They were going 220 mph. All that money to go that fast . The guy that won saved his fuel. He was a rookie,

    Reply
    • – nothing personal but when they run the race indoors with the doors closed — I’ll care.
      That goes for the spectators too.
      Let them manifest their own atmosphere.
      See how long they last.
      Plenty of free parking — come on in.
      OUT

      Reply
    • Xerxes Zorgon

       /  May 30, 2016

      You might as well have been watching Hurricane Patricia. All you have to do is go 220 mph and turn left.

      Reply
  30. “First Dog on the Moon” comments on the Great Barrier Reef disaster, via Brenda the Civil Disobedience Penguin. Definitely one of the enjoyable aspects of the road to ruin.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/may/30/brenda-the-civil-disobedience-penguin-loses-her-mind-over-the-great-barrier-reef-oh-my-god

    Reply
    • Colorado Bob

       /  May 30, 2016

      I clicked the link and saw dense bullshit, Don’t make the modern mind work.

      Try this :

      Reply
      • Colorado Bob

         /  May 30, 2016

        Politicians discussing climate change.

        Post this over and over and over. Not some dense cartoon with 6 panels.

        Reply
      • That’s already the “cover photo” on my Twitter page.

        Reply
      • Hey Bob, I see you and I’m sorry you didn’t care for the cartoon. I like First Dog myself, because of its black humor, but I’ll be sure to clearly label any cartoons in the future so that you can just skip over them and go on to other comments.

        Reply
  31. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    The lead feed on the Google News In gorilla’s death, critics blame mother, Cincinnati Zoo.

    Who could ever planned that a 4 year old mind could defeat the gorilla encloses er at the Cincinnati Zoo.
    . Not me.

    Shitty mother.

    Reply
  32. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    Shitty mother. Shitty world , Shitty times, Shitty fate, Shitty world,

    Bone apatite

    Reply
  33. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    Get ready little lady …………………….

    Reply
  34. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    Then end of our world What burden, what a time.

    Reply
  35. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    The Rolling Stones – Sympathy For The Devil -HQ

    Reply
  36. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    This has great power now –

    It’s title is –
    Politicans

    Reply
  37. Matt

     /  May 30, 2016

    Great news, The Australian Liberals (meaning free market types equivalent to the republicans in the US) have solved climate change! Not only are we to sack 200ish of our very best CSIRO climate scientists so we don’t get any of those pesky bad news stories, but we can now just remove any at risk area with the touch of a button….
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-27/australia-removed-from-un-climate-change-report/7450898
    No wonder Hunt won the “Best Minister in the World” competition, who can match that??

    Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  May 30, 2016

      The ‘Best Minister in the World’ award given to ‘Rhyming Slang’ Hunt was universally derided. It came from the petro-state of the UAE, which no doubt appreciated his work as Miniature Against the Environment in lying about the risks of fossil fuel emissions. This one is a real piece of work, combining whining disinformation in a squeaky voice that rises in pitch as his lies become more complicated, or if anyone starts to contradict him, where he will talk over people in a truly nasty fashion. He is, mind you, considered one of the ‘liberals’ in the regime, but has willingly debased himself for three years so far.

      Reply
  38. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    Steve Earle – Texas Eagle

    Listen to this folks , it;s world we lost.

    Reply
  39. Colorado Bob

     /  May 30, 2016

    ” Get ready little lady. hell is coming to breakfast”.

    Lone Wati

    Reply
  40. Wow. Fascinating, and a bit scary. Great post.

    Reply
  1. Fire in the Sky — More Than 330,000 Lightning Strikes Hit Europe in Just Eight Hours | robertscribbler | GarryRogers Nature Conservation

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