Extent of Ocean Surface Above 86 Degrees (F) Hits New Record During May of 2016

Not only is a human-forced warming of the globe expected to increase average surface ocean and land temperatures, it is also expected to generate higher peak readings over larger and larger regions. Such was the case during May of 2016 as a massive expanse of the world ocean saw temperatures rocket to above 30 degrees Celsius (or 86 degrees Fahrenheit).

Area of World Ocean Above 30 C

(A record hot global ocean has brewed up yet one more new extreme in the form of a 32.7 million square kilometer expanse of steaming hot waters above 86 degrees Fahrenheit or 30 degrees Celsius. Image source: Brian Brettschneider.)

According to climatologist Brian Brettschneider, 32.7 million square kilometers of the world ocean saw temperatures in excess of 30 degrees Celsius during May of 2016. A new record for the largest sea surface area above a high temperature threshold that typically sets off a range of harmful ocean conditions — including coral bleaching, lower levels of seawater oxygen, and increased rates of algae growth — even as it dumps copious volumes of high latent heat water vapor into the Earth’s atmosphere.

The new record belittled 2015’s May 30 C + extent of about 28.5 million square kilometers — beating it by over 4 million square kilometers. For reference, the new 32.7 million square kilometer record extent of such steamy ocean waters is about equal in area to the size of Africa and Greenland combined.

image

(A huge expanse of Equatorial waters saw sea surface temperatures in excess of 30 degrees Celsius or 86 degrees Fahrenheit during May. A record expanse of hot water that is also now in the process of dumping a record amount of high latent heat moisture into the Earth’s atmosphere. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

High water temperatures in the range of 30 C greatly increase the latent heat energy of the Earth system. Such warm waters pump out an extraordinary volume of high heat content water vapor into the atmosphere. And May’s record 30 C extent has almost certainly contributed to numerous extreme rainfall events occurring around the globe during late May and extending into early June.

Rising Sea and Land Surface Temperatures as Global Health Risk

Record extents of 30+ C waters also increase the potential for combinations of high heat and humidity over the Earth’s surface that result in a rising risk of human heat injuries or even death. In India this year nearly 400 people are thought to have died directly due to excessive heat. Thousands more are reported injured in what is now a record heatwave and drought affecting the highly populated country.

Field workers are also suffering from increasing instances of chronic kidney failure — a condition that health professionals are starting to link to the extreme heat, humidity and other conditions related to climate change. Though highest instances of kidney disease show up among those working outside during the heat of the day, 1 in 13 people in India now suffer from it. Lack of available water due to drought, rising temperatures due to climate change, a lack of air conditioning in the increasingly sweltering country, and a dearth of breaks in which outdoor workers can retreat to the shade are all identified as  factors that have led to such amazingly high rates of kidney illness and kidney failure in India.

In the worst instances of the most dangerous periods of high heat, wet bulb readings — which are meant to simulate the lowest temperature evaporation can cool the human skin to — have approached 35 C. A combination of temperature and humidity that renders the human body unable to transport heat away from the skin and a reading that greatly increases the risk of heat injury and death. And since maximum ocean surface temperatures are a good proxy for peak potential wet bulb readings, a record extent of 30+ C sea surface temperatures is a context of rising risk for the new kinds of heatwave mass casualties associated with human-caused climate change.

Links:

Brian Brettschneider

Earth Nullschool

Thousands Injured by High Temperatures in India

The Mysterious Disease That’s Killing India’s Farmers

Climate Change Linked to Increased Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

Hat Tip to DT Lange

Hat Tip to Cate

Hat Tip to Colorado Bob

 

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69 Comments

  1. Oh *good*

    Reply
    • Note the steep ramp up since 1998…
      😦

      Reply
      • Note the way scientific predictions of the rate of change run low by a magnitude.

        Reply
        • For global temperature increase rates, we’re still in the prediction fan that IPCC has been putting out for years now. 2016 will put us in the top range, but we’re still in the predicted range for BAU. Other effects like glacial melt and sea ice melt appear likely to make IPCC look a bit conservative.

        • Average temperature, sure. How heat moves around, not so much. This is a very large toaster oven.

        • I agree there. I also think they’ll rue leaving out the carbon feedback. Future scientists will wonder about a civilization that only planned for the 21st Century and shrunk its scientific analysis accordingly.

        • Yeah, very good.

  2. Jay M

     /  June 6, 2016

    wound up atmosphere:

    Reply
  3. Greg

     /  June 6, 2016

    Robert, thank you. That graph hits home like no other. Poseidon is the god to be reckoned with. Show that graph to a denier, ask them where all that heat came from, and wait for a response and watch all the convolutions. Tell them the heat capacity of water versus air and ask them if they know anything about the middle Miocene…

    Out

    P.s. after Colin hits Florida that steering trough might sit there and dump a lot more…

    Reply
    • You wont have much luck there. I heard a very good radio program here in Norway where one of the subjects was the cold spot south of Greenland, and since they had actual climate scientists in this program it had some very good theories. The general conclusion is that everywhere but this small spot is heating due to CO2. But people could also send in questions during the program to which they got a classic meme – if the new heat in the ocean could come from volcanoes or the earth… Its becoming very predictable now whenever there is actual scientific talks about climate change there is always someone popping in these ridiculous ideas about what other things it could be, and it bothers me that they still allow them “on air” even though in this case it was good to have a scientist refute that notion by explaining the heat in the ocean is rising from the top and not from the bottom and that the ocean is a perfect energy battery, something we are experiencing very well now as it desperately is trying to escape the planet but where an increasing amount is just returned back to earth due to the high CO2 consentration.

      Reply
    • Looks like the rain is predicted to go off shore for a bit after Colin passes. Over the next week US is expected to heat up and dry out. Texas gets a rain break. Heat over the US southwest shifts to Central US.

      Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  June 7, 2016

      Greg, if you ask deniers about any of that, and mention ‘Poseidon’, you will get grunts of incomprehension, followed by antagonism, unless they think you’re talking about their favourite disaster movie, the one where the boat goes belly up.

      Reply
  4. Kalypso

     /  June 6, 2016

    Wonder if this will turbo charge Atlantic hurricane activity. We have had three named storms and it’s only June 5th.

    Reply
    • If you look at the disposition of heat in the North Atlantic, there’s a lot of excess near the US Gulf and East Coasts. Temperatures are far higher than normal there. The Caribbean is also hotter than normal. Off Africa, it’s slightly cooler than normal. Some weather forecasters have said this may suppress hurricane development. But when you look at it in context of past years, it’s really not that cool. Just slightly lower than normal for this region.

      The shift to La Nina will aid in the generation of surface lows and cut down wind shear across the entire basin. Given the three storm head start, and given where the heat is, we may be in for both a busy season and a season in which many storms threaten the mainland US, Mexico, and Latin American (possibly Newfoundland as well).

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  June 6, 2016

        Newfoundland is pretty well guaranteed to get a taste of whatever hurricane activity is on the go up the Eastern Seaboard. They’re usually downgraded to tropical depressions by the time they hit the Grand Banks but they can still pack a punch—-“the tail-end” of hurricanes, as we call them. Colin will be arriving Wed into Thurs with about 20-30 mm rain.

        Reply
  5. redskylite

     /  June 6, 2016

    Wow that steep ramp is an eyeopener, thanks for drawing attention to it. It’s a late hour indeed. I read this today, somewhat good news after what has happened to CSIRO and threatened in other democracies too. Science is global and should be well above politics, lets hope that a strong Global scientific alliance is enough to override national ego’s and despots.

    Over 60 nations with earth-observing satellites have agreed, for the first time, to share collected data to be used to study and monitor human-induced green house gases and their effects on the environment.

    http://www.ibtimes.co.in/isro-nasa-other-space-faring-nations-fight-climate-change-together-681421

    Reply
    • Given the ongoing assault on climate science by conservatives and fossil fuel cheerleaders suffering from a regression to early childhood and throwing what amounts to global irrational temper tantrums, it appears that the scientific community has decided to circle the wagons. Good for them. It’s really sad that in the 21st Century we still suffer from assaults on science and scientists of this kind. A behavior one may have expected during the dark ages and not at a time when pretty much every leader should have learned from the terrible mistakes of our past.

      Reply
  6. redskylite

     /  June 6, 2016

    In another sad story from the South Pacific the author draws attention to an abandoned village, a victim climate change and sea level rise. He says he feels sorry for anyone who is still in denial. I cannot share that sympathy, because those very same people are slowing efforts to address the dangerous situation up and hindering real progress.

    “There’s a village there called Vunidogoloa and this is the first village in the world to be relocated due to climate change.

    “I’ve been to Vunidogoloa and seen the consequences. The entire village is gone and it’s not habitable anymore, they have had to shift so that in itself is a testament that climate change is real.”

    “We’re not making this up,” he says. “If you are still a climate denier, I feel sorry for you.”

    http://asiapacificreport.nz/2016/06/06/pacific-profile-jale-samuwai-curuki-if-youre-still-a-climate-denier-i-feel-sorry-for-you/

    Reply
    • If you’re still a climate change denier, you’re contributing to the problem. It’s absolutely correct to assert that climate change deniers are slowing our response time, are locking in more fossil fuel emissions, and are therefore increasing the degree of inflicted harm.

      Reply
  7. All the way up to 86 F — A veritable ‘sea change’.🙂

    Reply
  8. UK – Air pollution – This mother takes it seriously/personally.
    Everyone should.
    I do (ap) because it’s a direct attack on my personal health.

    Mother wants inquiry into role of pollution in daughter’s asthma death

    Lawyer for Rosamund Kissi-Debrah says government may be in breach of duty of care over death of nine-year-old in London

    A woman whose daughter died from an asthma attack wants an investigation to find out whether worsening air pollution in London contributed to the death.

    Ella Kissi-Debrah, nine, from Hither Green near the capital’s busy south circular road, died in February 2013.

    Through a lawyer, her mother, Rosamund, is calling on the attorney general to order a second inquest or to set up an independent inquiry to determine the impact of pollution on her child’s asthma and death. She is also calling for immediate action to reduce exposure to toxic air for children such as her son, Robert, whose lives she believes, remain at risk.

    The moves could pave the way for ground-breaking legal action against the Greater London Authority and other government bodies for failing to protect her child and others from air pollution.

    Jocelyn Cockburn, a human rights lawyer who is working with the family, said: “There are strong grounds to believe that our government may be in breach of its duty to protect life in Ella’s case.”
    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jun/05/mother-inquiry-air-pollution-daughter-asthma-death

    Reply
    • So sorry that this lady had to lose the life of her daughter due the government’s failure to hold bad corporate actors accountable and to fulfill their duty which is to protect and keep the public safe from harm. I do think that there’s a good moral and legal precedent for cases of this kind and that both the air pollution that impacts asthma and air pollution that forces climate change should fall under this precedent. My heart goes out to this brave woman. She is fighting defend us all.

      Reply
  9. Andy in SD

     /  June 6, 2016

    There are some pretty nasty storms in Australia. Check this before / after picture. On the left you see the before. Take note of the swimming pool in the center of the image. Now look for that same swimming pool on the right side (after storm).

    I believe that is what is referred to as erosion.

    Erosion swimming pool storms

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  June 6, 2016

      Here is the article it comes from. Of course the JPG doesn’t show and is just a link… *sigh*

      http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2016/jun/06/wild-weather-flood-warnings-victoria-tasmania-storm-sydney-south-coast-live

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  June 6, 2016

        Bleurgh, all those folks going where the rogue waves can just pluck them up. Talk about death wish.

        Reply
      • Got it.

        Heck of a picture, Andy. Looks like the ocean took out about 100 feet of dunes during the recent storms. If that had happened in VA Beach the oceanfront would have been swimming.

        Reply
      • Mulga Mumblebrain

         /  June 7, 2016

        Cate, the people who buy these absolute water front properties are generally rich, and are real Cnuts who think that they can just order the seas not to rise. At Byron Bay, in one hyper-expensive enclave, the rich owners demanded that the Council, which oscillates between being controlled by rational ex-hippies and insane property developers, build huge defences to protect their properties, at great expense. And, of course, all hopeless in the not so long term.

        Reply
  10. Area of World Ocean Above 30 C. This is an image for Extent of Ocean Surface Above 86 Degrees (F) Hits New Record During May of 2016.

    Reply
  11. Cento

     /  June 6, 2016

    Andy that’s a spectacular amount of erosion. It will be interesting to see if this awesomely destructive East Coast Low, which has delivered some amazing rainfall totals is recognized as a potential indicator of “weather on steroids” as a climate scientist described in a lecture to policy makers I once attended.

    Reply
  12. This is another interesting metric, similar to the one that shows how a significant amount of the energy accumulation has been in the oceans over the last 15-20 years. I’m sure that’s been mentioned here before, but I can’t seem to find it via Google.

    Reply
  13. DaveW

     /  June 6, 2016

    What stuns me is how so many of the metrics measuring changes are going off the charts this year – breaking previous records by record large margins. A “step change” as Kevin Trenbarth calls it?

    PS – small typo in caption for 1st graph – 30 C, not 36 C

    Reply
    • Andy in SD

       /  June 6, 2016

      Agreed Dave, too much, too frequently, too large of departures to fit the norms of the past.

      Reply
    • Trenberth is right, we’re definitely in a period of step change. We’ll probably average 1.25 to 1.3 C above 1880s this year. We might have one or two years below the 1 C mark after that. But then it’s bye-bye below 1 C and onward toward 1.5 C.

      PS thanks for the catch. The fix is in.

      Reply
      • DaveW

         /  June 6, 2016

        Robert – it amazes me how you not only continue to produce these excellent pieces, but also participate extensively in the comments.

        Have been lurking here for years – just started to make the odd comment –

        Many thanks for the blog – and the community it has built.

        Reply
  14. Andy in SD

     /  June 6, 2016

    Inside Poland’s ancient Bialowieza Forest, birds chirp and bison graze as visitors explore the lush green surroundings, a home to boars, beavers, lynx – and beetles.

    Occupying almost 580 square miles of woodland, Bialowieza is a UNESCO World Heritage site sprawling across the border with Bielorussia. But Europe’s last primeval forest is under attack, from bark beetles eating its spruce trees.

    https://widerimage.reuters.com/story/europes-last-primeval-forest

    Reply
  15. June

     /  June 6, 2016

    As Robert talked about in the Fort Mac posts.

    Spike in Alaska Wildfires is Worsening Global Warming

    “Northern wildfires must now be recognized as a significant driver of climate change – and not just a side-effect, according to the report from the U.S. Geological Survey.”

    “Our scientists found that the balance of carbon storage versus release in Alaska was strongly linked with wildfires,” Burkett said. “In years where there was high wildfire activity the net carbon balance declined dramatically, and then it would rebuild in the absence of fire.”

    Reply
  16. Robert in New Orleans

     /  June 6, 2016

    Mr. Scribbler,

    What are your views and/or opinion about this article?

    http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2016/06/howarth-alerts-white-house-growing-methane-danger

    Specifically this paragraph:

    Howarth told the group Earth’s atmosphere is on target to raise the average atmospheric temperature by 1.5 degrees C in the next 10 to 15 years and by 2 degrees C within the next 35 to 40 years. “The only way to slow this rate of warming and meet the COP21 target is to reduce methane emissions,” he said. “Although we should reduce carbon dioxide emissions, reducing carbon dioxide alone will not slow global warming on the time scale of the next few decades. The climate system responds much more quickly to reducing methane emissions.”

    Reply
    • If we reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions, then we reduce the rate of warming and that will be absolutely necessary in preventing catastrophic climate change. If we add in methane emissions reductions, then we increase our ability to avoid 2 C warming happening so soon. In essence, you’ve got to reduce both if you’re serious about preventing catastrophic climate change.

      There have been some who have used this statement to imply that CO2 emissions don’t matter. And nothing could be further from the truth. CO2 is the primary driver for the warming we are seeing now and is the result of the majority of the energy imbalance at the top of the atmosphere. The issue is that methane’s contribution is something that can be rapidly scaled down due to its short atmospheric lifespan. So if you cut your methane emission rapidly, you get a big short term effect.

      To be very clear, current CO2 levels of 407 ppm result in 3 C warming long term and 1.6 to 1.8 C warming this Century. So unless CO2 levels are also brought down, then you have ongoing warming and probably an amplifying feedback from the Earth System. Continuing to just emit CO2 alone at a rate that increases atmospheric levels to 450 ppm by around 2035 locks in 2 C warming this Century. So CO2 absolutely matters. And cutting CO2 is absolutely essential.

      You’ve got to do both. And what Howarth has said is to the point that continuing to burn natural gas is a very bad idea. To continue fracking is a very bad idea. To present this argument in a fashion that downgrades the importance of CO2 as a greenhouse gas, however, is both dishonest and dangerously misleading.

      Reply
      • Robert in New Orleans

         /  June 8, 2016

        Mr. Scribbler, what about the time lines mentioned in this article? More specifically, Earth’s atmosphere is on target to raise the average atmospheric temperature by 1.5 degrees C in the next 10 to 15 years and by 2 degrees C within the next 35 to 40 years.

        I am not a climate scientist, but if what he said is true and the article was correctly transcribed by the author, it sounds like we are toast. 😦

        Reply
        • So the key words are —

          “Under business as usual fossil fuel emissions…”

          If we get ourselves off the BAU path, then we slow down that timeline.

          2 C this Century is pretty bad. But it’s probably something we can survive and mitigate if we put together the proper effort. What we can’t survive is a continued BAU emission.

  17. Cate

     /  June 6, 2016

    The preliminary indications are that the Fort Mac fire was “human-caused.” This conclusion from Chad Morrison, Alberta’s senior wildfire manager. Human-caused means “anything other than lightning.”

    >>>>>>>>>>>While the investigation continues into the inferno known informally as ‘The Beast,’ Chad Morrison told the Globe and Mail on Saturday that the fire was probably the result of human action–a broad category that includes everything from careless ATV drivers to issues with power lines.
    That’s a conclusion local firefighters agree with. While the Fort McMurray fire might not have been intentionally set, human actions were responsible, said Paul Spring, the owner of a local helicopter company that has spent decades fighting forest fires in northern Alberta.<<<<<<<<

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/fort-mcmurray-wildfire-most-likely-human-caused-alberta-senior-wildfire-manager-says/article30279836/

    Reply
    • Human-caused climate change …

      Whether the fire start was initially caused by power lines or ATVs or a lightning strike is not what resulted in the fire’s expansive size. These were related to weather conditions related to climate change. To increased available fuels related to climate change. To record temperatures related to climate change. To an expansion of burn season related to climate change. ATVs, lightning strikes, or power lines would not have generated this fire during a normal year. But the year wasn’t normal, the time isn’t normal. We have worsening fire conditions due to human warming and so we have had this fire.

      Reply
  18. Shawn Redmond

     /  June 6, 2016

    There was an interview on the local CTV news last evening (ATV) with Scott Doney senior scientist from Woods Hole. He didn’t seem to concerned with the present level of ocean degradation that is discussed at this forum. No mention of the present heat and the coral bleaching just in passing. Are these guys funded by FF at all? That would explain his candour some what.

    Reply
    • Shawn, did he actually say he wasn’t concerned? Or he wasn’t concerned about some aspect in particular? It’s always hard to tell whether or not the interviewers edited out the parts they didn’t want in the report, and it’s often not the interviewee who is the problem.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  June 6, 2016

        He didn’t say he wasn’t, it was his demeanour and lack of input on the points. He is here during a week long educational push about global ocean heath. The U.S. state department is footing the bill for him if I understood correctly. Sorry I don’t have a clue how to link the interview or anything else for that matter. He talked mostly about co2 rising and the mention about the corals was very short. Nothing about the present heat in the oceans.

        Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  June 6, 2016

      If you google ATV news last evenings broadcast June 5 is there in full his interview starts at about the 30 minute mark.

      Reply
    • Everything I’ve seen out of Woods Hole has shown a high degree of concern for ocean health. They’ve performed critical research on the issues of ocean acidification and declining ocean health due to climate change. I think it’s likely that added ocean hear content was simply not a topic that was touched on in this program. Any media is limited by tge questions asked by the moderator and by the time constraints that are natural to the medium. I’m certain that Woods Hole researchers are very concerned about rising ocean heat content. And it’s a bit odd to imply that they are not.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  June 6, 2016

        I’m sorry if I implied that Robert. It just seemed to lack any sense of urgency throughout. Maybe I expect too much.

        Reply
        • So failure to communicate a due sense of urgency is something I’d say that many scientific agencies and scientists are guilty of. I don’t think this is due to direct fossil fuel influence in most cases but is moreso just an issue of scientific reticence.

          To be very clear, though, the trends Woods Hole is tracking are pretty disturbing and most of the science they’ve published, in my view, has been pretty much spot on — with the possible exception being carbon feedbacks from the Earth and Ocean system.

          To this point, if there is a possible conflict of interest it is on the issue of methane hydrate. Woods Hole has, in the past, been commissioned to perform oceanographic surveys of these deposits for the possibility of resource exploitation. I suppose it’s possible that some scientists there may have been influenced as a result.

          My thoughts on this are purely speculative. But the notion of performing surveys of methane hydrate for possible extraction while also monitoring changes in the ocean system due to human forced warming does represent a bit of moral hazard.

          Can you post a link to the program? I’ll take a look when I get the chance.

        • Re Woods Hole, my interest in this issue really ramped up when Scientific American published a lengthy article on it by Richard Houghton and George Woodwell, both of Woods Hole, in its April 1, 1989, issue (“Global Climatic Change”). Alas, it’s paywalled: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/global-climatic-change/

        • OK. Watched it. Seemed fine to me.

          So, to be very clear, what I think he was doing was trying to speak calmly about challenging issues. To highlight progress made and to point to a path forward.

          I agree that the level of urgency was low and that risks that are now rising were not highlighted as much as they should have been. Part of it had to do with questions asked. But the other part was probably due to the guest attempting not to sound too alarmist.

          That said, the tone of the discussion seemed to be a bit misleading. It seemed to indicate that we were already on the right path and that there wasn’t a huge amount of work to be done. Leveling off carbon emissions during 2015 was a big achievement on the part of the global community. But from the standpoint of ocean acidification and of warming, continuing to emit 13 billion tons of carbon into the air each year is a huge insult. So we should be ardently pushing for more rapid emissions reductions and net zero carbon emissions on a global scale as soon as possible. Any additional carbon that we emit now will continue to worsen the problem. In addition, we haven’t yet seen all the warming from the carbon we’ve currently emitted — which will go on for decades and centuries even if global emissions fell to zero next year.

          I think his view also fails to recognize a tenuous political situation in which fossil fuel special interests manage to continue to delay emissions reduction efforts.

          We have the opportunity to gain ground, but the battle in nowhere near won. So, yeah, I think someone maybe should have helped him with his messaging. And I agree, that there was a lack of urgency which didn’t adequately deliver the necessary message. But I don’t think this was intentional. Instead, I think the scientist here was trying to sound up-beat.

      • Shawn Redmond

         /  June 6, 2016

        Oh shit the interview starts at 29:23 I’m getting closer to figuring this out. I’ll keep looking for a shorter link. Very green at this!

        Reply
  19. climatehawk1

     /  June 6, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  20. A study of the incidence of high temperatures and kidney failure in workers on plantations in Nicaragua a few years ago found that dehydration caused a build-up of lactic acid prevented the kidneys’ ability to excrete the acid – and damaged the kidneys as a result, eventually killing many workers. – – I wouldn’t be surprised if just moderate activity combined with dehydration is probably the primary reason for kidney failure in India. Just a thought to share… Maybe more news later.

    Reply
  21. Sunkensheep

     /  June 8, 2016

    Superheated Indian ocean stikes again. For over a year the following note on our climate reports “More broadly, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are significantly warmer than average across much of the Indian Ocean. This warmth will likely provide more available moisture to weather systems as they cross the Australian continent”.

    The best explantion I have found for why is an ENSO related multi-decadal oscillation. The people who made that discovery correctly predicted the current “super el-nino” and record temperatures would be the result. http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/05/how-the-indian-ocean-ended-up-stealing-the-atmospheres-heat/

    The problem is the current el-nino has hardly gotten rid of the Indian Ocean’s heat content (see above earth.nullschool image). Sea surface height anomalies seem like another thing to keep on the cimate watchlist.

    Reply
  22. This commercial is running now from the Ontario Government, not without controversy though. Complaints are about David Suzuki receiving money from the government, even though he is donating the money to the Fort Mac fire victims, and it appears to be frightening children, I would suspect it’s actually good editing. Hopefully it will generate conversations and actions.

    The commercial has only had just over 3000 views on youtube, and a few nasty comments.
    Hopefully my link will work, or copy and paste it to your browsers.

    Reply
  23. Jai John Mitchell

     /  June 19, 2016

    Say it with me,

    “Reductions in coal consumption and increased regulations of light vehicle emissions in the
    South-East Asian region have reduced mid and upper Tropospheric SO2 loading, leading to a sharp increase in regional lapse-rate feedback contributions as well as increased globally averaged shortwave incident radiation. This effect has been determined to be have greater impact on the Arctic but is working on a global scale as well.”

    Reply
  1. Extent of Ocean Surface Above 86 Degrees (F) Hits New Record During May of 2016 | robertscribbler | GarryRogers Nature Conservation
  2. Today in climate change (7 June 2016) – Climate Change Update
  3. Ocieplenie ziemskiej atmosfery przyspiesza (aktualizacja: 12.06.2016) | Blog exignoranta

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