Four Thousand Mile Long River of Moisture Could Dump 2 Feet of Rain on The Pacific Northwest

As the U.S. East Coast is still reeling from impacts associated with Hurricane Matthew, the Pacific Northwest is just now confronting its own potential extreme climate event. For a 4,000 mile long river of moisture streaming off ex super typhoon Songda in the Pacific Ocean is now firing a barrage of storms at Northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. A series of storms that could, over the next five days, dump as much as two feet of rainfall over parts of this region.

Powerful Atmospheric River May Produce 2 Feet or More of Rainfall This Week

river-of-moisture-takes-aim-at-pacific-northwest

(A powerful atmospheric river is forming over the record hot Pacific Ocean in a record hot atmosphere. Typhoon Songda is delivering a great deal of tropical moisture to this flow — which is expected to impact the Pacific Northwest and produce very heavy rainfall this week. Image source: Weatherbug.)

Jet stream winds running across the Pacific now range between 180 and 220 mph. These strong winds are producing a powerful storm track even as they are tapping a vast plume of tropical moisture over the Eastern Pacific. Embedded in this moisture plume is the rain-rich ex supertyphoon Songda. As the strong upper level winds pull in Songda and draw on the extreme moisture bleed rising up off the record-hot waters of the Pacific Ocean, forecasters expect a resulting atmospheric river to run 4,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean and deliver storm after powerful storm to the Pacific Northwest.

NOAA model forecasts now show as much as 22 inches of rain falling upon parts of this region over the coming 7 days. However, with so much moisture loading up the atmosphere, it’s possible that locally higher amounts of rainfall will occur.

noaa-rainfall-forecast

(Very heavy rains in the range of 7-22 inches or more are expected to fall over the Pacific Northwest this week in associate with a powerful river of moisture streaming off the record-hot Pacific Ocean. Image source: NOAA.)

Conditions in the Context of Climate Change — Here We Go Again

Over the past year, a record hot atmosphere has helped to generate extreme moisture levels aloft. Such record to near record moisture levels have helped to produce 500 to 1,000 year flood events in places like Louisiana, Texas, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia and in other parts of the US and around the world. This week, record high moisture levels contributed to flooding rains falling over Virginia and North Carolina in association with Hurricane Matthew. Now, a similar extreme moisture pattern is taking aim at the Pacific Northwest.

So this is kind of a ‘here we go again’ situation. And, unfortunately, these types of extreme weather events are now more likely due to the fact that a world now in the range of 1-1.2 degrees Celsius warmer than 1880s averages is one in which a higher volume of water evaporates from the land and ocean surfaces and into the Earths atmosphere. Such a physical dynamic related to human-forced warming is one that increases rainfall even as it provides more fuel for powerful storms.

Links:

NOAA

Weatherbug

Supertyphoon Songda

Yes, Climate Change Helped Matthew Produce a Massive Swath of Destruction Stretching from Haiti to Virginia

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

Hat tip to DT Lange

Hat tip to Greg

Leave a comment

369 Comments

  1. redskylite

     /  October 12, 2016

    Thanks for the excellent early warning of what may happen in the very near future, and it seems during an election year Climate Change is really beginning to bite in the U.S.A. Hopefully nature’s message will finally get through to the good voters.

    Motherboard hits it on the head today, you need to see it all from space to get a true perspective.

    Seeing Earth from Space Is the Key to Saving Our Species from Itself.

    When Gagarin arrived back on firm ground, what seemed to have impacted him the most was not the vast spectacle of the universe outside our planet. It was the view of Earth within it.

    “Circling the Earth in my orbital spaceship, I marveled at the beauty of our planet,” he remarked following his historic voyage. “People of the world, let us safeguard and enhance this beauty, and not destroy it.”

    http://motherboard.vice.com/en_au/read/to-save-humanity-look-at-earth-from-space-overview-effect

    Reply
  2. Ooh, that looks very serious; thanks for the warning, which I’ve passed on to friends who live in that area.

    Reply
  3. I guess it’s our turn here in Pac NW. Blue skies and beautiful today, mid 60s or warmer, but a little chilly over night with clear skies. Say goodby to blue skies and frost, here comes the rain!

    Reply
  4. climatehawk1

     /  October 12, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  5. Those in the path of the worst, if they don’t “head for the hills”, should get life jackets and kayaks.

    Sent from my iPad 🙏🏻تن من دھن سب کُچھ تیرا

    Reply
  6. So I take it that this is not a normal weather pattern?

    Reply
  7. Genomik

     /  October 13, 2016

    And still no rain for Southern California!

    Reply
  8. Jay M

     /  October 13, 2016

    Not expert, but seeing the turning up the coast that makes these thing meridional impulses.
    I’m opposite Portland in Washington, the big impact is supposed to be on the coast. Good to get rain. The Washougal has been running robustly the last few days.

    Reply
  9. Andy_in_SD

     /  October 13, 2016

    Tens of millions face poverty unless cities plan for disasters: World Bank

    NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Climate change could plunge tens of millions of city dwellers into poverty in the next 15 years, threatening to undo decades of development efforts, the World Bank said on Wednesday.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-global-cities-poverty-idUSKCN12D042?il=0

    Reply
  10. Abel Adamski

     /  October 13, 2016

    Something OT or maybe not, it is the thread of humanity embodied within the fight against evil to save our biosphere and our children’s future

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/walaa-chahine/who-was-hussein-and-why-d_b_12429072.html

    Who Was Hussein and Why Does His Sacrifice Matter in 2016?

    An arrow through the eyes. Three spears in the center of an infant’s chest. Women in chains. A final, lone solider beheaded for his stand against injustice.

    This is the story of Karbala, the story you were never taught, the story your children will never learn.

    History books will never teach you of a man named Hussein or a land named Karbala. You have never learned of the day 72 stood against an army of 30,000 and won. No one has ever told you the story that the great British historian Edward Gibbons said will “awaken the sympathy of the coldest reader.”

    You have never truly heard of Hussein, Karbala, or Ashura, and you probably didn’t need to. No, this time in Islamic and global history never meant anything, until now.

    Reply
  11. Cheers. DT in PDX hospital. Bad lung infection/heart prob. ON THE MEND pronto. Here for a few days. High dry 5th floor. Watch weather/clime news from bed. PDX hosp care VERY GOOD. Been out of breath/feel BAD for past 10 days.
    How’s Robert and clan?🙂
    Ps Today’s PBS Newshour — last essay, had a story of PDX ‘moss’ as collector of air pollutants.
    CHEERS — OUT
    DT

    Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  October 13, 2016

      Hope your home is not in a gully. Get better, be safe.

      Reply
    • Cate

       /  October 13, 2016

      dt, my goodness, so sorry to hear you’ve not been well! Get plenty of rest and good care, and make sure you take the time you need to get better. We need you in fighting trim!🙂

      RS and family are all well and safe, as he explains in the comments to the previous post—this is the second of two short ones he posted back-to-back.

      Reply
    • 12volt dan

       /  October 13, 2016

      Take care DT ,I enjoy your contributions here and hope your back at it soon

      Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  October 13, 2016

      Get well soon, and hug a respiratory therapist for Rat.
      :>)

      Reply
    • Greg

       /  October 13, 2016

      Live long and prosper DT! Life sucks when you are sick. Wishing you a quick recovery.

      Reply
    • Please get well soon..One of my Yoga teachers had various infections…she had gained a bit of weight,,Gradually she improved then exercised all the time,very vigorously…Take care

      Reply
    • Get well soon, DT.

      Reply
      • Marcusblanc

         /  October 14, 2016

        Best wishes DT, hope you can get back to some kind of good form soon,

        I guess your interest in air quality makes even more sense to me now. My mum has a touch of COPD (still skiing though!), and being a sharp lady she is now well aware of the issue of polluted air, through the mainstream media (and Google). This issue has really come to the fore here in the UK lately, which, given that we are now told we are losing 50,000 people a year, is a bit of a relief!

        This is a story I saw today in the Guardian, about our slow but real move towards tackling this huge death toll. It is a pretty small step, but it will be a help in some of the worst blackspots outside London. Now the true number of deaths are really out in the open, and the real estimated cost of those deaths (£27.5bn!) has been publicised, the public health bodies will do a much better job in holding the government to account, and pushing forward. The numbers are so big that they have to! People have been asking for years why all the kids were getting asthma, and now they know. Of course, most of our actual vehicle standards will be set by our good friends in the EU, but hey, we’ve taken back control, apparently!

        https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/13/electric-vehicles-could-go-first-at-traffic-lights-under-uk-clean-air-zone-plans

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  October 14, 2016

          Best wishes to dt. The epidemic of lung disease is down to tiny particulates that get deep into the lungs, from diesel etc. From nitrous oxide and tropospheric ozone that are not good for any living tissue, and from the sheer burden of pollution of every type. Here, in Australia, in the ‘Deep North’ of Queensland, our Alabama (or is it Mississippi, Goddam?!)where the state regime has just made the gargantuan Adani coal-mine a ‘priority project’, meaning it will be rammed through, no matter what, and where one third of the Great Barrier Reef died this year, there has been a resurgence of ‘black lung’ disease in coal-miners, both underground and open-cut. Prospects are grim.

    • Ryan in New England

       /  October 13, 2016

      Get well soon, DT! I hope you have a speedy and thorough recovery🙂

      Reply
    • Mark from OZ

       /  October 14, 2016

      Hey DT!
      Hopin’ you’re back on deck soon and ‘swingin’ for the fences’ like always!
      Ain’t nobody else here that can throw a one bouncer from deep left centre to the plate just in time like you.

      Reply
      • Willy Mays — he might have got me though.🙂
        His famous over-the-shoulder catch of a fly ball in deep (center?) was good — but then he turned and fired to (home?) — and got the runner.🙂
        Thx

        Reply
    • Chris Lange

       /  October 14, 2016

      Go Dave!!! Your family cheering you on from not-soggy-enough northern CT. (As for poor southern CA, can’t you pitch a little of that moisture to Santa Barbara? The holdout homeowners are still talking about painting erstwhile lawns green.) Speaking of Green, remember to get an absentee ballot for the (horrible) Nov. 8 Pres. election. I can and will go Green this time. See you in the near future–after the rivers return to their banks!

      Reply
      • Just got this, Chris. Welcome to the forum!

        Reply
      • And just a reminder to others–going Green in this election, if you live in a swing state, is a vote for climate disaster. Half. A. Loaf. Is. Better. Than. None. Trump is less than none.

        Reply
        • Hillary is going to be the next president. That was easy to see for much of this year. It could be argued that folks who are willing to settle for the climate commitment of Hillary will be responsible for the weak climate action we will see during the hillary presidency (which will be one term followed by President Paul Ryan imho), but that whole blame game does not appeal to me. I have a funny notion that elections might be about voting for what we are for, not what we are against. Silly, huh?

          Be gracious. Your chosen candidate is going to win. My candidate is going to lose. Some say we get the government we deserve, but maybe we also get the government that we will settle for?

          Mike

    • Chris Lange

       /  October 14, 2016

      Dunno if you got my previous–don’t see it–your family sending love from CT. And please pitch some of that moisture to dusty Santa Barbara! See you soon after the creeks stop rising–hey ride it out on the 5th floor, don’t get dropped off home too soon! xox

      Reply
    • Nancy

       /  October 17, 2016

      DT,

      I’ve been out of touch for a few days – so sorry to hear you’ve been in the hospital. I hope you’re recovering at home by now and there is someone making homemade chicken soup for you.

      Healing thoughts sent your way,

      Nancy

      Reply
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  14. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    RS –
    Glad your clan came through OK.

    DT –
    Take care there , I saw the moss story as well, knew you’d catch it.

    Coffee And Climate Change: In Brazil, A Disaster Is Brewing
    October 12, 20164:00 PM ET
    Heard on All Things Considered

    “We’ve had no rain since last December,” Assu tells me in Portuguese, “and my well dried up. There was nothing we can do, except wait for rain.”

    But the rain doesn’t come.

    In fact, it’s been three years of drought here in Sao Gabriel da Palha. This region is part of Brazil’s coffee belt. Farmers here have been growing robusta — a coffee bean used in espressos and instant coffee — since the 1950s. Assu says he doesn’t know what to do.

    “To be honest, I don’t see a future,” he tells me.
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/12/497578413/coffee-and-climate-change-in-brazil-a-disaster-is-brewing

    Reply
    • El Nino is gone, and the brief respite it gave Southeast Brasil in rains has gone too. We were lucky, those in the Northeast and North Brasil had no respite from the drough (the situation in the São Francisco basin worries me a lot… almost a quarter of the population of Brasil depends on those waters), while the rains of june have filled reservoirs like the Cantareira to about 40%. With the end of the El Nino though… well, dry July and August are “normal” (in the last twentish years), but this September we had only 18,4mm of rain in São Paulo (historic normal values 73,3mm), making this the driest september in 22 years. I’m now happy to see the first rain in October here, outside my window. October normally is the start of the “flood season” (São Paulo’s sewage and rain drainage systems are incredbile badly designed), and usually, it should be raining almost daily. Reservoirs are going to keep things “normal” to urbanites for a while, but I’m expecting a new “sudden hydric crises” in 2018 (considering the rate the reservoirs normally drop during droughts).

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  October 16, 2016

        If I may Umbrios
        Back 10 or so years ago the point was being made about rainforest micro climate and how it shaped local climate and rainfall, most specifically the Amazon, the fringes were being cleared and palm oil plantations being planted instead, they do not provide a rainforest microclimate so rainfall in that and surrounding areas decreased , this area was a feeder for important streams and rivers, so the agricultural viability of a growing area was being impacted.
        The importance of rainforest microclimate has slipped beneath the radar since then.
        There is a huge difference climate wise between a rainforest, a forest and a plantation

        Reply
        • I fully agree. We´re lucky here in Brasil in the fact that we could prevent parcially some of the effects of the climate change (which is global), IF we invested in preserving the Amazon and the Atlantic Rainforest … both of those forests act as climate stabilizers, preventing both dramatic drought and the worst effects of dramatic rains (flooding, mudslides, etc).

          Unfortunally, there´s only 7% of the Atlantic Rainforest left, and deforestation in the Amazon is rising again. Scientists advising that the Amazon is in a tipping point (the atmospheric rivers are dwindling) are mostly ignored, as the greed for soy planting and cattle ranching trumps precaution.

          We should be reforesting the Atlantic Rain Forest and stopping deforestation in the Amazon, those are the two measures that could prevent those droughts from becoming the new normal. I´m trying to do what I can around here, for that, but this is a work far bigger than one person.

          It seems that the knowledge is spreading, people now are valuing the forest and reforestation is “cool”, a huge move from the 70s, when the idea was to fell the forest to “povoate” the land (I can´t translate this slogan properly, but “Desmatar para povoar” was a slogan during the Brasilian dictatorship era). But imediate greed is a powerful motivator too (if the people who were greed considered the future, they´d be adding their efforts to preservation), and not everyone has changed with the times. At least, environmental efforts aren´t labeled as “right” or “left” politics here, but the “ruralistas” (anti-green) have the third biggest number of congressmen, while the “greens” are sadly few.

  15. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    Breakage of monumental B.C. iceberg quietly sounds climate change alarm

    A massive chunk of ice – thought to be the largest iceberg to ever break off a glacier in Canada – fell into a lake in British Columbia this summer and no one noticed until a U.S. scientist saw it on a NASA photo.

    Dr. Mauri Pelto, professor of environmental science at Nichols College in Massachusetts and director of the North Cascade Glacier Climate Project for more than 25 years, said the Porcupine Glacier retreated nearly two kilometres in one leap when the iceberg broke off.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/breakage-of-monumental-bc-iceberg-quietly-sounds-climate-change-alarm/article32341873/

    Reply
  16. wili

     /  October 13, 2016

    WaPo has a new article on GIS melt and slr: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/10/11/how-greenlands-ice-is-melting-from-above-and-below/?utm_term=.02d7de56a51b

    “Greenland is melting from above and from below — and scientists say they’re connected”

    “…there appears to be a crucial interaction between ice melting on an ice sheet’s surface, forming into pools and lakes, and ice falling directly into the ocean where glaciers, extending out from the ice sheet’s center, terminate in often extremely deep waters. But precisely how they work together — and how much they could speed Greenland’s melt — is only beginning to reveal itself…

    …[surface lake] drainage has what they often refer to as a lubricating effect on the bottom of the ice sheet, helping it slide toward the sea. But Greenland’s future should include many more of these kinds of lakes…”

    Reply
  17. Ridley Jack

     /  October 13, 2016

    Mr Scribble if you had to make an assumption what do you think the global temperatures for September and October will end up being. I think September will become the warmest September on record beating last years 0.90 but October might FINALLY break the streak of monthly temperatures because last years October was 1.07 that’s going to be tough to beat, Anyway I think this year will finish at 1.25 above 1880s values which would result at 1.05. 2015 according to Nasa was 0.87 or 1.07 above 1880s values if 1.05 is the outcome that’s a 0.18 increase in one year and if you include 2014 0.74 that’s 0.31 in two years I realize the El Nino had a part in this but I’m really curious to see if 2017 is a neutral year if it can beat 2015 and become the second warmest year on record behind 2016. Sorry if it seems confusing. Thanks

    Reply
  18. miles h

     /  October 13, 2016

    BOMBSHELL…. please do read.
    “We hypothesize that ice mass loss from the most vulnerable ice, sufficient to raise sea level several meters, is better approximated as exponential than by a more linear response.”….”These predictions, especially the cooling in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic with markedly reduced warming or even cooling in Europe, differ fundamentally from existing climate change assessments.”

    http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/3761/2016/
    (from march 2016… apologies if old news to some)

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  October 13, 2016

      Yes, this is Dr Hansen’s latest big paper. Quite the bombshell.

      Note effect #4 in particular: “Increasingly powerful storms.” Check.

      Reply
  19. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    During the first six months of the year, carbon dioxide emissions from America’s energy industry dropped to the lowest point since 1991, according to a statement Wednesday from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
    That’s in part because warmer-than-average temperatures in the first quarter prompted fewer people to crank up their thermostats, lowering energy consumption. It’s also because clean energy installations increased 9 percent during the first half compared to a year earlier, reducing the need for power generated by burning coal and natural gas.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-12/clean-power-just-turned-back-the-clock-on-global-warming-gases

    Reply
  20. Kevin Jones

     /  October 13, 2016

    Well, as this years’ recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature said a long time ago: “It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.”

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  October 13, 2016

      Reply
  21. John B Davies

     /  October 13, 2016

    IN many ways this is a welcome development. There is a drought in the US west and while this rain will fall over too short a time period it will at least alleviate the drought, though in Southern California there will be no rain or any relief.

    Reply
  22. wharf rat

     /  October 13, 2016

    Bombogenesis

    Hurricane Nicole Strikes Bermuda at Category 3 Strength; One of Bermuda’s Most Intense Hurricane Strikes
    While Nicole’s intensity ticked downward to Category 3 intensity, the impacts will largely remain the same. All Bermuda residents should now be in safe shelter.
    https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/major-hurricane-nicole-atlantic-bermuda

    Reply
  23. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    Australia has experienced its second wettest September ever with the Murray-Darling catchment breaking a 110-year rainfall record.

    Last month’s nationwide heavy rain followed an unusually wet winter, with the May-September period Australia’s rainiest on record.
    It was also the second wettest September for Victoria, third wettest for Queensland and fourth wettest for South Australia.
    The BOM says abnormally warm waters in the Indian Ocean between Western Australia and Indonesia significantly contributed to the high amount of rainfall.

    http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/wet-september-sees-rainfall-records-tumble/news-story/546466f329d3b8641ecf84fbc3be6a5b

    Reply
  24. Kalypso

     /  October 13, 2016

    Don’t know if you seen this yet, but it looks like plants can no longer suck up carbon dioxide efficiently. I wonder if we’re beginning to see a shut down in the terrestrial carbon sink.

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/oct/12/past-our-peak-plants-and-a-burgeoning-problem-with-co2-weatherwatch

    Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    POLITICS OCT 13 2016, 1:39 AM ET
    Trump’s Campaign Is ‘Pulling Out of Virginia’

    Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  October 13, 2016

      Will Virgina be filing assault charges?

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 13, 2016

        Coffee damage to the screen and the keyboard here.

        Reply
        • Kevin Jones

           /  October 13, 2016

          I needed this, guys! First chuckle I’ve had in too long.

        • Greg

           /  October 13, 2016

          I want to know if that thing on his head has had its vaccinations.”―Craig Ferguson

      • George W. Hayduke

         /  October 13, 2016

        🙂

        Reply
        • Greg

           /  October 13, 2016

          +1
          Like a guinea pig staring at you through the porthole on a washing machine.”—Barry Shitpeas
          “Donald Trump really has egg on his face now. Which pairs nicely with the hash browns on the top of his head.”—James Corden
          His hair looks like a slovenly post-coital cat. —Frankie Boyle
          “It’s like an Internet comment troll ran for president.”—Jon Stewart

      • Hahaha, love it. Someone from New Yorker mentioned that as well on Twitter. Said everything is beginning to sound lewd to her, thanks to Donald (the dick).

        Reply
    • GOOD one and laughs always needed!

      Reply
    • Yep. Good news, odds of him winning getting longer and longer. Anyone who can spare a few bucks, chip in to the tight Senate campaigns in NH, PA, NC, NV. Or any others, if you have better info than me.🙂

      Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    Pacific Northwest bracing for the remnants of Typhoon Songda
    Another high-latitude anomaly of the tropical type will make its presence felt in the U.S. Pacific Northwest and far southwest Canada this weekend. Typhoon Songda reached its peak intensity on Tuesday at an unusually far northerly latitude: 30.3°N in the Northwest Pacific, where it briefly became a super typhoon with top sustained winds of 150 mph. No longer classified as a tropical cyclone, Songda remained a powerful storm in the North Pacific on Thursday morning, whipping eastward through the North Pacific near the International Date Line with a central pressure of 996 millibars. Songda will be incorporated in a train of storms heading into the Pacific Northwest, and models agree that it will deepen at least into the 960 – 970 mb range as it approaches the Olympic Peninsula of Washington (or perhaps a bit further south, if the ECMWF model proves correct]. This is a classic set-up for very heavy rain and damaging winds across western Oregon and Washington, including the Seattle area. High wind warnings are already in effect from tonight to Friday for western Oregon and Washington, where gusts may reach 75 mph along the Oregon coast, 60 mph along the Washington coast, and 55 mph in the Seattle area. Even stronger winds are liable to materialize late Saturday and/or Sunday as the remnants of Songda approach. We’ll have more details on this potential major event on Friday.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=3479#commenttop

    Reply
  27. wharf rat

     /  October 13, 2016

    Robert: Re previous post…
    “As a family, my relatives have suffered dislocation and some property damage from the storm. But we are among the fortunate ones. We did not experience the devastating material losses and loss of life”

    Glad to hear everybody is OK. I once lost everything but my dawg to a house fire. It taught me that it’s all just stuff, and that it’s good to have insurance.

    Mike

    Reply
  28. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    Another dying forest –

    Yellow cedar has long been a culturally, ecologically and economically valuable tree in southeastern Alaska. Many of the trees are ancient, aged between 700 and 1,200 years old. Their leaves and surrounding soils play host to unique bacterial communities; animals rely on the trees for food and shelter, while humans prize them for their durable, closed-grained wood.

    For the past 100 years, however, the yellow cedar has been dying off in large numbers across Alaska and British Columbia. As of 2012, 60 to 70 percent of yellow cedar in a 600,000-acre area in the region have died.

    Climate change is to blame for this die-off, scientists say. They’ve concluded that though the trees could withstand centuries of bugs, rot and injury, their shallow roots are vulnerable to freezing when the surrounding soil is not protected by a layer of insulating snow.

    Alaska has been melting for decades. The average temperature across the state has increased by about 3 degrees Fahrenheit over the past 60 years. That’s more than twice the warming recorded in the rest of the U.S., according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/climate-change-music-data-sonification_us_57fd9494e4b0e9c70229d691

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  October 13, 2016

      Reply
    • Great (if terribly sad) story, thanks. Tweet scheduled.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  October 13, 2016

      I have never linked a podcast before but I am going to try this one cause it is a great listen that anyone that frequents this blog would enjoy. It is not despairing at all. It is instead a fascinating look at a world that I never knew existed around us. It is also very well produced and is quite entertaining.
      “A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour.
      In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent.”
      https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/radiolab/id152249110?mt=2&i=373412750

      Reply
    • Greg

       /  October 14, 2016

      Yellow cedar trees are shown in abundance in Glacier Bay National Park, left. The image on the right, south of the park in the Tongass National Forest, reveals the impact climate change on this tree.

      Reply
    • Dave Person

       /  October 15, 2016

      Hi,
      Much of the initial work on yellow cedar (which is more closely related to cypress than cedars) was done by USFS folks I know well. The irony is that yellow cedar is being logged on federal and native corporation lands in SE Alaska because it is very valuable, particularly in Asia. It is essentially being mined and you and I pay for the mining by subsidizing logging jobs on federal lands (https://gsacc.net/issues/tongass-timber-economics-101/).

      dave

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  October 16, 2016

        It has been going on for centuries
        http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2013/01/29/whispers-from-the-ghosting-trees/

        Whispers from the Ghosting Trees

        A guest post by Gail Zawacki, who blogs at Wit’s End.

        While we hustle busily through the necessities of our lives, wrapped up in our daily preoccupations – our obligations to our families, our jobs, and our dreams – at the same time all around the world, trees are silently expiring. For those who take the time to look, we can see that the forests are being transformed before our helpless and incredulous gaze into spectral mausoleums, as even the most ancient living wood is consumed by a raging tsunami of pathogens unprecedented in scale and virulence. What has instigated this global explosion of lethal insects, disease and fungus, which is decimating swathes of trees across ravines and mountains, invading city streets and wilderness, rampaging through parks and suburban backyards? What would we hear the trees saying if we understood the language of their injured foliage, if we could discern the message in their tortured splintered branches?

        There is a long history of studying the mechanisms by which pollution damages plantlife, dating back to at least the 17th century. A sampling can be found on the DeadTrees…DyingForests webpage, taken from Imperial College Professor J.N. Bell’s compendium “Air Pollution and Plant Life” (2nd edition, published in 2002):

        “In 1661, the English diarist, John Evelyn, published his famous treatise, Fumifugium: Or the Inconvenience of the Aer and Smoake of London Dissipated, in which he described the contemporary air pollution problems in the English capital, making recommendations for their amelioration.”

        Reply
  29. Been missing your emails, thanks Robert!

    Reply
  30. Cate

     /  October 13, 2016

    Musical interlude time. The winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature 2016. Who knew? We knew. We always knew.🙂

    Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  October 13, 2016

    Way off topic, my friends latest piece of work –

    Reply
  32. More climate activism:

    Reply
  33. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    Reply
  34. June

     /  October 13, 2016

    Here in Maine, many people in the southern part of the state have seen their wells run dry. Well drillers are working seven days a week and still have a big backlog. Local water districts are also experiencing problems, and now the state Public Utilities Commission is considering the need for a statewide water supply plan. “The agency is surveying 153 utilities on the impact of below-normal rainfall and checking if conservation by the districts is adequate.”

    Interactive map: as rainfall lags, watch drought spread across New England

    http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/29/interactive-map-as-rainfall-lags-drought-spreads-across-new-england/

    Reply
    • No problem, just get LePage to declare that it’s all a hoax spread by illegal immigrants.

      Reply
      • June

         /  October 13, 2016

        Don’t get me started on LePage!! It’s so embarrassing to have such a crude, bigoted, ignorant person as our governor. For those people who are thinking about voting for a third party candidate, let this be a warning. He was elected both times only because there was a third party candidate who drew more voters away from the Democratic candidate than the Republican. And of course he is trying to hinder renewable energy efforts in the state.
        Sorry for the rant…I got started.

        Reply
  35. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    About time. We can now be carried to our grave without emitting carbon and other pollutants. Modified Tesla hearse.

    Reply
  36. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    While covering this storm for Washington State this weekend don’t forget what is on the ballot for Nov. 8th. A Climate friendly Tax:
    https://yeson732.org/
    Makes taxes more fair and promotes cleaner energy with four bold steps.

    Cut the sales tax by 1%
    Fund a tax rebate for working families
    Provide a tax credit of up to $1,500 a year for 460,000 low-income households.
    Reduce the B&O tax on manufacturing
    Keep good, living-wage manufacturing jobs in Washington.
    Add a tax to fossil fuels

    Pay for the tax cuts and tax the right thing – pollution.

    Reply
  37. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    Check out the Western Pacific and Alaska for next week:
    https://www.ventusky.com/?p=41.7;7.9;3&l=wind&t=20161019/06&m=gem

    Reply
  38. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    On Tuesday, climate activists broke through fences and cut locks and chains simultaneously in several states and simply turned the pipelines off.
    All it took was a pair of bolt cutters and the elbow grease of a few climate activists to carry out an audacious act of sabotage on North America’s massive oil and gas pipeline system.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-canada-pipelines-vulnerabilities-idUSKCN12C0BK

    Reply
  39. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    Reply
  40. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    “Bermudan roofs are slate tiles coated in a limestone slurry. Makes roof monolithic & very resilient to high wind.”

    Reply
  41. JPL

     /  October 13, 2016

    Starting to look like the Saturday storm may bomb out on us here in Washington. Pretty gnarley winds forecast. I may be about to find out well my solar panels are attached to my roof!

    John

    Reply
  42. Reply
  43. Cate

     /  October 13, 2016

    OT but hey.

    “You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.”

    Bob sings about weather more than any other song-writer.🙂

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3151652/Pop-s-weather-obsessed-star-answer-blowing-wind.html

    Reply
    • JPL

       /  October 13, 2016

      These days it’s more and more like ‘buckets of rain, buckets of tears, got all them buckets coming out of my ears…’ Maybe that’s the tune going through the head of my smiling Pacific Ocean psychedelic atmospheric river clown, upthread a few posts!

      Reply
  44. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    Nothing happening up here. Move along folks.

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  October 13, 2016

      Scary heat up there.

      Here are the daily mean temps from the DMI. Click previous years on this graph to compare just how far off the beaten track 2016 is meandering.

      http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

      Reply
      • marcel_g

         /  October 14, 2016

        There are no other years that come anywhere close to this. It’s gobsmacking. One of the earth’s two air conditioners will soon be defunct.😦

        Reply
  45. Greg

     /  October 13, 2016

    Hurricane Matthew now dumping its hot waters on Iceland. Video.
    http://www.mbl.is/frettir/sjonvarp/176125/

    Reply
  46. 0535 PST PDX cheers.
    One of you in mb might check press. in GOA near AK.
    windyty.com @ 29.06 inHg. in a smallish loe detached from the larger one.
    Big deal?
    DT inHg🙂

    Reply
  47. June

     /  October 14, 2016

    From the latest ENSO Diagnostic discussion. La Niña may be back on.

    La Niña is favored to develop (~70% chance) during the Northern Hemisphere fall 2016 and slightly favored to persist (~55% chance) during winter 2016-17

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_disc_oct2016/ensodisc.shtml

    Reply
  48. Vic

     /  October 14, 2016

    Australian state and federal governments have decided not to fund a scientific examination of the mass mangrove die-off in the Gulf of Carpenteria earlier this year. Why spend tax payers dollars on investigating an entirely unprecedented mass ecological collapse when instead you could use that money to help fund tax cuts to multi-national corporations?

    International mangrove expert Dr Norm Duke — who described the scene as the most “dramatic, pronounced extreme level of dieback” he’d ever seen — admitted a lack of funding had prevented him from returning to the site since he surveyed more than 7,500 hectares of dead mangroves in June.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-10/prawn-fleet-seeks-answers-on-unexplained-mangrove-dieback/7919374

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  October 14, 2016

      Vic, our denialist Abbott regime, temporarily fronted by the ludicrous Malcolm Turnbull, is probably just tired of denying every ecological disaster, in line with Murdoch MSM policy. So best just pretend it’s not happening. The MSM ‘coverage’ of anthropogenic climate destabilisation has dropped away to near zero and the ABC had a number of suspiciously similar stories the other day celebrating the recent rise in coal prices. Happy days are here again. The sheer depth of the stupefaction makes the famous ‘boiling frogs’ look hyper-alert and vigilant in comparison.

      Reply
      • Vic

         /  October 14, 2016

        Another accurate summation Mulga. I too noticed the ABC’s recent coal spruiking and how I had to read past the headline and deep into the article to find out they were talking about coking coal. And that pales into insignificance compared to the Orwellian level stunt they’re still pulling on SA’s windfarms. I don’t know how those people sleep at night. They don’t deserve to sleep at night.

        Reply
  49. Vic

     /  October 14, 2016

    Massive bushfire burning in the Kimberly region of Western Australia. More than one million hectares have burnt in the last two weeks with the fire front now around 200 kilometres long and growing.

    “…it’s sort of incomprehensible how much country’s been burnt … at times from horizon to horizon in every direction it’s just burnt ground,” .

    Reply
  50. Vic

     /  October 14, 2016

    BP has announced it will not proceed with plans for exploration drilling in the Great Australian Bight, offshore South Australia.

    BP spokesperson Claire Fitzpatrick :
    “We have looked long and hard at our exploration plans for the Great Australian Bight, but in the current external environment, we will only pursue frontier exploration opportunities if they are competitive and aligned to our strategic goals,”.

    Reply
  51. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Going to be toasty warm on this continent next week. Who needs Autumn?

    Reply
  52. Extraterrestrial impact preceded ancient global warming event. October 13, 2016.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161013141210.htm
    Summary:
    A comet strike may have triggered the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a rapid warming of Earth caused by an accumulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide 56 million years ago, which offers analogs to global warming today.

    Schaller was searching for fossilized remains of Foraminifera, a tiny organism that produces a shell, when he first noticed a microtektite in the sediment he was examining. Although it is common for researchers to search for fossilized remains in PETM sediments, microtektites have not been previously detected. Schaller and his team theorize this is because microtektites are typically dark in color, and do not stand out on the black sorting tray researchers use to search for light-colored fossilized remains. Once Schaller noticed the first microtektite, the researchers switched to a white sorting tray, and began to find more.

    As Schaller tells it, the discovery of microtektites was “completely by accident.” Ordinarily, the team passes samples through sieves of various sizes, to isolate samples most likely to contain forams. The tektites, which are smaller than most forams, would have been largely removed in this process.

    “We were having lousy luck looking for forams, and I was frustrated. I went to the lab and dumped a sample on the sorting tray without sieving it, and there it was,” Schaller said. “It was a stunning moment. I knew what I was looking at was not normal.”

    Reply
  53. Greg:

     /  October 14, 2016

    Only the first storm hitting the Northwest coast now but look at these wind gusts:

    Reply
  54. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Don’t know how to respond to this Matthew tragedy:

    Reply
  55. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Say goodbye to Barrow, Alaska (sort of)

    Reply
  56. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Wind gusts already over 100 mph (160 kph) in Oregon from the weaker first storm hitting Pacific Northwest:

    Reply
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  58. Kevin Jones

     /  October 14, 2016

    “Jeff Master’s WunderBlog is no more.” “….we are delighted to announce that we are now the Category 6 blog!” –Jeff Masters and Bob Henson

    Reply
  59. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Many were appalled by the Know-Nothings. Abraham Lincoln expressed his own disgust with the political party in a private letter to Joshua Speed written in August 24, 1855. Lincoln never publicly attacked the Know Nothings, whose votes he needed:
    I am not a Know-Nothing – that is certain. How could I be? How can any one who abhors the oppression of negroes, be in favor of degrading classes of white people? Our progress in degeneracy appears to me to be pretty rapid. As a nation, we began by declaring that ‘all men are created equal.’ We now practically read it ‘all men are created equal, except negroes.’ When the Know-Nothings get control, it will read ‘all men are created equals, except negroes and foreigners and Catholics.’ When it comes to that I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty – to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.[37]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Know_Nothing

    Reply
  60. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    SNPP/VIIRS
    2016/285
    10/11/2016
    16:25 UTC
    Fires in eastern Brazil

    Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 14, 2016

        For some reason the satellite passes over South America are rather hard to catch. ( It ain’t as big as Russia) . I posted a story here about coffee production crashing in this very region , our friend in Brazil filled in the details, of why this blunder is so bad.

        Now, as the sun moves South the fire season follows. The only good thing is that the Russian fires seem to have laid down, but the cloud deck has been in place for many days.

        Reply
        • Horrible. On Earth Nullschool there are some intense areas with CO levels of 2916 ppb. An industrial like haze over nearly the whole country. We have some sort of rolling fire season.

  61. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    MIAMI HERALD EDITORIAL BOARD
    In the long, long list of reasons that Hillary Clinton would be a far better president than Donald Trump, the world of difference on climate change is near the top.

    And this must be of great significance to Floridians.

    If voters had any doubt about what’s at stake, what the candidates said at opposite ends of Florida should crystallize it.

    Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/editorials/article108149502.html#storylink=cpy

    Reply
  62. Cate

     /  October 14, 2016

    Q+A summary of Dr Rahmstorf’s recent presentation on the AMOC—“the Gulf Stream slowdown and the Atlantic cold blob”— at the international Arctic Circle Assembly in Reykjavik last week. A long read but a good one–focused, detailed, and thorough.

    http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2016/10/q-a-about-the-gulf-stream-system-slowdown-and-the-atlantic-cold-blob/

    Reply
  63. A metaphor headline fcr AGW? Wow.Sign of the ‘times’
    No link (FoxN!
    BOSTON – The domestic disturbance that Boston police were responding to when two veteran officers were shot and wounded may have started as an argument over the thermostat, police said.

    Reply
  64. Reply
  65. Robert

     /  October 14, 2016

    Has anyone seen the global temperature anomaly number for September, 2016? It is usually out by this time of the month for the previous month. Maybe I skipped over it?

    Reply
  66. Does anyone know what is the September, 2016 global temperature anomaly?

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 14, 2016

      Robert. The Japan Meteorological Agency just came in with Sept. ’16 second warmest September on record. If NASA follows similarly they would have it above Sept ’15 and below Sept. ’14. (’14 just beat ’15 as warmest Sept. to date by their accounting,)

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 14, 2016

      Look for NOAA Global numbers around the 17th.

      Reply
  67. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Capital Weather Gang
    Pacific Northwest battered by 100 mph winds, braces for even stronger windstorm Saturday

    A powerhouse storm slammed into the Pacific Northwest Thursday night and Friday morning, uncorking wind gusts of up to 80 to 100 mph and half a foot of rain. An even stronger storm, traced to a Super Typhoon in the western Pacific Ocean, is forecast to hammer the region Saturday.

    Saturday’s storm could be the strongest in a decade according to the National Weather Service office in Seattle, which has posted high wind watches for the region. Winds may gust over 60 mph in Seattle and even higher along the coast in both Oregon and Washington.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2016/10/14/pacific-northwest-battered-by-100-mph-winds-braces-for-even-stronger-windstorm-saturday/

    Reply
  68. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Tornado now confirmed in Oregon as part of this weekend’s storms. Oregon is nearly ranked last for tornado states (46) with no history of deaths.

    Reply
  69. Greg

     /  October 14, 2016

    Oh boy. If this is what it takes to promote electric…

    Reply
  70. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Haiti storm peril exposes climate burden in poor nations

    Matthew’s devastation of Haiti is an example of what climate experts see as the disproportionate burden that global warming can have on poor, unprepared communities. Phenomena like extreme weather events, sea-level rise, coastal erosion and salinity intrusion tend to effect marginalized people more, they say.

    According to the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, the countries that are most vulnerable to climate change include Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan — none of which has the infrastructure and financial resources to adequately combat the issue. Haiti is the 23rd most vulnerable country on the list.

    “If you look at the disasters in the ’80s and ’90s, there are several factors that predict a larger impact in developing countries — larger death tolls, larger infrastructure damage and longer recovery rates,” said Beth Caniglia, director of the Sustainable Economic and Enterprise Development Center at Regis University’s College of Business and Economics.

    Link

    Reply
  71. marianne

     /  October 14, 2016

    It’s not looking too goosfor Svalbard either; unfortunately not all is translated in the english version of the norwegian weather forecast: http://www.yr.no/place/Norway/Svalbard/Longyearbyen/?spr=eng
    but the warning goes something like this “OBS-forecast warning for Spitsbergen: Friday and Saturday expects locally large amounts of precipitation, 30-35 mm for the whole period. Largest precipitation intensity in Longyearbyen is expected between Friday 17.00 and saturday lørdag 05.00 with ca 20-25 mm. Risk of water off the tracks, local flooding, small landslides and debris flows in steep terrain. The Obs-warning is made by MET in in consultation with NVE. See sysselmannen.no”

    Reply
  72. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Bay Fog @ Cat 6 has really interesting sat shot at comment # 47

    Outflow from developing Typhoon Sarika is entraining into the same jet that captured Songda, keeping the tropical moisture tap open across the Pacific.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/bermuda-endures-direct-hit-from-nicole-fierce-winds-in-store-for-paci

    Reply
  73. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Reply
  74. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Another history lesson –

    How Joseph McCarthy henchman Roy Cohn became Donald Trump’s mentor.

    Roy Cohn, the lurking legal hit man for red-baiting Sen. Joe McCarthy, whose reign of televised intimidation in the 1950s has become synonymous with demagoguery, fear-mongering and character assassination. In the formative years of Donald Trump’s career, when he went from a rich kid working for his real estate-developing father to a top-line dealmaker in his own right, Cohn was one of the most powerful influences and helpful contacts in Trump’s life.

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/04/donald-trump-roy-cohn-mentor-joseph-mccarthy-213799#ixzz4N6L2yNP6

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 14, 2016

      Over a 13-year-period, ending shortly before Cohn’s death in 1986, Cohn brought his say-anything, win-at-all-costs style to all of Trump’s most notable legal and business deals. Interviews with people who knew both men at the time say the relationship ran deeper than that—that Cohn’s philosophy shaped the real estate mogul’s worldview and the belligerent public persona visible in Trump’s presidential campaign.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 14, 2016

        The ghost of Sen. Joe McCarthy, occupies Trumps soul.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  October 14, 2016

          By the 1970s, when Trump was looking to establish his reputation in Manhattan, the elder Cohn had long before remade himself as the ultimate New York power lawyer, whose clientele included politicians, financiers and mob bosses. Cohn engineered the combative response to the Department of Justice’s suit alleging racial discrimination at the Trumps’ many rental properties in Brooklyn and Queens. He brokered the gargantuan tax abatements and the mob-tied concrete work that made the Grand Hyatt hotel and Trump Tower projects. He wrote the cold-hearted prenuptial agreement before the first of his three marriages and filed the headline-generating antitrust suit against the National Football League. To all of these deals, Cohn brought his political connections, his public posturing and a simple credo: Always attack, never apologize.

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  October 15, 2016

          I well remember Cohn ‘immortalised’ in ‘Angels in America’, by Tony Kushner. Not a sympathetic portrait.

  75. http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/nepac/h5-loop-wv.html On the far west side of this image–are those systems trying to combine?

    Reply
  76. – My friends. Every one.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 14, 2016

      We all love you DT.
      It’s a butcher’s world. And we all know it. You and I would have died like a boot if the web came 10 years later. Keep the bit in your teeth.

      Reply
  77. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    There is much talk of how climate change isn’t getting the attention it needs this cycle, and I agree. But, if Clinton would send Al Gore into North Carolina a week before the vote. well there’s yer Huckleberry .

    Reply
  78. coloradobob

     /  October 14, 2016

    Trump, in the end, turned some of that cold calculation on his teacher, severing his professional ties to Cohn when he learned his lawyer was dying of AIDS.

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/04/donald-trump-roy-cohn-mentor-joseph-mccarthy-213799#ixzz4N6fHsaed

    Reply
  79. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    The ghost of a drunken senator from the 50’s still hangs over us. The rot of the Republican Party has been spreading for a very long time.

    Vote, volunteer to work, get out the vote. It’s not just America.

    The fate of the Earth hangs in the balance.

    Reply
    • Marcusblanc

       /  October 15, 2016

      Fine words CB.

      As a Brit, I would advise all Americans that being a global laughing stock is not remotely funny, and we know all about that right now.

      I’m not that in love with Hilary, but she is a political giant compared to that horrible little man. The vote for Potus means a lot to the citizens of planet earth. Don’t take the result for granted, like we did with Brexit.

      As Bob says, it’s not just about the USA.

      Reply
  80. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    More history –

    He became Donald’s mentor, his constant adviser on every significant aspect of his business and personal life.”

    That December, representing the Trumps in United States v. Fred C. Trump, Donald Trump and Trump Management, Inc., Cohn filed a $100-million countersuit against the federal government, deriding the charges as “irresponsible” and “baseless.”
    The judge dismissed it quickly as “wasting time and paper.”
    The back-and-forth launched more than a year and a half of bluster and stalling and bullying—and ultimately settling. But in affidavits, motions and hearings in court, Cohn accused the DOJ and the assisting FBI of “Gestapo-like tactics.” He labeled their investigators “undercover agents” and “storm troopers.” Cohn called the head of DOJ down in Washington and attempted to get him to censure one of the lead staffers.
    The judge called all of it “totally unfounded.”

    Reply
  81. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    I post all this crap, because if we don’t turn out the vote , our discussions here mean zero.

    Get the bit in your teeth folks. If you do your a Daisy.

    Reply
  82. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    One last thing tonight.
    To see the Republican nominee roasted over sex. Even before the election. Makes my heart fly. What a bit of Karma. What goes around , comes around.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 15, 2016

      I’m thinking of all that crap they’ve throw up . The “The Values Voters Summit” . Our last man, lusted over an 11 year old girl on an escalator.

      If one thing rings true. The values of the right are dead.

      Reply
  83. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    VOTE, VOTE, we get he court back.

    Reply
  84. coloradobob

     /  October 15, 2016

    The Goldwater people have been moving on us since 1964.
    Now is chance to drive stake in their rotten hearts.

    VOTE.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 15, 2016

      Time to drive a stake in Scalia’s rotten fucking liver.

      VOTE.

      Reply
  85. Jay M

     /  October 15, 2016


    juicy storm passed through, 2″+ reported nearby
    Saturday we’ll see if we get the real pineapple express.

    Reply
    • We gonna’ see coconuts and breadfruit too….🙂

      Reply
      • Jay M

         /  October 15, 2016

        6″ in 2 days on a nearby gauge, not too shabby. Warm outside this evening, high sixties so I’ll call the pineapple. Should be more rain this evening.

        Reply
        • – Yeah, I’ve seen the P-apple in action in BC 20 miles inland Fraser Valley km inland circa 1978.
          -3 of days of cold snow followed 1.5 of very cold dry high — then bang — the high backs off to the NE — then in about 12 hrs just past dinner time comes 50-60 mph ocean scented tropical air out of the SW. You could smell the damn ocean. I was running around the yard stoked.
          Neat, eh?

        • ‘I was running around the yard — in shirt sleeves — after turning off the still hot furnace.’
          DT

        • – Oh Yeah II, though totally novice, I was watching my fairly good quality barometer drop in pressure as the above took place — and I just stood rapt and looked up trying to imagine what was going on above me.

          It was like taking the first steep hill on a roller coaster in the dark — then sensing rapid sloping descent — but my body (and house) was stationary while all changed around me.

          I suppose I was also purposely mindful engaged — and glad to have the opportunity to experience this exhibition of atmosphere.

          DT

  86. Notes from an Unprecedented PacRegion DT: Ha.
    Thinking of the many months ago hurricanes arching up to Hawaii.
    El Nino rains hitting above SoCal Bight.
    Numerous tornadoes PNW/OR
    Watch out BC,Van.
    HYDRO-POWER WRIT LARGE: raging megaton slab rivers of atmospheric moisture and WIND — propelled by E=mc2 as earthly carbon.

    – 2010-2012 Santa Barbara. Ca. with a film of black soot.
    “They say, ‘it’s only carbon.’ Or, “We can’t regulate, bad news”.
    – Of this, I swear.
    DT
    TALLY HO….

    Ps I lv hospital Sat. A-OK

    Reply
  87. Andy_in_SD

     /  October 15, 2016

    Forest fires in Lake Tahoe at this time of year?

    19 Homes Destroyed In Lake Tahoe Wind-Whipped Wildfires

    http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2016/10/14/wind-whipped-wildfire-out-of-control-in-tahoe/

    Reply
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  94. Overheard on WChnl re PNW COASTAL . tornadoes: ‘More like USA plains…

    DT: ‘ KANSAS came to OREGON via AGW. #EXXONKNEW.

    – Also: A closed low — in close at BC/WA. Straight of Juan de Fuca may be a wild POV.

    – Going home today sometime — hope to beat weather for trip there via cab.
    CHEERS/TALLY HO
    DT

    Reply
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  97. This Hamptons (Long Island, NY) potato farmer has found a way to keep the family farm. Because of its highly desirable location, the article says he could sell the very pricey land today for about $100M. But doing so would not allow him to keep the farm in the family, where it’s been for generations, and continuing to sell potatoes won’t provide enough to pay the inheritance tax he’ll face when he passes the farm to his heirs. The solution? Instead of selling the potatoes, make high-end vodka from them.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/nyregion/in-sagaponack-betting-the-farm-on-boutique-vodka.html

    Sounds like it could be a sensible financial plan, and I’m all for the locavore movement. Except the town they’re in – Sagaponack – will be partially under water at some point fairly soon, and the east end of Long Island could be pretty stormy this century, so eventually the land will be worthless (before it disappears entirely). To put it another way, I’d take the $100M right now instead of door number 1.😉

    I support any attempt at long-term planning, in general; that’s precisely what we need right now. But I think this particular case illustrates the importance of starting with accurate assumptions. It also shows how some people remain utterly clueless about what’s coming.

    Reply
  98. 11:25 PST PDX Prrepping for hospt discharge.

    WX A bit of rain
    can see hosptl changing onfused windsock of helipad –it shoulld be flat out straight within the hour.

    Reply
  99. Perhaps we should archive a copy of this, and its predecessor, somewhere safe. Maybe the Moon?

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  October 15, 2016

      It’s heartbreaking and tragic to think of the beauty and natural wonders that we will be losing in the coming century.

      Reply
  100. Cate

     /  October 15, 2016

    September Arctic sea ice volume 1979-2016. Sourced from PIOMAS.

    http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1269.0;attach=37322;image

    Reply
  101. Cate

     /  October 15, 2016

    Arctic daily mean temp north of 80 for mid-October. Still wandering away in entirely the wrong direction, as if mesmerised, or possessed.

    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

    Reply
  102. Cate

     /  October 15, 2016

    Attn dt and other aerosol watchers, ICYMI. Interesting opinion post yesterday by jai mitchell over at ASIF on diminishing Arctic sea ice extent. Collapse of the polar cell, +8C in the Arctic within 15 years? Anyone care to rate the probability of that, on a scale of 1-10?

    “Great piece on the implication of a low aerosol 400 ppm arctic future: https://www.skepticalscience.com/print.php?n=2845

    I believe that the combination of economic cycle + program reductions in chinese sulfate emissions plus increased atmospheric water vapor from the 2015 ENSO cycle is driving the collapse of the polar cell and a shift into a new state of +8C arctic warmth. This transition will likely be complete within the next 7-14 years with advanced and early arctic sea ice < 1,000,000 km^2 SIE values approaching June 21 around 10 years after that….."

    http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1269.msg91718.html#msg91718

    Reply
  103. – 17:23 PST PDX
    Back at the home station laptop . Fully provisioned with food and health.
    A bit windy but no serious weather — yet.

    – Cheers and thanks to all.
    A double to you, Robert.

    – I educated a few at he hospital. re weather nuances. RN H know to look at the helo-pad wind sock which can be seen from cardiac care unit.
    Otherwise, most unaware and content but show worry when thing hit. Media AMS and talking heads over do everything with multiple repeats with over eager chatter-monkeys in front of large graphics (Which could be useful but…) while CC/AGW is ‘safely’ avoided.
    Too much inbreeding — who knows. }?

    DT

    Reply
  104. Marcusblanc

     /  October 16, 2016

    This is a bit OT, but I’d like to recommend something to everyone, and it relates to some of CB’s comments about political threads that come down through the decades.

    A man who’s sublime work has picked up similar themes is British documentary maker Adam Curtis. If you don’t know of his work, he has a very distinctive and unusual style. His new documentary is released on the BBC iplayer in the UK today, this is the trailer.

    I cannot recommend his work highly enough. Quite a few of his documentaries are available on Youtube, but they are at their best on a big TV. Bitter Lake, or The Century of the Self are good places to start.

    Sorry for straying so far OT RS, I wont make a habit of it.

    Reply
  105. Griffin

     /  October 16, 2016

    This is a great op-ed in a paper by a doctor out in Western Mass.
    “My mouth was full of hardware last week as my dentist described the plot of the tv series Designated Survivor, which revolves around the destruction of our Capitol by terrorists. Nonetheless I managed to spit out, “But terrorists aren’t the main threat!”
    http://www.masslive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/10/global_warming_is_the_real_thr.html

    Reply
  106. wili

     /  October 16, 2016

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/16/vietnam-floods-deaths-reported-tens-of-thousands-of-homes-destroyed

    “Vietnam floods: deaths reported, tens of thousands of homes destroyed “

    Reply
  107. 05:17 UTC
    Quite a ‘show’ here.

    Reply
  108. Reply
  109. Abel Adamski

     /  October 16, 2016

    Meanwhile in the Great Southern Oceans, it is not just the die of of the great kelp forests in Australia’s Northwest, but also down the bottom end.
    http://www.themercury.com.au/lifestyle/tasweekend-tassies-disappearing-underwater-forests/news-story/a62e76e745b46e6a69caadac50181bcc

    TasWeekend: Tassie’s disappearing underwater forests
    KARL MATHIESEN, Mercury
    October 16, 2016 10:00am

    IT was one of the world’s great marine ecosystems. Stretching hundreds of kilometres along the eastern coastline of Australia, it provided shelter to a multitude of fish, algae and crustaceans and for many divers was considered a must-see spectacular. But this year a massive underwater heatwave smashed it into oblivion.

    This is not the Great Barrier Reef, but its southern equivalent; an underwater jungle that in the middle of last century ran the length of Tasmania’s East Coast. The trees, often more than 30m tall, were Macrocystis pyrifera – giant kelp – the world’s largest seaweed.
    .
    .
    .
    Baron has dived on the East Coast since the 1970s. Back then it was impossible to get a boat through the thick mats of canopy it left floating on the surface. “All those years ago it was everywhere. I mean, it was common as muck,” he says. “Now it’s just gone.” It has been an extraordinarily rapid decline. But unlike deforestation on land, these forests are neither being cut nor burnt. They are being starved.

    The Australian arm of the huge gyre that moves water around the Pacific is the East Australian Current (well known to Finding Nemo fans as ‘the EAC dude’). Traditionally, it pushed warm water south along the coast of the mainland before turning east towards South America long before it hit Tasmania.

    But in recent decades, something has gone awry. The warming global climate has discombobulated this once-reliable system. Huge eddies of ‘hot’, nutrient-poor water keep spinning down towards the Tasmanian coast.

    Because of this, eastern Tasmania has some of the fastest-warming ocean water on Earth, rising at two to three times faster than the global average. Over the past two decades, says Baron, the ocean has been getting “more and more rapidly mad”. Tiger sharks, marlin and Queensland grouper have all been recorded in places where they have no right to be. This February, one tuna fisherman caught 500 southern bluefin before the normal season even began.

    Reply
  110. Reply
  111. Reply
    • Click on the image thru a couple of layers — the a full image with name of pub will appear.

      Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 16, 2016

      Beautiful, dt. Just beautiful. Mr. Peabody knew! 1912.

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  October 16, 2016

        Too bad this reporter didn’t move to Oz. It’s been said that when a New Zealander moves to Australia the intelligence of both countries improves!

        Reply
    • This kind of thing is why I read this blog. DT how did you ever find that?

      Reply
      • – Just a variety of sources like variations on a theme — see what falls in…:)

        Reply
      • I still need to hone in the ‘newspaper/journal’ — ’10 cents per annum in advance’.
        I like the old type face used too.

        Reply
        • Marcusblanc

           /  October 16, 2016

          Brilliant find, thank you.

        • Tom Bond

           /  October 16, 2016

          10 shillings per annum

        • lesliegraham1

           /  October 17, 2016

          10 bob was a week’s wages for a maid in 1912.
          I know this because that’s what my Mother used to earn back then as a 14 year old kitchen maid in a ‘big house’.
          Actually, to be accurate, it was ‘ten and six’ – ten shillings and sixpence or half a guinea.
          The extra sixpence was for the girl to keep as pocket money as it was automatically assumed that the ten shillings would go into family housekeeping budget in those days. That was also around about the time my Dad caught polio and his 3 year old sister died from diptheria.
          Kids these days don’t know they’re born.
          Yet.

    • Abel Adamski

       /  October 16, 2016

      From the National archives, the original.
      Note Braidwood was a Coal Company and a coal town
      http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100645214
      The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954)
      Wed 17 Jul 1912
      Page 4
      COAL CONSUMPTION AFFECTING CLIMATE.

      The furnaces of the world are now
      burning about 2,000,000,000 tons of
      coal a year. When this is burned,
      uniting with oxygen, it adds about
      7,000,000,000 tons of carbon dioxide
      to the atmosphere yearly. This tends
      to make the air a more effective blan-
      ket for the earth and to raise its
      temperature. The effect may be con-
      siderable in a few centuries.

      That was a century ago before oil, gas and electricity, when coal consumption also was lower

      Reply
      • – Nice connection to ‘trove’. Is it a usual haunt, or did you sleuth it out.?
        Are there more like this out there – wherever?

        ‘…. a century ago before oil, gas and electricity…’
        See, everyone knew — since DAY ONE.
        Think about that also meaning ‘DAY ONE of Denial’

        Meaning that it was also relatively common knowledge that any natural or biotic system dominated by the burning of fossil fuels would break down and cease to function.
        This has been a running thread throughout my digging into the world of anthropogenic air/atmospheric pollution.
        For me, the daily ‘why’ of the societal ‘anthro’ — is more unsettling than the purely physical aspects of AGW.

        It’s good to talk these sort of thing.🙂

        Reply
  112. Colorado fire fears Oct. 2016
    Tahoe just had problems…

    Reply
  113. OT again, but there is an awful lot of cross-equatorial wind flow at the level of the jet stream, 250 hPa, between 30N and 30S.
    https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/250hPa/orthographic=132.52,8.13,586/loc=152.221,5.061

    Reply
  114. Xerxes Zorgon

     /  October 16, 2016

    Apocalypse Now: “At least 15 people have died in central Vietnam after torrential rains caused severe flooding across four central provinces and displaced thousands of people.

    The heavy downpours, which began last Wednesday and have barely eased since, have brought amounts of rain ranging from 300 to 900mm over the past few days, according to the Department of Natural Disaster Prevention and Control.”

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/10/deadly-floods-inundate-central-vietnam-161016102856637.html

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 16, 2016

      “The previous 24 hours saw a massive 526 mm, giving a total 961 mm of rain in just 24 hours.” 20.7 inches in 24 hours. 37.8 inches in two days. The world is getting into hot water.

      Reply
      • Kevin Jones

         /  October 16, 2016

        37.8 inches of rain in 48 hours would require a (16′ average) canoe to have 5,400 lbs. of water bailed out of it.

        Reply
        • Xerxes Zorgon

           /  October 16, 2016

          That’s about 1.8 Priuses in your canoe!

    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  115. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    EXTENDED OUTLOOK:
    48 HRS, VALID AT:
    181200Z — 15.6N 129.9E
    MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 140 KT, GUSTS 170 KT

    Reply
  116. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    24 HRS, VALID AT:
    171200Z — 17.6N 112.4E
    MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 090 KT, GUSTS 110 KT

    Reply
  117. AK –

    Reply
  118. Reply
  119. No surprise here:

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 16, 2016

      Guv’s twitter has his office saying “….be weary of back roads.”

      Reply
  120. Te he results are iIN

    Reply
  121. Cate

     /  October 16, 2016

    https://www.aer.com/science-research/climate-weather/arctic-oscillation

    Alas, as I have no idea what a geopotential height is, my attempts to make sense of this piece are severely hobbled, but this guy has a lot to say about the coming winter.

    RS, for your attention, ICYMI. 🙂

    Reply
    • High geopotential heights = high pressure, high temperature and a taller atmosphere as a result. Basically what they’re saying is that it’s much warmer than normal in the Arctic right now, the atmosphere there is taller as a result and we’re getting these various knock-on weather impacts in the middle latitudes as a result (such as cooler than normal conditions in Europe and Asia as a heatwave is building of the US East that will push temperatures into the 80s [F]).

      Such extreme warmth in the Arctic leads to high amplitude Jet Stream waves that can tend to generate extreme weather conditions for certain regions. If such warm Arctic conditions continue through winter, the US East Coast, as well as parts of Europe and Asia will see a higher incidence of extreme winter weather events while other areas experience extreme warmth and possible drought conditions.

      Reply
  122. OT but it isn’t raining at the moment in this part of the PacNW, so…DAPL news:

    Filmmaker Faces 45 Years in Prison for Reporting on Dakota Access Protests

    “They threw the book at Deia for being a journalist.”

    http://commondreams.org/news/2016/10/15/filmmaker-faces-45-years-prison-reporting-dakota-access-protests

    At LINK: Deia Schlosberg accepting an Emmy in 2014. (Photo: Danny Moloshok/AP)

    In an ominous sign for press freedom, documentary filmmaker and journalist Deia Schlosberg was arrested and charged with felonies carrying a whopping maximum sentence of up to 45 years in prison—simply for reporting on the ongoing Indigenous protests against fossil fuel infrastructure.

    Schlosberg was arrested in Walhalla, North Dakota on Tuesday for filming activists shutting down a tar sands pipeline, part of a nationwide solidarity action organized on behalf of those battling the Dakota Access Pipeline.

    “The actions of the North Dakota Police force are not just a violation of the climate, but a violation of the constitution.”
    —Josh Fox, Gasland filmmaker

    The filmmaker was held without access to a lawyer for 48 hours, her colleague Josh Fox wrote in the Nation, and her footage was confiscated by the police.

    Schlosberg was then charged Friday with three felonies, the Huffington Post reported: “conspiracy to theft of property, conspiracy to theft of services and conspiracy to tampering with or damaging a public service. Together, the charges carry 45 years in maximum prison sentences.”

    “They have in my view violated the First Amendment,” Fox told the Huffington Post, referring to the state’s Pembina County Sheriff’s Department. “It’s fucking scary, it knocks the wind of your sails, it throws you for a loop. They threw the book at Deia for being a journalist.”

    NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden observed that Schlosberg faces more years in prison than he does for leaking secret documents about the NSA’s mass surveillance program in 2013:

    “Deia isn’t alone,” observed Fox in an op-ed in the Nation. “The arrest of journalists, filmmakers, and others witnessing and reporting on citizen protests against fossil-fuel infrastructure amid climate change is part of a worrisome and growing pattern.”

    Indeed, the news of Schlosberg’s arrest followed Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman announcement earlier this week that she will return to North Dakota to combat charges she faces as a result of reporting on the Dakota Access Pipeline protest last month.

    “Goodman, whose camera crew filmed a private security team attacking peaceful Native American protesters with dogs and pepper spray, faces charges of criminal trespassing—which many have said amounts to an assault on press freedom,” as Common Dreams reported.

    It also emerged late Saturday that a North Dakota state prosecutor has dropped the trespassing charge and is seeking instead to charge Goodman with participating in a “riot,” Democracy Now reported.

    “I came back to North Dakota to fight a trespass charge. They saw that they could never make that charge stick, so now they want to charge me with rioting,” said Goodman. “I wasn’t trespassing, I wasn’t engaging in a riot, I was doing my job as a journalist by covering a violent attack on Native American protesters.”

    A warrant for Goodman’s arrest was issued September 8.

    Meanwhile, actor Shailene Woodley was arrested Monday while live-streaming a prayer action at a Dakota Access construction site. “She was singled out, the police told her, because she was well-known and had 40,000 people watching live on her Facebook page,” Fox wrote. “Other filmmakers shooting protest actions along the pipeline have also been arrested.”

    “Journalism is not a crime; it is a responsibility,” Fox said in a press statement about this pattern of arrests. “The actions of the North Dakota Police force are not just a violation of the climate, but a violation of the constitution.”

    Supporters have created a petition calling on the authorities in North Dakota to drop charges against Schlosberg, Goodman, and other journalists arrested for doing their work and reporting on the protests against Dakota Access.

    Neil Young, Mark Ruffalo, Daryl Hannah, and other celebrities have also signed an open letter to President Barack Obama and North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple, calling on the leaders to intervene and for Schlosberg’s charges to be dropped. The charges were “unfair, unjust, and illegal,” the letter said, according to Reuters.

    “This is not only about reporting on the climate-change movement,” Fox argued in the Nation. “Journalists have also been arrested reporting on Black Lives Matter, the movement for Native rights, and many other important movements the corporate media fails to cover. The First Amendment and the Constitution are at stake in this case. If we lose it, we lose America too.”
    ___________

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 16, 2016

      Damn fine catch there SitS-

      This story needs to be linked all over , by all of us.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 16, 2016

        The Arrest of Journalists and Filmmakers Covering the Dakota Pipeline Is a Threat to Democracy—and the Planet
        Deia Schlosberg, Amy Goodman, and Shailene Woodley are among those who have been arrested while covering demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

        https://www.thenation.com/article/the-arrest-of-journalists-and-filmmakers-covering-the-dakota-pipeline-is-a-threat-to-democracy-and-the-planet/

        Reply
        • Kevin Jones

           /  October 16, 2016

          Any journalist worthy of the name knows that persecution of any journalist anywhere is a grave threat to journalists everywhere. So NYT, CBS, WaPo, LATimes, CNN, NPR, PBS, etc:
          where’s your friggin’ solidarity? Where’s your enlightened self-interest? Last I looked you all did have one or two bona fide journalists, You gonna throw them to the dogs?

        • coloradobob

           /  October 16, 2016

          From the comments on this article –
          To quote Yeats: “Too long a sacrifice can make a stone of the heart.”

        • Good to see some of the larger outlets picking this up. I agree. It might hit the NYT in a few days or weeks. Finally.

      • P.S. Seal and CB
        To date the Sacred Stone Camp has raised $809,692 of $1.0M goal. I don’t think that’s going to do it. I think it will take filling the jails to where they can’t fit anyone else in (not an original suggestion).

        Reply
    • Incredible. Thanks for the update. I don’t remember. Were the tactics as hard-nosed with respect to the protests of Keystone XL?

      Reply
    • We all, as Americans, have a responsibility to protest and stand firmly against the unconstitutional actions by the State of North Dakota against Amy. Merely reporting on one of the most important protests in the history of humankind is not ‘inciting a riot.’

      Reply
    • I believe that this is the petition link:
      http://www.thepetitionsite.com/pt-br/takeaction/918/394/985/

      Don´t know if there are more petitions in other sites.

      Reply
  123. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    How the Attack on Science Is Becoming a Global Contagion
    Assaults on the science behind climate change research and conservation policies are spreading from the U.S. to Europe and beyond. If this wave of “post-fact” thinking triumphs, the world will face a future dominated by pure ideology.

    by christian schwägerl

    The last tweets that British Labor MP Jo Cox sent out into the world were about oceans, fishing, and trawler fleets. The day before her assassination by a right-wing nationalist last June, she shared an article on Twitter about why scientific advice is so important for fisheries policy and how it helps replenish depleted fish stocks. A further tweet showed Cox’s husband and their children in a rubber dinghy on the Thames, taking part in a bizarre symbolic “battle” about Britain’s departure from the European Union.

    Link

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 16, 2016

      This a hell of a good op-ed I urge everyone to read it.

      Reply
    • I think we’ve already entered an age where ideology has dominated the thinking of one political persuasion — the right. It’s sad. But the perspective has become less and less fact-based. Not to say that it didn’t already carry these flaws forward as of the 70s and 80s. The thinking, then, was that the late 1920s economic mindset needed to be brought back, that reliance on fossil fuels needed to be increased, and environmental impacts from bad actors needed to be downplayed. These views, of course, emerged as a kind of politically expedient pandering to monetary interests who were looking for increasing levels of economic dominance and easy/quick profits which sacrificed the long-term. It’s the kind of eat, drink and be merry, who cares about tomorrow mindset of the decadent that has tended to sink civilizations in the past.

      Historians have often wondered how this has happened. But it is pretty clear — ideologies that support and justify the bad behavior and bad actions that result in collapse are developed and adhered to. This is the very definition of calcification resulting in societal insanity.

      On the issue of climate change, it is becoming very, very clear that we absolutely have the means available to rapidly transition away from the ever-more damaging burning of fossil fuels. Renewables are far less expensive than they have ever been, and a number of rich societies are flush with resources. However, the political ideology prevents societies accessing those resources for positive work by enabling both hoarding of those resources into few hands and by enabling the continued destructive exploitation of the environment and the people of the world (as labor) which further empowers bad actors to retain an unhealthy influence and an increasing level of dominance over political systems.

      This is the dictator problem that people often lament when dealing with countries with high levels of inequality. But that problem has been proliferated the world over. We’re basically living in a Neo-Nero era in which the powerful are more empowered to misbehave and cause broader levels of harm. There are some individuals who run counter to this trend. But the trend is, overall, in place and getting worse.

      The solution of course is for governments and groups to reign in the bad actor individuals and corporations through the application of laws and responsible governance. This, of course, would affect the amount of wealth held by individuals around the world but would also greatly increase the prospects of everyone and everything living on Earth. In essence, in order to deal with these problems, groups need to be enabled to act while individuals need to take a back seat. If you’re a person who believes in superman, for example, or god as an individual man, or any other false idol, then this will be a very hard road to hoe. But this kind of thinking — that such supermen exist and that we can somehow all be superman has been ingrained through the past decades. And that’s what we’re facing now. That’s why science is being attacked. People’s internal faerie tales have been threatened, faerie tales that have been tied to their own self-image and self worth and sense of individuality and personal empowerment.

      And when you feel empowered in such a way it becomes very easy to exploit others and to ignore others’ plights and to think that other people or living creatures aren’t worthwhile or worth caring about or worth saving, or to attack those who are producing facts that run against your internal view in which you see yourself as ‘the hero.’

      Reply
  124. Abel Adamski

     /  October 16, 2016

    A reminder.
    https://thinkprogress.org/coal-protesters-shot-by-police-4-killed-fbcf6d2ec29a#.yhbjp5qel
    Bangladeshi police opened fire on a group of protestors Monday, killing at least four, according to local news reports. Thousands of people were charged with assault and vandalism in connection with the demonstration against Chinese-financed coal plants on the country’s southeast coast.

    And the conservatives and Trumpers see those Bangladeshi’s as backward and primitives, scarcely human in fact.
    Yet they are in fact no different, just as brutal and primitive

    Reply
  125. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    My head is spinning this evening over how much that dumpster fire, and I have in common. When he first said, “The system is rigged.” I thought, “welcome to the party jack-ass.”
    Clearly he, and I have two very different views on just where the system is being “rigged”.

    He’s a billionaire, psychopathic, narcissistic, sexual predator. And I’m a burnt out old hippy, with several cases of blunt force trauma to the head.
    When I read the latest from North Dakota, I thought, “at least they aren’t in Brazil, they’d be dead.”

    The quote the great Obi Wan : “There’s a great disturbance in the force.”

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 16, 2016

      “The continued skepticism about climate change is a repudiation of global and empirical thought.”

      Reply
    • I´d very much like to be able to object to that ( “at least they aren’t in Brazil, they’d be dead.” ), but it´s kind of true…

      Reply
  126. Marcusblanc

     /  October 16, 2016

    Prof McGuire has written an article for the Guardian which echoes his Waking the Giant book, giving more recent evidence to support his belief that a geophysical response to CC is likely. As with his book, he downplays this response compared to other CC effects, whilst explaining the mechanisms he expects to deliver a significant response.

    ‘Does this all mean that we are in for a more geologically active future as well as a hotter and meteorologically more violent one? Well, no one is suggesting that we will see a great surge in the number of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. As always, these will be controlled largely by local geological conditions. Where an earthquake fault or volcano is primed and ready to go, however, climate change may provide that extra helping hand that brings forward the timing of a quake or eruption that would eventually have happened anyway.’

    The comments section is a good laugh because even the folks on ‘our’ side of the argument can’t really cope with the concept, largely because of climate wars fatigue imho.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/16/climate-change-triggers-earthquakes-tsunamis-volcanoes

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 16, 2016

      Watch Iceland , and SouthEast Greenland.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  October 17, 2016

        Also, google “Storegga slide” and “Doggerland.”

        It is possible that historical tsunamis around the North Atlantic were triggered by slides/quakes on continental shelves, which in turn had some connection to climate change (methane clathrate guns, anyone?).

        Even here in Newfoundland, the 1929 Burin tidal wave is now thought by some researchers to have been caused by an undersea slide on the continental shelf. There’s a big multi-year study underway in the UK into continental shelves around the North Atlantic and the Atlantic coast of Canada is included in the study.

        This BBC piece is a great intro to the idea and the history.

        http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160323-the-terrifying-tsunami-that-devastated-britain

        Reply
        • Increased risk of slope collapse due to changes in physical forcing on slope systems is an issue due to climate change. Much like melting of glaciers over volcanoes potentially enhancing activity, it’s a geophysical change capable of producing increasing risks for such catastrophic events over long time-scales.

  127. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    A fiction I never wrote –
    Years ago I thought of some Russian ship that would be crossing the new open shipping lanes in the Arctic, there they would encounter an ocean fizzing like a glass of Alka Seltzer. It was clam sea, with no wind. Some seaman on deck would light his smoke. The ship. would go up in flames, and the ocean would just burn from that day forward.

    http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/others/news/n0760-arctic-methane-gas-emission-significantly-increased-since-2014-major-new-research/

    That fiction is melting along with the methane hydrates.

    Reply
  128. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    The Siberian shelf is the largest swallow water formation in the world. It goes off shore hundreds of kilometers from the the current shore. It’s all a permafrost cap on a hydrate substrate. It is waking up. Mr Putin has no idea what is coming. He thinks it’s the old world without the pesky ice. He’s never seen Lone Wati’s warning.

    Reply
    • g. orwell

       /  October 17, 2016

      if we humble commenters are relatively informed on CC, he’s gotta be more so; and probably he doesn’t have what he judges is an appropriate response/action.

      Reply
      • G.orwell (great nick, btw), don´t assume that people are better informed because they´re in a position of authority. Their “dunbar number” of friends may just not have the adequate knowledge.

        Reply
        • Hi umbrios27, Hi coloradobob

          I think Putin wants the revenue from sales of Siberian natural gas. It’s worth something like 10 trillion dollars. He has the resources of the entire Russian academic and intelligence apparatus to draw on – I don’t think we can assume he is ignorant.

          A few years ago, some scientists were claiming that Russia would be a climate change winner, and would actually benefit from climate change. Maybe that’s what he’s counting on. To get to that state, he may be thinking that there will be a rough transition period, and then smoother sailing as climate change ramps up.

          If the permafrost capping the East Siberian Arctic Shelf melts, though, and lets the free gas underneath it loose, this may tip the planet irrevocably into a methane catastrophe and general oceanic hydrate dissociation. This could kill off most of humanity, I think. If he thinks Russia will be an overall winner from climate change I think he is wrong. There will be no winners, I think.

        • Here is a paper that claimed there would be climate change winners:

          The Political Economy of Climate Change Winners (2012)

          http://discoverarchive.vanderbilt.edu/bitstream/handle/1803/6546/The%20Political%20Economy.pdf?sequence=1

          “13. A number of the national scale IAM studies show North America, Russia, and Eastern Europe as best off under a range of climate change scenarios, with small to substantial increases in GDP, and Africa, parts of Asia, and small island states as worst off. See RICHARD S.J. TOL, AN ANALYSIS OF MITIGATION AS A RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE 6, 10 (2009) (chart based on synthesis of a dozen IAM studies); Asbjørn Aaheim et al., Impacts and Adaptation to Climate Change in European Economies, 22 GLOBAL ENVTL. CHANGE 959, 964–67 (2012) (concluding that Eastern European nations will see a rise in GDP under a scenario of a global mean temperature rise of 2°C); Robert Mendelsohn et al., Country-Specific Market Impacts of Climate Change, 45 CLIMATIC CHANGE 553, 561–65 (2000) (“Given these regional results, it is no surprise that the impacts of global warming are not felt uniformly across countries.”).”

          Probably none of these papers considered potential methane releases, I think.

  129. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    One other item on this thread, the collapse of kelp forest off East Tasmania. That makes 4 systems . around Australia that have crashed . The mango forest in the North, the Great Reef, the collapse of kelp forest on the West coast , And now this .

    All just BOOM. Gone or crippled . In just a blink of our eyes.

    We are the comet.

    Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  October 17, 2016

      Bob, link to anything about the mango forests? I was aware of the kelp and the GB reef but can’t find anything about the mango forests being in trouble.

      Reply
  130. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    Something to sooth our despair.
    HOT CHOCOLATE – Everyone’s A Winner

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 16, 2016

      Something to sooth our despair.

      A bandaid on sucking chest wound.

      Reply
  131. coloradobob

     /  October 16, 2016

    The Soda Pop Kid’s brief reunion with Wild Bill Hickok

    Reply
  132. coloradobob

     /  October 17, 2016

    Little Big Man – This is us A to Z.

    Reply
  133. Griffin

     /  October 17, 2016

    Outstanding short clip from the king tides in Miami.

    Reply
  134. Reply
  135. Say no more… King Kong’s older brother just showed up.
    Ps this K K’s…is a little quip-trinket I’ve kept for some many years. It feels good to finally use it on a fitting image.

    Reply
  136. – Iraq – Battle for Mosul and the very major Mosul Dam and its water. And the dam’s risk of failing due to design errors. One fixed – now a battle.
    – I’ve been watching the repair situation — and the priorities adjudged and assigned to them by easily distracted humans.
    To me it’s a bit metaphorical of CC via AGW. Failure of this dam would prove catastrophic in impact, and environmentally.

    – VOA: ‘Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has announced the formal start of a military push to drive Islamic State extremists from the northern stronghold city of Mosul.

    The announcement on state television early Monday signals the opening of the largest military operation in that country since U.S. forces left five years ago.
    ###

    Reply
  137. – I’ve referenced this NGS and CAP dilemma before in relation to fates due to AGW.

    Central Arizona Project (CAP) delivers and manages the single largest source of renewable water supplies in the State of Arizona from the Colorado River. Simultaneously, CAP is the largest single end-user of power in the state. The Navajo Generating Station (NGS), located near Lake Powell on the Navajo Reservation, provides more than 90% of the power CAP needs to deliver water.
    -cap-az.com/public/navajo-generating-station

    Reply
    • To wit, to stop coal burning NGS is to turn off a very critical water tap.

      Reply
    • Replacement with a different power source for water provision is certainly possible. That’s one of the reasons we focus on replacement with renewable energy as opposed to simply just shutting everything down which causes its own series of crises. Unfortunately, due to the fact that we are facing an intrenched industry and due to the fact that we need protest action in order to enhance policy, you’ll tend to end up with instances where less than an orderly transition may occur. The point here is that an orderly transition is possible so long as regulatory capture by fossil fuel entities does not occur and so long as communication/marketing/special interest based misinformation by these entities does not muddy the water.

      Reply
    • My wife and I are sending you warm wishes and good thoughts for a happy recovery, DT! Get rest and think happy thoughts. Someone mentioned soup above. Always helpful in my case as well. Though being vegan, I haven’t had the chicken version in years. Best to you!

      Reply
      • Thanks, Robert, and wife🙂.
        All is well here.
        I came out the other side and now feel better than I have for many months with a new health baseline to gladly hold on to.
        The forced air O2 from the recent windy, and ongoing, weather is doing marvels for me.
        Cheers, with renewed vitality,
        DR

        Reply
        • Ps:
          Interesting hospitalization side note — riddle solved.
          I’ve long struggled with a frustrating inability to synch left hand, and fingers, with my right while typing at my laptop keyboard. it’s very hard to keep a sustained and constructive accurate writing rhythm.
          It turns that the blood pressure in my left — is 20-30 pts higher than my nominally dominant right.
          Frustration part of puzzle solved.
          Cheers to that.🙂

        • Great to hear, DT. Take care of yourself.

  138. Kevin Jones

     /  October 17, 2016

    NOAA has Keeling Curve clearly rebounding from seasonal low. Week beginning Oct. 9 in at 3.54 ppm CO2 above weekly value of one year ago. (a rate of 354 ppm/century)

    Reply
  139. Kevin Jones

     /  October 17, 2016

    Well, well. NPR and BBC are reporting on Amy Goodman and the North Dakota pipeline protests. I’m sure the NYT will ‘break’ this news in a week or two.

    Reply
  140. Andy_in_SD

     /  October 17, 2016

    Reply
  141. wili

     /  October 17, 2016

    More evidence that ground level ozone is harmful to plants and humans: http://e360.yale.edu/feature/ground_level_ozone_harming_plants_humans/3044/

    Reply
  142. Kevin Jones

     /  October 17, 2016

    NASA GISS: September 2016 temperature anomaly above 1951-1980 base period: 0.9C. A virtual ‘dead heat’ with record September 2014. (September 2015 came in at 0.79) To put this in some perspective, this so far hottest decade yet has averaged as of last year 0,70C.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 17, 2016

      Making 2016 so far, January-September 1.03C. (Which is exactly 1.3C above avg. for first three decades of the 20th century,

      Reply
      • Which puts us damn close to +1.5° C above pre-industrial.

        As David Wasdell says in one of his video presentations – ‘the hotter it gets, the faster it gets hotter’.

        Reply
  143. Kevin Jones

     /  October 17, 2016

    Gavin Schmidt (Director of GISS) tweets: With data now available through September, 2016 annual record (~1.25 above late 19th C) seems locked in.

    Reply
  144. Not as big as the storms there in the north, but huge for a country that once had no hurricanes and tornados. There was a “meteriological tsunami” (meteriologists are calling it that, I never heard the expression before today) in Santa Catarina yesterday. It destroyed a few cars and buildings, but the worst damage was that a seven year old girl died (she was in a car that was hit by a falling tree). There are also news about a couple that was in a car that was dragged to the seas and lost for at least a while, I´m unsure if they´ve been rescued (news from the radio) or if they´re still missing (news from another radio station).

    Article in Portuguese, striking photos: http://www.jornalmetas.com.br/geral/geral-gaspar/tsunami-meteorol%C3%B3gico-causa-destrui%C3%A7%C3%A3o-no-sul-do-estado-1.1940247

    Santa Catarina was also the state that was hit by the first and the second (and the only two thus far) hurricanes here in Brasil. I wonder if climate change will make that state in a new hurricane prone area.

    Reply
    • The storm tracked further north than expected and stayed mostly out to sea. This limited damages thankfully, although we had 103 mph winds, 30 foot surf, and heavy rains throughout the impacted area. This particular bullet was partially dodged. So we can breathe a sigh of relief for the moment.

      Reply
  145. Reply
  146. Reply
  147. By itself, this headline says alot:

    WEATHER
    Drought hits western North Carolina as eastern NC floods

    Monday, October 17, 2016 10:28AM
    HENDERSONVILLE, N.C.
    – AP

    While eastern North Carolina deals with massive floods, the western part of the state is falling deeper and deeper into drought.

    The U.S. Drought Monitor now has all or parts of seven counties in the far west in a severe drought. Almost everywhere west of Charlotte is reporting drought or abnormally dry conditions.

    The area missed any substantial rains as Hurricane Matthew brushed the state and drenched places around Interstate 95 last weekend.

    Asheville has reported only an inch of rain since Sept. 1.
    ….
    – abc11.com/weather/drought-hits-western-north-carolina-as-east-nc-floods/

    Reply
  148. Reply
  149. Keith Antonysen

     /  October 17, 2016

    Every time further news comes in about climate change it seems to become grimer.
    In Australia deniers are still pushing coal hard, I sent this off to a Tasmanian epaper which publishes articles the normal media is unwilling to present:

    http://tasmaniantimes.com/index.php?%2Fweblog%2Farticle%2Fhow-far-off-is-abrupt-climate-change%2F

    Reply
  150. bostonblorp

     /  October 17, 2016

    One can’t say definitively that climate change killed this 600 year old oak tree but the description of what did it in — “heat stress” followed by 12 hours of intense rain — sure sounds familiar. There’s a sad symbolism to a six-century old giant being unable to take it any more.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/17/nyregion/a-600-year-old-oak-tree-finally-succumbs.html?_r=0

    Reply
  151. June

     /  October 18, 2016

    From Jeff Masters Category 6 blog. It will be interesting to see what happens when it reaches the Arctic.

    Nicole is venturing awfully far north for a hurricane
    Don’t look now, but Hurricane Nicole is making a run for Greenland. Nicole regained hurricane strength on Saturday, the first Atlantic storm to cross the hurricane threshold at least three times in its life since Hurricane Ida in 2009 (thanks to Phil Klotzbach at Colorado State University for this tidbit). Nicole has stubbornly retained its warm-core characteristics well north of the tropics, making it to 41°N as of 5 am EDT Monday. Nicole was heading north-northeast at about 9 mph and should accelerate in that direction. Eventually, Nicole will become a cold-core system, although that transition may happen extremely far to the north. The National Hurricane Center predicts that Nicole will become a post-tropical cyclone by Tuesday. However, a phase-space diagram produced by Robert Hart (Florida State University) for Nicole on Sunday, October 16, suggested that Nicole would remain a warm-core system (though increasingly asymmetric) until Thursday. On Thursday morning, the NHC forecast has Nicole as a post-tropical cyclone located between Greenland and Iceland, less than 70 miles from the Arctic Circle. Even then, Nicole should still be a powerful storm, with a surface pressure below 970 millibars and peak winds on the order of 60 mph. After Nicole finally dissipates somewhere near Greenland, its core of warm, moist air will continue into the Arctic, where the extent of sea ice is at its lowest mid-October level for any year on record except 2007 and 2012.

    Reply
  152. For you, Bob🙂

    Reply
    • climatesignals has an article attached.

      Central Eastern US Heat Wave October 2016

      Mid-October heat breaks records across the eastern US

      Much of the Southern, Central and Eastern United States is experiencing record warmth for mid-October due to heat and humidity associated with an expansive high pressure weather system stretching from Bermuda over the eastern US as well as from winds in the upper atmosphere that are drawing heat up from the South.[1]

      High temperatures equaled or broke records in nearly a dozen locations around the country on October 16 and 17, with temperatures in some areas reaching over 100 degrees.[2]

      Oklahoma set a new record temperature on October 16 of 102°F — the hottest temperature ever recorded this late in the calendar year for the entire state.[3]
      http://www.climatesignals.org/headlines/events/central-eastern-us-heat-wave-october-2016

      Reply
  153. – FYI Addendum to above Mosul Dam

    Reply
  154. Andy_in_SD

     /  October 18, 2016

    This seems quite disruptive. Appears to be true technology as well (not a mock up or a smoke-n-mirrors thing).

    The annual Geneva motor show is a designer’s event, and its halls are packed each March with a predicatably dazzling array of concept cars, from the usual suspects along with the occasional unknown. So when a startup called NanoFlowcell arrived in Geneva back in 2014, pulling the wraps off a battery electric grand touring car called the Quant e-SportLimousine, the world was intrigued, if unsurprised. But beyond its dramatic looks and outlandish performance claims (zero to 62mph in 2.6 seconds, a 236mph top speed) this design study made a genuinely audacious promise: It could run on saltwater.

    http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20161010-driving-the-saltwater-sports-car

    Reply
  155. Greg

     /  October 18, 2016

    Hurricanes like Matthew have laid bare the dirty secret of the National Weather Service: its technologies and methods are woefully behind the times.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/23/magazine/why-isnt-the-us-better-at-predicting-extreme-weather.html?smid=tw-share&_r=2

    Reply
  156. Reply
  157. Greg

     /  October 18, 2016

    The answer to global warming lies not in one grand strategy but in a steady progression of measures deploying many different technologies. On Saturday, more than 170 countries took another important step when they agreed to phase out a powerful planet-warming chemical used in air-conditioners and refrigerators and to seek more benign substitutes.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/opinion/another-big-step-on-climate.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-left-region&region=opinion-c-col-left-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-left-region&_r=0

    Reply
  158. Reply
  159. Cat 6
    A good comprehensive post…Indeed.

    Twin Typhoons in Philippines; Nicole of the North; Hundred-Degree Heat in Plains

    By: Bob Henson , 2:18 PM GMT on October 17, 2016

    ‘The northern Philippines island of Luzon may soon experience its second typhoon strike in less than a week. Typhoon Sarika rapidly intensified from tropical storm to Category 4 strength in just 30 hours before plowing across central Luzon early Sunday The northern Philippines island of Luzon may soon experience its second typhoon strike in less than a week. Typhoon Sarika rapidly intensified from tropical storm to Category 4 strength in just 30 hours before plowing across central Luzon early Sunday

    ( I been wondering if this would happen):
    Nicole is venturing awfully far north for a hurricane
    Don’t look now, but Hurricane Nicole is making a run for Greenland

    Mid-October heat sweeping across the central, eastern U.S. this week

    It’s not every October that Dodge City, Kansas, gets up to 99°F. In fact, until Sunday, the city had never recorded a temperature that high in any October. The same intense jet stream that brought high winds and tornadic storms to the Pacific Northwest (see below) helped to force air downward over the central and southern Great Plains, leading to an oddly scorching weekend of clear skies and summer-like highs.

    Big wind in Pacific Northwest spares Seattle, Portland

    The much-feared prospect of a destructive windstorm failed to materialize across Oregon and Washington this past weekend. The surface low tracking near the coast on Saturday (containing the remnants of Typhoon Songda) ended up deepening to an impressively low 969 millibars near the northwest tip of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula
    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=3482

    Reply
    • Oh yeah — one more re PNW

      A rare significant tornado in Oregon

      The weekend storm in Oregon was partially upstaged by a different kind of wind. A sizable tornadic waterspout swept onshore from the Pacific Ocean into the town of Manzanita…
      B. Henson

      Reply
    • Ps _This is an addition to June’s above Cat 6 post.
      Hi, June.

      Reply
  160. Reply
  161. Robert McLachlan

     /  October 18, 2016

    Re: the note in the Rodney & Otamatea Times, and The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal, of 1912, both of these are reprints of a caption to a lengthy article on the greenhouse effect published in the March 1912 issue of Popular Mechanics. The original article was written by Francis Molena. https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Tt4DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA339&lpg=PA339
    Final sentence: “Yet even the dull foreigner.. by his toil in the dirt and the darkness adds to the carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere so that men in generations to come shall enjoy milder breezes and live under sunnier skies.”

    Note that Arrhenius, who in 1896 thought it would take 3000 years to double CO2, did not take seriously the prospect of exponential increase in the burning of fossil fuels, despite the changes wrought in the 19th century. All through the 20th century few people seem to have taken this possibility seriously. I remember in the year 2000, reading predictions that soon 100s of millions of Chinese would be living American-style lifestyles, and finding it farfetched. John Mercer’s 1978 prediction of the destabilisation of West Antarctica is one of the few early warning voices that I know of that took exponential growth seriously.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  October 18, 2016

      Even though he miscalculated how much carbon we would put in the air and how fast, it seems like there should be some kind of celebration of the 120th anniversary of Arrhenius’s discovery that CO2 is a GHG, the cornerstone of our modern scientific understanding of Global Warming. Is there any such than anyone knows of?

      Reply
    • Robert McLachlan: Thank you for linking this to its historical roots — and your comments.
      It has quite the distinct lineage. Not surprising that Popular Mechanics is involved — as the format and style on the reproduction had the feel of something like PopMech.
      Well done, indeed — it proves the value of constructive ‘blogging’ like RS.

      Now, if the theme of the article wasn’t so critically important — so much was known, for so long…
      DT

      Reply
  162. Ryan in New England

     /  October 18, 2016

    Just a personal observation of some crazy local weather here in Connecticut…today is going to be in the mid 80s today (record warmth) which are normal August temps. Yesterday and tomorrow are also crazy warm. The nighttime lows have been where the daytime highs should be. I’m wearing shorts at work when I should be wearing gloves and a hat first thing in the morning. Completely nuts!

    Reply
    • wili

       /  October 18, 2016

      Yeah, we’re having August like weather here in MN, too. Thunderstorm yesterday, temps well into the 70’s.

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  October 18, 2016

      We have 90’s in the forecast for next week here in San Diego.

      Reply
  163. Shawn Redmond

     /  October 18, 2016

    Last month “was the warmest September in 136 years of modern record-keeping,” reports NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS)
    This follows a record-setting July and August, which were so hot, they tied each other for the “warmest month ever recorded.”
    https://thinkprogress.org/2016-hottest-year-84f2a2cbc3f9#.icqcb91mn

    Reply
  164. coloradobob

     /  October 18, 2016

    U.S. All Time Records Summary

    Last 365 Days
    HIGH MAX – 51 HIGH MIN -120 LOW MAX – 4 LOW MIN – 4

    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/datatools/records

    Reply
  165. coloradobob

     /  October 18, 2016

    The JTWC –
    Haima at 140 knots (160 mph) with a pressure of 919 mb as of 1200z…

    Reply
  166. coloradobob

     /  October 18, 2016

    Professor Pitman’s centre will shift more of its focus to the study of climate extremes after securing funds from the Australian Research Council last month.

    “There is some emerging evidence that the system is redefining itself,” Professor Pitman said.

    Super typhoons and a soaking for Australia: weird weather explained

    Reply

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