Coming Big Arctic Ocean Warm-Up May Extend Sea Ice Melt Season

It’s September in the Arctic, a time of year when temperatures should be cooling off. But with sea ice at second-lowest levels on record in most monitors and the globe experiencing an unprecedented hot year, it appears that the next week may see the Arctic Ocean reverse its typical seasonal cooling trend and significantly warm up over the coming five to six days.

arctic-heat-september

(GFS model runs show a significant warming is in store for the Arctic Ocean over the coming week — and that’s bad news for sea ice running at second-lowest levels on record in the current daily measures and lowest levels on record for the first eight months of the year so far. Image source: Climate Reanalyzer.)

GFS model runs show a strong pulse of warm air will rise up over the Atlantic Ocean and Barents Sea in the next 72 hours. This warm air then will ride in over the Greenland Sea and invade the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard. Local temperatures over water are expected to be between 4 and 8 degrees Celsius above average over a broad region of the Arctic. Meanwhile, general departures for the entire region above 66° North Latitude are expected to hit around 2 to 2.5 C above average.

Temperatures for most of the Arctic basin in ice-covered areas are expected to again push to -2 C to +2 C. Generally, air temperatures below -2 C are needed to prevent melt, but in warm water and rough ocean conditions, which have tended to dominate the Arctic recently, air temperatures probably need to average around -4 to -6 C over most of the Arctic to fully halt melt.

Threats to Ice Coming From All Directions

During summer and early fall, the Arctic Ocean tends to help to moderate temperatures over the region, so these are very high predicted temperature departures for this time of year. Such high temperatures are likely due to the effect of added heat bleeding off recently ice-free waters. While sea-ice area and extent measures are in the range of second-lowest on record, there is some indication that sea-ice concentration in the Arctic may be at or near record-low levels.

amsr2-animation-neven

(AMSR2 animation constructed by Neven shows vigorous ice export and melt through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This is a heavy blow to the thin veil of multi-year sea ice remaining in the Arctic. Animation by Neven at the Arctic Sea Ice Forum. Images by Universität Bremen.)

The ice, generally, is extraordinarily weak, thin and dispersed. Large gaps run across an arc covering the Atlantic and Siberian side of the polar zone. In addition, large cracks are appearing in the very thin and unstable multi-year ice north of Greenland (below) as sea-ice export now threatens melt in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Nares Strait, the Fram Strait, and on into the northern edge of the Barents Sea.

Risks Rise for a Long Melt Season

Recent animations by Neven over at the Arctic Sea Ice Forum (above) show particularly strong export and melt in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago — which is a pretty unprecedented melt feature. What this means is that the ice is basically being hit from all sides and that the factors necessary to melt ice are compounding.

last-bastian-of-multi-year-ice-breaking-up

(Large section of multi-year ice breaking up north of Greenland on September 9, 2016. In recent years, less and less ice has survived summer melt to make it to the following winter. Ice with an age of more than five years has grown quite scant in the Arctic. The ice shown breaking up in the above image is part of the last bastion of old, thick ice in the Arctic. When that’s gone, the Arctic Ocean will only be a seasonally frozen sea, a possibility that may occur as soon as 2017 to 2025 and will probably occur before 2035. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

If the big warm-up does occur as predicted this week, there is risk that ice losses will extend through to September 15 and possibly beyond. These melt rates should not be particularly severe, given the time of year, but it is possible that 50,000 to 300,000 square kilometers or more will go. This would be enough to solidify 2016 as the second-lowest year on record for extent and area at the end of melt season. It would also help to fill the big gap between 2007 and 2012 — solidifying already significant decadal melt trends.

Overall, this is a pretty weird forecast, but set in the backdrop of a year that’s on track to be about 1.2 C above 1880s averages — the hottest year on record by far — the possibility of a late-season Arctic warm-up and a late end to a near record melt season is an entirely valid one.

Links:

Climate Reanalyzer

Universität Bremen

Arctic Sea Ice Forum

LANCE MODIS

Hat tip to Greg

Hat tip to DT Lange

Leave a comment

447 Comments

  1. Witchee

     /  September 9, 2016

    Grief is not strong enough for what I feel.

    Reply
  2. Cate

     /  September 9, 2016

    What on earth will winter bring?

    Reply
  3. Great wrap up here of ‘real time’ reality — ‘as it happens’.🙂

    Also there is ample warm terra firma with record or near record temps in places like Alaska, et al.
    This fast warming of the polar regions is also coincident with latitudinal warming. So we get two expanding areas of heat in places traditionally cool.

    Reply
  4. A view of Greenland.

    Reply
  5. Reply
  6. JPL

     /  September 9, 2016

    Dakota Access Pipeline lawsuit update:

    The bad news (not a surprise):
    “A federal judge ruled Friday against the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for a
    preliminary injunction to halt construction on the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline that the tribe says has endangered sacred burial grounds and could threaten its water supply.”

    The good news:
    “But that decision by District Judge James E. Boasberg was immediately put on hold by a Justice Department order to stop construction near the tribe’s reservation until the Army Corps of Engineers can revisit its previous decisions in the disputed portion.”

    Still hope!

    Reply
  7. “It’s a mess out there.” – RS
    And it’s getting some scrutiny… “curdled milk”.

    Reply
  8. One thing that springs to my mind is, we don’t need a La Nina for a new record. As long as you have two good melt years in a row, records can happen any time. This year has beaten 2011 by a good margin, so a record for next year is certainly on the table, even if La Nina forecasts are low. An Arctic ice free summer seems to be inevitable by now. Now we need not one, but many miracles!

    Reply
    • 2005 was a record low year during an El Nino. It’s just that the La Nina influence on NAO and the gyres in the context of a warming world tends to produce severe sea ice losses.

      Reply
  9. Bill H

     /  September 9, 2016

    Remarkable falls in sea ice volume at the moment. See the website of the DanishArctic Research Associations:

    http://polarportal.dk/en/havisen-i-arktis/nbsp/sea-ice-extent/#tabs-2

    Click on “thickness and volume” tab. It can take a while to load, so have patience. The cyclonic conditions of recent weeks are causing the thick ice north of Greenland and Ellesmere Island to be pushed into the North Atlantic, hence the big tongue of ice extending far into the Fram Strait. That tongue then gets rapidly eroded by the Warm Atlantic leading to more ice flowing to its death. With the forecasts for the next week, I feel we may be on for a record low in sea ice volume this year.

    Reply
    • That’s just nuts. Image here:

      Just goes to show that 2016 will probably present some challenges to 2012 in some monitors. The next week is looking remarkably warm for mid September. So it’s tough to say if the drama is entirely over yet and we won’t get something unexpected in the end.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  September 9, 2016

        Yikes. All that thick ice just pouring out the Fram!

        Reply
      • Doesn’t the climate models predict that winters will be milder and milder first and foremost, in that case I guess we will see a shift towards winter for when the minimum happens in the Arctic too. This volume graph really shows that the slush is now melting completely and we could be seeing a new record low volume even. I always felt the extent thing was less important than volume as its perfectly possibly to have very thin ice covering a large area, but that says little about how quickly it can go away – which volume certainly does.

        Reply
  10. Reply
  11. Griffin

     /  September 9, 2016

    First off, Robert I would have to say that you have put out more quality information on this blog in just this week than I have found anywhere else all month. Incredibly good reporting on what are truly terrifying events that have been taking place recently.
    The situation in the Arctic is really unsettling. I don’t have to be a scientist to look at the NASA Worldview website and know that things are in terrible shape up there.
    So, all that MYI breaking loose from Greenland like it’s Spring, if there is a massive transport of ice out through Fram, what does that do to salinity levels further down the straight? I know that it is very typical for ice to move out of the straight in a season but what I am referring to is the possibility of cross-polar flow just picking up the floes we have seen crack up this week and just carrying them out in a train. Does that result in a Heinrich type event on a small scale?
    The whole thing would be fascinating if it didn’t actually have such dire consequences for weather stability!

    Reply
  12. Griffin

     /  September 9, 2016

    Sounds like the DNI has been reading your blog Robert!

    Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, giving an overview of global threats as he opened an annual intelligence community conference in D.C. on Wednesday. Increased competition for “ever-diminishing food and water resources” will amplify socio-economically motivated armed conflicts, countries’ difficulties controlling their borders, and instability more generally, he said.

    “I think climate change is going to be an underpinning for a lot of national security issues,” Clapper said. It affects “so many things: the availability of basics like water and food and other resources which are continually going to become matters of conflict, and already are, between and among countries.”
    http://www.defenseone.com/threats/2016/09/pentagon-continues-beat-climate-change-drum/131384/?oref=d-topstory

    Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  September 10, 2016

      Did anybody hear “climate change” at the Commander-in-Chief Forum?
      It’s more important to spend 10 minutes on emails than 30 seconds talking about our navy bases flooding, Maybe Clinton will bring it up at the debates. I’m not counting on the moderators to do it.

      Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  13. Griffin

     /  September 9, 2016

    Good new video from Peter Sinclair.
    Featuring the indomitable Katherine Hayhoe!!!

    Reply
  14. Cate

     /  September 9, 2016

    What the climate change movement can learn from the Neoliberal coup, by Chloe Maxmin.
    Link from AbruptSLR at ASIF.

    Components of neoliberal success: Shared vision. Long-game perspective. Clean, clear, compelling messaging. Think tanks to incubate ideas and policies. Networks. Methodical implementation. Harnessing political power.

    “The bad news is that the Republican neoliberal coup—united behind a cohesive ideology and a thoughtful political, policy, and PR long game—successfully infiltrated the very marrow of American culture and politics. Here’s the good news: The climate movement can do this, and do it better…Bernie Sanders’s political revolution demonstrates that many Americans are already in rebellion against a political class that protects only elites. The climate movements offers our society truth instead of denial, survival instead of chaos, justice instead of injustice, equality instead of inequality, and democracy instead of oligarchy. Our own unified vision, methodical long game, mainstream communication strategies, innovative policies, and political power can be forged by, for, and of the people.”

    https://www.thenation.com/article/what-the-climate-movement-can-learn-from-the-neoliberal-coup/

    Reply
  15. – The chemistry of atmospheric pollution etc. – Indeed. All in tandem with GHG, etc. you produce one of them — you get both. Always.
    Very glad to see this.

    Atmospheric Chemists Should Tackle Risks to Society, Report Says

    Protecting public health and the health of the climate and ecosystems warrants more focus from this scientific field, according to the report.

    The field of atmospheric chemistry should improve its predictive capability to better anticipate and help people prepare for potential environmental and human health challenges, a new report urges. This and other steps recommended by a committee of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) could help to reduce air quality risks related to increasing energy demands, intensifying industrial and agricultural activities, a growing and more urbanized population, and other factors, according to the report, which is entitled The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research and was released on 25 August.

    “The future challenges for atmospheric chemistry involve nothing less than the health of the planet’s climate, the health of ecosystems, and the health of humans everywhere,” the report states. Atmospheric chemistry research has a history of helping with earlier challenges, including contributing to guiding policies that have cut urban smog, acid rain, and chemicals implicated in depleting stratospheric ozone, the committee states.
    https://eos.org/articles/atmospheric-chemists-should-tackle-risks-to-society-report-says

    Reply
  16. Shawn Redmond

     /  September 10, 2016

    The 2015 Paris climate talks put the 1.5°C temperature target firmly on the policy-making table, whilst also signing off on actions consistent with 3°C or more of warming. This has prompted more discussion in the climate movement about the emissions reduction task consistent with 1.5°C, and whether there is any “carbon budget” available.
    http://www.climatecodered.org/2016/09/unravelling-myth-of-carbon-budget-for.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ClimateCodeRed+%28climate+code+red%29

    Reply
  17. Andy_in_SD

     /  September 10, 2016

    Another knock on effect of this late melt season pulse, it shortens the winter freeze season (which is already diminished). This event may be felt next sprint / summer as well.

    Are there any metrics or data collected on the resultant heat absorbed by the open water we now see in the Arctic and it’s impact on refreeze or diminished freeze? There must be a correlation between absorbed heat energy and it’s impact on the freeze cycle up there.

    Reply
  18. Shawn Redmond

     /  September 10, 2016

    Man! these explanations of the numbers are needed in MSM.

    Risk management

    Are modelling outcomes sometimes interpreted in such a way as understate the risks or fail to appreciate the high-end outcomes?

    For example, one can get caught up in the numerical detail of a carbon budget that has a 50% or 66% chance of not exceeding the target. But what do those numbers mean?

    For a 1.5°C budget with a 50% risk, there is a one-in-two chance of exceeding 1.5°C of warming. What is not generally said is that this scenario also has around a 33% chance of exceeding 2°C of warming, and around a 10% chance of exceeding 3°C of warming. (10)

    People do not board planes or cross bridges if there is a 10% chance of failure.

    http://www.climatecodered.org/2016/09/unravelling-myth-of-carbon-budget-for.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ClimateCodeRed+%28climate+code+red%29

    Reply
  19. I was looking at 2015 Sep/Oct (to the end of visibility) the other day. The MYI ice north of Greenland stayed mobile well beyond the date of extent minimum – all the way to the end of available satellite view. Thus with the right conditions, the loss of multi-year ice via export could continue well beyond the overall end of so-called “melt season”. So IMO, “in situ” melt conditions, though important, are not even necessary for that MYI ice’s demise. It will be the export dynamics over the next month (or even slightly more) that will be the main determinant of what remains and what the set up is for next year.

    Reply
  20. Jay M

     /  September 10, 2016

    One cudgels one’s brain about where cold could come from:
    human warfare, asteroid impact, super volcano eruption
    chance occurences unlike building out solar voltaic and proceeding with industrialization from there
    grow plants and in the the sea and progress with zero footprint

    Reply
  21. Phil

     /  September 10, 2016

    Will be interesting to see nature of the transition from melting to refreezing and potential roles played by ocean heat and transport of land based heat and whether the melting season extends further than normal. Been a strange season – cloudy over much of June and July followed by the run of cyclones late last month.

    If the weather would have been more ‘obliging’ during June and July, there might not have been much sea ice left.

    Will be interesting to see how typical this June and July weather becomes over the next couple of years to a decade, and whether arctic amplification means extremely mild winters with perhaps a tendency for mild (cloudy) summers? That seems to have been the norm the last couple of years.

    Then again, with the right weather conditions, another step-change similar to 2007 and 2012 will eventuate.

    Reply
  22. Cate

     /  September 10, 2016

    Crystal Serenity sailed from Barrow to Baffin Bay in just over ten days.

    “The terrible irony with the Crystal Serenity’s voyage is that it’s taking place only because of climate change and the melting Arctic, said Michael Byers, a professor in the political science department at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. The Northwest Passage, which connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, has long been choked off by ice. But melting brought on by climate change is allowing passengers to cruise up the Bering Strait and then head east toward Greenland over the Arctic Ocean before docking next week in New York City.
    “And yet, by actually taking advantage of climate change, it’s contributing to the problem because the ship has a very large carbon footprint of its own,” Byers said.”

    Sadly, irony is lost on CS passengers. As Bob Lentz declared, he and his wife want to “experience things before crazy humans destroy it…”

    Um…Bob? .just a sec there, Bob…

    http://phys.org/news/2016-09-giant-cruise-ship-historic-voyage.html

    Reply
    • Before we slip into unconciousness
      Mother Nature’d like one good bye kiss
      A last chance at bliss
      Just one last kiss – farewell to this

      These days are bright, & filled with pain
      Enclosed me with a bomb of rain
      The time trump ran was too insane
      We’ll meet again..a sad refrain

      The Crystal Ship is being filled
      A thousand thrills, & unpaid bills
      A million ways, deniers lie
      If turned away, they’ll cross that line

      Apologies to Jim M, & the Doors(The Crystal Ship)

      Reply
      • – The word of yore has it that during a visit/gig in Santa Barbara Morrison went out the UCSB campus town of Isa Vista (my old hood) where from the cliffs or beach he saw oil Platform Holly at night — which became the ‘Crystal Ship’.

        I’ve seen it many times including imaginative psychedelic times…🙂 It was a good choice by JM.

        Platform Holly:
        – gorin-images.com

        Reply
      • Thanks DT, This melancholy Doors tune always intrigued me with the lyrics..what a time the late 60’s must’ve been, in them parts.

        Reply
  23. Cate

     /  September 10, 2016

    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/cameron-fenton/trudeau-oil-appeasement_b_11893846.html

    Trudeau plays Canada’s Chamberlain to the Big Oil Nazis.

    “Since his election in the fall of 2015, Justin Trudeau has become less the pipeline pusher that Stephen Harper was, and more of the fossil fuel industry appeaser. Championing Alberta’s climate plan, Canada has offered the fossil fuel industry it’s own Sudetenland, a 30MT expansion of the tar sands and at least one pipeline. Their argument is textbook Chamberlain — that the aggressor will relent under their own power if given just a little space to grow.
    It didn’t work with the Nazis in 1937, and it won’t work with the fossil fuel industry. According to a report from Influence Map, the fossil fuel industry continues to spend nearly $115 million a year lobbying against climate legislation.
    Knowing this, a better idea might be for Canada to get on the right side of history and start passing smarter policy by articulating exactly what the science is saying — we need to leave fossil fuels in the ground.”

    Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  September 14, 2016

      Cate, surely no-one really thought that Trudeau, a whiter shade of Obama, would be anything but a tool of the elite? Why do people allow themselves to be tricked, time after time after time?

      Reply
  24. Reply
  25. The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.

    ~ George Orwell

    Reply
  26. Lindsay Berge

     /  September 10, 2016

    I believe this is unfair to Chamberlain whose real policy of containment is unfairly labelled as appeasement. The options Britain had militarily were very limited as was shown by the rapid defeat in the Battle of France. At the time of the Munich Agreement, Chamberlain had already undertaken a massive commitment to rearmament including developing the Spitfire and Hurricane fighter planes so critical to the Battle of Britain. Churchill arguably fought the war with Chamberlain’s army. Also, Chamberlain’s motives were neither cowardly nor self-serving. Churchill said it best after Chamberlain’s death in 1940.

    “It fell to Neville Chamberlain in one of the supreme crises of the world to be contradicted by events, to be disappointed in his hopes, and to be deceived and cheated by a wicked man. But what were these hopes in which he was disappointed? What were these wishes in which he was frustrated? What was that faith that was abused? They were surely among the most noble and benevolent instincts of the human heart – the love of peace, the toil for peace, the strife for peace, the pursuit of peace, even at great peril, and certainly to the utter disdain of popularity or clamour. Whatever else history may or may not say about these terrible, tremendous years, we can be sure that Neville Chamberlain acted with perfect sincerity according to his lights and strove to the utmost of his capacity and authority, which were powerful, to save the world from the awful, devastating struggle in which we are now engaged. This alone will stand him in good stead as far as what is called the verdict of history is concerned… Herr Hitler protests with frantic words and gestures that he has only desired peace. What do these ravings and outpourings count before the silence of Neville Chamberlain’s tomb?”

    The actions of Trudeau, Harper, Abbott and other venal and cowardly politicians are the opposite of Chamberlains in almost every way.

    Reply
    • – Good points, LB.

      Reply
      • BJD

         /  September 10, 2016

        Yes. Well put LB. Chamberlain was trying to buy time. I don’t think that’s Trudeau’s game.

        Reply
    • Cate

       /  September 10, 2016

      Agreed, good points. It’s always good to be reminded of the wider picture in history, which is a sort of the communal story we tell ourselves about our past from a whole spectrum of viewpoints. Fenton’s allusion to “textbook” appeasement was made in passing, in the context of a larger war readiness analogy and was not meant, I believe, to draw extended character comparisons between JT and Chamberlain, but it is well to remember the differences.

      I agree that Trudeau is not buying time. Trudeau is treading water. He is completely swamped now. He is caught between doing what he knows is right for the people and the planet, and doing what Big Oil wants him to do. He will either panic and sink, or he will start swimming.We will know once the fall business of parliament gets underway.

      Reply
  27. – Amazing… GT:

    Reply
  28. – USA as TX, FL, LA flood and get soaked other places are in drought:

    0909
    The Providence Journal
    Drought disaster declared in northern R.I.

    Atlanta Journal Constitution
    Most of North Georgia is in a “severe” drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, with large swaths experiencing “extreme” drought.

    NewYorkUpstate.com
    Extreme drought area doubles in Upstate New York as dry spell deepens

    Reply
    • wili

       /  September 10, 2016

      Yeah, I was surprised the Hermine didn’t do more to alleviate those dry areas in GA.

      I wonder if we will see those spots of red spread out in the coming months. It’s supposed to be dry through much of the southern half of the lower 48, with abnormal dryness creeping up the East Coast and the Plains beginning next year.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  September 10, 2016

        Here in MN we apparently have an abnormally cold winter (brrr) followed by an abnormally hot summer to look forward to–worst of both worlds! Actually, next fall is predicted to be abnormally hot pretty much everywhere in the US!

        Reply
      • – I think that in effect — due to the ‘ridges and troughs’ Robert mentioned, we have created conditions that ‘channelize’ weather patterns. But we cannot ‘change channels’ lest we cease creating conditions that promote them.

        Reply
        • wili

           /  September 10, 2016

          Maybe all that heat throughout the states will add momentum for significant action on the issue.

  29. Jimbot

     /  September 10, 2016

    Average Annual Arctic Sea Ice volume has been the lowest on record all year and is still trending down. This has been nicely charted by viddaloo on Neven’s blog and elsewhere. A good chance that Central Arctic Basin extent will be close to zero by next year, if not very soon. They seem to have made a new industry out of chastising Peter Wadhams for saying so.

    Gee, there must be something wrong with the data, the long term models don’t show this happening until 2070 or later in the century ( after most of us are dead thankfully ). Maybe the slight discrepancy has something to do with the values they’re using for the CO2e of CH4. That’s my guess. ( Think about it, and this point has been made on other blogs by chemist Kevin Moore: If the CH4 levels are rising then it seems to make sense to use the instantaneous factor, which is apparently not known, instead of some decay factor residual value based on a certain rate at which it gets converted to CO2. Somehow they just pulled those out of a hat I suppose, since it seems nobody knows the starting value to do the calculation. Or do they? )

    Reply
  30. Bill h

     /  September 10, 2016

    Jim, which data set are you referring to as lowest on record? Piomas and the Danish Arctic Science Associations would disagree with you.

    That said you’re absolutely right about the models used by the ipcc not predicting a clear arctic till late 21st century. My guess is that they haven’t factored in the effect of jetstream weakening, allowing warm air from lower latitudes to feed into the arctic.

    Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  September 14, 2016

      My guess is that the IPCC cooked the books to achieve ‘consensus’ with climate criminals like Saudi Arabia, Australia, Russia and the USA. Moreover when Establishments are threatened in their ‘authority’ by non-conformists, they tend to double-down on their repression of dissidents, and the climate change establishment is as guilty of this as any other entrenched group. The MSM still publishes rubbish, based on the long ago, and even then tragically inaccurate, IPCC Reports’ predictions on Arctic sea ice loss, that speak of an ‘ice-free Arctic’ decades away, simply ignoring the facts. The same ‘soft denialism’ is rampant throughout climate science.

      Reply
  31. Cate

     /  September 10, 2016

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-08/climate-change-isn-t-just-making-us-hot-we-re-angrier-and-more-violent

    What are the societal impacts of climate change?

    “….researchers at the University of California at Berkeley… lend support to earlier conclusions on how it’s slowing global economic growth (by 0.25 percentage points every year) and has raised the risk of conflict in Africa (by 11 percent since 1980). But there are other, less predictable impacts as well.”

    —-such as mood, violent crime, academic performance, infant mortality, and human reproduction.

    Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  September 10, 2016

    White gulls dependent on ice are disappearing from the Arctic

    Tracking survival and migration patterns could help researchers figure out what’s going on before it’s too late, Elliott says. “If that Arctic ecosystem disappears – if the ice disappears – they’re not going to be able to survive.”

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2105380-white-gulls-dependent-on-ice-are-disappearing-from-the-arctic/

    Reply
  33. Reply
  34. Robert, you might check this out (a one page preview):

    Reply
  35. Reply
  36. No surprise here due petrochemical makeup of a multitude of ‘cheap’ products. Tie this into an earlier post of mine re firefighters negative health impacts from the same.

    Reply
    • Petrochemicals, VOCs (solid,liquid,gas) as accelerant

      ac·cel·er·ant
      əkˈselərənt/
      noun
      noun: accelerant; plural noun: accelerants
      a substance used to aid the spread of fire.
      “stolen accelerants could be used as firebombs”

      adjective
      adjective: accelerant
      accelerating or causing acceleration.

      volatile
      vol·a·tile
      ˈvälədl/
      adjective
      adjective: volatile

      1.
      (of a substance) easily evaporated at normal temperatures.
      synonyms: evaporative, vaporous; More
      explosive, inflammable;
      unstable, labile
      “a volatile organic compound”
      antonyms: stable
      2.
      liable to change rapidly and unpredictably, especially for the worse.

      – Google

      Reply
    • Reply
  37. Reply
  38. USA West — high winds/cold front

    NWS Missoula Verified account
    ‏@NWSMissoula

    Strong N winds will accompany a cold front tomorrow (Sun.)! Hazard to boats & docks on
    #FlatheadLake possible

    Matt Holiner Verified account ‏@MattHoliner 29m29 minutes ago

    Severe T-Storm Warning for #Cincy until 4:30pm. Wind gusts up to 60mph & penny size hail possible. Head indoors now.

    Reply
  39. Cat 5 winds possible near Taiwan:

    Reply
    • Unified Soul Theory ‏@Unisoultheory 5h5 hours ago

      “Notice that the stiffest tree is most easily cracked, while the bamboo or willow survives by bending with the wind.” – Bruce Lee

      Reply
    • Joint Cyclone Center ‏@JointCyclone 6h6 hours ago

      #Meranti could become a #typhoon on Mon. Taiwan is bracing for a super typhoon early next week.

      Weather Underground Verified account ‏@wunderground 5h5 hours ago

      Tropical Storm Could Strengthen into Strong Typhoon, Threaten Taiwan or Okinawa Next Week:

      Reply
      • Ryan Maue Verified account ‏@RyanMaue 16h16 hours ago

        HWRF 18z intensified TS 16W about 90 mb in 84-hrs … to 910 mb, likely powerful Super Typhoon

        Reply
  40. Oh great, another positive feedback:

    Until now, the focus has been on rising seas, more intense hurricanes, acidification of oceans, drought and crop failures. But new studies are finding that some of the most important effects will be directly on our bodies and minds.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/opinion/sunday/temperatures-rise-and-were-cooked.html

    On the bright side, at least this high-profile media outlet is talking about climate change.

    Reply
  41. Heavy flooding South Australia

    Reply
  42. coloradobob

     /  September 10, 2016

    The rain gauge at Hilo International Airport registered 24.68 inches last month, two-and-a-half times the August average and the highest total since 1991. Records for August rainfall totals were broken at Waiakea Uka, with 29.82 inches; Glenwood, with 28.86 inches; and Mountain View, with 26.48 inches.
    http://hawaiitribune-herald.com/news/local-news/august-awash-storms-brought-record-rainfall-parts-island

    Reply
  43. coloradobob

     /  September 10, 2016

    In Victory For Protesters, Obama Administration Halts North Dakota Pipeline

    An Obama administration decision to suspend construction on a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota is a game changer for efforts to protect tribal lands, officials say.

    Link

    Reply
  44. Syd Bridges

     /  September 10, 2016

    Unfortunately, this is turning out to be another “interesting” Arctic melt season. Even if it does not hit a record low for area or volume, I worry about how all this extra heat will delay the refreeze. After last winter’s record low maximum, another delayed refreeze is likely to leave the Arctic in even worse shape. Another “interesting” winter followed by an “interesting” 2017 melt season might just be too much excitement for the poor, decrepit Arctic ice.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 11, 2016

      Syd Bridges –

      I remember a state ice I used to love , a big glass of Coke, with home made ice from ice tray.
      A hot day, drinking the Coke slowly. Near the end, the Coke thinned out, but the ice became “rotten”, honeycombed with voids. And one could crush it on your back teeth. And the cube would shatter into slush.

      We have left, the time where ice breakers have to back up, and run into ice.

      Reply
  45. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    15 years ago tonight , I laid down just a few miles South of where Timothy McVeigh was arrested on I-35. I awoke the the next morning to NPR on my tractor radio giving the blow by blow account of 9 -11.

    That previous week , I had made a giant loop past every spot that we know today. I was hauling computers out of Houston , bound for New Jersey. Drove right past Shanksville, and saw New York City from the Jersey bank , then South through D.C. right pass the Pentagon.

    And all these years later , I wonder what if the Dulles brothers hadn’t over thrown the government of Iran ? What if we weren’t oil crack whores?

    Reply
    • Steven Blaisdell

       /  September 11, 2016

      We like to think we have much, much more control over ourselves as individuals than is actually the case. Humans are almost entirely non-conscious actants; even the behavior we think of as consciously determined, i.e., an intentional “choice,” is mostly (if not completely) initiated non-consciously through the somatic and limbic systems, with a conscious ‘narrative’ added after the fact. Very elegant and exacting neurological research over the past 30 years shows this beyond a doubt. At best, consciousness is a post-hoc explanatory process that acts within a feedback loop, influencing future ‘decisions’ which emerge, again, almost always or always prior to conscious awareness. This may be a matter of tens or hundreds of milliseconds, but is the case regardless.

      My point is this: it’s not that conscious awareness has no influence on human behavior. It does, albeit almost entirely as a post-hoc component of a behavioral feedback loop. But if the behavior of a single human is so thoroughly the product of implicit, before-consciousness processes (and speaking as someone who works with people, quite difficult to change), then what are the chances of somehow getting the necessary critical mass of all humanity, or the most critical segments of humanity, to change almost every aspect of socio-cultural, political, economic, and personal behavior in time to not trigger catastrophic climate change (assuming this hasn’t already occurred), especially given the vehemently opposing forces of almost unimaginable wealth and power – forces that themselves emanate from almost entirely non-conscious ‘drives’ and ‘instincts,’ and almost certainly less conscious of this than those working towards mitigation.

      I guess I’m saying that even if the Dulles Bros hadn’t opened the taps, humanity as a whole would’ve acted out its individual and collective non-conscious drives towards survival and reproduction in one way or another. If it wasn’t oil then every tree on Earth would be gone, like Easter Island or pre-Middle Ages Europe, with predictable results. Or some similar scenario.

      Until homo sapiens sapiens internalize – in my opinion via relentless and brutal external forcings recursively combined with deeply immanent, revolutionary shifts in socio-cultural evolution – the ability to effectively delimit and restrict behavior antithetical to sustainable existence within any given ecology, these cycles of species and ecological immolation will continue, possibly for millennia. The human forebrain is the most effective and efficient survival mechanism in the history of life on Earth; unfortunately, it evolved too quickly for the concomitant emergence of effective environmental constraints. So it’s up to us to create the systems of thought and action with which we can self regulate ecologically destructive behavior; when Earth systems have done their part with repeated external forcings, we’ll see if our species at some point finds the ability to identify and suppress the kinds of behaviors that lead to ecological destruction and collapse.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  September 11, 2016

        We have to change the way we think.

        Reply
        • James

           /  September 11, 2016

          Every animal thinks the same, shaped by the Maximum Power Principle to gather as much energy (wealth) and create as many offspring energy conduits as possible. If there is a solution it will not come by trying to change the innate behavior of mankind, but rather it will come from the outside and it won’t be pleasant. At what point does Dr. Chemo give up on technological miracles and pull the plug on this thing? How long can it be allowed to go on before it’s too late to salvage anything?

        • Cate

           /  September 11, 2016

          Shawn, agreed. Lovelock once suggested that humanity will come to grief in the climate crisis because we are simply not intelligent enough to deal with it. We have not evolved enough beyond our greedy, self-interested jungle-survival instincts to see what we have to do, collectively, and to do it.

          If this climate crisis doesn’t kick us to the next level of intellectual evolution where we become capable of mass co-operative action in the common interest of all, humanity may well be overwhelmed, along with a good deal of life on earth. But we may rise to the challenge, to see the way through this and to do what’s needed. Many are already doing so, as individuals and small groups. Is this building critical mass? I hope so. As Robert said, what we need now is a shift, in perception, in values, in action. There is still time, but barely.

      • Griffin

         /  September 11, 2016

        Steven, your comment is one of the most intelligent summaries of our predicament that I have ever read.

        Reply
      • ^What he said :^)

        Reply
      • g. orwell

         /  September 11, 2016

        Without an extra dimensional/off-world ‘solution’, things seem ‘tough’ ahead. Thanks for your paragraphs.

        Reply
      • Steven – excellent observations –
        Heinlein said it very well:
        ” Man is not a rational animal; he is a rationalizing animal.”
        Robert A. Heinlein – Assignment in Eternity (1953)

        Reply
  46. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    I saw something interesting this week about credit cards. One needs a 11 grade reading skill to understand the agreements. And 50% of America has 9 grade reading skill.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  September 11, 2016

      CB when my daughter started university in ’02 she had a required course in grammar. I couldn’t believe it. The course consisted of all the stuff I had to know to get out of elementary school. Social pass, we’re screwed.

      Reply
  47. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    Back to the good old days –

    Reply
  48. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    I changed my avatar, I’m standing on the skids of a Bell 206 , it’s – 40F at Strawberry Reservoir. Hunting oil. Too cold the fly. That day with never come again.

    Reply
  49. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    My first winter in Colorado , I was at the Mineral Hot Springs . The first week of January of 1971, it was – 50F all week. Those days are gone forever.

    There’s a lovely new age spa there now.

    http://joyfuljourneyhotsprings.com/

    Reply
  50. coloradobob

     /  September 11, 2016

    There 2 more near us. We smoked a great deal of hash is chilumes with tobacco.

    Reply
  51. MANDAN, N.D.—A reporter from Democracy Now! who documented security personnel with guard dogs working for Dakota Access Pipeline is facing criminal trespassing charges in Morton County.

    Authorities have issued an arrest warrant for Amy Goodman of New York for a Class B misdemeanor, according to court documents.

    Goodman, a reporter for the independent news program, can be seen on news footage from Sept. 3 documenting the clash between protesters and private security personnel with guard dogs at a Dakota Access construction site, including footage showing people with bite injuries and a dog with blood on its mouth.

    A total of 38 arrests have been made in connection with the Dakota Access protests.

    Morton County authorities also issued arrest warrants last week for Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein and running mate Ajamu Baraka for criminal trespass and criminal mischief. Authorities filed charges after they were alerted to video that showed Stein painting “I approve this message” on the front of a bulldozer and Baraka painting the last word in the message “We need decolonization.”

    http://www.wdaz.com/news/north-dakota/4112656-reporter-who-documented-guard-dogs-charged-trespassing-pipeline-protest

    Reply
    • Unicorn Riot ‏@UR_Ninja 7h7 hours ago

      #Breaking- ND has filed charges on Amy Goodman of @democracynow & Red Warrior Camp media spokesman Cody Hall #NoDAPL

      Reply
    • June

       /  September 11, 2016

      You can bet that we’ll see more of this as the number of protests against fossil fuel interests increase – and they will. These corporate criminals do not play nice, and they do not want light shined upon their immoral activities. The upside of the ubiquitous presence of cell phone video is that these repressive tactics are easier to document, as we have seen in the videos of police violence. And their tactics often backfire.

      Reply
  52. Reply
  53. The alarming number of fires in the Brazilian Amazon

    The sharp decrease in the annual rates of forest loss in the Brazilian Amazon is celebrated worldwide. The trend started in 2005 after a peak in deforestation the year before.

    However, the figures are not so bright when it comes to forest fires, and few people are talking about that.

    The number of fires in the Brazilian Amazon is alarming, and that was especially true in 2015, when a sharp increase in forest fires occurred.

    https://news.mongabay.com/2016/09/the-alarming-number-of-fires-in-the-brazilian-amazon/

    Reply
  54. Volunteer Firefighters in Russia Attacked With Guns, Knives

    “The environmental group Greenpeace, whose members were at the camp, said the men attacked their camp at night, beating up people and damaging their tents and cars parked nearby. Several people have been taken to the hospital, one of them with a broken nose, another with broken ribs.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/09/09/world/europe/ap-eu-russia-firefighters.html?_r=0

    Reply
  55. This day 15 years ago was my stepdaughter’s 21st b-day. The party was cancelled.

    But the Progress for a New American Century club must have been partying hard with little Wanker Bush’s ‘Trifecta’ having happened right on schedule. And now out comes some of the ‘redacted’ pages of the 9/11 report and we find out that the Saudis were heavily involved…

    Now that b-day girl is 36 and just what has changed for the better since then with the climate? That’s a very troubling question to ask oneself and ponder on. What we are all talking and posting about on this site is what the world climate my under 10 year old g-kids are going to be forced to live with. We’re only getting a taste of it. Makes my chest squeeze some days.

    Record heat heading for these mountains in the next ten days. 80s today but back into the 90Fs coming again. Still at high fire danger. Very warm winds and 68’F at 2am outside an hour ago. This forest is dry as a bone.

    More bad politician climate news:

    Don’t Be Fooled by the Latest Smokescreen for Logging Forests
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/09/09/dont-be-fooled-by-the-latest-smokescreen-for-logging-forests/

    U.S. Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) have joined with several Republican senators, who are among the logging industries biggest advocates in Congress, to propose legislation, the “Wildfire Budgeting, Response, and Forest Management Act of 2016”, that would severely weaken environmental laws to facilitate a large increase in commercial logging on our national forests and other federal public lands. Specifically, the bill would eliminate most environmental impacts-disclosure and analysis requirements for logging projects on federal lands, and would severely curtail public participation in public forest management decisions.

    Reply
  56. Ailsa

     /  September 11, 2016

    Fasten your seat belt – turbulence is on the rise

    “It is predicted there will be more and more incidents of severe clear-air turbulence, which typically comes out of the blue with no warning, occurring in the near future as climate change takes its effect in the stratosphere,”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/11/cost-bumpy-flights-air-turbulence-global-warming-united-airlines

    Reply
    • ‘….at heights of around 10 to 12km (6-7 miles), a typical cruising altitude for a modern passenger jet plane, temperature changes caused by increased amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have the effect of making different layers of airflow move at increased speeds relative to each other. ‘

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  September 11, 2016

      Look up one of the scarcely known Geniuses Viktor Schauberger
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viktor_Schauberger

      There is a good book that covers many of the aspects whitewashed out in other publications etc.
      “Living Energies: An exposition of concepts related to the theories of Viktor Schauberger”
      published in 1996

      An excellent article by Callum Coats was published in Nexus magazine in April May 1996 which is well worth reading if you can get a copy.

      Vortices in water and air and thermal drivers

      Reply
  57. John McCormick

     /  September 11, 2016

    From Eli Rabett; August 29 post:

    In The Challenge of Climate Change Neoskepticism, sadly not open, the authors define today’s neoskepticism as:

    accepting the existence of anthropogenic climate change (ACC) but advocates against urgent mitigation efforts on various grounds such as that climate models run “too hot”, or are too uncertain to justify anything other than “no regrets” policies as having net benefits. Mainstream scientists are well aware of uncertainty in climate projections. But neoskeptics citing it to justify climate inaction marks a shift in focus in climate debates from the existence of ACC to its import and to response options

    Reply
    • I just refer to these folks and other variants on the theme as “climate science deniers.” If they are opposed to immediate, urgent action, I don’t care what the justification is, they’re deniers. It’s way too late in the game for semantic misdirection.

      Reply
  58. Cate

     /  September 11, 2016

    Northabout, the doughty little boat of the Polar Ocean Challenge circumnavigating the Arctic Ocean, had clear sailing through the infamous Bellot Strait yesterday. No ice, “not even an ice-cube for a G&T”, according to the ship’s log.

    Reply
  59. Tamino:

    “Any way you look at it, Arctic sea ice is in decline. If you look at the entire year rather than just the annual minimum, the record year is this one.”

    https://tamino.wordpress.com/2016/09/11/climate-deniers-embarrass-themselves-about-arctic-sea-ice/

    Reply
  60. Today’s APOD offering shows instantly why the oceans have responded as violently as they have, and why they will continue to do so.

    Reply
  61. June

     /  September 11, 2016

    Good post by Tamino. The narrow focus on the number for the annual minimum doesn’t show how bad the actual quality of the ice pack is, as folks at Neven’s forum point out.

    Reply
    • I think we might be moving into unexplored territory WRT Arctic Sea Ice. Min Extent was more meaningful in the past, when the bulk of that remaining extent was fairly solid ice.
      Now ice is so fractured almost everywhere, many more factors in play – wave effects, sea surface temp, grinding of floe edges…

      Watching ASI is going to be very “interesting” over the next couple of years, I expect.

      Reply
  62. Reply
  63. USA West Coast:
    Incident: The Soberanes Fire is burning in the Los Padres National Forest, Ventana Wilderness, Monterey County, CA. The fire was started by an illegal campfire on July 22, 2016…

    Reply
  64. Reply
  65. Griffin

     /  September 11, 2016

    Well, we can safely say that temperatures have finally become a campaign issue in this election.

    Reply
  66. SHARK: SHowing Animals Respect and Kindness (SHARK)

    LONE WOLF, OK – SHowing Animals Respect and Kindness (SHARK) shut down a live pigeon shoot fundraiser held Friday afternoon by US Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK), the international animal protection group reported. SHARK said it will also monitor an Inhofe Dove Hunt Saturday if it goes on as scheduled.

    According to SHARK, the story begins at the Quartz Mountain Lodge in Lone Wolf, OK, which was the sign-in location for Senator Inhofe’s pigeon shoot. Activists followed the procession of vehicles when they left the lodge to go to the shooting area. The Inhofe party went through extreme measures to lose SHARK, including driving the rear cars at extremely slow speeds on the highway to block the activists.

    Inhofe’s team successfully lost the activists – except for one car, which eventually led the rest of the activists to the shoot, which was located down 10 miles of washboard dirt roads. The shoot site was located off of N2113 road in Lone Wolf.

    Once SHARK launched its Angel drone, the shooting of birds stopped. Almost immediately vehicles started leaving. A trickle quickly became a flood, as was video documented. This included the person who supplied the pigeons. He left with many still living birds in his vehicle. The entire pigeon shoot was over.
    http://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2016/09/11/shark-shuts-down-inhofes-pigeon-shoot-in-oklahoma/

    Reply
  67. wharf rat

     /  September 12, 2016

    Rapid Intensification Watch: Orlene and Meranti Spin Up in Pacific
    By: Bob Henson , 5:17 PM GMT on September 11, 2016

    While the North Atlantic is on the tepid side this weekend in terms of tropical cyclones, we have two potentially fearsome storms in the North Pacific. One is unlikely to hit land; the other is taking a bead on Taiwan. The latter is Typhoon Meranti, located about 900 miles southeast of Taipei as of 12Z (8:00 am EDT) Sunday. Meranti’s top winds, as reported by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center using the 1-minute U.S. standard, jumped from 40 to 85 mph in the 24 hours leading up to 12Z Sunday. This meets the National Hurricane Center (NHC) definition of rapid intensification: an increase in the maximum sustained winds of a tropical cyclone of at least 30 knots (35 mph) in 24 hours.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/rapid-intensification-watch-orlene-and-meranti-spin-up-in-pacific

    Reply
  68. climatehawk1

     /  September 12, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  69. – N Hem – NE Pac
    05:21 UTC

    Reply
  70. A ‘pin hole’ of an eye:

    Reply
  71. Reply
  72. Via Twitter: A sand (mining) update in a time of sea level rise — super typhoons, and unprecedented flooding:

    – YouTube Newswire ‏@ytnewswire 9h9 hours ago
    Thousands protest ‘sand mining’ in northwestern France

    – CNN Philippines Verified account ‏@cnnphilippines Sep 8
    Sandiganbayan orders the 90-day suspension of Pangasinan Rep Amado Espino over black sand mining case | @AC_Nicholls

    – FracTracker Alliance ‏@FracTracker Sep 7
    How Frac Sand Mining is Altering an Economy Dependent on Starved Rock State Park, IL

    – Boopal Sridhar ‏@boopalsridhar Sep 5
    If TN govt needs long term peaceful state, stop sand mining in Karur, Trichy and other kaveri districts

    – Robert Kibet ‏@Kibet_88 Aug 31
    Sand mining: the deadly occupation attracting Kenya’s youngsters

    – Nora FitzGerald ‏@ckasky Aug 30
    sandmining is an example of coastal erosion; Mauritius banned sand and moved to rock–Melissa Landesz WACA World Bank #Oceans4Africa

    – Creduganda ‏@creduganda2 Aug 30
    How sand mining is destroying Lake Victoria catchment

    – Winona Daily News ‏@WinonaDailyNews Aug 30
    Jerome Kulas: Frac sand mining threatens Winona’s water, natural beauty

    – John Hansen ‏@johnhanseneco Aug 30
    @MSLJeconomist: And the cement industry is also responsible for the increasing negative impacts of sand mining/extraction.

    – No 2 Mining Palawan ‏@NoMiningPalawan Aug 30
    Black sand mining next on environment crackdown THE Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) said it will review black..

    – Water News Global ‏@WaterTrends Aug 30
    INDIA: #Ganges floods ‘break previous records’ – worst ever #WaterCrisis? BBC News… #Siltation #SandMining are issues

    Reply
  73. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    UW’s Cliff Mass: The warm ‘Blob’ is back in the Pacific Ocean

    http://komonews.com/weather/scotts-weather-blog/cliff-mass-the-warm-blob-is-back-in-the-pacific-ocean

    Reply
  74. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 12, 2016

      NASA Analysis Finds August 2016 Another Record Month
      Posted Sep. 12, 2016

      August 2016 was the warmest August in 136 years of modern record-keeping, according to a monthly analysis of global temperatures by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York.
      http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/news/20160912/

      Reply
  75. From Triplepundit dot com:

    New York City is sinking, and no-one knows what to do.

    “New York City was proactive on tackling climate change risks long before Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc across the boroughs in autumn 2012. Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his successor, Bill De Blasio, have shown leadership on climate change resilience that inspired other cities to launch similar long-term plans.

    “Nevertheless, the evidence suggests the city will become more submerged as this century progresses, and city leaders and citizens are still unprepared for this eventuality.

    “Part of the challenge is that New York City is at the convergence of where geology meets climate change reality. Over the past couple of years, more studies were released suggesting that the Antarctic ice is melting faster than scientists had previously thought. Meanwhile, much of the eastern seaboard is slowly sinking, due to natural subsidence. New Yorkers (at least the wealthy ones) have a predilection for living along the waterfront in Manhattan, Brooklyn and even Queens. And the result is that massive investments and planning are needed if the Big Apple is to avoid becoming a Big Atlantis.”

    The biggest problems are the MTA, PATH and vehicular tunnels.

    Reply
    • JPL

       /  September 12, 2016

      More from the article:

      “As a result of that activism and that courage, yesterday — literally seconds after the court released its predictable result — the federal government did something pretty unprecedented. It said it was not going to let the company build the pipeline under the Missouri River. Not for now, anyway — not until there’d been far more consultation. It was the right thing for President Obama to do. Here are some of the things it means:

      1. The rest of us now have the time to come to full support of the tribes in their battle. There are solidarity actions scheduled across the country on Tuesday — Bernie Sanders will headline the one in D.C., in one of his first big speeches since the end of the primary campaign. They are more important now than ever.

      2. We need to ask for much more than a temporary halt. The reason the Obama administration got in this mess in the first place was that they “fast-tracked” the review process for these pipelines. In an effort to appease oil companies and pipeline unions when they were forced to halt the Keystone pipeline, they started ‘expediting’ review of almost every other thing in the country. That has to end.

      3. A real review would look not only at the impacts on water if something spills. It would look at the impacts on the climate when that oil gets burned. New federal rules announced a couple of months ago enshrines that ‘climate test’ as government policy; it should be followed here, since the same communities that will suffer from pipeline spills also pay an outsized price as our climate changes.

      4. It sure would be nice if Hillary Clinton actually said something about any of this. So far she’s been a cipher on it, apparently unwilling to buck the banks and oil companies that have poured more money into her campaign than even into Trump’s. That is… sad. “

      Reply
  76. June

     /  September 12, 2016

    new Joe Romm post, referencing Tamino’s graph mentioned up thread.

    Arctic death spiral: Icebreakers reach North Pole as sea ice disintegrates

    Second-lowest sea ice minimum, lowest average annual sea ice extent

    https://thinkprogress.org/arctic-sea-ice-death-spiral-b928be2fde0a#.sa6rv13xw

    Reply
    • ‘… As the Arctic air and waters warm, ice thickness decreases, too. As one leading expert pointed out, “The ice cap this spring was close to the thinnest we have ever seen.”

      Reply
  77. Reply
  78. Kevin Jones

     /  September 12, 2016

    GISS in with August. Another record month. WTF?

    Reply
  79. Reply
    • g. orwell

       /  September 13, 2016

      Jason Box has wimped out since his summer of 2014: “…WE’RE F****D ” statement went worldwide on the internet; his cop-out was/is ‘understandable’.

      Reply
      • he may have gotten a lecture over how to present the “we’re fucked” data more diplomatically. Ask Jim Hansen if there is pushback at scientists who speak out.

        Reply
  80. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    Speaking of bad storms Lionrock did a lot more damage that first thought –

    North Korea said the flooding was caused by the “strongest storm and heaviest downpour” since the end of World War II.

    TOKYO — Floods that devastated North Korea last month are turning out to be worse than initially feared, with more than 100,000 people left homeless, according to aid workers who visited the area last week.

    Link

    Reply
  81. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    Super Typhoon Meranti Endangering Taiwan
    TRMM, Monday September 12, 2016
    Typhoon Meranti was on it’s way to become a super typhoon when the GPM core observatory satellite flew over on September 12, 2016 at 0206 UTC. Meranti’s winds had increased to about 115 kts (132 mph). Data from GPM’s Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments showed that typhoon Meranti had multiple rain bands spiraling around a small well defined eye. Estimates from DPR data indicated that rain was falling at a rate of over 299 mm (11.8 inches)per hour in powerful storms in the northeastern side of Meranti’s eye wall. ….

    Link

    Reply
  82. Reply
  83. Dahr Jamail’s latest article in Truthout:

    Toxic Slime Spreads Across World’s Oceans as Climate Disruption Continues Apace

    It has been amazing and disturbing to be in Alaska for much of the summer as one record after another is broken. The contrast between spending time on glaciers, on Denali (the highest mountain peak in North America) and in some of the most remote areas of the state wilderness — bearing witness to the grandeur of nature — and then coming back to Anchorage between each trip to read about record temperatures has been heartbreaking. But I know the reports are true: I’ve seen firsthand the glaciers retreating so quickly that even the glaciologists here are shaking their heads.

    Anchorage, at the time of this writing, had seen a record 77-day run of higher-than-previous temperatures, with its low temperatures all at or above 50 degrees. This shattered the previous such record of 53 days, which was just set three years prior.

    Anchorage-based National Weather Service meteorologist Joe Wegman told the Anchorage Dispatch News of these phenomena, “The top four (low-temperature runs) were in the last four years. These are very late to be having temperatures this high.”
    He went on to predict, “We’re going to be around record territory for quite a while yet.”

    The march of anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) across Alaska and the rest of the Arctic is glaringly apparent.

    Another recent report showed that ocean slime, composed of toxic algae blooms, is rapidly spreading across Earth as a result of warming ocean waters. The toxic algae is worsening dead zones and wiping out parts of the food chain for marine life, causing collapsing populations of sea lions, seals, various bird species and fish around the planet.

    Meanwhile in the Arctic, fish populations are shifting rapidly as the sea ice dwindles. According to a recent report from the USGS and the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), at least 20 different species have now found their way into Arctic waters that had previously never been found there.

    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/37562-toxic-slime-spreads-across-world-s-oceans-as-climate-disruption-continues-apace

    Reply
    • … After spending a summer traversing much of Alaska while doing climate disruption research, I know that Alaska is no longer the Alaska of American folklore. It’s also no longer the Alaska I knew 20 years ago. The glaciers are melting and receding at record paces, and the long, frigidly cold winters are no longer nearly as cold as they once were.

      Alaska, along with the rest of the Arctic, is truly the canary in the proverbial coal mine. It is sending us a clear message: We are already living in a new world — a world definitively shaped by anthropogenic climate disruption.

      Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  84. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    Above the Arctic Circle, climate change closes in on the remote town of Barrow

    “The coastline is backing up at rates of [30 to 65 feet] per year,” says Robert Anderson, a University of Boulder geomorphologist who has studied Alaska’s landscape evolution since 1985 and who first noticed in the early 2000s how alarming the erosion was becoming. “It’s baffling.”

    When the sea ice melts, the coast becomes exposed to waves, wind and storms that slam into the shore, causing erosion. As ice moves farther from shore, waves can be as high as 20 feet when they reach land, Anderson says.

    Link

    Reply
  85. Speaking of ocean warm-ups, here’s another article at NYTimes.com, prominently displayed on their website right now:

    ‘Oceans Are Absorbing Almost All of the Globe’s Excess Heat’

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/09/12/science/earth/ocean-warming-climate-change.html

    Reply
  86. JPL

     /  September 12, 2016

    Check out the latest xkcd comic – so good!

    A Timeline of Earth’s Average Temperature

    Deny that!

    Reply
  87. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    One of the best cartoons ever from XKCD is too large to post.

    http://www.xkcd.com/1732/

    Reply
    • JPL

       /  September 12, 2016

      Hah, yeah was careful to make sure I didn’t post the graphic itself. Would have blown up the comments section with a graphic that long. Randall Munroe is awesome.

      Reply
    • June

       /  September 13, 2016

      And a quick scan of comments reveals that (surprise) the deniers totally missed, or denied, the point.

      Reply
  88. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    The super typhoon –
    MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 155 KT, GUSTS 190 KT (218.64 mph)
    MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT AT 121800Z IS 47 FEET.

    Reply
  89. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    Reply
  90. Robert McLachlan

     /  September 12, 2016

    Greetings from 40 south. I’ve been wondering if we really appreciate the cumulative nature of CO2 in the atmosphere. OK, so everyone here knows about it, and probably most of the general public sort of vaguely know about it, but have we truly, deeply, understood and internalized it? I think it may be possible that when people think of pollution, they tend to think that if the source of the pollution is removed then the problem will go away. Our river is polluted – let’s improve the water treatment and move the cows further away from the river – we expect the river to improve. Our national animal is heading for extinction – let’s identify the cause of its decline and remove it – we expect the animal numbers to increase. But CO2 is not like that. I can’t think of any common, every day situation that people are used to dealing with that has this cumulative character.

    The closest analogy I can think of is a family in debt. Their expenses vastly exceed their income and their debt accumulates every month. So far, the bank is willing to keep increasing their debt ceiling. The only strategy they can think of is to cut their expenses a little. But they can’t even agree on that and clearly it’s not enough as their debt will continue to increase. They also argue about what might happen to the family when their debt is called in. Meanwhile, compound interest is kicking in.

    It may have been the long string of car and truck commercials on TV last night that set off this train of thought.

    “The verdict does not come all at once; the proceedings gradually merge into the verdict” – Franz Kafka, The Trial

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 12, 2016

      Amen.

      Reply
    • June

       /  September 12, 2016

      I agree. When I talk to friends, I use the analogy of a supertanker (ah, the irony). It doesn’t stop when it cuts its engines. The momentum keeps it moving forward quite a distance, so calculations need to be done to determine the proper stopping distance to keep it from crashing into the dock. But we can’t be precise about a safe “stopping distance” for CO2 levels. We should have “cut our engines” 20 years ago.

      Reply
  91. Bipartisan national security leaders urge robust action on #climate change

    Reply
  92. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    40 south –
    Compound interest :
    Louisiana flood toll tops 100,000 vehicles

    Your out of work, your house is full of mud, and your on foot, and your car payment is due, house payment comes next week. And your 55 years old with a bad knee.

    Reply
  93. Nothing in English yet but it looks like a serious wildfire in NW Spain – San Pedro de Paradela.

    Reply
  94. Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 12, 2016

      Years ago an entire valley , in far Northern Canada did this . The top thaws, and the water greases the whole carpet on the still frozen permafrost.

      The melt out will not proceed in an orderly fashion.

      Reply
  95. coloradobob

     /  September 12, 2016

    It’s amazing how much one finds hunting a scrap of information.

    11 JAN 2010: REPORT

    A permanent shift to shrub-rich, lichen-poor tundra ‘could be really bad news’ for caribou.

    http://e360.yale.edu/feature/arctic_tundra_is_being_lost_as_far_north_quickly_warms/2229/

    Reply
  96. Veterans For Peace Statement in Support of the Pipeline Resistance at Standing Rock

    Four Arrows (Wahinkpe Topa), aka Don Trent Jacobs, an American Indian scholar and activist and co-founder of the Northern Arizona chapter of Veterans For Peace, has this to say regarding the Standing Rock resistance: “The last healthy land masses on our planet are not coincidentally those occupied by Indigenous Peoples. That they are on the front lines in standing against oil and mining operations threatening to destroy waterways should not be surprising. The Indigenous worldview, one that guided humans to live in relative ecological harmony, sees this place as sacred…At this crossing point in American history, at the threshold of a mass extinction, the Standing Rock protest is much more than symbolic and deserves all the support VFP can give it.”
    https://www.veteransforpeace.org/our-work/position-statements/veterans-peace-statement-support-pipeline-resistance-standing-rock/

    Reply
  97. coloradobob

     /  September 13, 2016

    50 years ago we all are taught about the “domino effect” , If we didn’t bomb the hell out of Laos. The entire world would be commie. That didn’t turn out so well, if you live in Laos. We dropped more bombs on Laos than the combined tonnage of Germany and Japan in WWII.

    All these years later the “domino effect” is in full force. But it’s the plants and animals on our planet racing from the “domino effect”. That one, was fiction , this one is a race to the Poles.

    Reply
  98. Cate

     /  September 13, 2016

    Congratulations to Northabout: mission accomplished. David Hempleman-Adams and crew have made the first circumnavigation of the Arctic (NE Passage and NW Passage) in a single season.

    “The Polar Ocean Challenge successfully completed their quest to sail the North East Passage and North West Passage in one season. The North West Passage was completed in an astonishing 14 days due to the fact that it was almost totally ice free. They encountered ice only twice in their 1800 mile NW Passage part of the voyage. This highlights an extraordinary loss of sea ice in the Arctic in the 30 years that David Hempleman-Adams has been coming to the area. He said, ‘ whilst we are all delighted to have succeeded, it is extremely worrying to see this lack of ice so starkly ‘ The objective of the expedition was to raise awareness of the change in the fragile climate in the Arctic. They left Lancaster Sound at the end of the NW Passage at 19.18 UTC on 12th September and are headed for Greenland.”

    Here is the ultimate, heartbreaking irony: by coincidence, in the very same week Northabout was negotiating the area where the Franklin expedition came to grief, searchers finally found HMS Terror, intact and “in perfect condition” on the sea floor—reported today in The Guardian and on CBC.

    http://polarocean.co.uk/

    Reply
  99. Cate

     /  September 13, 2016

    Blight is affecting apple crops in Quebec to an “emergency” level in some areas. Climate change may be an exacerbating factor.

    “The disease causes the trees’ leaves and branches to wilt, shrivel and turn brown or black, giving the appearance of being scorched by fire. If allowed to spread, it can cause the death of the tree….Although the disease has been present to some degree over the last few years, this spring’s hot, humid weather provided optimal conditions for it to flourish. Vincent, for one, says he believes climate change is to blame.”

    http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/apple-growers-start-harvest-after-summer-of-fighting-disease-1.3067981

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 13, 2016

      But it’s the plants and animals on our planet racing from the “domino effect”.

      Reply
  100. coloradobob

     /  September 13, 2016

    Reply
  101. coloradobob

     /  September 13, 2016

    In English, the dogs of war is a phrase spoken by Mark Antony in Act 3, Scene 1, line 273 of William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar: “Cry ‘Havoc!’, and let slip the dogs of war”.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_dogs_of_war_(phrase)

    Reply
  102. What Greenland’s melting ice looks like – up close: WaPo http://wpo.st/Hnnx1

    Reply
  103. Jay M

     /  September 13, 2016

    Ian mid-atlantic

    Reply
  104. wharf rat

     /  September 13, 2016

    Category 5 Meranti Threatens Taiwan; Tropical Storm Ian Forms in the Atlantic

    By: Bob Henson and Jeff Masters , 4:36 PM GMT on September 12, 2016

    Earth’s strongest tropical cyclone of 2016 thus far is heading for a potentially destructive encounter with Taiwan. A mere 50-mph tropical storm just two days ago, Super Typhoon Meranti was packing top sustained winds of 155 knots (180 mph) at 12Z (8:00 am EDT) Monday, using the 1-minute peak wind standard employed by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and the National Hurricane Center. (Outside of the U.S., most weather agencies employ a 10-minute wind average; by this standard, Meranti’s peak winds were 115 knots, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency.) Meranti has vaulted to Category 5 strength by taking advantage of nearly ideal conditions, including very warm sea-surface temperatures around 30°C (86°F), very low wind shear (below 10 knots), and a fairly moist mid-level atmosphere (60-70% relative humidity).

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/category-5-meranti-threatens-taiwan-tropical-storm-ian-forms-in-the-a

    Reply
  105. Hey, Bob: Solar ovens

    Reply
  106. Reply
  107. Shawn Redmond

     /  September 13, 2016

    Some comments – those claiming climate change is a hoax, devised by those who wish to control the world’s resources – are not worth responding to. Since 97 percent of all relevant experts cannot convince climate change skeptics of the basic scientific facts, then nothing I say will change their minds.

    Other concerns, however, do require a response. Many people reacted to my work on procreation ethics by saying climate change will not be so bad, and so curbing individual desires, such as having children, in its name is unnecessary fear-mongering.

    In my work, I suggest that 1.5-2 degrees Celsius warming over preindustrial levels will be “dangerous” and “very bad,” while 4 degrees C will be “catastrophic” and will leave large segments of the Earth “largely uninhabitable by humans.” Here is a very brief survey of the evidence for those claims based on what I consider reputable sources.

    At 1.5-2 degrees C, a World Bank report predicts an increase in extreme weather events, deadly heat waves and severe water stress. Food production will decrease, and changing disease vectors will create unpredictable infectious disease outbreaks. Sea levels will rise, combining with increased storm severity to place coastal cities at risk. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that from the years 2030-2050 – as we reach this level of warming – at least 250,000 people will die every year from just some of the climate-related harms. https://theconversation.com/bioethicist-the-climate-crisis-calls-for-fewer-children-65014

    Reply
  108. Cate

     /  September 13, 2016

    http://e360.yale.edu/feature/why_we_need_a_carbon_tax_and_why_it_won_be_enough/3033/

    Bill McKibben: Why we need a carbon tax, and why it won’t be enough.

    “Not just a price on carbon, but “dramatic subsidies for renewables….an end to producing coal and gas and oil on public land…..a ban on fracking….a dozen other major regulatory changes that have some chance of cutting emissions the six or seven percent a year that’s now required…..We are, as you might say, in a war, and if that’s the case then think of a price on carbon as the infantry. It’s going to get things done, but it’s going to need the Navy, the Air Force, and the Marines as well…..”

    Reply
    • wili

       /  September 14, 2016

      As I said on the SkS fb posting of this excellent piece:

      We need to directly regulate carbon.

      Any extra carbon released into the atmosphere at this point is like a bomb being launched onto our children’s heads.

      If your neighbor was making bombs that you knew were going to end up dropped on your children, would you just want there to be a slightly higher tax on the bomb making materials?

      No, you would want there to be very strict limits and eventual banishment of the bomb making materials, ideally sooner on the total banishment rather than later.

      Why is that so hard for people to see?

      Reply
  109. Kevin Jones

     /  September 13, 2016

    Averaging decadal anomalies from 1901-1930 (-.273C below 1951-1980 base) and adding last 12 month average (Sep. ’15-Aug. ’16) 1.03C we get a neat 1.3C. From Hillaryville to Trumpopolis, America and World, we have a problem. (NASA data) I know this has been said. I know it bears repeating…..

    Reply
  110. Cate

     /  September 13, 2016

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2016/sep/12/bbc-climate-coverage-is-evolving-but-too-slowly

    Fascinating analysis by a Harvard post-doc fellow of the discourse around climate change on the BBC, and how it fosters public confusion, doubt, and denial with words like “blame” and “believe.” Instructive as well: we need to interrogate and call out all media in our own countries for using language that hedges the facts and confuses the issues around climate change.

    “The public absolutely deserve to hear the debate. But they also deserve to know that the debate is political, not scientific. They deserve to know that science-wise, one side is right and the other is wrong. They deserve to know that scientists unanimously agree that humans are causing climate change. And they deserve to know that President Trump would be the only leader in the world to oppose that consensus.”

    Reply
    • Why Is USA Today knowingly confusing its readers about climate change? http://mm4a.org/2cda9Ew

      Reply
    • Marcusblanc

       /  September 13, 2016

      The BBC has been running scared ever since the tories got in, in 2010. David Shukman is a joke, but there are plenty of other Beeb programmes that are moving on from the false equivalence of the recent past, but you wouldn’t know that from their Science Editor.

      Reply
    • Mulga Mumblebrain

       /  September 14, 2016

      The BBC is the State propaganda service of the ruling UK elite, although they ludicrously pretend otherwise. The UK elite are intricately involved in the global capitalist system that is based on the tens of trillions in fossil fuel assets, directly though petro-chemical and hydrocarbon interests, and even more so through the financial apparatus that bank-rolls it. Any BBC hack that dared tell the raw, unadulterated, truth, would not last long. After decades of selection for Rightwing ideological reliability, they are no doubt temperamentally disinclined to criticise capitalism.

      Reply
  111. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    Reply
  112. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    Are there more and more twins showing up these days?

    Reply
  113. Witchee

     /  September 13, 2016

    And so it goes- I won’t say begins, because this is not the beginning.
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/13/asia/india-water-dispute/index.html

    Reply
  114. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    “Yes, the changes I am observing in the Antarctic are huge and I had not expected to see any in my lifetime.” Had the wonderful privilege of spending last Saturday with an Antarctic researcher at Old Dominion University, Dr. Hofmann who volunteered to help our local boyscouts obtain their oceanography merit badges. I had no idea just how difficult the work is down there, conducted from the NSF Laurence M Gould research vessel, and the lengths they go to to collect data. Having to take required drysuit dives under the ice in order to collect live undamaged samples of krill and other fauna when the windchill temperature outside is minus 58C. Having to chase Adelie penguins and induce them to volunteer their stomach contents to see what their diet consists of, and then having to analyze the contents in the ship’s lab while wearing full winter gear because they can’t warm ship’s interior enough. A huge shout out to these researchers and their graduate students.

    Reply
  115. Cate

     /  September 13, 2016

    http://www.euractiv.com/section/agriculture-food/opinion/our-very-existence-depends-on-soil-so-why-is-it-not-protected/

    Soil is often overlooked in climate change discussion. By some estimates, the soil in the UK is good for only 100 more harvests. This article focuses on Europe but has global implications.

    “The link between migration, climate change and soil may not be obvious at first, but researchers have shown that while some people leave their homes because of war, others are forced to trek halfway across the world because the increasingly poor state of their soils leaves them unable to produce food….

    Scientists expect that climate change will increase migration of this kind, warning that land degradation could reduce global food productivity leading to a significant increase in world food prices which, in turn, would disproportionately affect the world’s poorest. This would likely result in greater hunger, violent social unrest and, ultimately, conflict….

    If we want to continue farming in Europe, we need to act now to protect our soils by a transition from intensive, industrial agriculture in favour of methods like agro-ecology that include compost, green manure and crop rotation….this can only be achieved by a complete rethink of the current European agricultural policy…”

    Reply
  116. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    Adrian Linares@Adriansweather
    Just wow STY #Meranti’s central pressure is now estimated at 890mb Haiyan’s was 895mb. Incredible stuff.

    Reply
  117. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    Last Friday’s tornado track in Illinois. Shows just how much luck determines outcomes. A small change in direction and our little cozy home is toast.

    Reply
  118. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    The tiny island (pop 2988 and thus likely little/no press) of Itbayat in N. Philippines now in northwestern eyewall of Meranti.

    Reply
  119. Fire weather SW USA

    Reply
  120. Greg

     /  September 13, 2016

    Jeff Masters must posted latest on Meranti. “The tall mountains of southeast Taiwan will wring out huge amounts of moisture as the storm approaches, with localized rainfall amounts of 25” or more quite possible along east-facing slopes…Meranti’s worst impacts may well be in China. Especially if the typhoon avoids a direct hit on Taiwan, it will weaken only partially before reaching the China coast, so there is the potential for major wind damage and storm surge…Given the mountainous terrain of China’s Fujian province, we can expect widespread torrential rainfall as a weakening Meranti slows down and grinds its way inland.
    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=3427

    Reply
  121. Meanwhile in Greenland

    Reply
  122. U.S. Senate advances water bill that includes $1.9B for Everglades, algae bloom projects in Florida

    WASHINGTON — The U.S. Senate voted to move forward Monday on a $10 billion water projects bill that includes about $1.9 billion for projects to restore Florida’s Everglades and combat algae blooms that have fouled the state’s beaches and rivers.

    Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said in a newspaper column last week that fellow Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida had convinced him to back the project after years of opposition.

    Rubio’s Democratic opponent, Rep. Patrick Murphy, has accused Rubio and Republican Gov. Rick Scott of not doing enough to find a long-term solution for algae blooms caused by polluted water flowing from Lake Okeechobee.
    http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/stateroundup/us-senate-advances-water-bill-that-includes-19b-for-everglades-algae-bloom/2293351

    Reply
  123. Ailsa

     /  September 13, 2016

    Climate Disruption: Here & Now

    Don’t think this has been linked to here yet – the first show of the autumn season of Radio Ecoshock.

    “The most experienced scientists, even the heads of most governments, know we are headed into very dangerous climate disruption. I wondered what the only world body formed to address this, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, would do.

    It turns out that body just held an introductory meeting in Geneva this past August. It’s a “scoping meeting” – laying out the groundwork for a report due out in 2018. The subject: the grave risks of a world 1.5 degrees hotter than the days before we began this mass industrial experiment. As you’ll hear, we have already breached that danger line, at least for part of 2016.”

    http://www.ecoshock.org/2016/09/climate-distruption-here-now.html

    Reply
  124. Weather/climate driven Cat 4-5 wind speeds vs human operated power blowers.
    That is power blowers used every day to damage landscape foliage, destroy and disperse valuable nutrient laden leaf litter — or used to blast toxic traffic debris embedded with petroleum.
    Here are some air velocities to note. The extremely hot air temperatures emitted by these machines are harder to find but leaf and soil scorch is evident to the naked eye. Contaminated asphalt is chipped, degraded and pulverized — then suspended in the air only to settle, or be re-deposited.
    These blowers are used on plants, landscaping, asphalt streets, parking lots, school playgrounds, hospital grounds, etc.

    BR 500 Backpack Blower

    AIR VOLUME
    With tube: 810 m3/h (477 cfm)
    Without tube: 1380 m3/h (812 cfm)

    AIR VELOCITY
    81 m/sec. (181 mph)

    The Toro 51599 Ultra 12 amp Variable-Speed Electric Blower/Vacuum

    CFM 255 (7.2 cu. m. per minute) (blow mode) / 390 (11 cu. m. per minute) (vacuum mode)
    Leaf Shredding Reduction 16:01
    Motor Amps 12
    Nozzle Velocity Max. Up to 235 mph (378 kph)

    – Source: manufacturer online literature.

    Reply
    • Noteworthy bits:

      ‘ According to the California Air Resources Board the types of air pollutants emitted when using a gasoline-powered leaf blower for half an hour are equivalent to those emitted from 440 miles of automobile travel at 30mph average speed. Compared to an average large car, one hour of operation of a leaf blower emits 498 times as much hydrocarbons, 49 times as much particulate matter and 26 times as much carbon monoxide’.

      ‘Every doctor affiliated with the Mt. Sinai Children’s Environmental Health Center in New York City signed a letter submitted on April 22, 2010 by the Mt. Sinai Hospital supporting proposed restrictions on leaf blowers in Eastchester, NY. The Mt. Sinai team of doctors stated that:

      “Leaf blowers pose multiple hazards to human health. Children are the most susceptible members of our population to these hazards because they breathe more air per pound of body weight per day than adults and thus inhale more of any pollutants that are thrown into the air by this equipment. Children’s vulnerability to the health effects of this equipment is further magnified by the fact that they are passing through the stages of early development, and thus their lungs, ears, eyes, and other organ systems are inherently more sensitive to environmental hazards than the organs of adults.”

      The doctors went on to elaborate in great detail the specific hazards associated with leaf blowers, emphasizing the categories of: airborne pollutants, noise, and eye hazards.’

      ‘ Steve Zien, a professional landscaper and Executive Director of Biological Urban Gardening Services (BUGS), an international membership organization of primarily professional landscapers, states:

      BUGS has opposed the use of leaf blowers for many years for a variety of reasons. There are many hidden costs when utilizing blowers regularly. The leaf blower is perhaps the most over-used and inappropriately used landscape tool. Autumn’s tremendous amout of organic debris that requires collection might be considered appropriate use of this tool. However, the weekly routine of blowing abuses the soil and damages landscape plants while the noise creates ill will from neighbors and clients alike..

      http://www.greenwichcalm.org/apps/blog/show/6583443-health-hazards-of-leaf-blowers

      ###

      For societies which allows these devices — is to deny the inherent damage attached.
      Once that is done — denying climate change is easy…
      – DT

      Reply
  125. FYI

    Reply
  126. Reply
  127. Ailsa

     /  September 13, 2016

    Scientists discover unprecedented atmospheric behaviour has disrupted one of world’s the most repeatable atmospheric patterns

    ‘The normal flow of air high up in the atmosphere over the equator, known as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, was seen to break down earlier this year.
    ‘Dr Scott Osprey, an NCAS scientist at the University of Oxford, said: “The recent disruption was not predicted, not even one month ahead.”
    ‘Prof Adam Scaife, Head of Long-range Forecasting at the Met Office and Honorary Visiting Professor at the University of Exeter, said: “This unexpected disruption to the climate system switches the cycling of the quasi-biennial oscillation forever. And this is important as it is one of the factors that will influence the coming winter.” ‘

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/news/releases/2016/quasibiennialoscillation

    Reply
  128. The Brit flower gardening book says (each year) dig a trench to spade depth (10 in.), fill the bottom 25% with organic matter (any plant kind). This way you don’t have to mix. Nonetheless, imagine what it would take to till a farm adding 25% organic matter to the soil each year.

    Reply
  129. WebHubTelescope

     /  September 13, 2016

    Ailsa said above:
    “Scientists discover unprecedented atmospheric behaviour has disrupted one of world’s the most repeatable atmospheric patterns

    ‘The normal flow of air high up in the atmosphere over the equator, known as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, was seen to break down earlier this year. … ‘ “

    The scientist who came up with the current QBO model, Richard Lindzen, is a contrarian and AGW denier. Lindzen’s model is probably not valid as it ignores the external forcing required to get the QBO in motion. We are working on a realistic model here:
    http://contextEarth.com/2016/08/23/qbo-model-final-stretch/
    and at the Azimuth Project forum.

    It may be the reason that Lindzen came up with a faulty model is that his contrarian streak does not allow him to admit that the climate can change due to external forces. This includes a QBO forcing or a CO2 forcing leading to AGW. So instead he creates these fantastical yet somehow plausible-sounding models that he hopes that gullible readers will believe are realistic. But it is very rare that a behavior as significant and global-scale as QBO will arise from an internal state, which Lindzen would have us believe.

    So with these new data points on QBO, we are likely seeing how the behavior will get impacted due to a change in forcing.

    Reply
    • Ailsa

       /  September 13, 2016

      WebHubTelescope: So have I understood you right that with your new model, you still conclude that the QBO has undergone unprecedented disruption?

      Reply
      • WebHubTelescope

         /  September 14, 2016

        Ailsa, Science moves one step at a time. The problem right now is that we have over 50 years of limited understanding of QBO thanks to Lindzen’s poor analysis. It will take some time to unwind the work of all the other climate scientists that have tried to build on Lindzen’s model.

        Fortunately the improved model of QBO relies on very simple forcing mechanisms and a good match to the data is available without having to use massive climate simulations. I will be presenting the new model at the American Geophysical Union meeting this December, pending the abstract gets accepted. Will find out if there is resistance to the model at that time.

        As for this latest QBO observation, it’s possible that it is indeed a disruption, but it also could be just a transient behavior that will subside by the next full cycle. A good analogy is that of ocean tides. If you measure a tidal gauge and you notice the tide level moving unexpectedly, it’s likely that a hurricane or cyclone is impacting it. Yet, that tidal cycle will resume later on, as if that event never happened. So what we have to do is wait for the next QBO cycle and find out if it has gone out of sync with the regular cycle.

        Reply
        • Ailsa

           /  September 14, 2016

          Thank you for this clear explanation, and good luck with getting the abstract accepted.

        • Kevin Jones

           /  September 15, 2016

          Dr. Paul Newman of NASA’s GSFC likened this QBO disruption to Old Faithful. the Yellowstone geyser failing to go off on time. Quite curious.

  130. Reply
  131. Reply
    • Cate

       /  September 13, 2016

      This picture makes me want to vomit.

      Reply
    • wili

       /  September 13, 2016

      “Humans Are Super Predators, but Unlike Wild Predators, We Can’t Manage Complex Ecosystems

      Wild predators can regulate and uphold natural ecosystem balances. In this regard, the human super predator is failing miserably.”

      (This is the title of the same article in a different venue. I think it sums up his point–and our predicament–nicely. Note that the author is David Suzuki, perhaps Canada’s most famous writer on ecological issues, unless that should go to the equally impressive Farley Mowat.)

      http://www.alternet.org/environment/simple-minded-nature-human-super-predators

      Reply
      • It is the gun.
        The immoral obese fool pictured couldn’t hunt down a cheese sandwich if it was nailed to the floor.
        Likely he was flown, and driven, on a plume of fossil fuel just to get to the majestic lion’s locale.

        Reply
        • Mulga Mumblebrain

           /  September 14, 2016

          It was probably ‘ canned hunting’ or whatever it’s called, where the victim is bred to be killed, is more or less tame and in an enclosure of some type. The killing is the thrill, not the ‘hunt’. Obvious solution is to let Mr. Creosote loose in some area where real lions still roam free, and see how he fares, He’d feed a few lions for a wee while, although he’d probably be very ‘unappetising’.

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  September 14, 2016

          What does it all mean when there are no development strategies, when there is no help from the rich countries, when minerals fall into the hand of multinationals, leaving enormous trails of destruction behind for others to clean up, if they can be cleaned up, others who have no means, communities that live on the brink of self-preservation, governments that starve for income? As Suthcliffe said, the development of un-development is also the development of un-sustainability. Wilson gives an idea of the magnitude that is involved – and this estimation is by now severely outdated because it dates from 2004 and since then climate change proceeded at a much faster pace than almost everybody ever held possible. According to Wilson, the only way to save upward of 90 percent of the rest of life is to vastly increase the area of refuges, from their current 15% of the land and 3% of the sea to half of the land and half of the sea. That amount can be put together from large and small fragments around the world to remain relatively natural, without removing people living there or changing property rights (see here). http://www.flassbeck-economics.com/the-demise-of-the-great-apes-growth-gdp-capitalism-causes/

    • Ryan in New England

       /  September 14, 2016

      This photo makes me wish I could hunt down that fat piece of sh*t and shoot him. What I just said makes a lot of people angry, and they inevitably claim that human life is worth more than that of “lower” lifeforms. I think it’s just the opposite. Man is the only animal that participates in “sport” killings, and the only creature that gets pleasure from the murder of innocent animals. If there was ever an animal that deserves to be killed, it is without a doubt members of our own species that behave in such a manner as to be accurately described as evil. Seeing an innocent, majestic lion (or any other animal) murdered simply for the “fun” of it makes me want to weep, especially when I reflect on the fact that our species is the reason that we are in the midst of the Earth’s sixth great extinction. And it’s for this reason, and others, that I wish people like the a**hole in the above photo would be shot, instead of precious wild animals.

      In response to Shawn’s comment, E.O. Wilson has just recently released a book on the very idea you mentioned, title Half Earth.

      Reply
  132. Jay M

     /  September 14, 2016

    Local paper PNW covers sea temperature anomaly that has been off coast for at least a couple of years. Trophic systems affected.
    http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest- news/index.ssf/2016/09/warm_water_blob_off_northwest.html

    Reply
  133. It does spin fast — Wow — worth a look.

    Reply
    • Robert Speta
      ‏@robertspeta

      Comparing pressure mins of Typhoon Meranti with other famous storms in recent history.

      Reply
    • Robert Speta ‏@robertspeta 8h8 hours ago

      To put in perspective, the sustained winds in #Meranti right now if in tornado form would be about a F3. Gust higher.

      Reply
      • The Fujita Scale
        F-Scale Number Intensity Phrase Wind Speed
        F0 Gale tornado 40-72 mph
        F3 Severe tornado 158-206 mph
        F4 Devastating tornado 207-260 mph
        – tornadoproject.com/cellar/fscale

        Reply
        • Power/leaf blowers — many thousands of them in use scouring every sq inch of many land/city-scapes.

          AIR VELOCITY: 181 – 235 mph.

  134. Worth look too:

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  September 14, 2016

      Thanks for this DT. Their unity could accomplish much going forward. Their voices together could be so much more powerful.

      Reply
  135. Reply
  136. Ryan in New England

     /  September 14, 2016

    This dovetails nicely with the comments/photo above regarding killing our fellow inhabitants of the Earth.

    The terrible trends and data have led the venerable progressive political scientist and social-justice advocate Susan George to introduce what she calls “a new phenomenon in the history of humankind.” In a recent lecture to the International Centre for the Promotion of Human Rights in Buenos Aires, she names it “geocide,” meaning “the collective action of a single species among millions of other species which is changing planet Earth to the point that it can become unrecognisable and unfit for life.” Humanity, George says, “is committing geocide against all components of nature, whether microscopic organisms, plants, animals or against itself, homo sapiens, humankind.” George is unstinting in her denunciation of the human species: “Homo sapiens has only existed for roughly 200,000 years. The time we’ve spent on this planet compared to its total age is infinitesimally short, just the tiniest sliver of geological time. It amounts to a mere 0.00004 percent of Earth’s existence. And although any given species of plant or animal—vertebrate or invertebrate—tends to last on average about 10 million years, our species seems determined to cause its own extinction, along with the rest of creation, long before its allotted time.”

    http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/how_to_stop_capitalisms_deadly_war_with_nature_20160913

    Reply
    • Mark from OZ

       /  September 14, 2016

      Good info Ryan and glad to see you ‘back’!

      Walt Kelly’s 1970 comic for the inaugural Earth Day:
      “We have met the enemy and he is us”
      http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2011/04/we-have-met-enemy-and-he-is-us.html

      ‘We’ either can’t learn and won’t learn or can learn and will learn. Metaphorically, the current beneath our canoe has just quickened perceptibly and in the distance, the roar of big white-water can now be heard clearly. Every stroke now matters as if our life depends on them.

      Time to transmit this heightened awareness found here to those who are asleep and farther upstream. The ‘asking’ period is over; time to be ‘telling’ where sharp, urgent declarations will convince like they always do in time of real crisis.

      Reply
  137. Waiting for news as eye of typhoon Meranti passes over Philippines’ Itbayat. 3000 live on the island.
    “Pagasa officer Romeo Ganal Jr told Channel NewsAsia that there had been no communication at all from the Pagasa Itbayat satellite station since midnight of Sep 13. There are currently no flights over the area as flight routes have been altered.

    With no flights available, a plan has been drawn up for a Civil Defence team to use either a Coast Guard or Navy vessel to go on a fact finding and needs assessment exercise to Itbayat.”

    http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/eye-of-typhoon-meranti-passes-over-philippines-itbayat/3125510.html

    Reply
  138. On another topic, I participated in the 350.org protest of DAPL here in Raleigh last night. About 40 folks there, not nearly enough. Effect appeared subdued. More than just the tribes need to consolidate. This pipeline will go under the Missouri River. (super exclamation point). Pipelines eventually leak. A spill will contaminate the entire central watershed of the country, down to Gulfport and into the Gulf. It’s total insanity. I used to live in Biloxi back when it was a small slice of paradise. Everyone please do what you can. “SAVE THE MISSOURI” “SAVE THE MISSISSIPPI” if nothing else.

    Reply
  139. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    Imperiled by climate change, Joshua trees could be declared a threatened species

    Scientists have found that Joshua trees are gradually dying out and disappearing from portions of the desert landscape in Joshua Tree National Park. As temperatures have risen, researchers say, the trees have stopped reproducing in hotter and drier low-elevation areas in the park. The knee-high young trees that normally would sprout have largely vanished in some areas, leaving mature trees that are unlikely to be replaced.

    Scientists have projected that by the end of this century, Joshua trees won’t be able to survive in most of the national park due to higher temperatures and will likely be able to hold on in roughly 10 percent of their current range in the park.

    http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2016/09/13/imperiled-climate-change-joshua-trees-could-declared-threatened-species/90338184/

    Reply
  140. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    Agriculture losses from the March and August floods totaled almost $367 million, according to an analysis by the LSU AgCenter, threatening the future of some of Louisiana’s farmers.

    “It could be a knockout punch to a lot of people,” said Caddo Parish rancher Marty Wooldridge, who had 2,000 acres of pastures flooded in March and again in May. “What’s even worse is cattle prices are half what they were last year, and I think it’s a similar story for other commodities.”
    http://www.thenewsstar.com/story/news/2016/09/13/ag-losses-march-august-floods-total-277-million/90296302/

    Reply
  141. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Washington, DC – Three separate bipartisan groups of senior military and national security experts, including many who served under Republican or Democratic administrations, today issued a statement and two major reports urging a robust new course on climate change…‘in the coming decades, an underlying meta-driver of unpredictable instability will be…climate change…we don’t have the luxury of choosing to wait until all of the data is in:
    https://climateandsecurity.org/2016/09/14/three-bipartisan-groups-of-military-and-national-security-leaders-urge-robust-new-course-on-climate-change/

    Reply
  142. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    A big step forward in transportation electrification was just crossed. GM has begun producing its Bolt. Surprisingly this thing easily can go 290 real world miles on a charge. I believe it will mark a turning point historically.
    http://insideevs.com/chevrolet-bolt-first-drive-reports/

    Reply
  143. Opps… some new developments I put into an earlier thread by mistake… so I’m reposting them here:

    I’ve got two bits of news today: First, Tropical Storm Julia is the first named storm to ever have formed over land:

    http://twentysixteenisstrange.blogspot.com/2016/09/a-new-first-tropical-cyclone-forms-over.html

    August ALSO hottest month on record! Or almost.

    Link below.

    Reply
  144. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    The Great Polar Bear Feast re-aired September 2016.

    About the Show
    The Great Polar Bear Feast is the astonishing story of an annual natural phenomenon that occurs in early September on the north slope of the Arctic. Every year, up to 80 polar bears gather on the frozen shores of Barter Island, near the village of Kaktovik, to feast on the hunter-harvested bowhead whale remains. This extraordinary gathering is highly unusual because polar bears are known as solitary predators, rarely if ever moving in a group.

    Kaktovik is a small Inupiat hunting community. Perched on the edge of the world, it’s inaccessible by road and locked in by frozen sea ice for 9 months of the year. But for the month of September, it becomes the center of polar bear studies as scientists and wildlife photographers flock to the tiny town to observe the bears’ unusual behaviour. And with more and more polar bears turning up year on year, scientists are determined to find out why this is happening. How do the bears know to come to this remote island and at exactly this time of year? And what is happening to the polar bears of the South Beaufort Sea that is seeing so many of them desert the ice for land?

    We also witness what happens to the inhabitants of Kaktovik when the whale bones are picked bare, and the huge group of polar bears heads for the town.

    The film has extraordinary access to the work of scientist Todd Atwood, the lead polar bear scientist for the U.S. Geological Survey. He has estimated that there has been a 40 percent decline in the polar bears around the South Beaufort Sea since 2006. It is an extraordinary decline, and he is determined to find out why.
    http://www.pbs.org/program/great-polar-bear-feast/

    Reply
  145. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Tropical Storm Julia has formed in Florida over land! First in almost 30 years:

    Reply
  146. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    What it was like in Maui, Hawaii last night in one personal account:

    Reply
  147. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Climate Signals ‏@ClimateSignals
    Super Typhoon #Meranti dumps up to 30″ on Taiwan.

    Reply
  148. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Meranti hasn’t hit China yet but already is reeking a little havoc in the streets of Fuzou:

    Reply
  149. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    Just a few days back –
    Typhoons striking China and Southeast Asia have become much stronger
    And they’re likely to get worse

    Link

    Reply
  150. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    4 recent typhoons to be given ‘extreme severity’ designation

    TOKYO —
    The government said Wednesday it will designate a series of four recent typhoons as a disaster of extreme severity, allowing affected communities to receive higher subsidies from the central government for reconstruction work.

    The typhoons Chanthu, Mindulle, Lionrock and Kompasu will be grouped as one disaster, according to the Cabinet Office.

    https://www.japantoday.com/category/politics/view/4-recent-typhoons-to-be-given-extreme-severity-designation

    Reply
  151. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Video coming in from Taiwan re: Meranti. Idiot on a scooter:

    Reply
  152. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Manhattan sized ice shelf separating from Greenland after unusually warm summer (Jason Box)

    Reply
  153. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Russian researchers “besieged” by Polar Bears have been rescued (who will rescue the polar bears?)
    A helicopter took off from the Akademik Tryoshnikov and delivered “three puppies and pyrotechnical devices” to the beleaguered weather station staffers, TASS reports.
    The crew of the ship helped chase away the bears, and meteorological observations have resumed, the Russian news network says.
    A spokeswoman for Sevgidromet tells the Guardian that the bears’ behavior was unusual, and related to the reduction in sea ice — the bears were trapped when the ice receded rapidly and were stuck on Troynoy instead of the islands where they usually go.
    “There’s no food on [Troynoy] island, so they came up to the station,” the spokeswoman told the newspaper.
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/09/14/493893940/passing-research-ship-saves-weather-station-staff-from-polar-bear-siege

    Reply
  154. 17:38 UTC

    Reply
  155. – Lamar smith’s ugly escapades — Haven’t looked at yet but I pass it along

    Reply
    • JPL

       /  September 14, 2016

      Lamar just needs some R&R to get his head right. Maybe Scalia’s favorite room at Cibolo Creek Ranch is available this weekend. Or perhaps a little quail hunting with Dick Cheney would be just the ticket. So many opportunities to unwind…

      Reply
  156. Nevada Court Overturns Solar Rate Hike for Existing Customers
    Legal case protects existing solar customers, leaves Nevada’s solar future uncertain

    September 14, 2016
    Carson City, NV —

    On Tuesday, in Vote Solar vs. the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada (PUCN), the Nevada State District Court for Carson City agreed with Vote Solar and ruled that a PUCN decision to hike rates on existing solar customers earlier this year were made through an unlawful process that left existing solar customers with inadequate notice and did not satisfy the due process clause of the Nevada Constitution. Earthjustice and Vote Solar led the appeal of the PUCN decision in order to restore consumer solar options, jobs, and health benefits to Nevada communities.
    http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2016/nevada-court-overturns-solar-rate-hike-for-existing-customers?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ejtwpr2+%28Twitter+%28News%29%3A+Press+Releases%29

    Reply
  157. Reply
  158. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    Another huge liability for oil companies drilling in the Gulf of Mexico to the tune of $40 billion. More evidence to transition to a renewable world
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/debtwire/2016/09/13/dangers-in-the-deep-a-40-billion-time-bomb-threatening-the-gulf/#205f76de4abc

    Reply
  159. Greg

     /  September 14, 2016

    What are solar buildings beginning to look like? Here are five inspirational ones nearly completed or in the works:
    http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/energy/blogs/5-solar-powered-buildings-will-forever-change-architecture

    Reply
  160. Reply
  161. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    El Nino and global warming combine to cause extreme drought in the Amazon rainforest

    Some El Niño events, like those of 1982/1983 and, especially, 1997/1998, are stronger than average. In 2014 alarm bells started ringing at the possibility of another such ‘Mega Niño’, as they are known, though ultimately not all of the necessary conditions converged. However, in 2015 they all fell into place, leading to the current 2015/2016 event, which, coupled with the trend of global warming, is proving more extreme than any on record.
    The study, by researchers at the Universitat de València and published in Scientific Reports, shows how the current El Niño event is associated with an unprecedented heating of Amazonia, reaching the highest temperature in the last forty years and, probably, the last century. Additionally, extreme drought has hit a much larger area of this region than usual and is distributed atypically, with extremely dry conditions in the northeast and unusual wetting in the southeast (something which occurred in 2009/2010, though to a lesser extent).
    According to the UV scientists, this fact, not observed in the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 events, implies that, the more the central equatorial Pacific is heated, the more marked the difference between and distribution of the wet zones and areas of extreme drought in the Amazon rainforest.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
    • “I think there are a lot of reasons to be optimistic about the oceans, because we haven’t impacted them much yet.”

      Well that certainly helps….

      Alex

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  September 14, 2016

        Alex –
        This comment reminds me of the term “generational amnesia”. Like seeing some whales near South Georgia Island, and not knowing the same scene before the whaling station was set up there.

        Reply
      • Griffin

         /  September 14, 2016

        Typical Chris Mooney article. Always with the tamped down impacts.
        But yeah, we haven’t impacted the cans all that much. I mean what’s a Ph number on a logarithmic scale really mean anyway? And all that heat? We should be very optimistic that only 20% of the Great Barrier Reef died in the past year. The rest of it that was only severely bleached? Coulda been worse.
        I cannot believe that people can be so dumb as to repeat such diarrhea of the mouth.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  September 14, 2016

          Easy big fella,
          He’s just passing along the what the researchers are saying. And don’t read his comments it’s always a “basket of deplorables” over there.

    • Ergo, all the whale and dolphin beachings we’ve been having in recent years…😦

      Reply
  162. Ailsa

     /  September 14, 2016

    “Mother (Earth) stands for comfort, Mother hides the madman, Mother will stay mum…”

    Maybe not so much any more.

    Reply
  163. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    Typhoon Meranti triggers 17-meter record-high waves

    The waves were the highest ever recorded in the history of China’s offshore wave surveillance, said the NMEFC, which on Wednesday upgraded its warning for ocean waves triggered by Typhoon Meranti to “red,” the highest alert on a four-color warning system.

    Link

    Reply
  164. Ailsa

     /  September 14, 2016

    Hello Earth…

    Reply
  165. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    One meter is 3.28084 feet. That means the waves the Chinese observed were 55.7743 feet.

    Reply
  166. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    A bad night in China.

    Reply
  167. Cate

     /  September 14, 2016

    https://thinkprogress.org/global-warming-jump-419da72c9215#.qh0xd4xfl

    Joe Romm: record-smashing August means long-awaited “jump” in global warming is here.

    ‘The kinds of extreme weather we have seen over the past year or so will be routine all too soon, but then even worse records will be set,” as Kevin Trenberth, one of the world’s leading climatologists, told me. Trenberth explained that “the nature of the changes going on now suggest that we have made another step up the ladder to another rung, and we won’t go down again.”

    That means the recent bouts of extreme weather “will be routine all too soon, but then even worse records will be set. It is not something to welcome and it is hard to plan for.’

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 14, 2016

      Cate –

      His site has been swallowed up , it’s a real heart break over there, they updated once again , it’s buried. And one can not reply anymore. And like Mooney at the Post, the rotten eggs fall out Hillary’s basket buy the dozen. Open the thread, you’ll see me there earlier today.

      I used to read him everyday, like we do here. But it has declined like the sea ice.

      Reply
  168. Cate

     /  September 14, 2016

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/polar-bears-sea-ice-hunting-1.3760554

    A new study on polar bears, published in Cryosphere.

    “We would expect them to blink out.”

    Blink out. Like dying stars, fading to black.

    “The consequences of too little sea ice can appear very suddenly. Mother bears have to carry hundreds of pounds into the denning season if they are to give birth and raise their cubs. Without that extra fat, the pregnancy will be aborted — this internal calculation means that a few lean years can cause a plummeting birth rate alongside the starvation of living bears, a potentially disastrous outcome for a species with dwindling prospects.
    “It’s clear that, you change the sea ice, you affect the bears,” says Derocher. “And there’s only so far that you can push them. At some point there’s just not enough sea ice for them to persist in an area and we would expect them to blink out.”

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 15, 2016

      Thanks for this link. It’s not just the bears linked to the sea ice, their prey the ring seals depend on it, the walrus hang in the balance as well. Watch this PBS show on them , “The Great Polar Bear Feast” …………………………. They collared a female bear with a yearling cub, she swam 650 km to the ice pack, her cub did not make it. It’s a great story and they did a great job, don’t be fooled by the title.

      “The Great Polar Bear Feast”
      http://www.pbs.org/program/great-polar-bear-feast/

      Reply
  169. coloradobob

     /  September 14, 2016

    Cate –

    Have some Hot Chocolate ……………….

    Reply
  170. Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 15, 2016

      It;s been raining in Fairbanks for days.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  September 15, 2016

        The water machine seeks a condenser. The Typhoon this week when to over 55,000 feet .
        The heat will seek the cooler condenser, Always. This law is why you have ice in your freezer.

        Reply
  171. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    Think that you are a hot water molecule somewhere off the Azores, suddenly you are driven off the sea. Your’re not just water, you carry the heat that drove you off the ocean . That heat drives you , until it get’s off. In a condenser. Then you go back to being water.

    America was no idea why they have ice in their kitchens . The above this why we can make ice.

    Reply
  172. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    Have an other drink folks ……………….. The Asteroids Galaxy Tour – “The Golden Age”.

    Reply
  173. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    One more creepy message –

    St. Vincent – Digital Witness

    Reply
  174. Jay M

     /  September 15, 2016

    Dry right now along western north america 091416

    Reply
  175. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    One night, I left the dusty heat of Phoenix , crawling up the rim to cooler places , and this came on –
    Madonna – Ray Of Light

    I was a lone , and spent, this made me so happy.

    Reply
  176. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    Courage is where you can find it.

    Reply
  177. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    The greatest album ever cut ……………………. In 1966,

    Listen to this , and tell me I’m wrong.
    THE PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND – EAST WEST (FULL ALBUM)

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 15, 2016

      Wait for East/West.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  September 15, 2016

        In 1967 , I was sitting on a pile of rail road ties. At Clovis, NM. I was playing East/West, in my head. But I had a radio in my hand , and this came up. It was a Tuesday afternoon.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  September 15, 2016

          I was completely covered in railroad soot. I had been through an electrical storm in Arizona at 70 mph, The bolts were hitting 50 yards from train, I was sitting on suitcase, in a car carrier. Back then a railroad rails were 30 feet long . The train was empty. We were haulin’ ass. . It was a 100 empty cars.

          Back then , we shipped over seas. , Now we only export logs corn, beans, and cardboard.

          Pretzel Logic

  178. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    That was the greatest trip anyone modern fool ever made . We left San Bernardino with a 6 pack of root beer.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  September 15, 2016

      When people, tell you to bring lots of water , don’t bring a 6 pack of root beer.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  September 15, 2016

        We got to Winslow, the train was changing crews. Tooter got off, and a one armed wino got on. With 2 bottles of Thunderbird. He drank both bottles in short order. The next stop, he woke up, and I assured him we had plenty of time. He got off.

        A Navajo railroad man looked right at me , and said, ” Would you like a drink ” ?
        I filled both Thunderbird bottles with water.

        The train left the one armed wino, and Tooter.

        Next stop was Belen New Mexico. The largest ice plant in the world. This where the Santa Fe iced down the cars coming out of California. Remember, it was 49 year ago, and railroad cars didn’t have refrigeration.

        It was like the dark side of the Moon. Blocks of ice, sitting in a giant train yard.

        Later that day, I made my way to the number 2 engine. Over the cars.
        This saved my life. There’s water source on every engine.

        When I got to Colvis, I was sitting on the back steps of the number 2 engine. A West bound train was slowly passing by, They had roses on their table. Breakfast was about to be served.

        I sat on a pile of rail road ties in Clovis for 8 hours while the train to Lubbock was put together.

        When I got to Lubbock. My friend Joe Ely picked me up. He had no idea who I was. When I got home, my mother she had no idea who I was.

        You can’t make this shit up.

        Reply
        • You may have crossed paths with my uncle Jim who rode the rails from about 1955 til about 2000 when he died sleeping under an overpass in Colorado or Nebraska.
          You never knew when he would take off at the sound of a train ‘whistle’.

  179. Reply
  180. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    RS –
    Post a new thread . Please, we’re down to my bullshit.

    Reply
  181. – The airliners that took down the towers were fueled for cross country with thousands of pounds of aviation gas (kerosene) aboard.
    Except for some steel columns all became clouds of fine particulate.

    ‘Cancer and PTSD plague those who put their lives on the line at Ground Zero
    September 9, 2016’

    “The average age of the first responders in 2001 was 38. Today, they are 53 and at an age where they have a higher risk for diseases like cancer,” said Dr. Michael A. Crane, medical director of the World Trade Center clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital, one of seven Clinical Centers of Excellence treating World Trade Center (WTC) rescuers and survivors.

    Since 2006, Crane has been treating those workers who spent time “on the pile” clearing debris and inhaling the toxic cocktail of chemicals and particles, including asbestos, benzene, fiberglass and mercury, created when the million-ton Twin Towers collapsed into a fiery, dusty heap.

    Crane says that while the immediate health issues were upper respiratory, such as asthma, persistent coughing and sinusitis or gastrointestinal, such as acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), after 15 years he sees a “steady stream” of 9/11 survivors with cancer.

    The delay is predictable; many cancers have a long latency period.
    http://www.nextavenue.org/caring-other-911-victims/

    Reply
    • Afterwards, civil aviation was shut down — and for a few glorious days, we had clear blue skies. Then we went back to murky white skies — which is where we are now.

      Professional weather-casters tell us the skies are clear yet I look up each day as jet trails fill the air white gauze…

      Reply
      • And as I recall, the airliners also have to carry their own source of oxygen that allows those thousands of pounds fuel to burn at altitude. This is after a tremendous amount of fuel is burned just to take off from an airport location — and gain airspeed.

        The ‘wild blue yonder’ is a thing of the past.

        Reply
  182. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    When I sat on that pile of ties in Clovis, I now it was my highwater mark.

    Reply
  183. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    Back to the past –

    Reply
  184. Reply
  185. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    The Drake Well is a 69.5-foot-deep (21.2 m) oil well .

    This changed the killing of whales.

    Mr. Rock, sent salesmen to China. Free lamps, , I’m drowning in kerosene..

    Reply
  186. John S

     /  September 15, 2016

    OT. Apologies in advance for abusing this forum

    AVAAZ have created a simple tool for Americans living outside USA to register and vote at forthcoming election.

    Apparently there are 8 million of you, and most expats never vote because it’s too hard.

    Well now you can!

    I’m not even American, but I’m all for every possible vote against Trump. Share!

    https://secure.avaaz.org/en/globalvote_rb2/?bePeJjb&v=81338&cl=10701423838&_checksum=05e98578c88af91eba1588fa6543296976aa2aa9ba6068148a4cb3ad3231c0ec

    John from Mulga country

    Reply
  187. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    If you don’t know history. You are a drift. Alone, by your self.

    Reply
  188. coloradobob

     /  September 15, 2016

    DTL

    In race, to be nut ball we are neck and neck.

    Reply
  189. wharf rat

     /  September 15, 2016

    Flash Flood Warning
    Kahoolawe in Maui County, Hawaii
    At 2:35 AM Hst, radar indicated rapidly developing Heavy showers and … Thus most of this rainfall will lead to runoff and dangerously high water levels in streams …
    20 mins ago – National Weather Service
    =
    Multiple Swift Water Rescues During Maui Floods
    By Maui Now
    Posted September 14, 2016

    http://mauinow.com/2016/09/14/multiple-swift-water-rescues-during-maui-floods/

    Reply
  190. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    Gov’t flood maps no longer dependable in Climate 2.0 as we all know here.
    http://www.npr.org/2016/09/15/492260099/outdated-fema-flood-maps-dont-account-for-climate-change

    Reply
  191. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    CB, a musical tribute to fishermen the world over and a reflection on the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster, from my sister and her husband:

    Reply
  192. Drug resistance
    How Big Pharma’s industrial waste is fuelling the rise in superbugs worldwide

    Factories in China and India – where the majority of the world’s antibiotics are produced – are releasing untreated waste fluid containing active ingredients into surrounding areas, highlights the report by a coalition of environmental and public health organisations.

    Ingredients used in antibiotics get into the local soil and water systems, leading to bacteria in the environment becoming resistant to the drugs. They are able to exchange genetic material with other nearby germs, spreading antibiotic resistance around the world, the report claims.

    https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/2016/09/15/big-pharmas-industrial-waste-fuelling-rise-superbugs-worldwide/

    Reply
  193. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    Residents begin clean-up in China (Xiamen) from Meranti. One dead in Taiwan. One in China:
    https://dsx.weather.com//util/image/w/gettyimages-605795708.jpg?v=ap&w=980&h=551&api=7db9fe61-7414-47b5-9871-e17d87b8b6a0

    Reply
  194. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    Sidebar. That red polar ice cap on Charon likely got that way from methane streaming off its host Pluto and capturing ricocheted cosmic particles that chemically transformed the methane into tholins which are dusty amino acid precursors, all over countless winters that last a century at a time with temperatures close to absolute zero. Hey, let’s play with our own poles real fast and see what happens!

    Reply
  195. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    A Koala weary from South Australia flooding:

    Reply
    • – Via Climatehawk1:

      Victorian floods: State battered with worst September deluge in a century

      Victoria has copped the worst September deluge in a century triggering landslides along the Great Ocean Road, evacuations and school closures.

      The wild weather affected 12 council areas, with 102 roads shut, seven schools closed and 14 bus routes disrupted on Wednesday. Emergency services conducted 11 rescues in floodwaters.

      Flood warnings are in place for Glenelg, Loddon, Goulburn, Murray-Riverina, Hopkins and Avoca, Barwon and Werribee rivers.

      The SES received more than 440 calls for help from across Victoria on Wednesday, with 242 about flooding.
      http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/victorian-floods-state-battered-with-worst-september-deluge-in-a-century-20160914-grgijs.html

      Reply
  196. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    You can see these new ghost forests on the Delmarva Peninsula prominently, due to creeping sea level rise and subsistence. Lots of houses abandoned there as well.
    https://o.twimg.com/2/proxy.jpg?t=HBhdaHR0cDovL2Fzc2V0cy5jbGltYXRlY2VudHJhbC5vcmcvaW1hZ2VzL21hZGUvOV8xM18xNl91cHRvbl9CYXNzX1JpdmVyLTM2XzYwMF8zMTVfc19jMV9jX2MuanBnFLAJFPIEHBSEBhSUAwAAFgASAA&s=T7jBUADAf6NLOh23CEiUi1KggZQpIKnwpQBUDawIFgc

    Reply
  197. Greg

     /  September 15, 2016

    There she is at her minimum for 2016. Not many more of these familiar arctic icecap images at this time of year left in our lifetime. Hell is knocking at the door to come to breakfast

    Reply
  198. Shawn Redmond

     /  September 15, 2016

    To avoid an Eaarth (as both Bill McKibben and the Statoil authors imagine it) and preserve the welcoming planet in which humanity grew and thrived, climate activists will have to devote at least as much of their energy and attention to the international political arena as to the technology sector. At this point, electing green-minded leaders, stopping climate deniers (or ignorers) from capturing high office, and opposing fossil-fueled ultra-nationalism is the only realistic path to a habitable planet.
    http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/176186/tomgram%3A_michael_klare%2C_the_rise_of_the_right_and_climate_catastrophe/#more

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  September 15, 2016

      Don Pittis at CBC makes a similar analysis—in effect, we CAN do it, but will we? It’s up to our politicians now. And “politicians are green until they’re intimidated by the electoral price..” of voters rejecting the short-term pain required to slow climate change.

      “Suddenly, it seems, now that it’s time to pay the bill, everyone has forgotten their recent enthusiasm for saving the world. There are signs politicians may be backing away from the difficult process of convincing voters that making the transition is worth the cost….
      Energy has to be more expensive. Pipeline opponents must be given a voice, even if it hurts the established giants of the doomed fossil fuel economy. Carbon has to cost us more….
      If oil and natural gas continue to be cheap, the only thing standing between us and a world damaged by climate change will be the resolve of politicians.”

      Well. Good luck to us on that, eh?

      http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/disruption-climate-change-economy-1.3761655

      Reply
    • Considering what transpired in Europe in the 20s and 30s (Italy, Poland, Germany, Portugal, Spain, &c) that will be quite the tall order.

      Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  199. Jimbot

     /  September 15, 2016

    Bill H,

    Sorry for this late reply, probably too late, I was away for a bit. I think viddaloo is using PIOMAS data. He posts at Neven’s blog and Wunderground. He is following Annual Average Volume in a very nice graphic format.

    You caught me, cherry picking ( from faulty memory ) for maximum effect, without checking source. I haven’t located viddaloo’s post yet, but he said it was lowest all year since January I think. Here is a viddaloo graphic showing 5 yrs Annual Average: http://i.imgur.com/seBIoH7.png

    Reply
  200. Pacific Ocean’s response to greenhouse gases could extend California drought for centuries
    September 15, 2016 UCLA
    “Clues from prehistoric droughts and arid periods in California show that today’s increasing greenhouse gas levels could lock the state into drought for centuries.
    Drought-like conditions can last indefinitely as long as increased warming, or radiative forcing, is present. And greenhouse gases are currently expected to increase.”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160915131524.htm

    Reply
  201. Jay M

     /  September 16, 2016

    Late winter OZ jetstream

    Reply

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