Message to Presidential Debate Moderators: Failure to Ask Climate Questions = Climate Change Denial

115,000 — that’s about how many years back into Earth’s past we’d likely have to go to find one that was hotter than 2016 globally. 0 — that’s the number of Presidential debate questions that raised the issue of human-caused climate change during this critical election year.

What do we call this? According to David Leonhardt at The New York Times, it’s a complete failure of journalism.

Debate Moderators Fall Asleep as Climate Threats Worsen

In a year in which the very existence of the 25 million year old Great Barrier Reef was threatened by climate change, at a time during which climate change has brought more droughts, fires, floods, extreme weather events, sea ice losses, glacial melt, threats to global security, and negative impacts to ocean health than at any time in human history, and during a period in which the formation of dangerous entities like ISIS and the generation of mass waves of refugees now crossing the world are being spurred by droughts and floods and losses to food and water security related to climate change, you’d think that just one Presidential Debate question would have mentioned the subject.

(Climate change has been linked to the 1,000 year scale drought event that spurred unrest, mass migration and extremism in Syria. As the world warms, climate change will threaten the stability of an increasing number of states. Failure to adequately mitigate climate change multiplies threats across the globe. From Michael Mann’s twitter feed.)

Instead, a critical issue of security and survival for every child, woman and man now living in the United States and around the world was utterly and completely ignored.

In fact, based on the questions presented, we can only assume that the mainstream media entities hosting the U.S. Presidential Debates were dramatically uninformed on an issue that is now guaranteed to represent the greatest threat of our age. And the simple failure to ask these essential climate questions generates a state of denial in both our politics and in our news reporting. A denial that helps to freeze a necessary societal response to a growing existential threat facing our nation.

Failed Journalism Presents False Frame to American Public

How did some among us become so irresponsible? So willing to turn a mass media deaf ear to the pack of climate wolves now howling at our collective doors? The level of failure in journalism is so great that it generates bafflement over possible, understandably rational causes.

To be very clear, not all mass media sources are contributing to the problem. And there are many responsible journalists who are aghast that moderators have so greatly failed the public interest in this way. David Leonhardt from the New York Times noted today:

The failure to ask about climate change is a failure of journalism. I thought that the debate moderators had some very fine moments over the last few weeks, calmly drawing out the candidates. But the lack of a single question on the world’s biggest problem was a grievous error.

But Lester Holter of NBC, Anderson Cooper of CNN, and Chris Wallace of the climate change denial proliferating Fox News, all failed the public in this respect. One might especially expect more from Cooper, who at least seems to show some appropriate concern for climate change related threats. But even this somewhat more responsible debate moderator failed to deliver on a subject of serious concern for the American people.

september-of-2016-hottest-on-record

(According to NASA, September of 2016 was the hottest September in the 136 year climate record. This most recent record hot month occurred during a year in which global temperatures are fast approaching the dangerous 1.5 C climate threshold. Image source: NASA GISS.)

Climate Change Debate Denial Prevents Awareness and Response

What I can say is that there is no way to generate an adequate response to climate change unless the issue is taken seriously and presented to the public in an honest and open fashion. One that includes how our fossil fuel burning is generating worsening climate impacts with each passing year. A rational person observing us from afar might think that by 2016, during a year in which global temperatures will hit 1.19 to 1.25 C above 1880s averages, in which very damaging events due to climate change are now encroaching and multiplying, this issue would be placed squarely in the public eye by moderators who are at least concerned about the well being of their own properties and families.

But no. Nothing. Nada. Not a chirp.

As a result, the debate moderators and their hosting media agencies have presented a false framing of issues during 2016. For all practical purposes — an alternate reality in which climate change does not appear to be happening in the media sphere has been generated by this lack of discussion. And so we are all once again tumbling down the rabbit hole of unreality as outside conditions continue to worsen. This essential failure is as tragic as it is both shameful and morally wrong.

Links:

The Debates Were a Failure of Journalism

Michael Mann

Climate Change Creates Existential Crisis For Great Barrier Reef

NASA GISS

Hat tip to Wili

Leave a comment

153 Comments

  1. Paul PNW

     /  October 21, 2016

    So I don’t think I ever actually checked into this but iirc, during the last election, I read a comment/article somewhere that said the debate questions are selected by a committee and not the hosts/hosting channel and that said committee was funded in large part by [prepare to be unshocked]… the fossil fuel industry.

    Reply
    • Election debate comittee funded by fossil fuel industry?? If that’s the case, then it’s definitely a failure of journalism.

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 21, 2016

      Just watch the Sunday morning shows. who’s picking up the tab? Boeing . And lately the Kochs with their WE ARE KOCH. Before that it was the ENERGY VOTERS from the API. Before that it was the tall leggy blonde from the API. They dump what ever is needed into Sunday morning to buy time.

      We have never seen one Green Peace ad ever on Sunday Morning. Yet they are the rich cabal playing with the numbers so that lazy scientists get fat grants from from an unknown center to change our world.

      The right wing is now in full blown reptile thinking . They flick their forked touges . Higher thinking, and history don’t matter. Just the heat of their body temperature.

      Reply
      • Having some experience with ads, it’s pretty clear that the fossil fuel money is everywhere. Like cigarettes, there really should be laws against it.

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  October 22, 2016

          Won’t happen in any kind of timely fashion. Who do think is writing the laws? Its talked about here all the time. Shake your head your eyes are stuck!

        • Keep your eyes on the prize, Shawn. In my view it’s absolutely an apt comparison. And if you consider the level of harms done, the fossil fuel industry is far more destructive than the cigarette industry. If your point of view is that we should bow to the unjust and harmful arrangement of political influence that exists currently, then I’d have to say that your view is defeatist and unlikely to have a positive influence. If we are to stand up as leaders then we must stand against the currently harmful acceptance of bad actors.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  October 23, 2016

          From Whispering Jack, 30 years ago, puts it clear

        • Abel Adamski

           /  October 23, 2016

          The original with children’s choir and bagpipes plural

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  October 23, 2016

          No RS I don’t think we should bow to it. Having spent the last three and a half decades trying to lead by example and seeing almost no one following is a bit disheartening. Everything from subsistence farming to moving the whole thing off grid to show a quality of live that is quite comfortable as well as running as a green candidate in a provincial election once. I think we should ignore them as we struggle to find a way to live without them. We need an alternative ” economy” to what they have to offer. One that runs around them or off to one side as opposed to with them. The only thing they understand is money. We have to take that away. Its not about the billions they already have, they want more. We live in a feudal system for sure, we just pay for our lease to life with monies instead of wheat and/or potatoes etc.. Sorry about the way my response comes off above, didn’t mean to seem defeatist. Despair does creep in from time to time, perhaps that is what’s coming through in translation. This shows I am no word smith. At the time of writing it seemed to fit my feelings well, but conveys them only to me! I’ll try to reread my comments through others eyes before posting in the future. Steady as she goes folks and damn the torpedoes.

        • Well, Shawn, I think you’ve done everything an individual person could. And everything, including your passionate dedication is commendable. But the greatest effect comes from multiplying such efforts by bringing them into the mainstream. Not by succumbing to despair, splintering off, and withdrawing. In this day, we have more than enough splinter movements. It’s time to move together in a way that impacts as many people as possible. And we’ve already made great gains, but the enormous challenges remain. With our hopes half-achieved, now is not the time to stop working together. And we should be very clear that dealing with climate change will require a nimble, long lasting response, that continuously expands in scope to meet the enormity of the developing problem. A simple counter-culture is not enough to achieve that requirement. We need to grow the movement and push together.

          This is one reason why the fake populism of Trump has been so corrosive. He’s risen to popularity, in part, due to his criticism of elites. But you can’t claim a valid populist mantle while fighting to cut taxes for the 1% and defending the interests of fossil fuels — whose corporate entities continue to increase inequality, promote harms, and victimize the middle class. The Washington Post article on Trumpism basically misses the point. Trump is simply an example of the Republican Party trying to play divide and conquer by paying lip service to fears from the middle and lower classes (especially whites) without promoting any material policies capable of addressing actual problems.

          Trumpism, for the most part, scape-goats Latinos, women, blacks, Asians, Muslims, and any other such group in an attempt to give destructive interests a pass. This dark game of divide and conquer has been used by dictators throughout time and it has resulted in great harms, injustices, and instability.

          Bernie Sanders was the real populist in this election. And Clinton, with her proposed increases in taxes on the wealthy, expanding limits to fossil fuels, and attempts to increase supports for a renewable economy that will enable the middle and lower classes, is far more populist than Trump will ever be. Trade policy, sometimes looking the other way on monopolies, and middle of the road seeming pragmatism when it comes to the energy transition will ensure that Clinton never rises to the level of a Sanders in this regard. However, between the two, Clinton is far more populist — in effect reigning in the powerful far more than Trump ever would. And the fact that he is taking the anti-monopoly line at this late hour in the election is nothing more than crocodile tears coming from a capitalist who made his fortune by monopolizing certain sections of the real estate industry.

      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  October 22, 2016

        Bob, the reptiles will enjoy the higher temperatures, whereas we mammals will burn out rather quickly. The sheer deliberation of the drive to ecological disaster, despite the fact that we know that these creatures have been FULLY aware of the science for decades (even stretching back over 100 years)makes me certain that they intend the catastrophe to occur. How, or even if, they intend to survive themselves is the question of questions.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  October 22, 2016

          MM, re intention of catastrophe—-I tend to concur. The elites appear to be betting that a climate catastrophe will not affect them, but will merely rid the world of at least half its population, which they believe will solve many problems in one shot. They think their money will protect them from all the misery. Joke’s on them, eh?

          But IF climate catastrophe does come knocking, they think they have a trump card—so to speak: they’ve got an escape plan and they’re paying smart guys to finalise it. Hence all the frantic activity for “space tourism” and colonising Mars. Sadly, they’re racing against a huge and inexorable clock on that one—Mother Nature’s clock, which is now starting to pick up speed.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  October 22, 2016

          Cate, there is a bitterly poetic justice in the space colonisation/escape and I am sure there will be underground and undersea safe enclaves.
          They will all be prisons with no escape and nowhere to go regardless of how luxurious

    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  October 22, 2016

      The best darn democracy that money can buy!

      Reply
  2. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    September 18, 2014

    Only 36 percent of Americans can name the three branches of government

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/09/18/only-36-percent-of-americans-can-name-the-three-branches-of-government/

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  October 22, 2016

      It’s Coca-Cola, Exxon and General Motors, ain’t it Bob?

      Reply
  3. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    Some where there’s a box of rocks giving the American Public a real race for it’s money when it comes what matters.

    Reply
  4. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    We are dealing with reptile thinking . But I like the term “lizard brained thinking”. These are the people that never invented anything.. They burnt witches , murdered Indians. and killed Jews for the last 500 years. They never go away, we just beat them back.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  October 22, 2016

      CB we don’t beat them back, we learn to live amongst them.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  October 22, 2016

      Bob, it’s the ‘infratentorials’ (Them) versus the ‘supratentorials’ (Us).

      Reply
  5. Griffin

     /  October 21, 2016

    Great post Robert. Just a really good point and incredibly important for all of us.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind words, Griff. We’re living in a climate dystopia. A failure to publically address climate change is both a cause and a symptom.

      Reply
  6. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    Hell comes to breackfast

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 21, 2016

      slave ships diagram
      About 79,800 results (0.61 seconds)

      Reply
      • Jeremy in Wales

         /  October 22, 2016

        A Liverpool ship, that “trade” turned the place from a fishing village to a major city, largely forgotten now but Liverpool and Bristol made fortunes. Even when the trade was banned and slaves freed in the Empire the ex-slave owners received £20 million in compensation (1837), the equivalent in todays terms of billions of £.

        Reply
  8. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    The food processor –

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 21, 2016

      The sharks followed the slave ships all the way across the Atlantic.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 21, 2016

        All of this was done it the name of – “profit”/

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  October 22, 2016

        Do you know the famous Turner painting, ‘Slavers Throwing overboard the dead and dying -Typhon coming on’? Turner painted it in 1840 after reading of the Captain of the ‘Zong’ throwing 133 slaves overboard so he could collect the insurance. Turner, a fierce abolitionist, appended his own poem to the painting.
        ‘Aloft all hands, strike the top-masts and belay,
        Yon angry setting sun and fierce-edged clouds
        Declare the Typhon’s coming.
        Before it sweeps your decks, throw overboard
        The dead and dying-ne’er heed their chains
        Hope, Hope, fallacious Hope!
        Where is thy market now?’

        Reply
  9. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    And we are baffled why we are torn apart.

    Reply
  10. coloradobob

     /  October 21, 2016

    One last thing tonight. When the country was founded , If you were black, it was a crime for you to read and write.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 22, 2016

      Now. all these year’s later if a black man speaks. He may be attacked because, he’s too white.

      How do we fix this, where do we go ?

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  October 22, 2016

        cb, these images and words are beyond comprehension. Thank you for posting them.

        A related thought—one reason why Canadians feel so smug compared to the US is that we never had slavery, or so we believe. We were all raised to believe that Canada is the true home of freedom and equality.

        We conveniently ignored our first peoples in this congratulatory self-assessment. (Canadians do very well at self-admiration, btw—JT with his selfies is just the poster boy for a much wider tendency in Canada.)

        As Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip—who expressed “Canada” for an entire generation—- recently quipped, “This is not the country we think it is.”

        The film part of his powerful project, “Secret Path”, airs Sunday night, 23 October, on the CBC TV network. Canada’s dirty little secret is out.

        http://secretpath.ca/

        Reply
  11. Griffin

     /  October 21, 2016

    Outstanding article from Chris Mooney today.
    “The problem is that in this part of West Antarctica, you have everything you don’t want on a warming planet – a changing ocean up against glaciers that are both very wide and very deep. And scientists now know that warm ocean water is reaching these glaciers at depth, and melting them from below – causing them to shrink, leaving the remaining glacier to retreat backwards and inland. And as they retreat, the seafloor gets deeper the further back they go — what researchers refer to as a “retrograde” configuration. The deeper the water gets, the more ice that can be exposed to the ocean, and the more the glaciers are thereby capable of losing. So there is a fear that there is here something that is called a “marine ice sheet instability” in which, once you start this process, you can’t stop it — and that it has already been started.”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/10/21/scientists-just-showed-what-it-truly-means-when-a-huge-antarctic-glacier-is-unstable/?postshare=9451477067964468&tid=ss_tw&utm_term=.1048e88524a4

    Reply
  12. Gordon

     /  October 21, 2016

    Journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed: everything else is public relations. Orwell

    Keep up the good work!

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 22, 2016

      Do what ???????????

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 22, 2016

        Journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed:

        Fire this asshole.

        Reply
    • Gordon

       /  October 22, 2016

      Colorado Bob
      George Orwell was a keen observer on the use of propaganda in politics. The debates are the creation of the Democratic and Republican parties and reflect their agenda.

      Robert continues to scribble about scientific reality which is in conflict with the current paradigm of unfettered consumerism and progress. He is the type of person that Orwell
      was referring to as a journalist.

      I appreciate his work

      Cheers

      Reply
      • Jeremy in Wales

         /  October 22, 2016

        But is it an Orwell quote? when Orwell was writing “Public Relations” was a very American term unused in the UK. Have not found any attribution for the quote although it is still a brilliant quote.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  October 22, 2016

          Jeremy and Gordon, I recently had occasion to research that very quote, as I was doing some work on Alfred Harmsworth Lord Northcliffe, to whom it is also attributed—although he apparently said “advertising” instead of “public relations.”

          Here’s a potted history of this interesting quote:

          http://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/01/20/news-suppress/

        • Jeremy in Wales

           /  October 23, 2016

          Blimey, good bit of research Cate – looks like it was a generalised quote probably used throughout journalism/publishing for a century. So Orwell may well have known and used the term or a variation but we just do not know whether he did.

          Still a brilliant quote though.

    • Thanks for the kind words, Gordon.

      Part of the reason why the public doesn’t understand climate risks is due to the fact that the media and the political forum doesn’t provide a broadly-accessible, truthful communication RE climate risks. To be clear, some sources are truthful, but the issue hasn’t been elevated by the largest outlets and forums to a level appropriate to the danger represented. And if the public isn’t exposed to such an informed discussion, there’s not a necessary urgency for climate response. In a democracy, that means policy support lags and responses are slow. This compounds climate harms. But, more to the point, it’s the primary reason why climate change responses lagged throughout the past 4 decades. We can’t afford a similar period of malaise. In fact we’re at a point now where it is imperative to do everything that we possibly can now.

      Reply
  13. Jim Miller

     /  October 22, 2016

    Robert, what I think you’re not understanding is that the corporate media is in bed with the corporate party, and both are in bed with the deep fossil fuel business infrastructure ruling our society.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 22, 2016

      Welcome to the party.

      Reply
    • Jim — the media is still made up of people who can make their own choices, regardless of the fact that corporate special interests increasingly dominate the mainstream sources. These people have the ability to influence coverage, which is why I shine a light on their personal responsibility in the matter. In any case, when it comes to corporate influence, there is no mainstream source that is untouched, even NPR. However, among sources there is still a range of coverage and quality of coverage. And even within the so-called corporate media there are responsible sources. Blanket generalizations of this kind are, therefore, unhelpful.

      Reply
  14. coloradobob

     /  October 22, 2016

    Jim Miller
    Good, this is not a box of rocks.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  October 22, 2016

      CB this is a sling shot and we need more rocks for the sling. Keep em coming!

      Reply
    • A part of an effective communications strategy with regards to climate change involves calling individuals to account.

      Reply
  15. Shawn Redmond

     /  October 22, 2016

    Wow! Stunning! What the hell! This is why I think we’re screwed. Small thinking.

    Half of existing nuclear power plants are no longer profitable. The New York Times and others have tried to blame renewable energy for this, but the admittedly astounding price drops of renewables aren’t the primary cause of the industry’s woes — cheap fracked gas is.
    But a major reason solar and wind energy receive federal subsidies — which are being phased out over the next few years — is because they are emerging technologies whose prices are still rapidly coming down the learning curve, whereas nuclear is an incumbent technology with a negative learning curve.

    https://thinkprogress.org/nuclear-power-is-losing-money-at-an-astonishing-rate-e9473d62acc5#.6zsgawmn8

    Reply
  16. mulga mumblebrain

     /  October 22, 2016

    The fact that a MSM entirely controlled by the Right and business interests is not interested in anthropogenic climate destabilisation, or any other of the plethora of ecological crises, is easy enough to comprehend. The reasons why are simplicity itself, too.
    The decarbonisation absolutely required to avert a climate catastrophe requires the leaving of fossil fuels unexploited. That requires the reduction of their value to zero, and as those valuations currently represent tens of trillions of dollars, and underpin the entire capitalist edifice, including the finance Moloch, represents the end of capitalism.
    Unless we recognise that ‘reforming’ a system based on endless growth (one that no longer drags the mass of humanity up, but rewards the rich only)is insanity, and begin agitating for an utterly different system, we have NO chance of avoiding a cataclysm that will end our ‘civilization’ and possibly our species, and soon. A vote for Trump is suicidal if only because of his insane anti-environmentalism, but Clinton serves the rich first, so that way promises ‘buyers’ remorse’ for the third election running. I’d say that Stein is the only sane choice, but politics in the USA is so sewn up by the ruling elite that it resembles nothing much but a bunraku play, where the marionettes are manipulated by puppeteers dressed in black, who we are meant to pretend are not there.

    Reply
    • 44 south

       /  October 22, 2016

      Who is this “we” of whom you speak?
      There is no we, that is the problem.
      All they care about is money and power, the one growing the other.
      “We” might have a shared awareness of climate change and it’s potential to destroy everything we value, but talk amongst ourselves for ten minutes and we’ll find a reason fight. Hell the wording of a comment will do it, let alone our attitudes toward race,abortion,capital punishment,feminism,transgender…
      the list is endless!
      I could go on, but recommend that you read the latest posts by two of my favorite Americans at “I got somethin to say- where doom is a given” AND “Fred on everything- scurrilous comment by Fred Reed”

      Reply
  17. Abel Adamski

     /  October 22, 2016

    An interesting article on Trump and his backers future.

    http://www.theage.com.au/comment/donald-trump-is-already-laying-the-groundwork-for-whats-next-after-losing-the-election-20161020-gs7dtj.html

    Yet when it comes to someone as dangerous as Trump, it would be prudent to believe that he knows precisely what he is doing. Knowing the election is lost, he is laying the groundwork to tell about 30 million angry and disaffected Americans that he was robbed on election day without a shred of evidence. That is enough people to create a right-wing rump political movement that would also double as a lucrative, right-wing media empire. Trump is preparing to lose. But he has no intention of going away.

    Consider that if Trump is viewed over the longest term – the past 40 years or so of his public life – he has displayed a ruthless ambition, a quenchless thirst for fame, a passing interest in power for its own sake, an absolute ignorance of governing and, of course, a disdain for most people. He has constantly telegraphed these qualities.

    A union of these men, with Trump at the helm, would present two opportunities: a rump movement of the far-right that will effectively destroy the Republican Party by cleaving it in two. More tangibly and lucratively, a new far-right-wing media empire would emerge from the ashes of the campaign. There is big money in conservative media for advertising, books, direct marketing and petition-based fundraising. Conservative media’s dirty little secret is that it takes a healthy rake on all of it.

    In this admittedly nightmare scenario, Trump might appear night after night on the flickering screens of television screens, computers and mobile devices, the flames fanned by the likes of Bannon and Jones. The US political system could become wildly unbalanced with only one functional major party, controlled by establishment Democrats who would then move to co-opt what would be left of genuine Republicans. This could allow a Clinton presidency to fashion a long-term monopoly on power.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  October 22, 2016

      The US political system is already pretty wildly unbalanced. The only hope for rebalance was the Sanders campaign. I think that now the only hope is for Sanders folks to reach across and find the saner elements of Trumps camp who might be able to hear about the _real_ reasons that they have been left behind. I’m doubtful that will work, though.

      Reply
      • June

         /  October 22, 2016

        I agree that Sanders was our best – and probably last- hope of loosening even a little the hold of corporate power. That’s why the Democratic Party establishment sabotaged his campaign. Mason Williams once said that radio, television and the print media teach us to buy not to be. They do to our minds what corporations have done to the land. We now think like New York City looks (I might change that to Las Vegas).

        Reply
        • Sanders was fantastic. Not just for the fact that he basically represents the ideal candidate on climate change, but also due to the fact that he effectively moved Climton on the issue. And the fact that Clinton was receptive to Sanders on climate change provides some hope for her stances and future policy positions.

  18. Kevin Jones

     /  October 22, 2016

    According to AMSR (University of Bremmen) Both Antarctic and Arctic sea ice extent are at record lows for 10/22. Has this ever happened on any calendar day before?

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  October 22, 2016

      Sorry. Looked at ‘selective years’ chart. Apparently Antarctic sea ice was lower way back in 1986 then today. Still I wonder if combined anomalies aren’t lowest ever.

      Reply
  19. June

     /  October 22, 2016

    Watchdog group uncovers a coal ash spill after hurricane flooding

    On Wednesday, Waterkeeper Alliance, a local watchdog organization, published pictures of “a substantial but undetermined amount of coal ash” along the Neuse River in southwestern North Carolina. The following day, the state responded.

    https://thinkprogress.org/duke-on-the-hook-for-coal-ash-spilled-floods-1faea6a83e93#.ucazkz3o4

    Reply
  20. miles h

     /  October 22, 2016

    de-oxygenation of the oceans due to climate change. may be a serious problem by 2030… http://www.theinertia.com/environment/a-horrifying-new-study-found-that-the-ocean-is-on-its-way-to-suffocating-by-2030/

    Reply
  21. wili

     /  October 22, 2016

    The ‘debates’ have been a sham ever since they were taken over from the League of Women Voters.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  October 22, 2016

      Way back in 1988: “LEAGUE REFUSES TO ‘HELP PERPETRATE A FRAUD’

      WITHDRAWS SUPPORT FROM FINAL PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE”

      http://lwv.org/press-releases/league-refuses-help-perpetrate-fraud

      Reply
      • June

         /  October 22, 2016

        Exactly. I like this quote from the article: “It has become clear to us that the candidates’ organizations aim to add debates to their list of campaign-trail charades devoid of substance, spontaneity and honest answers to tough questions,” Neuman said. “The League has no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public.” Sad that things have only gotten worse since then.

        Reply
  22. Griffin

     /  October 22, 2016

    The people of Fuvemeh are among hundreds of millions who are paying a heavy price for a problem they didn’t create. At the current erosion rate, villagers predict that their homes will disappear in less than six months. Left with the bitter choice of staying to be swept out to sea or abandoning his land, history, and way of life, Buabasah doesn’t know what to do. He has moved his wife and children to another village, but he can’t follow them because Fuvemeh serves as his fishing base. Migrating would mean giving up on his job and his ability to feed his family, since the government will only facilitate resettlement to inland communities.

    “I am very afraid for the future of this place,” he says in despair. “Sooner or later we will have to leave, but we have nowhere to go.”
    http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/10/21/west-africa-is-being-swallowed-by-the-sea-climate-change-ghana-benin/

    Reply
  23. As Clouds Head for the Poles, Time to Prepare for Food and Water Shocks

    View story at Medium.com

    Reply
  24. I would like to ask those of you who cannot monetarily assist the Sacred Stone camp to consider sending any spare camping equipment you no longer need to them. They have a list on their site, pretty basic stuff. It will a long winter in a teepee.

    Just out of interest I am abstracting part of a letter I received from one of our politicians in response to my letter writing blitz. I am not experienced in this type of response, but some good news seems to be that pipeline construction is halted at least or now.

    “. . . the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the U.S. Department of Justice recently announced they will begin a series of scheduled consultations with the nation’s tribal leaders regarding the development of the pipeline . . . ”
    “Currently, the question as to whether the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline will proceed is under appeal before the U.S Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Energy Transfer Partners, the pipeline’s developer, has also announced they will suspend construction while these consultations and legal matters unfold. . . .

    Reply
  25. Ryan in New England

     /  October 23, 2016

    On the subject of climate denial, here’s an interview with Tom Toles and Michael Mann on their new book, Madhouse Effect.

    https://thinkprogress.org/toles-mann-madhouse-96eb1c4c747a#.dm407y40f

    Reply
  26. Cate

     /  October 23, 2016

    With over two months to go, we already know that 2016 will be the hottest year ever recorded—and the third “hottest year ever” in a row.

    “Before we get too anxious, it is almost certain that 2017 will be cooler than 2016. In fact, we may not set another record for a few years. But just as a few hot years doesn’t prove global warming, a few cooler years wont disprove it.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2016/oct/21/global-warming-continues-2016-will-be-the-hottest-year-ever-recorded

    Reply
    • Absolutely. We likely won’t see another record hot year until the next El Niño. Considering the big heat spike in 2014-2016 we’re going to be gap filling for a while. That doesn’t mean warming has stopped. It’s just that we’re passing a big spike year.

      Reply
  27. Griffin

     /  October 23, 2016

    Pennsylvania.
    The flooding caused a Sunoco Logistics gasoline pipeline to rupture, spilling an estimated 54,600 gallons into a tributary of the Loyalsock Creek and threatening the water supply of several thousand customers.

    Pennsylvania American Water said its treatment plant along the Susquehanna River in Milton – downstream of the spill – might be impacted, and asked customers to conserve water in case the plant had to be shut down. Residents would be served by a second, unaffected treatment plant if the Milton plant had to be taken offline, the company said.

    Two other water systems, serving customers in Sunbury and Shamokin Dam, are also potentially impacted by the spill, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection.

    Sunoco Logistics said crews were using skimmers to remove gasoline from impacted waterways and erecting containment booms downstream.

    The storm took most residents by surprise.
    http://globalnews.ca/news/3019223/pennsylvania-flooding-kills-1-ruptures-gas-pipeline/

    Reply
  28. June

     /  October 23, 2016

    The authorities get more brutal as they realize the protesters are not going away.

    Stakes Are Getting Higher’: 83 People Arrested, Maced in North Dakota

    Saturday’s arrests follow reports of escalating police abuse at the protest sites, including beatings and unnecessary strip-searches of those arrested

    http://commondreams.org/news/2016/10/23/stakes-are-getting-higher-83-people-arrested-maced-north-dakota

    Reply
    • Josh

       /  October 23, 2016

      “First they ignore you
      Then they laugh at you
      Then they fight you
      Then you win”

      Apparently not actually a direct Gandhi quote but nevertheless…

      Reply
    • “Construction on the pipeline is continuing despite a request from the federal government to put a halt on activity so that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can properly consider objections.”

      Well, that is interesting. That is not what my federal politician, above, wrote.

      Reply
  29. And completely off topic but maybe for a little perspective beyond this tiny speck of dust we are so worried about. Noticed a couple of other links I’ve posted disappeared being as they were pretty sad reality stuff and discouraging as hell…this one is more amazing.

    Universe has 2 trillion galaxies, astronomers say

    Hubble telescope images from deep space were collected over 20 years to solve the puzzle of how many galaxies the cosmos harbors

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/oct/13/hubble-telescope-universe-galaxies-astronomy

    There are a dizzying 2 trillion galaxies in the universe, up to 20 times more than previously thought, astronomers reported on Thursday. The surprising finding, based on 3D modeling of images collected over 20 years by the Hubble Space Telescope, was published in the Astronomical Journal.

    Scientists have puzzled over how many galaxies the cosmos harbors at least since US astronomer Edwin Hubble showed in 1924 that Andromeda, a neighboring galaxy, was not part of our own Milky Way. But even in the era of modern astronomy, getting an accurate tally has proven difficult.

    To begin with, there is only part of the cosmos where light given off by distant objects has had time to reach Earth. The rest is effectively beyond our reach. And even within this “observable universe”, current technology only allows us to glimpse 10% of what is out there, according to the new findings.

    “It boggles the mind that over 90% of the galaxies in the universe have yet to be studied,” commented Christopher Conselice of the University of Nottingham, who led the study. “Who knows what interesting properties we will find when we observe these galaxies with the next generation of telescopes?” he said in a statement.

    Using deep space images from Hubble, Conselice and his team painstakingly converted them into 3D to measure the number of galaxies at different times in the history of the universe. The analysis reached back more than 13bn years – very near the time of the “Big Bang” thought to have given birth to the universe.

    A galaxy is a system of millions or billions or stars, held together by gravity, with planetary systems within them. Using new mathematical models, the astronomers were able to infer the number of “invisible” galaxies beyond the reach of telescopes, leading to the surprising realization that the vast majority are too faint and far away to be seen.

    When the universe was only a few billion years old, there were 10 times as many galaxies in a given volume of space as there are today, the findings suggest. This in turn suggests that “significant evolution must have occurred to reduce their number through extensive merging of systems”.

    Reply
    • I can’t help but see it as another example of the defining paradox of the moment. While small numbers of humans are making astounding jumps in their knowledge of the natural world, be it molecular genetics or astrophysics, many more of the species continue on a path back to the Dark Ages.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 23, 2016

        Excellent point. And all that whiz bang stuff still stands on the shoulders of the natural world. Defeating cancer means nothing, if famine over takes the world.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  October 23, 2016

          Well said, cb.

          What has all our knowledge actually taught us? What have we learned, since coming down from the trees, about how to get along with each other on this planet?

        • Exactly. We’re often hypnotized by the power of technology. But technology is worthless if it can’t help to prevent civilization collapse. To be clear, it’s wonderful that we’re able to expand our view to other worlds and to, by extension, expand our minds. But it becomes little more than fantasy unless we can take that knowledge and use it for the betterment of those (all those) currently living on the Earth. If we are destroying the Earth’s capacity to support civilization while gazing up in wonderment at the stars, then what can we really say for ourselves?

          As for the space program, I’ve always been a passionate supporter of the notion of bringing life to dead worlds and of expanding the scope of life that originated here on Earth. However, if we remove Earth’s capacity to support life even as we take our first steps into the sea of space, then our prospects for survival on dead worlds really isn’t so hot. In other words, we need to learn how to take care of life here if we’re going to effectively expand our reach to places like Mars, for example. In other words, increasing our ability to support life here increases our chances of successfully moving beyond the confines of Earth.

          People who see space as some kind of escape hatch for a wrecked planet are basically deceiving themselves. They’ve got it backward. We must first learn to care well for our life supports here, to understand them more, and to create systems that sustain and revitalize them before we can have much hope of reaching outward toward the wondrous heavens above.

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  October 25, 2016

          Our science and technology have advanced, Cate, but, despite the unceasing efforts of philosophers, religious speculators, psychologists, artistic geniuses and others we have made no progress in defeating human Evil. In fact, of course, today it is more ubiquitous and pervasive than ever, in the form of ‘Free Market capitalism’, ‘Libertarianism’, ‘conservative politics’ ‘the Rightwing’, etc, Protean in its variability and pitilessly ruthless in pursuit of Money, the concretisation of Evil in all its forms ie insatiable greed, misanthropy, love of violence, lack of empathy and compassion, and gigantic egotism. As was noted long ago, ‘Love of Money is the root of all Evil’, and under capitalism it is more or less the sole raison d’etre for our brief existence.

    • lesliegraham1

       /  October 24, 2016

      Hmmmm.
      So that means that now we know there is an utterly incomprehensible number of stars that is 20 times as big as the previous utterly incomprehensible number of stars we already couldn’t imagine in the first place. I’m impressed. I think.

      “Space is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is”.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  October 25, 2016

        And this is just one universe in an omniverse where universes float like bubbles along the river of Time.

        Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    Hillary Clinton has opened up a 12-point advantage over Donald Trump following their final debate last week and has reached the critical 50-percent mark, according to a new poll released Sunday.
    Clinton’s 50-percent-to-38-percent lead over Trump in the first ABC News tracking poll, which is based on interviews conducted Thursday through Saturday, represents a swing from an ABC News/Washington Post poll following the second Clinton-Trump debate, which showed Clinton ahead by just 4 points, 47 percent to 43 percent.

    Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2016/10/clinton-trump-poll-abc-news-230199#ixzz4NwEGUcnm
    Follow us: @politico on Twitter | Politico on Facebook

    Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    At ground zero of Alabama’s drought: ‘It’s an agricultural disaster’

    http://www.al.com/news/huntsville/index.ssf/2016/10/at_ground_zero_of_alabamas_dro.html

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 23, 2016

      Alabama streams, rivers drying up due to extreme drought

      http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2016/10/alabama_streams_rivers_drying.html

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  October 23, 2016

        No doubt Dr. Spencer will come out with blog post blaming Obama, and his “secret weather control police”.

        Reply
        • wili

           /  October 23, 2016

          Yes, Alabama is a ground zero for AGW impacts, and yet they are among the most likely to reliably vote for climate denier Trump. Oklahoma similarly. One need look no further than these to discredit claims one sometimes hears: “People won’t really respond to GW until it personally affects them.” It takes more than just brutal experience for people to understand what processes are destroying their lives.

        • utoutback

           /  October 24, 2016

          Trying to understand the radical right Arlie Russell Hochschild spent parts of 4 years with the Tea Party folks of Louisiana to write “Strangers in Their Own Land”. The book examines one of the most polluted places in America and the paradox of why the folks who live there support policies that reward the corporations that are destroying their way of life.
          Interesting read.

  32. June

     /  October 23, 2016

    A sad day, and a reminder of the dedication of field researchers who brave the harsh conditions of polar regions to deepen our knowledge of the climate system.

    University of Maine professor dies while conducting research in Antarctica

    ORONO, Maine (NEWS CENTER) — A leading University of Maine professor in the School of Earth and Climate Sciences died in an accident Saturday in Antarctica.

    Gordon Hamilton, who was also a researcher with the Climate Change Institute, was working on White Island in the Ross Archipelago in Antarctica, an area where he has conducted research for several seasons. The snowmobile he was riding hit a crevasse and he was killed in the 100-foot fall, according to the National Science Foundation. He was 50.

    Hamilton studied the behavior of modern ice sheets and their role in the climate system. His research focused on understanding ice sheet mass balance — how much mass is coming in and going out, and the processes responsible — and involved satellite remote sensing. His current research projects included ice-ocean interaction in Greenland and ice shelf stability in Antarctica.

    http://www.wcsh6.com/news/local/university-of-maine-professor-dies-while-conducting-research-in-antarctica/340268288

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 23, 2016

      Thanks for this June, notice he wasn’t sitting in his office writing grant proposals trying to pad his IRA.

      Reply
    • Cate

       /  October 23, 2016

      June, that’s terrible news. I’ve often thought about the danger that ice scientists and glaciologists and other climate researchers face for the sake of their research. As you say, cb, it’s not about sitting behind a desk at all, for these guys. It’s about putting themselves on the line in very hostile environments. My heart goes out to his family.

      Reply
  33. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    This is a great op-ed.

    THE NEW YORKER ENDORSES HILLARY CLINTON
    The election of Hillary Clinton is an event that we would welcome for its historical importance, and greet with indescribable relief.

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/10/31/the-new-yorker-endorses-hillary-clinton

    Reply
    • Agreed. But if Trump is elected, at least to would be clear to more people that our civilization is kind of a bad joke. Or isn’t it?

      I tried to make climate change an important topic for more than 10 years in Slovakia (and Czech Republic). Without much success. I am called to some TV or RD interviews from time to time, responding the same questions all the time. No progress. Few people care. That’s the reason I think our civilization is a bad joke. Not because of Trump. He is just the outcome.

      Best,

      Alex

      Reply
      • We’re in the process of establishing policies that push us off a BAU track. We have stiff resistance now. That said, if we hadn’t raised the issue of climate change repeatedly, we would have never been able to achieve this progress.

        Reply
    • Excellent article from the New Yorker. Thanks for posting it, my friend. RE early voting — it starts in MD this week and my wife and I plan to be at the polls as soon as they open. Northern VA isn’t far and will be stumping for Hillary there.

      Important thing to remember is:

      We may be ahead due to Trump offending just about everyone and demoralizing a decent chunk of the republican base — but it’s no time to get complacent.

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  October 24, 2016

        “No time to get complacent.” No time to get complacent indeed. Time to stomp this SOB and all of his backers who are in public office into the dust.

        Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    Early voting starts tomorrow here. I plan to be there first thing.

    Reply
    • Jacob

       /  October 24, 2016

      Good deal CB. We vote absentee in our household here in California and have already cast our votes. Doing what we can to prevent climate change deniers from being elected.

      Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    On Sunday, Trump picked up his first endorsement of the general election from a major newspaper when the Las Vegas Review-Journal backed his candidacy. The newspaper is owned by Republican mega-donor Sheldon Adelson, who has been reluctant to donate to Trump. In 2012, Adelson spent about $150 million trying to help elect Republican Mitt Romney.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-idUSKCN12N0N1?il=0

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 23, 2016

      I find it so ironic that Sanders people, and Trumps people say the same thing. That the system is rigged. Well it is, but there’s the rub.
      Money is not speech, but our court say’s it is. That my voice has the same weight of Boeing, API, or ATT.
      No where in the founding documents does the word “money” come up.
      There Indians fighting money tonight in North Dakota. Money has always crushed them.

      Reply
  36. Cate

     /  October 23, 2016

    David Suzuki just debuted an excellent program on the California drought on “The Nature of Things”, CBC-TV’s long-running nature series.

    Drought in US agricultural areas is of intense interest to Canadians because we have so much water up here that can be so easily diverted, and we know there are plenty of folks in the US who want to do just that.

    “RUNNING ON EMPTY is the story of a natural disaster and how Californians are responding as they face a water level that is dropping to zero. Suddenly, hard questions are being asked. Where did all the water go? Who’s fault is it? And what needs to change to save California from itself?”

    http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/running-on-empty

    PS Who’s? should be Whose, but no-one at the CBC can spell anymore. 😉

    Reply
  37. coloradobob

     /  October 23, 2016

    A word about NAFA –
    I was driving lower 48 in the late 90’s. I got dispatched to Laredo to pick up a load of slick shopping bags, bound for Minneapolis. As I hooked up that trailer I thought about all those skilled printers out of work near Minneapolis. This is why Trump has support.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  October 23, 2016

      I hated going to the border. The trailers always had problems. Lights.,reflectors, tires, you name it. It was a semi parts store for Mexico.

      I should be Trump 100%, but I’m not. Because he’s a fucking moron .

      Reply
    • Trump is targeting this sentiment for political gain. I doubt there’s much sincerity to it.

      Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  October 24, 2016

        And I hate to get all touchy-feely, but I think people in Mexico deserve to have jobs too.

        Reply
        • I think we have a moral obligation to work to make lives and conditions better in other countries and especially to increase wages and benefits there all while ensuring that the US middle class doesn’t take more hits and more money isn’t transferred to the top of the economic spectrum here.

        • climatehawk1

           /  October 24, 2016

          Agreed.

  38. redskylite

     /  October 23, 2016

    Interesting opinion piece in the New York Times, one of the first media references to the danger of burning fossil fuels was printed in New Zealand well over a century ago. Taken time for the message to be digested and sink in eh !

    “When did news coverage begin?

    The earliest (and most concise!) article I’ve seen was published on Aug. 14, 1912, in a couple of New Zealand newspapers, the Rodney and Otamatea Times and Waitemata and Kaipara Gazette:

    The furnaces of the world are now burning about 2,000,000,000 tons of coal a year. When this is burned, united with oxygen, it adds about 7,000,000,000 tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere yearly. This tends to make the air a more effective blanket for the earth and to raise its temperature. The effect may be considerable in a few centuries.”

    http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/10/21/coals-link-to-global-warming-explained-in-1912/?module=BlogPost-ReadMore&version=Blog%20Main&action=Click&contentCollection=Climate%20Change&pgtype=Blogs&region=Body#more-58613

    Reply
    • Genomik

       /  October 24, 2016

      In that area of New Zealand that the original article mentions, Warkworth, is a Space X large satellite antennae. Somebody saw that article and thought it was interesting as its very remote yet ahead of its time!

      Reply
    • They were right. Apparently, few were listening at the time even as the fossil fuel industry was well on its way of falsely portraying their products as ‘clean’ and ‘natural.’

      It’s worth noting that approx 2.1 billion tons of carbon hitting the atmosphere at the time was approx twice the rate of atmospheric carbon release during the last hothouse mass extinction event (the Paleocene-Eocene). We’re about 10 times+ that rate of atmospheric carbon release now.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  October 25, 2016

      ‘The effect ‘may’ be ‘considerable’ in a ‘few centuries’,’ie an early example of the complacency and soft denialism of the IPCC Reports.

      Reply
  39. lesliegraham1

     /  October 24, 2016

    Not sure if this has been posted elsewhere but just thought I’d mention that, according to Climate reanalyser, the Arctic temperature anomaly is forecast to be +6.36C on Saturday.
    ( !!! )

    Reply
  40. Griffin

     /  October 24, 2016

    Sandwich, Massachusetts is an absolute gem of New England’s coastal history. Like so many coastal towns across the world, Sandwich is staring at the rising sea and fidgeting nervously about it’s future. The sea is rising and has already made a noticeable impact to the residents of the town. There are old timers that worry about being caught on the wrong side of medical help during a storm and not being able to count on an ambulance reaching them due to flooded roads. A less immediate concern is the tide taking away some of the big money homes that contribute to the tax base of the town. If the most expensive homes are lost, the tax burden will fall to the less fortunate and a death spiral of migration may result. No one wants to raise taxes to pay for moving the fire department away from the marsh that runs to the heart of the town.
    Unlike many towns, Sandwich has an ace when it comes to taxes. The Cape Cod Canal power plant is a huge source of income for the town. The plant used to burn oil and has mostly been offline in recent years. A sad sight in a beautiful place, it’s rising stack a reminder that we have managed to ruin the best of places.
    Now the plant is dangling a juicy carrot in front of the residents of Sandwich. An upgrade to the plant in the form of a switch to methane would bring a huge increase in tax money for the town.
    Take a look at the article put forth by the Cape Cod Times. The way that it is written. Misleading is an understatement. The small solar portion of the plant, the way that the reader is led to believe that the plant will only run in times when renewables are not available. Sorry folks, but renewables are not available. The Kochs have successfully held off any attempts at harvesting the vast offshore wind resources the Cape. The only other nearby source capable of meeting the sizable power requirement of the populous Cape is the aging Pilgrim nuclear power plant up the coast in Plymouth. So the Canal plant will run. It will burn the fracked gas that is delivered to it at a terrible cost to our country and it’s people. To think otherwise is to be delusional. Cleaner than oil it may be, but an emitter of CO2 nonetheless.
    I guess it is emblematic of the conundrum of our present situation. As happy as folks may be over the switch to a cleaner fuel, we are sadly past the point where this switch is an acceptable course of action for the sake of our future. Our host is stone drunk and switching from whisky to wine just won’t help anymore. “Keep it in the ground” means all of it.
    Unfortunately the dollar will win again. The town will gleefully hitch it’s cart to the devils chariot. Dooming tomorrow for the sake of today.

    “The value of a repowering project dwarfs anything else we could do in town,” Dunham said. “We were hoping this day was coming.”
    http://www.capecodtimes.com/article/20150716/NEWS/150719565

    Reply
    • lesliegraham1

       /  October 24, 2016

      I do tend to get a tad irritated at this ‘fracking is cleaner than oil’ myth.
      It isn’t. Not in terms of CO2e anyway.

      Reply
  41. Climate lessons from the Clinton campaign’s hacked emails:

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/10/wikileaks-hillary-clinton-climate-230177

    The Clinton campaign is concerned about climate change, and is willing to be pushed by environmental groups after the election. They are aware of the methane threat, and say that natural gas “cries out for regulation”.

    Reply
    • Hah. Unintended positive press coming from hacked emails. Wikileaks anti-democratic infowars just turned into a two-edged sword.

      Reply
    • Hi Robert-

      Yes. Really the methane belongs in the ground, but that’s where the pushing comes in.

      Maybe Bernie can help push, in the Senate.

      I hope that Trump so destroys the Republican party that real positive change becomes possible in the Congress. Maybe Trump is, unintentionally, an agent of change after all – by losing.

      Reply
    • The first thing we need to know is how much methane hydrate there is, worldwide, I think. We need to be able to assess the probability of a hothouse mass extinction event and methane catastrophe.

      The oil corporations need to turn over all their seismic scan data on this, one way or another. Or, the U.S. government needs to develop an independent seismic hydrate mapping capability, perhaps as part of the U.S. Navy, I think. One way or another we urgently need to know how much hydrate there is and how likely it is to destabilize. We need an independent look at this.

      The Impacts (Impacts of Abrupt Climate Change) group of national labs and universities was doing a good job of this I think, before their DOE funding was cut.

      Reply
      • It’s not just hydrate — it’s net carbon stores vulnerable to release given X warming. The significant volume represented by hydrate presents a serious risk. However, it’s one of many carbon stores we need to be looking at if we’re going to get a complete picture of possible feedbacks.

        Reply
        • Yeah. you’re right.

          I really hope that Hillary picks a really good science advisor, and that he reads blogs like RobertScribbler.

          Maybe we’re through the dark days of inaction and denial…Christ, I hope so.

          The fossil fuel interests are so entrenched, and such an integral part of the economy…it’s going to be a hell of a fight. But at least it looks like there will be a fight.

        • Exactly. We’re in the fight of our lives right now. So let’s see if we can go out and win a few more people over for the cause😉

          Looking now like EVs have the potential to crash oil production/prices by the mid 2020s all on their own. There’s going to be a big fight over that. But, as one example, that’s part of the big fight for our future.

  42. June

     /  October 24, 2016

    Another part of the world that we hear much less about that has been changed already by climate change. Stories of actual people struggling everyday to deal with the changes around them have an impact that data alone can’t provide.

    Living in China’s Expanding Deserts

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/10/24/world/asia/living-in-chinas-expanding-deserts.html

    Reply
    • Expanding deserts in China and the US Southwest and in India, Pakistan, Africa and South America (among others), sea level rise starting to impact more and more regions, severe rainstorm events and other severe weather, glacial melt and risk of outburst floods, monsoonal disruption, deforestation acceleration due to wildfire increase, worsening ocean health leading to loss of fisheries, mass ongoing coral bleaching events, expanding ocean acidification from the poles, we could just go on and on and on.

      Reply
  43. Tomatoes in the desert! Oh yeah, they taste as bland as hydroponics and deliver the nutrition of canned tomatoes. yes? Somebody eat one and get back to me. Like Florida tomatoes, the soil just isn’t there for a tasty red bulb. And when the growers moves them to the supermarkets the refrigeration turns them into plump mush.

    Reply
  1. Message to Presidential Debate Moderators: Failure to Ask Climate Questions = Climate Change Denial | GarryRogers Nature Conservation

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