Election 2016: A Portrait of America Under Siege

“Donald Trump is an ignorant man, a vulgar man, a man who reminds me of Adolph Hitler and Josef Stalin in his arrogance and thirst for power.” — Bernie Sanders

A Bizarro Reality

To look at Donald Trump’s version of what makes America great is to take a retrograde step through a rip in space-time and enter a fake populist bizarro land. To venture into an alternate dimension where a once-mighty and enlightened nation was strong-armed into taking the downward-sloping path into crisis and collapse. And like the bizarro land of the Superman mythos, this alternate reality is trying to inflict itself on the real world. It will succeed if we let it.

Trump’s a man who’s angrily proud of the fact that he does not pay taxes to support the safety, security and prosperity of the nation he seeks to lead. He’s a billionaire pandering to white workers’ fears of economic disenfranchisement while fighting to cut the very social and economic supports that these voters often rely on. A red-faced fear-monger blaming innocent immigrants and African Americans for economic woes his party — the republicans — engineered through forty years of trickle down economics. Policies that party is seeking to enforce through an unjust suppression of voters in places like North Carolina and Florida.

trumpdystopia

(A portrait of America under siege. What would America under Trump look like? This smokestack shanty town under darkening skies and surrounded by walls topped with barbed wire fences sitting in the shadow of gilded corporate towers just about says it all. Image source: What Would Jack Do?)

Donald Trump has often sought the populist mantle Bernie Sanders rightly bears. But Trump, Sanders says, “is an ignorant man, a vulgar man, a man who reminds me of Adolph Hitler and Josef Stalin in his arrogance and thirst for power.” And as Bernie Sanders goes to bat on the campaign trail for Clinton, pledging to make Trump —  “start paying his fair share in taxes,” the rage-filled corporate mogul tars the career public servant Hillary Clinton, attempting to smear her with the same Wall Street trappings Trump of Trump Towers ignominy has worn since the day of his birth. In other words, it’s one thing to take campaign donations from Wall Street, but another thing entirely to live, eat, and breathe the Wall Street mantra. To support, as Trump has throughout his life, the same harmful tax cut, deregulation, and anti-minimum wage policies that created the problem of Wall Street vs Main Street in the first place.

Entering the Dystopian Upside Down World of Donald Trump

To live in Trump’s reality is to live in an America under a strange kind of upside down siege. If the real economic problem in America is income inequality — then Trump promotes more of it. If the real threats to America’s foreign policy endeavors are increasing isolation and alienation of our allies — Trump seeks to build a wall. If dictators imperil our country or disrupt our elections, then Trump praises them. And if the very real climate change spurred threats such as coastal inundation facing cities like Miami, Norfolk, and Elizabeth City and drought losses threatening the water supply of the Colorado River states are ever-worsening, Trump seeks to burn more coal, oil and gas, attacks renewables, and denies that climate change is actually happening.

(As bad as the effects of climate change currently are today, Donald Trump’s combination of anti-science, anti-renewables, and pro fossil fuels policy will result in a reversal of critical climate change mitigation at exactly the time when they are needed most. Leonardo Di Caprio makes an impassioned appeal for us to do our part and vote for politicians that support responsible climate change policies and against those like Trump who hurt pretty much everyone by pandering to harmful fossil fuel special interests.)

If abuses by the powerful have created harm in America and abroad, Trump talks up abusive strong-men like Russia’s Vladimir Putin. And Putin, for his own part, appears to have done everything he can to help Wikileaks hack Hillary Clinton’s emails or even post fake versions of emails to further misinform the American electorate.

Trump makes fun of dying polar bears, pretends Obama has no birth certificate, mocks reporters with physical disabilities, panders to white supremacists, and has turned himself into a wretched caricature of misogyny. There’s not a victimizable person, animal, or class he doesn’t appear willing to take advantage of.  Bully may describe him, but it doesn’t fully contain his apparent rage-filled ardor for exploitation, for wrecking lives, for running rough-shod over people or things he has labeled ‘loser.’

Praying to America’s Darker Angels

Trump seems to believe that we can transport ourselves back to a mythological past when America was greater than it is today. To promote the illusion that we are, somehow, not far better off now than we were at a time when African Americans were held as slaves, or suffered under the abuses of Jim Crow, when scientists were persecuted, when there were no labor laws preventing the exploitation of children or protecting workers’ rights to fair pay and treatment, when women had no right to vote, when the abuses of state-supported corporate exploitation by such entities as the East India Trade company led to the real Boston Tea Party and wholesale continental revolt, and when a policy of systemic genocide was enacted against the natives who lived on American soil for thousands of years before the colonists came.

What Trump’s lack-vision fails to see is that America’s aspirations for greatness led her out of a very dark time scarred by these ills and into the far more enlightened age of today. An age that is now under threat by the retrograde narratives and policies promoted by people like Trump who seem to push ever on toward a return to the old dark days of injustice and oppression. And this mindset, the abusive and revisionist view of history, is something we must reject if we are to have much hope of navigating the very serious troubles that are coming in this age global climate change and increasing dislocation. We must embrace new ways of doing things. We must turn to new leaders. We must reject the political violence of an old, angry white man, and the system of dominance and harm that he promotes.

A Necessary Endorsement of One of Our Nation’s Strongest Women

This is my endorsement for Hillary Clinton. A woman whom I admire for her strength, her tenacity, and her clarity of purpose. I may not agree with every policy she stands for or admire every aspect of her life. Like the rest of us, she is human and imperfect. But she is a true American who has served her country with honor. A lady who supports our America not just with her words, but both through paying a fair share of her substantial earnings and through her considerable life’s work. A leader I can stand behind. Someone who has already done many great things for this nation and who I believe, with the help of people like Bernie Sanders, is capable of so much more. In a day when we face off against so many abuses both at home and abroad, I think America would benefit from the steady hand of this strong woman — who has the potential to be a truly historical figure and to lead our nation out of a sea of troubles.

Donald Trump represents the worst sins the old world, but if we give Hillary the right kind of support, she can stand for the better virtues of tomorrow and serve the vision of an age that confronts its problems rather than spiraling ever deeper into self-destructive denial, anger, and isolation. That’s what this election means to me — risking an almost assured disaster by electing Trump or creating a very real possibility for reducing and escaping present harms if we elect Clinton. The choice, for me, couldn’t be clearer.

hillary-stormborn

(Throughout his campaign, Trump has impuned the dignity of women, calling them nasty and bragging about objectifying them. As a strong woman, Hillary is exactly the kind of person who should face down Trump’s misogyny. Image source: House of Clinton. )

So I urge you to lift your voices in this election. To be heard and to make your power and capacity to promote justice known. I ask you to stand strong against the intimidation, against the pervasive misinformation coming from those who would inflict so much harm. You are capable. We are capable. We can do this. We can release America from the siege that a fake Tea Party promoted by corporate interests and that people like Trump have placed her under. And we can make a strike against the underlying systemic mysogyny of our nation by electing our first female President of this United States of America.

I have listened to your voices and I know that you are strong. So be heard! It is time for the real America to shine through.

Leave a comment

202 Comments

  1. MT

     /  November 3, 2016

    You are right about Trump. I don’t feel so confident about Clinton though, she represents the corporate interests that are driving this climate crisis.

    Reply
    • Her proposed climate policies are now quite strong. I support them even though I think we’ll need more. She’s fighting for Paris, to strengthen the Clean Power Plan, and to promote renewable energy. That’s better than Obama and much better than Trump. Is it as good as Sanders? No. Will we still have to fight pipelines and fracking. Yes. Like McKibben said — it’s elect Hillary and then fight like hell. What I’m trying to do here is to help create a mandate for climate action for her. If that happens, we can work to hold her accountable if she doesn’t live up to her side of the deal. We basically act as a constituent to counter the corporate influence. That’s the strategy.

      Reply
      • csnavywx

         /  November 3, 2016

        She still holds open disdain for environmentalists, especially the harder greens. That’s one thing the Wikileaks e-mails have shown, which is kind of discouraging. I agree with McKibben here, but I don’t see her being the champion of climate. She is to the right of Obama and has been for a long damn time. It’s going to be a fight. When the folks you have in your employ say stuff like “let’s hurry up and crush Bernie before we start believing our own BS”, it doesn’t inspire confidence. (Yes, that’s an actual leaked e-mail).

        Reply
    • Andrew J Dodds

       /  November 3, 2016

      In a sane world, Clinton would be the republican candidate and Sanders the Democrat one. And Trump the joke one.

      It’s a serious problem in a 2 party system if one of the parties goes bonkers..

      Reply
    • Charles Simmons

       /  November 4, 2016

      You need to stop believing the lies of the alt-right. The Democrat party is not equivalent to the Republican party.

      Reply
  2. vastmandana

     /  November 3, 2016

    Well said… While I feel we really need the Bern, I hope Hilary surprises everyone and does huge things we need doing to survive… She is no dummy… And as the first female leader maybe everything can change… For… It must!

    Reply
  3. vastmandana

     /  November 3, 2016

    Do u have a Patreon account? I love ur eloquent work and will gratefully support you… Btw go talk to Alex again at radio ecoshock… People need to hear your thoughts.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind words, vastmanda. Will see what I can do about another EcoShock interview. Quite a bit has happened since the last one and I’ve always enjoyed the conversations I’ve had with Alex.

      RE Patreon. Unfortunately no. I wasn’t even aware of the site as most of my time is spent here doing research and writing and I guess I don’t keep up with the self promo trends very well. (However, we do have a link in the upper right if you are so inclined.)

      I’ve always loved Bernie and was proud to see him have so much impact on this race. I see Hillary as a pretty complex person who wants to do the right thing but can have difficulty getting perspective because the people who have for so long surrounded her have been overly corporate leaning. But there are other influences that are moderating her stances now and these (including Bernie), I think, should be taken into account.

      Reply
  4. Greg

     /  November 3, 2016

    Hear!Hear! Robert. Excellent. Might I suggest you try this as a letter to the editor of the Post and Times and Herald Trubune and….

    Reply
  5. Genomik

     /  November 3, 2016

    I have too many liberal friends who are not voting for Clinton. I get that they don’t like her but it’s like the World Series. There are really only two candidates/teams and only one can win.

    Letting trump win would be so humiliating as a liberal. It’s often like that in the world, the right gets behind one strong leader or religion and the left splinters into many factions and thus hands elections to the right.

    Reply
    • I think of it this way — would I have rather had Gore than Bush? Heck yes. Is Clinton worse than Gore? No way. Is Trump worse than Bush? By a long shot!

      Reply
      • Andy_in_SD

         /  November 3, 2016

        Heck yes. Is Clinton worse than Gore? No way.

        Many may disagree with that, I being one of those. I see Gore are sincerely concerned and less “owned”. I see Clinton as nothing more than a slogan glued to a face, operated by a cabal of handlers and beholden to too many special interests. I don’t think we have met her yet, only the cultured creation of others.

        Is Trump worse than Bush? By a long shot!

        I can not disagree with that, you could replace the name “Bush” with “Charles Manson” and I would still agree.

        Reply
        • I disagree. I think she’s a pragmatist who’s been demonized for making politically expedient choices. We have had 20 years of right wing media demonization of the Clintons. Had Gore stayed in the political realm, we would have seen the same. Not to say she’s unblemished as the virgin snow. But that’s tough to find.

    • Henri

       /  November 3, 2016

      You’ve got democratic primary voters to blame for that. The only positive attribute about Trump I can come up with is that he is not Hillary Clinton. Seems like that will get him if not straight up elected to president at least much much closer to the post than his credentials justify. I still do have faith in humanity and come the election day the people of US will do the right thing.

      Reply
      • So one reason I think Hillary did so well in the debates was that she didn’t really live up to the political caricature that has been made of her for all these years. This political framing of Clinton, I think, is about three or four shades darker than the real thing. Now that it’s all media, all the time, it has a deleterious effect.

        Reply
  6. F. A. Roberts

     /  November 3, 2016

    Thank you, Robert, for saying so clearly what the press has plainly lost track of in the furor. Americans are significantly stressed by this election (over half of us, according to a survey published on October 13 by the American Psychological Association), and too many are shutting down. We need to hear words like yours.

    Reply
    • Fear is there for a reason it’s a warning. But if one succumbs to fear rather than facing it, it kills your ability to think clearly.

      “Fear is the mind killer. The little death that brings obliteration…”

      Trump and those who support him have attempted to put us in a panic. All the more reason to rally our forces and to stand strong together.

      Reply
      • Witchee

         /  November 3, 2016

        The litany against fear has been on my mind quite frequently lately.

        Reply
    • Spike

       /  November 3, 2016

      Americans aren’t the only stressed ones. I can foresee a Trump presidency tempting Putin to military adventurism in Europe, and the end of 70 years of peace and prosperity. I have two sons just flowering into manhood and thought they would never have to fight and die in battle – if Trump wins I fear it becomes at the very least an outside possibility.

      Reply
      • The Russian military is the most aggressive its been in decades. An isolationist Trump giving a let-do nod to Putin is not an implausible scenario.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  November 4, 2016

        Believe me Spike, Russia has no intention of invading anyone. Where Putin needs to change is in the atmosphere of ignoring the environment that pertains under his Government, partly driven by necessity because fossil fuels is their greatest source of revenue. But there are enough real disasters in the world to invent new ones. Like it or not, the mighty USA must co-operate with Russia and China if we are to survive climate destabilisation. China is doing well, but Russia still needs convincing, and that won’t happen while they are being demonised and threatened.

        Reply
        • Ukraine says otherwise, Syria says otherwise, Georgia says otherwise. Military adventurism on the part of Russia is on the upswing to include land grabs and carpet bombing innocent civilians. Europe has a reason to be concerned.

        • Yep. Nonsense to suggest he has no territorial ambitions.

        • Bill H

           /  November 4, 2016

          cyber-intelligence suggests otherwise too: strong evidence for Russian state’s undermining others through cybercrime, which is, I would suggest, a form of invasion. Who needs to invade the U.S. when you can get your man in by virtue of hacking emails and passing them to wikileaks?

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  November 5, 2016

          Ukraine was the USA spending five billion (Nuland’s own words)to install a Rightwing regime through a violent putsch against an elected President, Syria is Russia aiding the Syrian Government to end an invasion by jihadist terrorists, Georgia was Saakashvilli attacking South Ossetia by bombing Russian peace-keepers and civilians in a sneak attack, Crimea voted to rejoin Russia, which it was part of for centuries, and ‘carpet-bombing civilians’ is black propaganda.
          My position is that in the face of the unprecedented ecological crisis it is MADNESS to join in the sort of propaganda demonisation of Russia, that the West has been engaged in for years. Russia can, and will if attacked, cause a nuclear winter in retaliation, which will resolve ALL our problems. This is my great fear re. Clinton, who is clearly, otherwise, far less dangerous than Trump. Her drive to bring Russia and China to heel is simply CRAZY. We need to hope that she co-operates fully with China in combating climate destabilisation, and use them to bring non-aggressive pressure on to Russia to face reality re. climate destabilisation.

  7. My fear is that even if we defeat Trump (and we probably will), something uglier will take his place eventually. Think it can’t get worse? It already did. Just now. The global populist movement is well underway and one could make the argument that it is a natural consequence of the steady, slow erosion of the economic and geopolitical situation brought on by increasing anthropogenic pressure on the natural world. I worry that we’ll have to try and repeatedly slay this beast (or try and keep it at bay) as we’re trying to fight an uphill battle with climate change. Climate change requires some global action and it’s already apparent that it’s a threat to global action. Brexit is only the tip of the potential iceberg if we’re not careful. Something as fragile as the Paris accord currently is can easily be effectively destroyed by the undertow of geopolitical unrest.

    Reply
    • mark o dochartaigh

       /  November 3, 2016

      The current economic bubble will pop within a year or so and with interest rates near zero the FED will be unable to bounce the economy. We will feel what Japan has been going through for the last quarter century. The economy will be blamed on the Democrats and in four years we will face a Republican party with the same disastrous policies but headed by a less bombastic blowhard. Personalities instead of issues have been the focus of this election, as of almost all ‘Murican elections for years. The electorate remains largely ignorant of the issues which really matter. We must spend every day of the next four years educating the people.

      Reply
      • So income inequality is a huge part of this, for a certainty. And you absolutely need policies to address this.

        In addition, if you do business in new ways (renewables etc) you create new economies that take in the old. There have been a lot of bad investments (fossil fuels) and we can either deflate the bubbles or do nothing and watch them burst. But it’s not a foregone conclusion that there’s this inevitable endless spiral coming.

        The threat is not just economic, but physical. The changes to the Earth System threaten to wreck large chunks of civilization infrastructure and generate waves of displaced persons which creates a very real collapse pressure to the various nations of the world if they fail to deal with the issue well. If they do not create policies that help to alleviate inequalities, then the situation gets much worse.

        That said, even the first two phases of climate change are something that can be dealt with if societies form cohesive groups that work together to confront the challenges and to help people. What we can’t survive is continuing to burn fossil fuels and continuing to generate policies and ways of doing business that only serve the interests of the most wealthy and powerful people on the planet. In other words, governments and businesses need to generate systems that lift people up, not exploit them or put them in ever more vulnerable situations.

        Reply
    • Indeed. From Donald Trump: The Dress Rehearsal for Fascism:

      The Democratic and Republican parties may be able to disappear Trump, but they won’t disappear the phenomena that gave rise to Trump. And unless the downward spiral is reversed—unless the half of the country now living in poverty is lifted out of poverty—the cynical game the elites are playing will backfire. Out of the morass will appear a genuine “Christian” fascist endowed with political skill, intelligence, self-discipline, ruthlessness and charisma. The monster the elites will again unwittingly elevate, as a foil to keep themselves in power, will consume them. There would be some justice in this if we did not all have to pay.

      http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/donald_trump_the_dress_rehearsal_for_fascism_20161016

      Reply
      • So here is a good point. You absolutely need to address income inequality — otherwise, you’re right, more Trumps will pop up to attempt to exploit the fear and sense of loss from these people. I think one of Bernie’s big wins with Hillary was in his push to raise the minimum wage. That’s a start. But so much more needs to be done.

        Reply
      • I wonder if the Clinton Administration’s actions in these directions will be enough to prevent the rise of another, even more insidious demagogue in 4 or 8 years.

        Reply
        • The truth is, probably not. Until Republicans start losing elections, they are not going to stop constantly attacking and obstructing. They have no incentive, as long as those tactics work.

    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 4, 2016

      ‘Populism’ is just a pejorative term for ‘democracy’. The real root of populist discontent is the Free Market capitalist system that has deliberately impoverished tens of millions and massively increased poverty, elite wealth and inequality. To survive, those elites have utilised classic ‘Divide and Rule’ tactics, and the new, or recent, invention, Identity Politics which further fragments society and narrows people’s intellectual horizons. Populist demagogy has been deliberately fomented and fostered by the ruling elite through their MSM, PR, advertising and ‘entertainment’ machines. Climate destabilisation denialism here in Australia is STILL, today, being promoted with ruthless fervour by the Murdoch apparatus in particular, and we elected our Trump, Tony Abbott, to power in 2013, on a tsunami of hatred of environmentalism and climate science.

      Reply
  8. Kevin Jones

     /  November 3, 2016

    Climate Reanalyzer has average surface temperature for the Arctic AND Antarctica at +5.05C. There is no space for ideology in my mind or planet. With all due respect.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jones

       /  November 3, 2016

      My unclear point is this: We’re all fossil fuel addicts, we’re therefore all killing the children’s future (and the planet’s) so we all must acknowledge this. Stop the too mutual BS and recognize the common threat. Our piss poor materialistic mindset.

      Reply
      • We need to stop caring about things and start caring about people. One of the best ways we can do that is to stop burning fossil fuels.

        Reply
  9. Keith Antonysen

     /  November 3, 2016

    Another strong article, Robert.
    Huge numbers of people here in Australia are very worried about Trump being elected. When the odds seemed to rise of him being elected lately, there was a drop in the Stock Market.

    Reply
    • I think there are a lot of people worried everywhere. A big sample of the recent articles I researched while doing background for this one focused on how anxious so many people were about Trump being elected. The guy has really generated a lot of fear. Some have said that he’s already damaged the United States just by running. I think that’s absolutely true.

      Reply
  10. entropicman

     /  November 3, 2016

    I am reminded of Argue Schlesinger’s cyclical theory of American history.

    This is the choice between emphasis on public purpose and private interest.

    Public purpose shows in welfare, protection of social rights, gun control and, of late, climate change mitigation policies.

    Private interest stresses laissez-faire capitalism, protection of property and social Darwinism.

    The last eight years have emphasised the public purpose of Obama’s health policies and climate policies.

    This year’s US presidential election has made the choice between public purpose and private interest much clearer than usual. It will be interesting to see which way the American public jump.

    Reply
    • It’s also worth noting that a single party in the US rarely holds the presidency for more than two election cycles. The electorate is fickle and tends to be most critical of those in power. For Obama and Clinton, this has been amplified by a broadening number of right wing media sources that have put their policies and goals in the harshest of lights. Many people now don’t have enough information to make rational choices. But anyone stepping back and looking at the arc of history here in American, anyone with a rational perspective, would see that we need a continued turn away from private interest as it, overall, continues to have numerous terrible impacts. Enough of the electorate knows this despite the large number of misinforming media sources out there that this race is still leaning toward Clinton. However, it’s no-where near a certain thing.

      Reply
      • Charles Simmons

         /  November 4, 2016

        “Many people now don’t have enough information to make rational choices.” Yes they do. Many people might not be smart enough to look at the available information and use it to make rational choices, but the information is readily available.

        Reply
        • If your only sources are coming from the right, then, no, you don’t. If you’re not taking your time to do research then, no, you don’t. So much of ‘news’ now is just substanceless talk-talk and highly slanted misinformation. And people gravitate to the sources who pander to their preconceptions. It’s true that the information is available. But just like getting off fossil fuels, it’s tough to access individually. Most people either don’t have the research skills or the time to honestly sift fact from fiction.

      • I seriously think most Americans don’t have enough information to make a rational choice, thanks to the nature of the US news and entertainment media.

        In which countries are citizens most subjected to propaganda?

        Reply
  11. Cate

     /  November 3, 2016

    Erik Solheim, chief of UNEP, said the world was “moving in the right direction” on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and tackling climate change, but that measures should be taken urgently to avoid the need for much more drastic cuts in emissions in future. “If we don’t start taking additional action now, we will grieve over the avoidable human tragedy.”

    That grief would go through the usual stages, we can be sure, so we might expect anger and denial on huge scales, along with plenty of useless bargaining.

    Perhaps we are already in stages of grief.

    Countries are not doing enough, fast enough. We need to increase the pressure on our govts to act properly and sufficiently to meet this crisis.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/nov/03/world-on-track-for-3c-of-warming-under-current-global-climate-pledges-warns-un

    Reply
    • Excellent article. And these are very important points to be making right now. I think we also need to say that the world is on track for 3 C warming this Century, and about 6 C warming long term if we don’t get our act together right now.

      Reply
  12. Merf56

     /  November 3, 2016

    You could have a second career as a speechwriter. I intensely dislike Clinton’s foreign policy. My spouse and I travel often for our businesses and being an American abroad these days is not what it used to be! And frankly we don’t blame the citizens of other nations for expressing their dislike of America’s behavior to the few Americans they see but the finger pokes in the chest asking us what the h## wenthink we are doing meddling in their country are getting more threatening with each year. I also think her Russian obsession is politically expedient but made up out of whole cloth but it is also profoundly dangerous.
    But you are right. She is capable and not insane. Something one cannot say for Trump. My only description of him is a lunatic self worshipping demagogue without a principle to his name.
    And since I think climate issues are a top priority she is by far the only candidate that can make positive change though I think any change she both puts forth and gets through will not be anything near the level of change we need . I like the general climate policies Dr Stein has spoken of but of course she has zero chance and besides both sides would use, abuse and stymie her at every turn. She would get far less done than aclunton no matter what she personally believes in.
    So a hold the nose button push for Clinton is in the cards for me and my spouse.
    Though I am certain I will feel the need of a shower afterward…. I wish and hope for better choices for the presidency and for Congress next time…

    Reply
    • If Clinton hangs on and wins this election she will face a very strong Paul Ryan in 2020. I would love to see Hillary and Jill pull out and ask their supporters to vote for Bernie

      Reply
  13. Bill G

     /  November 3, 2016

    First things first -Trump is a disaster- and I voted for Clinton. And I don’t like nor trust Jullian A. – he is in league with folk like Alex Jones. However I never voted for Bill Clinton in the 90s because of the liberalization of trade and the deregulation of the financial markets in his administration (voted Nader). And the Clintons did get rich through their ties with the financial sector. I don’t think it is just a smear. I voted for Bernie in the primary because of that. But Trump is death – just the end. I am not a happy camper.

    Reply
  14. Darrin Clements

     /  November 3, 2016

    At this point its one of two choices, lay down and give up and do nothing or put a SMILE on your face, nose to the grindstone and do something, do anything until your last breath. I enjoy reading your page.
    P.S
    I am writing this from a off-grid cabin somewhere in the remote forest of North Eastern Ontario. Really noticed some disturbing changes up here this summer.

    Reply
  15. BDev

     /  November 3, 2016

    The choices are beyond horrible this election season, across the board. Both major candidates are disastrous. Minor ones little better, if at all. Trump lives in the 50s and seems to want to force a return to those crude attitudes. Clinton is an evil, corrupt, disgusting criminal, and arrogant about it – totally untrustworthy and unlikable in every way. One would have thought this a prime opportunity for libertarians and others… but they all totally blew it.
    To get behind Clinton seems absurd. Is this article an April Fools joke? Or a giant misprint?
    Mr. Scribbler, you are an astute man, intelligent and insightful. Surely you can see the extremely twisted, malevolent, even psychopathic foundation behind the whole system? What point is there to “back” any of it, or any representative of it? Government will not now, and will not ever follow any recommendations from the likes of you or me, regardless of “mandate”… as if the people’s mandate has any power or meaning any more. Gotta get past the wishful thinking. Simply speak your truth, connect with others to create a lifestyle that represents your deeply held values, and carry on. Don’t waste your time and precious Life energy with politics.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 3, 2016

      Do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

      Voltaire

      Reply
      • BDev

         /  November 3, 2016

        CB – I don’t see it being about good vs perfect.I see it more as allowing oneself to be caught up with and perhaps aligned (and therefore to some degree subservient of) powers and forces that are life-devolving, life-degrading and life-negating. Those forces will not be reformed, reconstituted or renegotiated. You cannot pretend to be able to use them toward your own ends; and if you may get lucky and appear to do exactly that, it will most certainly be temporary. The most life-affirming and aware conscious approach is to live and speak fully from your own convictions, whilst also calling out degeneracy wherever it rears its head. Certainly you will be labeled a heretic and banished from the tribe… but what’s the point of Life if one cannot grow beyond the herd?

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  November 3, 2016

          BDev –

          ” Certainly you will be labeled a heretic and banished from the tribe… but what’s the point of Life if one cannot grow beyond the herd? ”

          Flowery Utopian cynicism has never been a favorite of mine. For without the “tribe”, or the “herd”, the “bear” has a way of coming along, and “eating one’s ass”.

          Your posts remind me of why the right is so effective, all they need is bumper sticker, and general. The left has thousands of generals, each with a single spaced 3,000 word manifesto on why their view should exempt them from being a soldier.

      • Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

        -Either Einstein or Alcoholics Anonymous

        Reply
      • Thank you for holding the fort down, everyone. Very much appreciated. We may be a tribe. But we are a tribe of equals. And what really gives me hope is the way everyone stands up for each other.

        Reply
    • Robert in New Orleans

       /  November 3, 2016

      “Clinton is an evil, corrupt, disgusting criminal, and arrogant about it – totally untrustworthy and unlikable in every way.”

      Really?????

      Bdev, I think you are trolling the wrong blog

      Reply
      • BDev

         /  November 3, 2016

        Heck no, I’m not behind Trump or the Repubs. Nor behind Clinton and the Demos. The Libertarians were closest to my philosophical beliefs (zero-aggression principle [zeroaggressionproject.org], individual sovereignty [wikipedia.org/wiki/Individualist_anarchism], etc), but the Libs have been co-opted and warped beyond recognition by the repubs for when the time comes that the repub party falls apart. I don’t think the Demos have a backup for themselves, unless Bernie’s socialists figure they can handle it.
        Probably the best summary of practical political reality is an interview here: http://www.internationalman.com/articles/doug-casey-a-civil-war-could-be-in-the-cards-after-the-election.
        If one feels he must play in the muck of this election and this political state of affairs, wow, it must really stink down there. How do you stand it? Likewise, hoping or expecting any of these blatant narcissists running for office to “do the right thing” and selflessly serve for your pet issue, much less for the benefit of all, is ludicrous. You guys are surely aware of this, yes?
        Re: RS blogs about climate changes – I thoroughly enjoy his work and read it regularly. I know that the feeling of desperation to Do Something comes naturally when aware of CC and its implications. So yeah, just a reminder to remind yourself that humans and human nature has created our current situation, and one of the strongest parts of human nature is that it does not Change or Do Something until the crisis is immediate and palpable. CC is nowhere near that stage yet, and by the time it is palpable, it is far too late. So again, why waste your time with politics?

        Reply
      • BDev

         /  November 3, 2016

        CB – What is this 3000 word manifesto of which you speak?
        And if U R comfortable being part of the herd, well, I suppose that is fine. Good luck.

        Reply
    • “I have not passed through fire and death to bandy crooked words with a witless worm.”

      I’m sorry. I don’t see Clinton as malevolent. I disagree with some of her past choices. But her current policy stance is clearly benevolent and is much, much more positive than the great leap backward we would see from Trump. Is Clinton as progressive as I would like her to be? Not yet. But she’s moving in the right direction. Trump might as well be Sauron of Mordor for all that he would do to this country and the world. If you can’t see that which is just so obvious, then there is nothing I can do to help you.

      Farewell BDEV, I’m sure Trump’s operatives appreciate your efforts (ignorant or otherwise) on their behalf.

      Reply
  16. Hatrack

     /  November 3, 2016

    The one thing that concerns me is that she’s not going to do nearly enough on climate. There is, I suspect, an almost reflexive desire to display one’s grasp of newly-achieved power by showing just how attuned you are to “the way things really are”, particularly when it comes to all things economic.

    Assuming a Clinton victory (which I don’t necessarily assume), we’ll learn a lot from her financial nominations and appointments. If they’re all about Conventional Wisdom (see also: Summers, Larry), then we’re going to need to get out and push, because that car’s been stuck in the mud for some years now, and we don’t have a lot of time left.

    There’s also the possibility that things are moving so rapidly, and with so many unanticipated consequences, that any incoming president is going to be hard-pressed to respond to multiple climate impacts. Black Swans whose wings span the planet, are made of depleted uranium and are moving at velocities we haven’t seen in 15 million years, don’t stop to inspect even the best of intentions.

    Reply
    • For the record, I totally agree that Hillary doesn’t get it on climate and that she won’t do enough. It’s going to be up to us to push for better climate policy, just as we’ve had to do with Obama. The fundamental underlying problem is, not enough Americans take the issue seriously enough yet to dominate the political system, and until they do, NO politician who can win is going to be pure enough for us.

      Even so, it’s pretty easy, when Trump rallies in coal states feature people holding signs that say “Trump Digs Coal” and when Trump appoints an professional climate science-denying asshole like Myron Ebell (just Google him and his comments) to head his EPA transition team, to tell who would be an utter disaster for U.S. climate policy if elected.

      I think that is what Bernie and Al Gore understand and a major reason why they are urging support for Hillary. MHO.

      Reply
      • That’s my calculous too. I’ve been trying to do my part here to raise awareness so that the broader public can get a better understanding of the issue. If that happens we can have more national level candidates that push for big changes — not the kind of half measures that we’ve tended to see. But half measures are better than no measures or going backward in full reverse.

        Reply
      • Hatrack

         /  November 5, 2016

        Fascinating commentary on NPR last night (speaking of Trump): there was a discussion of Ohio as a swing state, and apparently Youngstown is a Trump stronghold. What came through clearly in the interviews was the fervent belief that yes, Trump will bring back the steel mills, and yes, we will get our old jobs back, and yes, everything will be just like it used to be.

        The reporter then spoke with someone – an economist or eco-devo representative, I believe – who noted that a new steel mill did open in Youngstown in the last few years. A French company invested $1.2 billion in a state-of-the-art steel site. The mill employs a total of 400 people, because it’s almost completely automated.

        The whole thing reminded me of nothing so much as accounts of the Ghost Dance of 1888-1890; a peace and prosperity ritual invoked as a last mental defense by a civilization stuck in a world that was rapidly mutating beyond all recognition. We can expect many more such magical invocations in the near future, I suspect.

        Reply
        • good read on things, Hatrack. I think we are living through another cultural revolution. A followup to the industrial revolution (which has been a disaster for the environment and ecosystem diversity and stability). This current revolution is about the loss of importance of labor, the loss of importance of a working class and a transition to to the importance of a consumer class. One problem with this transition is that you cannot have a consumer class if personal incomes to support consumption is not maintained somehow. Of course, the truth is that the planet won’t support the transition of a working population of say, 5 billion, to a consumer class of 5 to 8 billion (capitalism needs growth, steady state capitalism is an oxymoron).

          We actually need to retool human economic activity to focus on shelter, food production, social stability in the form of education and caregiving for the ages of human life that require support, but that retooling requires the current economic winners, the so-called 1%, to give up their dreams of yachts, multiples homes, first class travel, lives of leisure, etc. That group just does not seem agreeable to an overhaul of the global economic system at this moment (you can review almost anything that Dick Cheney says to get a read on what that group is thinking). Paul Ryan is the current leader of the political system that protects the status quo, Hillary is also a leader of that same political system, but she is an incremental reformer. Bernie and Jill Stein are leaders of the political movement for the retooling of the human economic system. Trump is a manifestation of the rage that is building about the loss of stability for the folks in the 20% to 65% income range. Unfortunately, there is a lot of rage and there are a lot of folks in that income range. Trump is a like the monster from the id in that old sci-fi movie “forbidden planet.” It will be a disaster to have Trump as president. Unfortunately, we have a disaster unfoldiing in the natural world and it is far from certain that Clinton’s incremental reform impulses can be anything more than something akin to the proverbial deck chairs on the Titanic response, so this is a dark time. Because our political system is so corrupted by power and influence and the body politic of this country is so depleted by the competition of neoliberal globalism and so easily distracted by sports events and kardashions, we cannot muster the political power and will to engage in a real challenge to the current global economic system and entrenched power, we can only entertain the possibility of election of an incremental reformer like Obama or Clinton who are very unlikely to produce large, fundamental changes to the economic system. The Obama/Clinton type candidates are better than the Ryan/Romney types and much, much better than the prospect of “leadership” from a monster from the id, but man, that is a very low bar.

          People talk about having to fight for Hillary to be elected, then to fight with Hillary to create the change we need. That is the best option that our political system is willing to offer to us. We are in an ugly situation. The theatrical part of this political tragedy has only one more week to go, then we are faced with the demands of a very difficult struggle with a very dysfunctional governmental system so committed to the status quo and so controlled by the 1%ers that real change seems like a dream.

          As MLK Jr. demonstrated in his monumental struggle against systematic racism in this country, it is very important to have a dream. I dream about our species laying down its arms and working together to create an economic system that does not require the wholesale destruction of the planet. I dream of doctors without borders, then I dream of education and agriculture without borders. I dream of a world without borders and a world where might does not make right.

          So silly, but there it is.

          Mike

  17. coloradobob

     /  November 3, 2016

    Way off topic –

    Hello Miami, one more test coming your way :

    If you only see one astronomical event this year, make it the November supermoon, when the Moon will be the closest to Earth it’s been since January 1948.

    During the event, which will happen on the eve of November 14, the Moon will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average full moon. This is the closest the Moon will get to Earth until 25 November 2034, so you really don’t want to miss this one.
    http://www.sciencealert.com/we-re-about-to-see-a-record-breaking-supermoon-the-biggest-and-brightest-in-nearly-70-years

    Reply
  18. The true long-term and short-term strategy is to seriously challenge the corporate party, and the best way to do that is to give Jill Stein (who has *vastly* better environmental policies than either Clinton or Trump) as many votes as possible, so that the Greens retain ballot access and receive federal funding.

    I am not voting out of fear any more in my life. I’m voting for who I think is the best candidate, and in this election that decision is extremely clear.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 3, 2016

      Third Parties: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

      Reply
    • Votes for Ralph Nader gave us George Bush. Votes for Stein will give us Trump. If you vote for Stein, you may as well have voted for Trump. The best thing Stein could do now for America in this race is to leave the election and to ask her supporters to vote for Clinton.

      Reply
      • Yep. If you don’t get elected, and Stein won’t, then you can’t do a thing. But hey, if you are thinking of voting for Trump and live in a swing state, by all means vote for her instead.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  November 4, 2016

        rs, if you are saying that anyone in what is anything close to a swing state should think very carefully before voting for a ‘third party’ candidate, I’m with you.

        But the Bush/Gore election was so close and so full of chicanery and worse, I don’t think that it is completely fair to just blame a handful of Nader voters for what happened. Voter suppression took many times more votes from Gore, as did Democratic defections and any number of other things. I really don’t want to derail the discussion with a rehash of that whole fiasco, but I’ll just point out that even my most loyally Democratic friends admit that Gore’s failure to even take his own state was kind of an indication that he could have been a better candidate.

        Reply
    • In any case, Jill Stein’s running mate sounds a lot like Trump. For example, he has called NATO a group of ‘gangster states’ (This includes America and appears to be more in line with Putin’s thinking than anything else) and has referred to Obama as ‘Uncle Tom.’ There are other reasons to believe she’s an intentional spoiler, but this is the most glaring.

      https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2016/08/26/jill-steins-foul-language-on-race/

      Reply
  19. Cate

     /  November 3, 2016

    Meanwhile, in Canada—

    Filthy fuel development continues unabated and indeed with redoubled force, as if there were no tomorrow, as if climate change were a Hollywood fantasy.

    Canada aims to get the stuff out of the ground, get it to market, and roll in the dough it brings in.

    Canada does not understand #NoMorePipelines or #KeepItInTheGround.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/montney-natural-gas-challenges-1.3829007

    Reply
  20. this will be over soon, meanwhile:

    http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/obama-pipeline-rerouting-under-study-to-accommodate-sacred-lands-of-native-americans/?utm_source=Sightline%20Institute&utm_medium=web-email&utm_campaign=Sightline%20News%20Selections&utm_source=Sightline+Newsletters&utm_campaign=05041ed826-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_11_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_18df351f8f-05041ed826-296268189

    I think it’s weak to argue against fossil fuel infrastructure for protection of water, or any other consideration other than the long term CO2 consequences of moving and burning the fossil fuels. So in this case, Obama can appease and protect water of the Dakota first nations, but still accommodate the movement and burning of fossil fuels. Nimby issues are weak unless we see the entire planet as our front/backyard

    My own take on the current election cycle: if we end up with a President Trump or a President Hillary, we should ask ourselves:

    What is wrong with this system?
    How could we end up with these options at this moment?

    I thought the possibility of a President named Bernie seemed like the kind of change we needed. My interest waned when that option disappeared. Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum are not inspiring. I choose to be moved by hope and I reject the peddlers of fear. Fear and loathing are not the basis for wise governance.

    Reply
  21. June

     /  November 3, 2016

    This election cycle has shaken many of us to our core. Bernie tried to focus people’s anger where it belongs – the corporate takeover of all three branches of government. He generated so much energy and hope that the Democratic Party apparatus crushed him. As Robert says, our task now is to prevent Trump getting into office. Then we must try to resurrect Bernie’s revolution. If we lose focus and interest after this election, and snipe at each other, then we will never be effective in reining in the monied interests. If Trump gets in because people stay home or vote for a third party candidate then he could light a spark that will cause tremendous damage. I, too, am angry at being forced once again to vote the lesser of two evils, but our whole future is at stake in this election. Now is not the time to throw up our hands and say it doesn’t make a difference. It does.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 3, 2016

      “The climate movement has to elect Hillary Clinton — and then give her hell,” writes the movement leader and journalist Bill McKibben.

      What the election outcome will really mean for climate and energy
      By Chris Mooney

      https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/11/03/what-the-election-outcome-will-really-mean-for-climate-and-energy/#comments

      Reply
    • Thank you for the clear-thinking here, June. Your comment acknowledges a disappointment that so many of us feel for losing the hope represented by Bernie earlier this year. But you’re right. We’ve only really lost if we’ve given up fighting. Up until this election, Bernie was just a blip on the political radar. Now he’s a real political force who’s able to influence the entire democratic party. In addition, we have other leaders who seek to walk a similar path. Losing a battle is not losing the war. But if we let Trump in, then we will have lost so much more than just one battle. We will risk losing everything we’ve fought so hard for. Clinton we can bargain with and influence. Trump will try to do everything in his power to crush all that we stand for. There really is a very clear choice here.

      Reply
  22. June

     /  November 3, 2016

    Reply
  23. Montysano

     /  November 3, 2016

    The right wing echo chamber, which is without any morals or scruples whatsoever, is apparently quite effective. Even on this blog, which is a haven for intelligent and fair-minded people, many seem to have been overwhelmed by the decades long smear campaign against HRC. As Robert put it up above, the caricature that’s been created is far from the reality. I’m well aware of Clinton’s flaws, but the choice between her and D. Trump seems, to me anyway, to be beyond discussion. He is dangerously unstable.

    Reply
    • Montysano

       /  November 3, 2016

      Many of my friends on social media have gleefully taken up the chant of “Lock her up”, without stopping to think what an ugly, and wholly un-American, thing it is that they’re promoting.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 3, 2016

        Reply
      • we lock up a lot of people in the US, it is probably a terrible idea, but it’s pretty American.
        The folks chanting “lock her up” believe Clinton has broken laws and they are applying their conventional thinking to the question of what to do with lawbreakers.

        I think it makes sense to do good analysis, search for meaningful questions that will help folks join in thoughtful analysis and not engage in a lot of reactionary political action. But, hey, that’s just me.

        There are numerous value systems that folks might use to determine how to vote (or not vote) this cycle. Sometimes I think this country has become the United States of Fear and Loathing.

        I think that fear, loathing, disgust are powerful motivators that are used to manipulate us and prevent change that would challenge entrenched power.

        both sides have demonized the other party’s candidate. Ask who benefits from this kind of election process.

        This will be over soon for bad or badder. Take a deep breath. Don’t succumb to fear. The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. FDR said that at a moment when fascism was on the rise around the globe. What an enlightened bit of advice that was in a dark time! Don’t succumb to fear. I said that.

        Mike

        Reply
      • It’s ugly and un-American because we don’t lock people up just because we disagree with them politically. And that’s the motivator here. Clinton is guilty of no crime that would result in her incarceration. Trump has made this claim falsely. He seeks to be judge and jury. Yet one more example of his dictatorial bent.

        Reply
    • From the article: “Dirk Notz calculates that for every person who drives a car 1,000 miles or takes a round-trip flight from New York to London, three square meters (about 32 square feet) of sea ice vanishes from the Arctic.”

      In other words, for each ton of carbon a person emits, they melt about 3 square meters of ice in the Arctic.

      Which really underlines the urgency both for individuals to try to do something about their carbon emissions and for governments and businesses to provide them with more choices and encouragement/incentives for bringing those emissions down.

      Reply
      • webej

         /  November 3, 2016

        An interesting calculation. I once tried to calculate how much energy we were expending on a family summer holiday, flying and driving, and I came to about 3½ years worth of our energy use at home (cooking, heating, shower, electricity). I was surprised at how hard it was to find a way to calculate this. Any tips for good energy/carbon calculators (websites) — it can be quite interesting to get a feel for magnitudes on the basis of day-to-day activities.

        Reply
  24. JPL

     /  November 3, 2016

    “I’m a pessimist because of intelligence, but an optimist because of will.”
    Antonio Gramsci, Letter from Prison (19 December 1929)

    Same.

    When I need some perspective, my mind often wanders to thoughts like this:

    “According to astronomers, there are probably more than 170 billion galaxies in the observable Universe, stretching out into a region of space 13.8 billion light-years away from us in all directions.

    And so, if you multiply the number of stars in our galaxy by the number of galaxies in the Universe, you get approximately 1024 stars. That’s a 1 followed by twenty-four zeros.

    That’s a septillion stars.

    But there could be more than that.”

    What is this greater thing that we are all a part of? Wild, unknowable nature. Brings me comfort somehow.

    John

    Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  November 3, 2016

    Leo’s little movie –

    7,521,922 views
    219,818 up 8,496 down

    Reply
  26. Am quite a fan of the blog Robert, thanks for your work. I’m wondering if you would comment on this; recently heard an interview with Mr. Curran about this paper. Northern Hemisphere soil carbon uptake peaked in 2006, 24-65 or 70 years ahead of schedule. Summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean may be gone by 2020, 30-80+ years (according to UN) ahead of time. Alarming that multiple, disparate indicators of a rapidly changing climate are occurring literally decades before recent predictions? Not enough coverage of ‘much faster than expected/’

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/oct/12/past-our-peak-plants-and-a-burgeoning-problem-with-co2-weatherwatch

    Reply
    • Thanks Josh. I’ll see what I can do. Excellent article and one that’s somewhat related to my recent CO2 post. You push the system hard enough and things do break down faster than expected. That’s what we’re doing now. And if we don’t get off this fast track to destruction soon we are all basically screwed.

      Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  November 3, 2016

    THE BIG IDEA: One in five voters in 2012 were college-educated white women. Mitt Romney won them by six points, according to exit polls.

    Our fresh Washington Post-ABC News Tracking Poll, which has Hillary Clinton ahead by just two points among all likely voters nationally, finds that Donald Trump is losing college-educated white women by 27 points.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/paloma/daily-202/2016/11/03/daily-202-college-educated-white-women-are-hillary-clinton-s-firewall/581a47c4e9b69b6085905de4/

    Reply
  28. i think we are over the cliff, but that’s a story for a different day. I didn’t mean to imply you should cover those faster than expected issues more, just the media in general .No pressure!

    Reply
  29. coloradobob

     /  November 3, 2016

    Climate Change Captured in Stunning Antarctic Ice Photos
    NASA’s IceBridge missions provide visual evidence of melting ice.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/nasa-ice-bridge/

    Reply
  30. I am an avid reader of Robert’s posts, extremely well written and easy to understand. I also follow many of the contributor’s posts and delve into the links. Many are beyond my pay scale, but persistence does pay, I am learning new things almost daily, canfield oceans, hienrich events, positive feedbacks to name a few! My earlier thoughts about this blog were that it tends to be somewhat alarmist, so to balance my readings I try to find other websites for a sensible view. I tend to pick what I consider mainstream websites, i.e. NOAA, NASA, BBC, Wikipedia. What I am learning there does not conflict with Robert’s blogs, it only reinforces them.
    Something Robert wrote in 2015:
    I often find it difficult not to fall into crushing despair. Probably the Worst Crisis Humankind has Ever Faced.
    There are so many negative and frightening events happening in the world right now, it is hard to stay positive. The election in the US is but one example. After BREXIT nothing would surprise me. I read a hopefully unbiased article about Clinton on a BBC website, I cannot understand Trump’s message of wanting to “lock her up”, what has she done that is actually a crime or criminal? Then there is the state of the world’s ice, the coral reefs, the oceans and so much more.
    Individually I have tried to do what I can, drive less, retired my clothes dryer, put in LED lights, collect rain water, added insulation, I wish I could afford an electric vehicle or solar for my roof. Actually what I really wish for is a good nights sleep!!

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 3, 2016

      65karin –

      You win the post of the day.

      Here’s yer prize :

      Battle of Britain – The final battle

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 3, 2016

        65karin –

        I say this, because you have stated what anyone who has studied this topic, comes to :

        “Something Robert wrote in 2015:
        I often find it difficult not to fall into crushing despair. Probably the Worst Crisis Humankind has Ever Faced.”

        It’s a bit like watching the plague ship sail into Genoa harbor. They knew it was coming. They knew it was bad, they just that no idea how bad it would be, or why it was coming. There’s just one difference today, we know why it is coming.

        Reply
      • CB
        I wasn’t sure if I should accept my “prize” or run or hide, your sense of humour is different, but I love your taste in music.

        Reply
    • Re the solar and EV, keep checking around for angles. We just purchased a share in a local community solar project (you’re allowed to do that in Vermont, pay for part of the project and get credit for part of the electricity produced, as long as the installation is within a few miles of your residence). We did it to cover the extra electricity needed for our EV and heat pump. It’s in a much better location than our own backyard solar panels, and so the payback will be quite a bit faster. Meanwhile, it’s like an annuity–we invested some money, and each month we see a savings benefit, for the life of the panels. We were able to take advantage of federal and state tax credits on the original panels and the EV which reduced their cost.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  November 3, 2016

      65karin welcome and thanks for such a warm and honest post. You will find good company here and hopefully go out to fight the good fight well armed.

      Reply
  31. climatehawk1

     /  November 3, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  32. Vic

     /  November 3, 2016

    It’s time for a song. This song.

    Reply
  33. Spike

     /  November 3, 2016

    We know what happens when societies succumb to fanatical unreason.

    Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  November 3, 2016

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 3, 2016

      ” MONSTERS BEHIND THE DOOR ”

      it’s a phrase I caught a few weeks back from the Tom Brokaw special on Global Warming.

      Tom plowed a lot of the same ground that’s been in the news for the past few years, but the show was notable for the above phrase, and what it describes. Dr. Hanson from The Goddard Space Flight Center used it. And like the 50’s SiFi movies it’s the things we don’t know that scare him .

      That was Sept. 7th in 2010.

      http://colorado-bob.blogspot.com/2006/09/monsters-behind-door.html

      Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  November 4, 2016

    I”m listening to Leo’s movie soundtrack as I wander the web tonight. This is like the printing of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”.

    According to legend, Abraham Lincoln greeted Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1862 by saying “So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war.” Whether the story is true or not, the sentiment underscores the public connection between Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the Civil War.

    Reply
  36. coloradobob

     /  November 4, 2016

    “The onion skin around the Earth”.

    The deniers say we are , What I call “Puny Humans”, well this says something far different –

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 4, 2016

      In 1908 , sliced bread hadn’t been invented, and all this was still dark.

      I post this crap, because we have no idea how far, and how fast we have come.

      And it is getting faster,

      It seems we will grind the world to to feed our children so they may have the next load of crap.

      Reply
  37. Here’s a little anecdote for those who are thinking about third-party votes this year.

    I lived in Washington, D.C., for a number of years in the 1970s and 1980s, and there was a Democratic Congressman named Herb Harris who represented a swing district in Northern Virginia. He had won it very narrowly two terms in a row, but in 1980, he lost it narrowly to a much more conservative guy, a Republican named Stan Parris. The primary reason for the loss (by 1,000 votes) was that an independent candidate running on a platform calling for the legalization of marijuana received 5,000 votes.

    My recollection is that it later turned out that the third-party candidate had actually been recruited to run by one of Herb’s own former staff members, whom Herb had fired and who had vowed to get even with his boss. He did.

    You can get a sense of the dynamics at work in minor-candidate races from this clipping from the 1982 Washington Post about yet another race between Harris and Parris. Parris, now the incumbent, is saying he welcomes the entry of another third-party candidate, a nuclear freeze advocate, into the race because “any impact this young man has on the campaign has to be contrary to Herb’s campaign.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1982/06/18/third-candidate-qualifies-for-ballot-in-va-8th-district/9eaf97ee-b5df-4694-a8f5-12757f9b7873/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 4, 2016

      tep.

      Reply
    • Perhaps Mr. Harris should have been more appealing to a wider array of voters than was Mr. Parris and the third-party candidates. As Ralph Nader recently said, ‘why blame the little green party (particularly for bush winning in 2000)?’ Was it Nader’s fault that over 300,000 registered Florida Democrats voted for George W Bush in 2000? Was it Nader’s fault that Al Gore lost his own home state of Tennessee to Bush?

      Reply
      • wili

         /  November 4, 2016

        Good points, Josh. And of course, it is on the face of it quite ridiculous to claim that one candidate has the responsibility of ensuring the election of an opposing candidate that he (or she) is running against! Why that is so hard for some to grasp is beyond me.

        Reply
        • Yeah, it’s Nader’s fault. He did a profoundly stupid thing. As for how to be smart on ones feet, see Bernie Sanders…

      • Perhaps. Or perhaps I’m right, and you are wrong. All I can tell you is what I told you. Harris had a disgruntled aide who vowed to take his boss down. He did it by recruiting a candidate like Stein, who had no chance of winning, but could siphon votes away in a tight race. If that is what you want to happen here, vote for her, but if Trump wins, it’s on you and everyone else who did not vote for the one candidate who had a chance to beat him.

        Reply
  38. Marcusblanc

     /  November 4, 2016

    No matter how little Hilary fails to inspire, the idea that she is just as bad as Trump is simply ludicrous.

    A Trump victory would severely damage the standing of the US around the world. People would be laughing at you, just as they laughed at us when we voted for Brexit.

    The year of stupid? Don’t let it happen, brothers and sisters…

    Reply
  39. http://www.pondbiofuels.com/Company/News/assets/earthandindustry_com.pdf

    Some good news, the manufacture of concrete is right up there with FF for emitting GHG. This company has become the first to successfully use carbon dioxide emitted from a major industrial source to produce high value biomass from microalgae.

    Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  November 4, 2016

    What set of threads these are. That RS has murdered the trolls.

    What set of threads these are.

    Reply
  41. coloradobob

     /  November 4, 2016

    I miss DTL, and I worry.

    Reply
  42. Thanks Mike. Your comment “And really, it’s not questions about whether she should be prosecuted, it’s rage about the double standard and the hypocrisy.” opened my eyes a little more. Understanding American politics is difficult at best and from what I read neither candidate is palatable, it’s just that Trump is worse.

    Reply
  43. coloradobob

     /  November 4, 2016

    My last point , This is the last spot to see the last chance we have. And it ain’t good.
    We can always pull a rabbit out of our ass.

    But the ocean of fear and stupid is winning.

    Now comes the dark the time.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 4, 2016

      See, when he loses , he has a way to attack. This is never going away. His whole plan is to be the most richest , most powerful right wing ass hole on the planet.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 4, 2016

        My liver is as big as a Zeppelin .

        My retirement plan called for me die long before this.

        Plan well kids.

        Reply
      • Hilary

         /  November 6, 2016

        I think this Opinion piece fits tight in here, CB:

        If Donald J Trump wins the US election on Wednesday, your impulse may be to cry, scream or start building your bunker.
        But don’t freak out. It may be – in the long run – the best thing that happens to us. It may stop something worse happening.
        Trump is the symbol of something very ugly happening in not just the US, but around the world. He didn’t create this ugly thing, it created him. Sure, he lassoed it all into one place and gave it words to hurl at others, but it was there before him. It’s the growing mob of angry people, who feel like they’re becoming poor and powerless…………………….”

        http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11741782

        Hilary, agog watching all this from down under in NZ

        Reply
        • thanks for sharing a sophisticated read on what is happening around the world and how it arises with things like Brexit and the Trump movement.

          I don’t think Trump will win, but if/when he loses, the bitter Trump supporters will still be with us and an electoral defeat will not make them more reasonable. The Clinton presidency may be a pyrrhic victory unless Hillary is more successful that Obama at bridging the political gap. That does not seem likely. Heck, it seems impossible to bridge the political gap with these folks and yet, we have to if we are to make needed changes.

          We have our work cut out for us in any case. Telling the Trump voters how dumb they are does not seem to help. Shocker.

          Maybe it helps if we tell ourselves how bitter and frustrated the Trump voters must be to embrace this guy. Does that generate any sympathy for them?

    • June

       /  November 4, 2016

      Dark times indeed. This is the kind of behavior Trump inspires.

      Poll Worker Injured By Trump Sign Booby-Trapped With Razor Blades

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-sign-booby-trapped-box-cutter_us_581a786de4b0c43e6c1df3e5

      Reply
  44. June

     /  November 4, 2016

    “Simulation brings global 100% renewable electricity system alive for the first time”

    The global Internet of Energy Model visualizes a 100 percent renewable energy system (100%RE) for the electricity sector for 2030. It can do this for the entire world which, in the model, has been structured into 145 regions, which are all visualised, and aggregated to 9 major world regions.

    The model is designed to find the most economical solution for a renewable electricity system. The model shows how the supply of electricity can be organised to cover the electricity demand for all hours of the year. This means that best mix of renewable energy generation, storage and transmission components can be found to cover the electricity demand, leading to total electricity cost roughly between 55 and 70 euros per megawatt-hour for all 9 major regions in the world.

    “With the simulation, anyone can explore what a renewable electricity system would look like. This is the first time scientists have been able to do this on a global scale.” says Christian Breyer, LUT Solar Economy Professor and a leading scientist behind the model.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161103090753.htm

    Reply
  45. Cate

     /  November 4, 2016

    All over the newsfeed today—the UNEP “Emissions Gap” report. It’s dire.

    “The carbon pollution cuts on the table from now through 2030 will put the world on a trajectory to warm 3.4°C (6.1°F) by 2100. In order to keep warming close to the 2°C threshold, the world will have to find a way to cut an additional 25 percent of its carbon pollution.”

    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/unep-report-climate-change-20846

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 4, 2016

      Direct link to the report:

      https://web.unep.org/emissionsgap/

      Reply
    • csnavywx

       /  November 4, 2016

      Yeah, we’re nowhere near where we need to be yet, much less to the 2C or 1.5C target (the latter of which is probably already blown). “Must cut an additional 25% from forecast 2030 emissions”. That’s AFTER INDCs — yikes. This is why Kevin Anderson makes the argument that 2C is already blown. I’ve listened to his argument and it’s pretty convincing.

      Reply
    • Griffin

       /  November 4, 2016

      I find these projections, however dire, to be misleading. Hopefully I am wrong but I am under the impression that the reality of the situation is even more critical than shown here.
      I don’t know for sure but it seems that these projections are run using straight emissions data. While straight emissions consequences alone are easily enough to fry us, it is the earth system feedbacks that may accelerate the warming to a degree that renders these projections obsolete for any significant time period.
      We are witnessing the effects of Arctic Amplification right now this month. The strength of the warming is catching the eye of even seasoned experts. The energy on display is real. We can be confident that we will not see a large scale recovery of ice mass on our planet going forward. How well do these “by 2100” projections factor in the energy imbalance of the loss of albedo across the Arctic?
      Are they accurate enough to make policy decisions on or are they merely conservative assumptions that will inevitably lose out to the AGW mantra, “faster than expected “?

      Reply
  46. wili

     /  November 4, 2016

    http://occupydemocrats.com/2016/11/03/trump-roger-stone-just-ordered-court-voter-intimidation-tactics/
    “Trump and [his advisor] Roger Stone Were Just Ordered To Court For Voter Intimidation Tactics”

    Reply
  47. Apologies if posted before:

    ” … Are we divided? Sure. But there’s only one party that is so vigorously undermining core democratic institutions in this way. You may not like what Democrats stand for, but they aren’t engaging in widespread official vote suppression, chanting that should their candidate win her opponent should be tossed in jail, promising to prevent any Republican president from filling vacancies on the Supreme Court, suggesting that they’ll try to impeach their opponent as soon as he takes office, cheering when a hostile foreign power hacks into American electronic systems, and trying to use the FBI to win the election … ”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2016/11/03/republicans-are-now-vowing-total-war-and-the-consequences-could-be-immense/

    Reply
  48. Vic

     /  November 4, 2016

    French energy giant Engie has finally decided to pull the plug on the 50 year old Hazelwood brown coal fired power plant in Victoria. Once described by WWF as the most polluting power plant in the developed world this old clunker is believed to be responsible for roughly 3% of Australia’s CO2 emissions.
    Along with the closure of Hazelwood, Engie also announced it had decided to appoint a financial adviser for the possible sale of Loy Yang B coal power station, also in Victoria, and the Kwinana co-generation facility in Western Australia. The closure follows the sale by Engie of its coal plants in Indonesia and India earlier this year.
    Thankyou for your leadership Engie. Thankyou for stepping in where the Australian government fears to tread.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/nov/03/hazelwood-coal-power-station-to-close-with-loss-of-800-jobs

    Reply
  49. Hillary and Trump are what the MSM has given us. This is just the next step in a steady de-evolution, in the demise of what was once a great nation. And, FWIW, nothing about Hillary (or any within the Clinton fraudulent flophouse) is to be trusted. She has been TERRIBLE for the environment, and will continue to be TERRIBLE for the environment, as she continues to serve money alone.

    Reply
    • Not to mention it’s now become widespread knowledge that Clinton aggressively promoted natural gas fracking during her time at State Department. She loves methane leaks

      Reply
    • wili

       /  November 4, 2016

      rfn, soooo, you find Trump to be wonderfully trustworthy? A man who can’t utter a sentence without spewing one or more Big Lie? (Well, I could have stopped at just “A man who can’t utter a [coherent] sentence” but that’s another issue ‘-) )

      Nearly all politicians in both camps lie and nearly all are or have been at some point beholden to moneyed interests. But Trump is pretty much ONLY about money and lies. To call him a con man or a scam artists is actually an insult to those who practice those dubious skills. As someone said above, he lies even when he knows that we know that he is lying. He seems to be addicted to the practice.

      As many environmentalist and others have said, we need to elect Clinton to avoid the utter disaster of Trump. Then we need to double our efforts to hold her feet to the fire. Warren, Sanders, McKibben and others are committed to just this. Will you join us?

      Reply
      • wili

         /  November 4, 2016

        As rs has reminded us repeatedly, we should avoid false equivalence. Trump’s moral and character failures are leaps and bounds beyond Clinton’s. (And I have plenty of problems with much of what she has said and done.)

        And as ch1 has pointed out:

        “…here’s only one party that is so vigorously undermining core democratic institutions in this way. You may not like what Democrats stand for, but they aren’t engaging in widespread official vote suppression, chanting that should their candidate win her opponent should be tossed in jail, promising to prevent any Republican president from filling vacancies on the Supreme Court, suggesting that they’ll try to impeach their opponent as soon as he takes office, cheering when a hostile foreign power hacks into American electronic systems, and trying to use the FBI to win the election … ”

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2016/11/03/republicans-are-now-vowing-total-war-and-the-consequences-could-be-immense/

        Reply
    • Clinton provides a policy platform that has stronger supports for the environment and renewables than Obama. This is in stark contrast to Trump who has pledged to bring back coal and to kill the EPA. One of these things is not like the other.

      Reply
  50. Vernon Hamilton

     /  November 4, 2016

    long time lurker , first time poster, here.
    I call bullshit on all the nothing-Hillary-can-say-not-to-trusted meme repeating troglodites,
    Here is your medal of honor winning progenitor, he smirks every time you repeat his balderdash. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/President_Bush_presents_William_Safire_the_2006_President_Medal_of_Freedom.jpg

    Reply
  51. entropicman

     /  November 4, 2016

    The BBC have been running daily updates on the % support for the candidates. based on a poll of polls.

    As of 4th November they give 45% Clinton, 45%

    Reply
  52. entropicman

     /  November 4, 2016

    Make that 45% Clinton, 45% Trump.

    Reply
  53. John McCormick

     /  November 4, 2016

    My worst fears are Trump signing every Koch-sponsored legislation that comes to his desk while he feeds the nearly 50% of vote-casing Americans what they really want…eliminate government and lower their taxes.

    The tens of millions that vote for him are the real threat. They know they can win the next election if she wins. They will make the tea party and jerry fallwell look like rank amateurs. They have breitbart and david duke as their organizers.

    Reply
  54. Robert tells it like it is IMO.

    Reply
  55. Dennis Mitchell

     /  November 4, 2016

    I feel like making the environment a right left political issue is a mistake. It has disenfranchised many Republicans from the environmental movement. The more it becomes a toy of the politicians the less we can have the foundational changes that are needed. We need to break free from the strangle hold of big buisness and big government. Trump would be a horrendous president, but you can’t get an addict free from drugs by protecting him from his own behavior. If you concentrate on the bad of the repugnacons the worst it will get. If you concentrate on the good the better they will get. Republicans have a deep history of protecting the environment. Throw that in their face!

    Reply
    • Nixon started the EPA, now republicans are fighting to kill it. Sometimes you have to call a spade a spade.

      Reply
    • In other words, Dennis, we didn’t cause the republicans to act badly just because we pointed out that they acted badly. And, in general, the media has been absolutely terrible about holding anyone accountable for anything on the right. Your way of thinking enables bad behavior. They should at the very least be shamed for it. In my opinion they should be held to a higher accountability standard because they are now in the process of wrecking things for all of us. Who talks about this?

      Reply
      • Dennis Mitchell

         /  November 5, 2016

        Teddy Roosevelt started the National park system. Another Republican. Who has been horrible about holding the Republicans accountable are the Republicans. Being captured by the antiscience oil cartels has shamed many Republicans and the press has not given them a voice. We only see the tea trumpeters. There are rational Republicans. The Republican majority has been bought by the oil companies and brainwashed by corporate yellow journalism. I’m sure most solutions will come from Democrats, but a foundational solution will have to involve all humans. We need to include the right in the fight to save the earth.

        Thanks for this blog it is one of the main ones I read.

        Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 5, 2016

      Dennis, it was the fossil fuel industry and their denialist industry that made it a Right versus Left argument, long ago. It was a clever and wicked strategy, to enlist the ignorant, greedy, fools of the Right to the cause of their own self-destruction and that of their children by simply painting science, rationality, the laws of physics and even the evidence from reality, as a Leftwing ‘conspiracy’. In Australia, where stupidity is a national pastime, this strategy found fertile ground. It was, and still is, heavily pushed by the Murdoch cancer and other arms of the MSM and has borne the Right rich rewards politically, even as the Great Barrier Reef, kelp forests and temperate rain-forests all die right before our eyes.

      Reply
  56. The entire political spectrum has run so far to the extreme right in the last 36 years that Ronald Reagan wouldn’t be allowed to run on the Democratic side of the corporate party for being ‘too liberal.” Much less on the Republican Trump side.

    Prior to the Ronald Reagan regime, Obama and both Clintons would have been Republicans and not even close to being Democrat candidates. Bernie Sanders would have been as he is NOT a Socialist; he is an old school FDR New Deal Dem. To be considered a Socialist shows how far to the right this country has slid.

    Forty Years of Reaganism Behind This Disastrous Train Crash

    http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/37816-forty-years-of-reaganism-behind-this-disastrous-train-crash

    As to the right wing echo chamber the US calls MSM, six mega-wealthy corporations owned and operated by the conservative elite, slightly over 200 wealthy Republican white men, control all the news for 200million+ in the US. That sucks.

    Reply
    • Yeah. I have to agree with you here, Seal. No wonder so many people are starting to suffer from Stockholme Syndrome. And you’re right, Bernie is the closest thing to FDR we have living today. I sincerely hope he continues to be a strong force. And we need more like him. As others have said, in a normal world, we’d have Hillary running as the republican and Bernie as the democrat with Trump as the whacko independent. Bernie did move Hillary and the democratic party, though. In other words, he shifted the party left for the first time in decades. Not to say that there wasn’t some drift post 2008. But it was pretty slight considering the rightward jump that took place from the late 70s onward.

      But there is a big difference. And there’s a very real reason why Bernie is campaigning for her.

      Reply
  57. June

     /  November 4, 2016

    My anxiety level has shot up over the last few days. The fact that almost half of Americans are so alienated and disillusioned that they just want to lash out blindly and allow Trump to wreak havoc is frightening. The anger out there seems to be reaching a fevered pitch. Dirty politics has been taken to a new level. And now we have the FBI blatantly trying to influence the outcome. Can you imagine the fallout if Trump gets in and decides to use the FBI to pursue anyone who he feels is slighting him, or disagrees with him? It would make COINTELPRO seem like a picnic, especially since their powers and surveillance techniques have become broader and more sophisticated in the digital age. You can bet that progressive activists and journalists would be targets.

    Reply
    • I feel the same way, June. I watch as dems eek out small leads in early voting even as the overall polls tighten. It appears to be very close when, in a sane world, this would be a landslide victory against Trump.

      People have asked me not to write about politics on this blog. But I have a platform, no matter how small, and I can’t in good conscience stay out of a race whose outcome will echo on through the ages.

      We decide the fate of so much in 2016. And you’re right. I’m betting pretty much anyone who speaks out against Trump will be directly targeted. I can’t see this man holding up as sacred any part of the Constitution, such as free speech and freedom of religion or the press, if it goes against his views. We elect him and we’ve opened Pandora’s box.

      Reply
      • June

         /  November 4, 2016

        You have gathered an incredible group of commenters on your blog, Robert, which is a tribute to your efforts. It is a wonderful place to learn, share experiences and perspectives, and in the case of this election, to vent! As it says in your header…scribbling for environmental, social and economic justice.

        Reply
        • Thanks June. It feels great hearing you say that after I’ve gone through yet one more supremo wrestling match with a number of bots and trolls. The political articles certainly do draw a lot of heat!

          But reading through these comments and all you guys’ various honest thoughts and sharing makes it all worthwhile. If we are conscientious enough to carry the spark of enlightenment with us, we can stoke it to shine even in the most remote corners or at the darkest times. I am lucky to have you all here with me. You make me a better person.

        • John S

           /  November 5, 2016

          RS, every time I read your blog I am extremely grateful that you keep the trolls out.

          It’s enough reading and discussing facts of AGW without also having the dishonest and deceitful trying to befoul the conversation, not to mention the spiteful and offensive language often employed.

          Thank you Robert for your excellent research, presentation and overall curation skills.

  58. June

     /  November 4, 2016

    In some good energy-related news…

    U.S. Designates Electric Vehicle Charging Corridors

    The plan calls for electric vehicle charging stations to be installed at least every 50 miles within the corridors and new government-approved signage to help drivers identify the locations of charging stations along the highway in 35 states.

    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/us-designates-electric-vehicle-charging-corridors-20842

    Reply
  59. Genomik

     /  November 4, 2016

    This seems legit and a great way to raise awareness and money.

    For every use of #BeforeTheFlood across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram between October 24 – November 18, 21st Century Fox and National Geographic will together donate $1 to Pristine Seas and $1 to the Wildlife Conservation Society, up to $50,000 to each organization.

    http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/before-the-flood/interactives/share-beforetheflood-to-raise-money-how-it-works/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_term=video_fbch20161030FullFilm&utm_content=BTF

    Reply
  60. Reply
  61. kay

     /  November 5, 2016

    I agree, Robert. Hillary all the way! She will need us to help her fight the fossil fuel party when she gets elected. It is going to take all of us. I will do my part and show up for every protest near me, call and write senators and congressmen, donate to all green progressives and green dems nationwide who run for office who have a shot at winning. And this time I will show up for the midterm elections and not bow out after the election. I think that was a mistake with Obama. We needed to keep the pressure on the republicans and that didn’t happen. They got away with way too much. We need protests in the streets if when they try to block emission reduction. BIG protests, like the one we had in NYC. Everyone has to stand up again and again and again.

    Reply
  62. Abel Adamski

     /  November 5, 2016

    A very concerning analysis.

    Where is the world being taken. ?

    https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/remember-trump-does-not-win-223955287.html

    As an intro to an excellent frightening article by The SMH

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 5, 2016

      http://www.smh.com.au/world/us-election/republicans-slide-into-authoritarianism-under-donald-trump-makes-party-unworthy-20161104-gsioba.html

      The Republican Party is now deep into its post-democratic phase.

      It is not just that it has selected as a candidate a man with a professed authoritarian streak, and a fondness for Vladimir Putin, a man who has said he may not accept the result of the election should he lose.
      It is not just that Republican governors are systematically seeking to prevent African Americans from voting.

      It is not just that Donald Trump himself has called on his supporters to “observe” voters at polling booths in the suburbs of Philadelphia, where minorities might cost him the state of Pennsylvania.
      Related Content

      Fake documents targeting Hillary Clinton campaign emerge: sources
      FBI and New York police probe election eve terror threat

      It is not just that Donald Trump has threatened to imprison his opponent should he win, nor even that his supporters chant, “lock her up” whenever they gather in his name.

      Having lost the popular vote in five of six of the last presidential elections and facing the very real possibility of losing another, the leaders of the party are now actively threatening to undermine the very institutions at the heart of American democracy if the electorate does not elect their candidate.

      A handful of Republicans in Congress – including the chairman of the powerful House Homeland Security Committee – have suggested that should Hillary Clinton win they will move to impeach her for her use of a private email server while serving as secretary of state.

      “This [committee’s] investigation will continue whether she wins or not, but assuming she wins and the investigation goes forward, and it looks like an indictment is pending, at that point of time in the Constitution, the House of Representatives would engage in an impeachment trial,” Michael McCaul said during an interview on Fox News.

      “It would go to the Senate, and impeachment proceedings and removal would take place.”

      And then the kicker.

      “I would hate to see this country be thrown into a constitutional crisis because of Hillary Clinton’s behaviour.”

      This is like a bloke in shiny suit telling a shopkeeper, “That’s nice new window you have out front, I’d hate for something to happen to it.”

      The threat is no mistake either. Trump has started inserting the same language into his stump ramble.

      “If she were to be elected it would create an unprecedented constitutional crisis and the work of the government would grind to an unbelievably inglorious halt.”

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 5, 2016

      It is a long article but one worth reading

      http://www.smh.com.au/world/us-election/forget-clinton-and-trump–americas-democracy-is-broken-and-they-cant-fix-it-20161103-gshl3c.html

      It is up to the American people or maybe a complete breakdown with all the violence and cruelty that will involve, however now is the absolute worst time for the worlds future and the future of life on this planet

      Reply
  63. eric smith

     /  November 5, 2016

    Exactly what planet are you on? Have you even heard of Mena? Have you seen her comment on Gaddafi’s murder? She is a monster and purely criminal if not downright evil in nature. What exactly do you think she will do for our planet besides destroy it? Again:
    TRUMP IS CLEAN AND HAS GUTS. WHEN IN POWER HE MAY WELL GRAB THIS THING BY THE BALLS AND SHOW IT WE MEAN BUSINESS HERE. IT MAY WELL BE THORIUM REACTORS FOR STARTERS.
    Geez, get real here.

    Reply
  64. RandyS

     /  November 6, 2016

    Thanks, Robert, I can’t add much other than to agree with your assessment & pretty much every thing you’ve said here. I voted early for Hillary & Jim Barksdale here in Ga. & gladly.
    Averting the Trump calamity is but one in a dizzying array of items on the Critical Path for continued survival of humans & the ecosystem beyond the next couple of decades.

    Reply
  65. BREAKING NEWS….
    NEW YOUK– President-Elect Donald Trump said Wednesday that one of the top priorities of his administration would be to raise global sea levels about 6 feet. This would effectively give the White House an ocean view.

    Reply

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