From the Bering to Maine, Hot Oceans Are Killing the Puffin

“The Bering Sea has been off-the-charts warm. We’ve never seen anything like this. We’re in uncharted territory. We’re in the midst of an extraordinary time.” Nate Mantua, an ecologist at NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Santa Cruz, California in this National Geographic article.

*****

Some have claimed that the effects of global warming are only gradual and mild. That the impacts to the Earth’s weather systems, its oceans, its lands, its web of life do not now represent a crisis that risks global catastrophe and mass human tragedy. That, somehow, the growing die-offs now inflicted on key species amounts to some kind of pleasantly quiet background noise that we should rationally, coldly, consider, but that should not increase our level of concern or, perish the thought, alarm. And when the very real harms that are now escalating as a result of climate change are realized more fully by human civilization, the fact that these voices did not warn us more strongly, that some of these voices attacked those of us who were rationally concerned, will stand in history as stark evidence to the harms of pandering to the false comfort of an unwarranted reticence.

image

(Today, sea surfaces in regions surrounding the Arctic are between 2 and 10.5 degrees Celsius above average. These waters are so warm now that they are less able to support a vital food chain. And the impact to Puffins has been considerable. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

If they could speak, a lovable breed of northern bird would tell us their own tale of tragedy and loss at the hand of global heat. And if we could hear the sad tale of their own great plight, our hearts and minds might not be so hard or so cold. For in and near the Arctic there is every indication that winter is dying and along with it, the Puffins.

Mass Puffin Die-Off Underway

Northern waters are rich with life. Or they were, at least, until recently. High oxygen content, cold water, high nutrient content all help to form a basis for the teeming life of this region. However, as atmospheric carbon levels increase and as oceans warm, these waters become less able to support life. They hold less oxygen. They become more acidic. And they tend to become more stratified. The food chain is disrupted and winnowed down. And such a winnowing can have a terrible impact on all kinds of life forms.

For the Puffin, such ocean warming related food losses have become a subject of growing alarm among researchers. In the Bering Sea between Alaska and Russia, both National Geographic and Digital Journal have compiled reports of severe loss of life to both adult birds and young. In parts of the Bering sea, adult Puffins are dying at 200 times the normal mortality rate. Nesting rates, normally at 60 percent, have plummeted to 12 percent. And the few chicks that do manage to hatch from eggs are emaciated.

Tufted Puffin

(Charismatic Puffins imperiled by climate change are now subject to an increasing extinction pressure due to this man-made crisis. Image source: NRDC.)

Over on the Atlantic side, a similar mass die off of Puffins has occurred in the Gulf of Maine even while stresses to the birds have been increasing into Scotland, the Barents Sea and Iceland. Die offs further south in Maine began to become widespread during 2014 as the waters off the US East Coast hit extreme levels of warmth. By 2016, the mass mortality had extended to Iceland where more than 80 percent of Puffin chicks were reported dead.

To researchers, there’s no mystery as to what’s killing the birds. They’re starving. But the root cause of the great loss among Puffins is even more disturbing. Julia Parrish, a University of Washington professor who coordinates a West Coast volunteer bird-monitoring network noted to National Geographic:

“Clearly something very weird is going on. It’s basically every year now we’re getting some huge mass-mortality event. It seems that the bottom-up changes provoked by the atmosphere are creating massive, massive changes in marine ecosystems. And the forage fish that everything depends on are taking it in the shorts.” (Emphasis added)

In other words, the fish that Puffins feed on are dying due to global climate change and so the Puffins are dying too.

Conditions in Context — We All Rely on Bountiful Oceans

If we are unable to escape the stresses of our own lives, or step back from our own individual difficulties to take account of the larger trajectory of our race, the plight of Puffins starving in the North Atlantic or Bering Sea may seem a remote or minor concern. However, when one realizes that, like the Puffins, human beings also rely on the bounty of the oceans as a primary food source, the matter strikes much closer to home. And in this case, Puffins join a long list of ocean-dependent wildlife — corals, seals, fish, polar bears, walruses, lobsters and so many more — who are sending us an increasingly loud warning as they perish.

Life in the world’s waters is in peril due to the warming we are causing. And because life on land is ultimately connected to what happens in the waters, not paying attention, not responding to what’s happening by halting the fossil fuel emissions that have created this terrible extinction pressure, is a wretched road to follow.

Links:

Puffins are Starving to Death Because of Climate Change

Puffins Starve to Death in High Numbers off the Gulf of Maine

Something is Seriously Wrong on the East Coast and it’s Killing all the Baby Puffins

Huge Puffing Die-Off May Be Linked to Hotter Seas

Global and Regional Food Consumption

NRDC

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

Hat tip to marcyincny

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244 Comments

  1. I first read about the puffins in the Gulf of Maine two years ago in Mother Jones. For me it’s one of the saddest stories to date. Any one here remember “Lucky Mrs. Ticklefeather” and her puffin, Paul?

    Reply
    • Thanks Marcy. I do recall this charming tale. And, you’re right, this is absolutely heartbreaking. As for the Mother Jones article, I’ll see if I can find that to add to the links. Best. –R

      Reply
    • Kelsey K

       /  November 13, 2016

      Yes. Mrs. Ticklefeather was my favorite childhood book, which my father read probably hundreds of times. It led me to go see the puffins on a trip to Norway. Unforgettable experience, and a tragic loss to see this happening.

      Reply
  2. miles h

     /  November 11, 2016

    extinctions make me desperately sad… curiously, for me, its often the small things that upset me most. the creatures that were largely unnoticed; tiny beetles, newts, frogs, all those small things that have quietly perfected over eons and just lived out their tiny, beautiful, blameless lives in their niche. then theyre gone… forever.
    and often the loss of one small species leads to the loss of another a step further up the food chain.
    i hope i never develop a thicker skin to these things. every species loss is an utter disaster.
    puffins used to thrive in their masses around the british isles, and have been diminishing for years – apparently, its the loss of sand eels that hits them hardest – losses wrought by us humans: ocean temperature changes, overfishing….
    who knows what creatures depend on the puffin to survive? they’re next.
    and on it goes……

    Reply
    • If more of us had your sensibilities, Miles, we’d be far, far better off. Too many people to me seem both numb to loss of life and outside harms. Many of us have become victims of our comfort and our fight to defend it at all costs.

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 11, 2016

      miles h
      Well said, on the flip side, it’s the really small things that are going be the fangs that bite us in the ass. If it’s one group that is really heat sensitive it’s these guys and all their little buddy’s –
      I’m just waiting for them to really go after our food supply.

      Fatal Fungus Linked to 4 New Deaths—What You Need to Know
      Get the facts about a lethal yeast that isn’t responding to known drugs and is causing hospital outbreaks around the globe.

      http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/deadly-fungus-drug-resistance-candida-auris-health-science/

      Reply
      • Bob’s been beating this drum for years now. His warnings have proven to be quite prophetic.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  November 12, 2016

        I’ve seen people die or be severely disabled by other fungal infections like Cryptococcus, and no full well that BigPharma have not been interested because there was no money in researching fungal disease. They spend more money on advertising and bribing medical staff than research in any case. The simultaneous development of resistance in separate populations is very sinister indeed. Probably another ‘unknown unknown’ like giant snow-balls, that our destroying the planet’s homeostasis is causing. And never forget-stay away from hospitals at all costs! Over here, private hospitals are worse, with great food, nice carpets, but no doctors with any brains on hand, unless you wish to ring them on the golf-course.

        Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 12, 2016

      miles h, your description of the “tiny beautiful blameless lives” brings tears to my eyes. This is what breaks my heart, because this is happening now, daily—the human-caused loss of so many organisms—fellow creatures with us—“quietly perfected over eons”. We have failed miserably in the task of stewardship of this planet.

      Reply
  3. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    Iceland August 11, 2016 –

    More than 80 Percent of Puffin Chicks Die

    After initial reports of a successful nesting season—unusually many puffins laid eggs and unusually many chicks were hatched—it has now turned out that 83 percent of puffin hatchlings in the Vestmannaeyjar islands off Iceland’s south coast have died due to lack of food.

    “After mid-July and until the first week of August the nesting collapsed. Eighty-three percent of hatchlings were either abandoned or killed in a short period of time. It’s the usual reason: lack of food,” ornithologist Erpur Snær Hansen told Vísir.

    Life has been rough for the Vestmannaeyjar emblem bird in recent years with nesting failing season after season due to lack of sand eels in the ocean around the islands.

    http://icelandreview.com/news/2016/08/11/more-80-percent-puffin-chicks-die

    Reply
    • Thank you Bob. I saw this before but was unable to track it down. Will add to the above.

      Reply
    • Warmest regards, updates in.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 12, 2016

      We are having the fifth or so gale to hit the region this winter, into spring, with big hailstones, fierce winds, heavy rain and tornadoes knocking out the power. All unpredicted by the weather forecasters. The peasants are beginning to notice, but the MSM treats it as a non-event and the denialists are crowing about Trump’s win. Sleep-walking to oblivion.

      Reply
  4. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    THE NEW FACE OF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY

    Reply
    • Sarah Palin on her way to Washington to add lip stick.

      Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  November 12, 2016

      As a representative of the Porcine Delegation we are deeply offended by this association.

      Reply
      • Syd Bridges

         /  November 12, 2016

        Agreed.It reminded me of this old music hall song.

        One evening in October
        When I was about one-third sober
        And was taking home a load with manly pride
        My poor feet began to stutter
        So I lay down in the gutter
        And a pig came up and lay down by my side

        Then we sang “It’s All Fair Weather”
        And “Good Fellows Get Together”
        Till a lady passing by was heard to say
        She says, “You can tell a man who boozes
        By the company he chooses”
        And the pig got up and slowly walked away.

        Reply
      • My most sincere apologies to the esteemed members for any perceived misrepresentation due to my remarks above.🙂

        Reply
  5. Vic

     /  November 11, 2016

    Major automakers are seizing on the infancy of President-elect Donald Trump’s administration to mount a push to ease regulatory headaches faced under President Obama.
    In a letter to Trump’s White House transition team today, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers proposed that the new administration pause a key step in the ongoing midterm evaluation of the Obama administration’s 2025 fuel economy and greenhouse rules until Trump’s administration can “lead efforts” with regulators and automakers on “a pathway forward” for the final four years of the rules.

    http://www.autonews.com/article/20161110/OEM11/161119989/automakers-reach-out-to-trump-on-regulation-seek-review-of-fuel

    Reply
    • Here we go. But I wonder if easing fuels standards is simply signing the auto-makers’ death warrants. If they don’t push for electric vehicles, EV automakers will eventually overtake them. That said, it will absolutely delay EV manufacturing increases and along with them adoption rates if these fuel standards are hamstrung. It’s Reagan all over again but worse.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 11, 2016

        The Tesla Battery plant is dagger pointed right at this problem, watch for the attack on it tomorrow.

        Reply
        • Tomorrow? Is something going down?

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 12, 2016

          JAXA has been off air since the 10th, server issues, so is Uni Bremmen. Jaxa sends you to a Twitter feed.

          How long before the satellite visual access is cut so they can lie through their teeth without anyone being able to call them out

        • Robert

           /  November 14, 2016

          Sec’y Kerry left for Antarctica just before the election and the White House press sec’y couldn’t explain the timing. After a few days he flew back up north, stopping in for a visit with the Prime Minister of New Zealand, and then onward (hours before a 7 5 earthquake coincidentally struck.) If JAXA and Bremen are still “off” (and they won’t explain Kerry’s abrupt visit) and something major transpires and satellite visual access has indeed been cut, would there be multitudes kept in the dark and presumably a minority with access?

  6. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    miles h
    Your remarks jogged my neurons

    Monday, October 16, 2006
    Good Bye Little Friends

    Last spring, the first reports came out on what was happening in the Cloud Forests in Costa Rica . If you or I walked into them we wouldn’t know anything was amiss. But subtle changes have already wiped out dozens of it’s residents. This post is prompted by this weeks Newsweek story :

    Why the Frogs Are Dying
    Climate change is no longer merely a matter of numbers from a computer model. With startling swiftness, it is reordering the natural world.

    From the story ……. A study by 75 scientists published earlier this year in the journal Nature estimated that two thirds of the 110 known species of harlequins throughout Central and South America have vanished. And that may be just the beginning.

    Like I said … Good Bye Little Friends

    http://colorado-bob.blogspot.com/2006/10/good-bye-little-friends.html

    Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    The good ole’ days

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 11, 2016

      Reply
    • Well, I think it’s terrible that it’s come to this. But, as some have said here, we get to again see proof that all of us were correct in our warnings. In my opinion, it’s better to be actually working in a positive direction than to be proven right when republicans again blow things up and we get to say ‘I told you so.’ It’s a hollow consolation. I’d rather be helping people than be proven right.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 11, 2016

        So true, I when looking for that blue frog, and found all that rich fire in my gut from 10 years ago. I got one more from that time , one of best –

        This was a good one from that time frame
        Wednesday, October 04, 2006
        Farewell B-15A

        The birth of B-15, and it’s off spring, B-15A and B-15B were one of the first things I really began to follow on the internet. I stumbled across this picture back in 2000 ……. And I say stumbled. Remember, in 2000 you couldn’t “google” B-15. Oh, there were search engines, but entering B-15 in their search boxes would’ve given you vitamins, not chunks of ice the size of Delaware.

        Link

        Reply
      • climatehawk1

         /  November 12, 2016

        And on that note of helping people:

        Reply
        • I am so proud that I live in a country where women and children show the courage of dragons when facing off against bigotry. We white men, those of us who have not fallen prey to the hate and the fear, must show solidarity with all the victimized groups. We must defend them. We must not allow the atrocities that have happened in so many other places to arise here and take hold once more.

  8. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    He’s hiring the alligators for his drain the swamp project.
    On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
    H. L. Mencken

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
  9. islandraider

     /  November 11, 2016

    Not crazy about the website sourcing this info (at all), but each line contains a link to a news story supporting the claim. This is a staggering list of mass animal deaths.

    http://www.end-times-prophecy.org/animal-deaths-birds-fish-end-times.html

    A quote that is appropriate:

    “The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, “What good is it?” If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”

    – Aldo Leopold, Round River, 1953

    Reply
  10. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    Just still looking at 10 years ago , and fighting with gerbils at Cat 6 tonight, ……………..

    Name the Movie :
    “You are all condemned men ….. We keep you alive to serve this ship …. so row well, and live.”

    Reply
  11. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    ” WE’RE FIGHTING THE STRAWMEN HERE, SO WE DON’T HAVE TO FIGHT THEM OVERSEAS”

    Reply
  12. coloradobob

     /  November 11, 2016

    “NO MATTER WHERE YOU GO….THERE YOU ARE”

    The only thing I learned in college.

    I had a work study grant in college. 3 days a week I worked in the ceramics lab with George Soco. George had been tricked into coming to Texas Tech by the administration there. George wasn’t happy about that. They promised him a modern lab to teach glass blowing to grad students, he ended up in the government surplus barracks teaching education majors ceramics.

    Everyday when I showed up, my first duty was to ride my bike to the student union and get Prof. Soco 5 packs of Marlboro green 100’s. Then my day could begin. On days we emptied the kilns after a firing, he would stand by wearing a big asbestos glove. Should a particular ash tray or coffee cup catch his eye, he would step forward, take the offending object, and hurl it across the court yard into the barracks wall that contained offices of other art profs. The pile of broken bisque ware was 3 feet deep.

    In the late April of 1970, while sitting in a biology lecture, something snapped in my head and I got up, rode my bike to the administration building and dropped out of Texas Tech. I was bound for Colorado. When I went by the ceramics lab to say good-bye Prof. Soco said the following:

    ” Bob, if you forget everything I’ve taught you remember this….No matter where you go, there you are.”

    http://colorado-bob.blogspot.com/2006_08_01_archive.html

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 12, 2016

      By the way, that is a mule deer shirt with Indian Head buttons moose hide chaps , and a real Mexican hat. I made everything but the hat and the boots.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  November 12, 2016

        Wow, cb. That’s impressive. And that was something we did back in the day, was it not? We made a lot of our own duds. Making it was better than buying it. We got that. We picked up those skills and we went for it. Folks still working leather out your way, I guess?

        Reply
  13. Vic

     /  November 11, 2016

    Two days after Donald Trump won the White House, Exxon Mobil vice president Suzanne McCarron tweeted, “The Paris agreement is an important step forward by governments in addressing the serious risks of #ClimateChange .”

    Go figure…

    Tina Casey at Cleantechnica suspects it shows that Trump is about to throw the US coal industry “under the bus”.

    https://cleantechnica.com/2016/11/11/stabbed-back-exxonmobil-throws-shade-us-coal-industry/

    Reply
  14. We’re in big trouble. And the problem with the prevailing mentality (present company excluded) is that there’s an implicit mindset that ‘maybe climate change isn’t so bad, even if it’s real, but if it turns out to be bad we can fix it then’. I’ve tried using the metaphor that it’s like riding a canoe down the Niagara river – if you wait until you hear the falls to decide to head for shore, you’ve probably waited to late and the current’s taking you over the falls – no do-overs. But there’s a lack of ability to understand (or an unwillingness to accept) the inertia built into the climate system, and an even worse lack of ability to imagine and respect what types of changes are possible when systems behave non-linearly.

    Reading this story, watching the arctic temperatures on Climate Reanalyzer, watching the ice fail to refreeze on nsidc, I’m increasingly concerned that we’ve already passed a tipping point – that the skeptics, deniers and cynics are not far from getting a first-hand education in inertia and non-linearity like nothing we’ve ever experienced.

    Reply
    • With climate change, it’s an issue of multiple falls. Multiple tipping points. A few might be survivable but not pleasant and very damaging. Beyond that, survival is in question. The Niagra metaphor is a good one, but based on my experience/research, my opinion is that there are multiple ‘points of no return.’ We’ve probably already hit a few of those.

      Reply
      • Hopefully the evidence from crossing those first points-of-no-return is compelling enough to end the wide-spread complacency before we go sailing past the point of survivability.

        Reply
        • I hope so too. And there’s a worrisome possibility that the current velocity of human caused climate change is enough to cross multiple tipping points all at once.

      • I’m starting to watch for socio-economic tipping points. When a state government stops subsidizing flood insurance, when banks stop offering 30-year mortgages in certain coastal areas, when a nuke gets shut down for SLR or too-warm cooling water supplies, when Mecca’s wet bulb temperature starts significantly cutting into the Hajj.

        Reply
        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 12, 2016

          Interesting point there.
          The wet bulb factor relates to perspiration for cooling. worked out in European studies with European subjects

          My best friends wife is a Syrian, her family (Christians) fled Tripoli as the sheik was coming to collect the 10 and 8 YO attractive daughters for his harem in the morning and they were to be readied for him. The family was on the way to Malta by dark and emigrated to Australia.
          She does not sweat nor even perspire , even in a sauna.
          My friends travelled a lot and in one of the Arabic Desert states they were in a tent where it was 43C in the shade , the sweat was pouring off my friend, but the belly dancer that had been performing for over 2 hours had not the slightest sheen of perspiration and was relaxed, comfortable and not in the least stressed, he noted nor were the othe locals around them.

          They have had thousands of years of adaptation and evolution like the Sherpa’s and Innuit. Their bodies conserve water and can handle far higher heat than caucasians, especially northerners.
          Poetic justice , the Aryans wiill suffer most and those they despise will thrive.

          I wonder how many other groups are in the same position.

          Nostradamus did say the black people would rule the world, I often wondered how that would happen, maybe that is the answer, they will be the survivors.

          Also that reference some articles ago re the goal of a utopian Randian society around a melted arctic with a Mediterranean clime.
          Maybe a fresh look at the geology and the fossil record, the fossils were of mainly amphibians. Guess the rains will be horrendous , especially in the season of permanent dark for menty hundreds of years. Something for Alaska and Canada to consider in their positive spin fantasies

        • Abel, when I first read about the wet-bulb threshold, I wondered about just that. Humanity is not so uniform as people seem to think. I remember one of my husband’s friends, a man from Cuiabá, with ancestral family from that place. He was mixed blood, indian and some of the earliest portuguese people to reach Mato Grosso. Cuiabá is the hottest place in Brasil, not in eventual records, but in regularly being hot. The medium temperature there is 26C, but that’s because nights are colder. 16C is the lowest temperatures during winter, and people there die of cold and hipotermia in the days when these cold temperatures are reached (16C is a bit cold, but no one dies of hipotermia in São Paulo when the termometer reaches that mark, and I can’t believe this is just cultural). In summer, temperatures are normally around 40Cs or higher, and while the place is not as humid as Manaus, it’s not an desert either.

          That friend of my husband, when he was told that I was from São Paulo, told me about the only trip he made here. He was interviewed by television reporters because of how heavily he was cloaked in 25C weather, that, for him, was way to cold (since he came back from São Paulo with pneumonia, it probaly was really). The day we talked with him, we were in the street, and street termometers were reaching 46C (not official, taken in the shadow measurements, but those street digital termometers measurement, probably affected by the noon sun). I had insolation that day, got heavily sick with the heat. My husband, who is from Rio de Janeiro and had lived in Cuiabá for 16 years, was fine. That friend of his was using a sweater, as he thought the weather was still a bit chilly.

          That variability gives me a bit of hope in the capacity of humanity to adapt.

          But then I hear about heat-waves in India, and how many lifes were lost… and while India is a huge place, it is also well known as a hot and humid country (mostly), with very ancient populations who should be adapted to the heat… but who aren’t ready for the hell that’s coming for breakfast either. Heat-waves aren’t just killing people in Europe, or other places unused to the heat. India, Bangladesh… those are not cold countries.

          I still have a few doubts if 35 wetbulb is a temperature that would kill every human. I think that people like my husband’s friend and your best friends wife could have a chance of surviving it… but if things reach 36, 37C wetbulb, they’ll reach their limits too. And each day we’re baking more heat in the atmosphere.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 14, 2016

          umbrios, thanks for that.
          Interesting the difference, the desert people and I include Asia, Africa, Australia (Aborigines moved into Central Australia over 40,000 years ago.), parts of the US and Mexico where people have “adejusted/evolved” over many generations and have interbred with those that have adapted. In most of those low altitude deserts the nights are freezing as there is no moisture/cloud to trap the heat. So they have evolved to handle extreme temperature ranges.

          The key will be the “Sweaters” will find survival difficult without energy and air conditioning so will be easy pickings, just cut the power.
          I can see underground cities being built by the Sweaters for survival, dependant on robots and androids to handle what needs to be done on the surface, shades of the alien conspiracies whilst the ones evolved to handle what is coming will just take over.

          Mars colonies, there will be colonies by different groups including the asteroid belt where “Death Stars” will be built with all the resources and as yusal those groups and colonies will be at war with one another.

          I read an interesting article years ago – fantasy/new age stuff, who knows but interesting framework and concept.
          The Martian Chronicles

    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 12, 2016

      DJ, Ugo Bardi has a concept he calls ‘Seneca’s Cliff’, after the Roman philosopher who noted that progress was hard won and slow, but, in contrast, things fall apart rapidly. That is becoming staggeringly plain in regard to the planet’s biospheres. Where some have argued for a while that diversity brings resilience, it looks more and more likely that diversity brings vulnerability, when every little creature, every tiny biome, each symbiotic or commensal relationship, is vital, and its destruction or degradation has quick and far-reaching effects on other creatures and relationships. And when, as we have done most particularly in the last forty years, you kick the crap out of living systems across the length and breadth of the planet, you are going to see a rapid and accelerating unraveling, latest victims, the puffins.
      Pretty plainly, the years of the phony ‘hiatus’ after 1998, where huge amounts of energy were sequestered in the oceans, was quite likely the point of no return, and Trump doesn’t even matter, really. Here, talk of geo-engineering has suddenly materialised from nowhere in the MSM, which is still either ignoring or denying climate destabilisation, which seems a sign that the powers that be know that it’s deck-chairs on the Titanic re-arranging time.

      Reply
      • Thanks Mulga, I’ll have a look for it. The cliff reference makes me think of Hemingway’s lines – ‘How did you go bankrupt? Two ways Gradually, and then suddenly.’ Ronald Wright has a good book called ‘A Short History of Progress’ that illustrates a similar concept from a slightly different angle – that civilizations’ successes tend to sow the seeds of their own collapse. Its a good read, sort of a more condensed version of some of the themes covered in Jared Diamond’s ‘Collapse’.

        Reply
  15. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Everyday new voices show up here, and they are all so well spoken, and so insightful and bright. This place is changing, and all for the better.

    Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    I miss DtL

    Reply
  17. Griffin

     /  November 12, 2016

    Myron Ebell picked to lead the EPA transistion. The stuff of nightmares and rage.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 12, 2016

      Myron Ebell, the James Watt for this generation.

      Reply
      • Mulga, please, don’t be offended but… could you clarify?

        James Watt, for me, is this guy (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Watt ) who was a brilliant enginner and scientist. His inventions lead to the Industrial Revolution, which has a lot of bad mixed with the good, sure (real LOT of bad), but the bad came less from Watts engine and more from the fact that this engine was set loose in a society that was already bigoted, machist and classist (and the argument that society got less bigoted, machist and classist because of the industrial revolution can be made). Watts engine started the heavy usage of coal and all the problems we’re seeing now, ok, but… he was not standing on the shoulders of the right giants then, to see the consequences of his invention. He may have uncorked the bootle, but that was ignorance, not evil, in his part.

        Myron Ebbel, in the other hand, seems to be malicious in intent. Not brilliant scientist and engineer that actually created something that had more effects in the society and the world than he could ever imagine, but a mediocre men with no big achievements. Who’s trying to promote things that he knowns that will be suicidal for the world, but he doesn’t care, because in the short term, he’ll be rewarded, and the money in his pocket is all that he cares about.

        Maybe I don’t known enough of James Watt (probable, never studied much about him), or this was not the James Watt you meant, but if not, I didn’t get your argument at all.

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  November 13, 2016

          Well, umbrios, James Gaius Watt was Ronny Raygun’s first ‘Secretary of the Interior’. He was a far Right Republican fanatic and anti-environmentalist. He stood out then, but today he would not be seen as so extreme, more mainstream Republican denialism. Look him up-it’s a really tragi-comic tale.

        • Thanks, Mulga, I didn’t knewn about it.

  18. June

     /  November 12, 2016

    Another victim of the warming waters off the coast of Maine…shrimp. There has not been a shrimping season since the end of 2013, and it has been cancelled again for 2017.

    Maine’s depleted shrimp fishery to remain closed for another season

    Scientists say the status of the small crustacean “continues to be critically poor” with the stock’s overall numbers, including the shrimp that can be harvested and could spawn new generations, at unprecedented lows for five consecutive years, according to the latest shrimp stock assessment report.

    The scientists blame the “poor prospects for the near future” on rising temperatures in the Gulf of Maine.

    http://www.pressherald.com/2016/11/10/maines-shrimp-fishery-to-remain-closed-in-2017/

    Reply
  19. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Coal –
    What does the world need coal for ?

    Steel –

    Where is the best coal > closest to the mills > Australia.

    Cement –

    How do we fire our limestone kilns ?

    Ground up tires. .

    This is called “Green”. Today. Because tires are a real pain in the ass. You bury them in a land fill , and they float to the surface. But DTL set me on to this . And I gave it some thought some years ago.
    I have a white car , and I have not washed in years. It is slowly turning black. With tiny points of carbon that land on it every night when the water condenses out of the air. My sister said, “What’s that?” I said the exhaust of the of the modern world.

    It is an experiment I have running for him, what a wonderful soul he is.

    My car looks like it’s turning into a lump of coal.

    Just like DTL’s finger print.

    Reply
  20. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Here we go-

    Reply
  21. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Let’s all take a break.

    Reply
  22. Andy_in_SD

     /  November 12, 2016

    Nothing to add

    Reply
    • We used to sing this song at Episcopal youth camp. I choked up when I played this. So sorry for his loss. The world is a dimmer place without him, but his light will shine on in us.

      Reply
  23. June

     /  November 12, 2016

    Sorry if this has already been linked to from another source.

    Climate Change Has Already Altered Nearly Every Ecosystem on Earth

    The researchers say 82 percent of “core ecological processes” on land and sea have been affected by climate change in a way that had not been expected “for decades.”

    Co-author and professor John Pandolfi of the University of Queensland said, “Temperature extremes are causing evolutionary adaption in many species, changing them genetically and physically. These responses include changes in tolerances to high temperatures, shifts in sex-ratios, reduced body size, and migration of species.”

    http://commondreams.org/news/2016/11/11/climate-change-has-already-altered-nearly-every-ecosystem-earth

    Reply
  24. utoutback

     /  November 12, 2016

    Thanks Andy.
    Another voice lost.

    Reply
  25. Jimbot

     /  November 12, 2016

    Another great report about the ongoing great extinction event, R.S. Thanks for all the work you do to try to get people aware.

    I was wondering if there are any papers on what the sequence is of when particular categories of species disappear in extinction events in general. Or are these events all different? For instance, do the dominant predators, or the dominant monoculture plants and plant eaters tend to disappear early on as the event unfolds?. Or do the less prevalent species die out first? There are some with niches that always survive with no need to adapt, such as the hydrogen sulfide little eaters around the underwater volcanic vents and maybe others.

    Of course, we’ve known for some time that at the very least a major bottleneck is coming which most humans won’t get through. This was explained by many scientists, mathematicians, sociologists, economists and computer modellers. The Population Bomb and Limits to Growth have pretty much stuck with me since I read them when they first came out. I didn’t read Bottleneck until several years after it came out. There were many thinkers and writers proposing solutions also from the same era.

    It seems that such a huge global civilization has a very definite trajectory and momentum, it can’t really be changed significantly, not even by the Democrats. The Seneca’s Cliff effect ( Dr. Bardi helped research and write Limits to Growth ) might at least allow some more species to pull through if the collapse happened sooner and more drastically than the more gradual smooth landing idea ( which is likely a product of wishful thinking anyway ).

    Reply
    • Dave Person

       /  November 12, 2016

      Hi Jimbot,
      As you can imagine, extinction and adaptation are complex and much depends on the current state of species populations and their ecological communities. If we consider climate change as a disturbance, typically generalists will be the most resilient and specialists the least. Plants tend to have immense genomes compared to vertebrates by which, hopefully, they are able to adapt but the rate of climate changes may be too much for many plant species. Again the rates of change likely will favor generalists and invasives. Another thing to consider is the decay or loss of entire ecological systems and communities. If one or more key species or groups of species go extinct an entire system can collapse causing rapid loss of many more species than are directly affected by the disturbance from changing climate. Finally, climate change will reduce the planet’s carrying capacity for human beings. As that happens, humans will absorb more and more of the net primary productivity of the planet leaving less for other species and communities. That situation will cause even more extinctions than what would be caused directly by climate change.

      dave

      Reply
      • To add to this — in the broader sense, hothouse extinction events hit the ocean first and hardest. A general loss of productivity is the first impact. But then extinction generally starts at the ocean bottom and them moves toward the surface.

        In the current event, the velocity of change provides its own extinction pressure. Species cannot move to favorable zones or adapt/evolve to new environments fast enough. Furthermore, niche/island environments are disappearing very rapidly. Islands, mountain tops, poles. These marginal zones are changing rapidly and it is in these margins that we see high instances of loss.

        Reply
      • Jimbot

         /  November 13, 2016

        Thanks for your reply Dave
        I didn’t know that about plant genomes. I guess that has something to do with them having been around for so much longer and having had to work out many more different survival strategies. Ancient wisdom perhaps you could say? They got by without the vertebrates. Hopefully some plants can adapt to rapidly changing temperature zones.

        Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    This was us as we slid into war after the quest for light began,

    See there is about 3 of us who understand this, It’s not about power as we know it. It’s about staying after dark,

    Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    I have always seen those who rape the Earth, are easy to spot. Those who stop them I have no clue. It’s a tossed salad of jackasses.

    Reply
  28. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    For get brunch and hell, It’s a tossed salad of jackasses.

    Reply
  29. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Time for these jackasses to stand up.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 12, 2016

      I am a happy jackass. Who stands with me ?

      The Sec, of Education may be Dr, Ben Carter, A brain surgeon who thinks our world is 6,000 years old.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 12, 2016

        Sorry a typo Dr. Carson

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  November 12, 2016

          He thinks our world is 6,000 years old as well.

        • coloradobob

           /  November 12, 2016

          He thinks that Jesus pony’s are real. That men once rode dinosaurs like horses.

          Sec. of Education.

  30. Abel Adamski

     /  November 12, 2016

    JAXA has been off air since the 10th, server issues, so is Uni Bremmen. Jaxa sends you to a Twitter feed.

    How long before the satellite visual access is cut so they can lie through their teeth without anyone being able to call them out

    After all Trumps cabinet is a family affair with a goodly smattering of nut jobs

    Reply
  31. Cate

     /  November 12, 2016

    Arctic mean temp above 80N finally went over a little cliff—but them promptly bounced back up. The low of Nov 10 was still higher than the low of about a month ago. These temps are below freezing, of course, but just not as far below freezing as they normally would be.

    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

    Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    It’s a fruit cake of foolish .

    Orange juice as we know is dead.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 12, 2016

      This :” Greening” is the first attack, make no mistake. Corn, Soy Beans, and Wheat are next.

      Reply
  33. Cate

     /  November 12, 2016

    Puffins always make me think of capelin. Ever hear of capelin?

    For centuries in Newfoundland, the first sign of summer was the capelin coming in—millions of little black-and-silver fish rolling onto pebble beaches to spawn, where they were harvested for use as bait, fertiliser, and human consumption. I grew up munching whole smoked or dried salt capelin as a treat.

    Capelin is the foundation of the food chain for many species in the NW Atlantic, and since 1990, stocks have crashed. Nevertheless, fishing pressure has increased: capelin is now caught in huge seines offshore by larger vessels, during “capelin season”—which happens to be their spawning season, but they are caught before they can spawn. Fishing pressure is intense and highly competitive because in a poor province, it’s so lucrative: the major market for the spawn is Japan, where they can’t get enough of it (it’s masago, for you sushi fans). As for the males, a capelin buyer on the dock told me that he supplies male fish to Sea-World/Marineland type aquariums.

    Our leading provincial biologist recently called for an end to the capelin fishery.

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/08/23/leading-biologist-in-newfoundland-calls-for-end-to-capelin-fishery.html

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 12, 2016

      Cate……………you are our pearl in the North Atlantic,
      Your are our pearl , singular , and we all love every stroke you make.
      All us know how how rare pearls are in the North Atlantic,

      Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  November 12, 2016

    Think I’m craxsy ? google citrus greening, Then we talk.

    Reply
  35. Abel Adamski

     /  November 12, 2016

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/everyone-is-vulnerable-trump-presidency-a-risk-to-australias-climate-science-20161111-gsneld.html

    Australia’s climate research relies on many US programs, some of which have been targeted by the Republican-controlled Congress. President Barack Obama resisted cuts to agencies such as NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration but he will leave office on January 20.

    At the extreme end, a Trump administration could jeopardise global climate efforts by withholding access to data that underpins climate models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said David Karoly, an atmospheric scientist at Melbourne University.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 12, 2016

      Abel Adamsk

      Get ready hell is coming to breakfast.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 12, 2016

        Abel Adamsk
        He’s not draining the swamp, he’s hiring in alligators for the pit.
        Then our swamp is a cesspool,

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 12, 2016

      More from the article
      “All the [Coupled Model Intercomparison Project] data is stored on US data servers,” Professor Karoly said, adding the US is the only place storing all that information.

      Any interruption could mean the next IPCC assessment potentially doesn’t proceed, which “would be an enormous setback for climate science”, he said.

      Christian Jakob, a Monash University professor who attended a recent CMIP gathering in the US, is less pessimistic about an interruption to data access. Future phases of the modelling, though, could be affected if other nations didn’t step up to fill any US void.

      Of more pressing concern is whether expensive satellite programs run by NOAA and NASA get axed, a move that would damage not only climate modelling but “close cousins” the short-term weather forecasts, he said.

      Reply
      • We’ve already had some of the key monitoring sensors go dark. And there is a very real danger now that many more will be shut down by republicans + Trump.

        RE my lipstick comment — I was sarcastically criticizing Palin’s past remarks. I’m pretty much against everything she stands for.

        Reply
      • bostonblorp

         /  November 13, 2016

        That’s nuts. Unless we’re talking about over 500TB of data we could easily crowd-source the funding to host that outside of the US. No problem. I could build the system to accommodate such in a week if someone put up a cc. I have managed multi-petabyte storage before and that was before the huge convenience of the cloud.

        Reply
        • It’s not so much a data mining issue which is relatively inexpensive. It’s a sensors issue. You need to get sensors aboard satellites to monitor the globe RE climate change. What’s happening now is that the monitoring sensors aboard older satellites are starting to fail. If they’re not replaced, then we’re stuck with surface, balloon and aircraft observation. So, I don’t know if there’s any precedent for crowd sourcing a satellite payload. But that’s what we’d be talking about.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 14, 2016

          And there are actually replacement ones sitting in warehouses that the Republicans were only too happy to have built at great expense to the taxpayer by their sponsors, yet who have emphatically refused to allow them to be launched by the US Navy who own them

  36. Suzanne

     /  November 12, 2016

    Trump’s Client Contrarian….
    At the NY Times this morning:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/12/science/myron-ebell-trump-epa.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=b-lede-package-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news
    From the article:
    In looking for someone to follow through on his campaign vow to dismantle one of the Obama administration’s signature climate change policies, President-elect Donald J. Trump probably could not have found a better candidate for the job than Mr. Ebell.

    Reply
    • “We face the most profound crisis in human history. Our response is to elect a man to the presidency who does not believe in climate change. Once societies unplug themselves from reality, those who speak truth become pariahs and enemies of the state. They are subject to severe state repression. Those lost in the reverie of the crisis cult applaud the elimination of these Cassandras. The appealing myths of magical thinking are pleasant opiates. But this narcotic, like all narcotics, leads to squalor and death.”

      http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/its_worse_than_you_think_20161111

      Reply
      • The New York Times projects that Clinton will win the popular vote by 2 million. This is the fourth time in history that the US has split the electoral vote and the popular vote. And if the NYT final count projection turns up, it will be the first time that a president has lost by such a wide margin. Clinton looks to have more popular votes than Kennedy.

        In addition, voter suppression policies by sitting republican governors likely swayed that total as well in places across the country like North Carolina.

        So the truth of the matter, in this year more than any in which a President won, but lost the popular vote, was that we did not elect him. So we absolutely do not deserve this.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  November 13, 2016

        That is happening in Australia, too, and has been for some years. The hard Right Abbott federal regime (Abbott was crowing over Trump’s victory this week)currently headed by a pathetic front-man, Malcolm Turnbull, sabotaged science after coming to power in 2013, after a dishonest and hysterical campaign against our carbon tax (now abolished). They cut science spending, and put a Silicon Valley ‘entrepreneur’ in charge of the premier science institute, the CSIRO. He immediately targeted climate science for a vicious purge sacking world renowned researchers and simply ignoring widespread protests.
        The MSM is putrid, too, particularly the Murdoch cancer, that not only denies climate destabilisation and every ecological crisis, but which also runs vicious campaigns of hatred and vilification against Greens, environmentalists and climate scientists, including long and determined vendettas against individuals like Tim Flannery.
        In short, the Right caused this ecological catastrophe, and, being psychopaths, will NEVER turn about, no matter how great is the devastation, particularly as long as their Eternal Enemy, other people, are suffering, not them. Like most stupid, ignorant, people, they are insanely stubborn, and will not change their opinions because that affronts their egomania. These current developments, in 2016, where the most insanely destructive imbeciles are taking over, and, no doubt, the polite environmental Establishment will do NOTHING but wring their hands impotently, is something I have always anticipated. The charade pretense of ‘democracy’, that it leads to the best possible outcomes, by ‘balancing’ interests, was always idiocy, and here is the final (I fear) proof of that truth.

        Reply
  37. Suzanne

     /  November 12, 2016

    The 350.org live web chat from last night…Community Organizers from several different type of groups basically “spit balling” on where do we go from here. Bill McKibben and Greenpeace were present..but not just focused on CC. Still posting for anyone who want to know what different groups are thinking and planning…including Sanctuary Sites…and how to safely do Non-violent protesting:
    https://350.org/fight-ahead-webchat/

    Reply
    • In my opinion, anyone involved in a #NotMyPresident protest right now should seriously consider signing on with 350.org, Greenpeace, and/or the Sierra Club in order to pursue direct action against the Trump Administration’s fossil fuel based agenda. Bigotry and an active pursuit of policies that harm the environment appear to come from the same place — a callous attitude, elitism, and an intense disregard for the needs of others.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  November 13, 2016

        Exactly…we must form coalition’s….to fight against the Lunatics Regime… 350.org gets it!

        Reply
  38. climatehawk1

     /  November 12, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  39. Stephen

     /  November 12, 2016

    I thought this appropriate in these times.

    Reply
  40. Latest on DAPL:

    Betraying Water Protectors, Obama Set to Approve Dakota Access Pipeline
    Green light could come just one day ahead of national #NoDAPL solidarity rallies planned for Tuesday

    http://commondreams.org/news/2016/11/11/betraying-water-protectors-obama-set-approve-dakota-access-pipeline

    UPDATE: The Obama administration said late Friday afternoon that no decision has been made on the disputed easement for the Dakota Access pipeline.

    Even as water protectors continued to face off against police on Friday in North Dakota, news outlets reported that the Obama administration is set to approve the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) as early as Monday.

    Citing “two sources familiar with the timing,” Politico said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could approve a disputed easement within days, which would allow pipeline construction—on hold since September—to continue across the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Sioux’s reservation. The Standing Rock tribe is vehemently opposed to the project, saying it threatens water supplies and sacred sites.

    Amid such opposition, Politico reported, “the prospect of a Monday announcement is raising concerns that nationwide protests planned for Tuesday could turn uncivil.”

    “That risk of escalating tension may yet prompt the administration to postpone its decision until later in the week,” the outlet continued, “to add additional safety requirements to the easement that the Army Corps of Engineers first put on hold in September—or to change course entirely.”

    Meanwhile, according to Reuters, at least 39 protesters were arrested at the construction site in Mandan, North Dakota, on Friday.

    Pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners said earlier this week it was mobilizing drilling equipment in preparation to tunnel under Lake Oahe, a reservoir on the Missouri River. The Army Corps had previously asked the company to “voluntarily pause all construction activity within 20 miles east or west of Lake Oahe,” and on Friday it suggested that to do so might result in fines or legal action.

    Still, Donald Trump’s election on Tuesday led many to believe the $3.7 billion pipeline’s completion was all but inevitable.

    Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren—a donor to Trump’s campaign—said Friday on “CBS This Morning” that he was “100 percent confident” the president-elect would ensure DAPL is built.

    Now, it seems he won’t even have to wait that long.

    Reply
    • Thanks for this Seal. It appears to me that the Obama Administration has at least been somewhat open to negotiation and compromise on this issue — acting to delay the pipeline and to defuse conflict. I don’t think we can have much hope that a Trump Administration will show the same level of restraint. That fact, however, makes the protest action even more necessary.

      Reply
    • Wiki –
      “Lake Oahe (oh-WAH’-hee) is a large reservoir behind Oahe Dam on the Missouri River; it begins in central South Dakota and continues north into North Dakota in the United States. The lake has an area of 370,000 acres (1,500 km2) and a maximum depth of 205 ft (62 m).[1] By volume, it is the fourth-largest reservoir in the US.[1] Lake Oahe has a length of approximately 231 mi (372 km) and has a shoreline of 2,250 mi (3,620 km).[1] 51 recreation areas are located along Lake Oahe,[3] and 1.5 million people visit the reservoir every year.[1] The lake is named for the 1874 Oahe Indian Mission.[3]”

      On the map, Lake Oahe is essentially a dilation of the Missouri River. The planned crossing of DAPL is at the upper end of the Lake, a decision of such incomprehension I cannot find a (non-religious) word for it.

      Reply
  41. Thinking about DTL and RS’s scribble that there are a lot of us on this site that are in the ‘death anytime’ age. Older people just…disappear forever and pretty dang suddenly. We are ‘driving’ an old car that is giving out and know it, just not when it’ll be time for the junkyard.

    When I got home at 6pm on Wednesday there was a phone call message light blinking. It was from my little brother down in Humboldt County saying that Coco, an old friend from the Hog Farm concert crews whom I worked with for years, was about to leave the planet (cancer) and really wanted to talk to me and here’s the number. Haven’t talked to Coco in 11 years, since 2005 when at the last concert I ran the pre/post security crew.

    I immediately called. The woman who answered said she was so sorry and yes I was one of the people he did really want to talk to but he walked through the curtain at 4:20pm.

    I missed him by 2 1/2 hours. If, like Coco, DTL has done the same, he is doing fine though his knowledge and thoughts will be missed on this side of the curtain.

    Life can seem so fleeting and fragile, can’t it?

    Weather in the NE corner of the Inland PacNW mountains: Continuing insanity.

    60’F days, no freezing nights, wet foggy mornings, warm-on-the-arms sunshine that makes you sweat. Yellow jackets and honeybees and ladybugs and stink beetles and flies and all sorts of other tiny flying critters in the air that shouldn’t be. New grass growing and flowers popping up on different plants. Bare brown mountain peaks in every direction. Continuing insanity.

    Reply
    • Yep, finally getting our first freeze here tonight (about 3-4 weeks late) in St. Louis. Temps will be back well above normal in a couple of days though. No good cold air source in sight with +10-20C anomalies blasting back into the high Arctic again in the next few days. DMI 80N+ temps sitting at or above +10C (still). Crazy circulation changes going on this year.

      Reply
      • Scott

         /  November 14, 2016

        It still hasn’t frozen in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis and Saint Paul). Our first freeze is now in the forecast for late this week. Low of 32 on Saturday. If we escape that one, it looks like it starts to warm up again over the weekend. We passed the record late freeze/frost over a week ago.

        Reply
    • I would suggest life doesn’t just seem fleeting and fragile at the odd moment, such moments (more and more often these days) serve to remind me that life IS fleeting and fragile.

      Reply
      • 12volt dan

         /  November 13, 2016

        + 1 I think as we get older (and hopefully wiser) we do get a little more respective of life all around us. Like Mike’s comment on the little things that disappear that affect us more

        for me that happened this summer when 3 milkweed plants pushed up through the cold patch pavement in June right in front of the garage where I work. they literally pushed the patch up and out and grew up out of it. Bering on the pavement there was no way they would get enough water so i took it upon myself to water them for the Monarch Butterfly

        The plants grew well and are casting their seed into the wind.

        I did not see a single Monarch this year and I was looking.Something Ive see all my life here and it’s goon

        that one hurt

        Reply
  42. Greg

     /  November 12, 2016

    My father woul recite this poem by heart. If all the world were like my father was it would live in peac, both with itself and with earth. RIP dad

    Oh, there once was a Puffin…
    Oh, there once was a Puffin
    Just the shape of a muffin,
    And he lived on an island
    In the bright blue sea!

    He ate little fishes,
    That were most delicious,
    And he had them for supper
    And he had them for tea.

    But this poor little Puffin,
    He couldn’t play nothin’,
    For he hadn’t anybody
    To play with at all.

    So he sat on his island,
    And he cried for awhile, and
    He felt very lonely,
    And he felt very small.

    Then along came the fishes,
    And they said, “If you wishes,
    You can have us for playmates,
    Instead of for tea!”

    So they now play together,
    In all sorts of weather,
    And the Puffin eats pancakes,
    Like you and like me.

    Reply
  43. Ailsa

     /  November 12, 2016

    Hard to believe its nearly a year since COP21. And now its COP22 in Marrakech, which seems to be a bit under the radar, upstaged by Trump/Clinton. Below is part one of 3 part video.

    Climate adaptation and mitigation in the face of a changing ocean: COP22 Side Event – Part I

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 13, 2016

      Another view of COP 22, from those on the ground in Morocco.

      http://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/cop22-morocco-between-greenwashing-and-environmental-injustice-391898113

      “Emphasising its renewable-energy policies, Morocco is selling itself to the international community as a green actor and promoting a greenwashing discourse. Meanwhile, the environmental problems inside the country, from resource exploitation to land expropriation to water and air pollution, completely contradict that narrative…Even worse, the regime is not only taking part in the environment’s destruction but also oppressing local efforts to resist…..“The question of climate change is not an exclusively expert issue or a matter limited to negotiations between governments. For us, climate change is at the heart of the daily lived reality of citizens who demand a rupture with the liberal policies that are causing the deterioration of our social and environmental conditions.”

      Reply
  44. Greg

     /  November 13, 2016

    My wife just got off the phone with her old classmate a few minutes ago, having told her she wasn’t going to D.C. for the inauguration or even watching it on t.v.. Her friend then said she had to come for the Million woman march with our whole family the next day, Saturday. Said all her female classmates, as far as California, were buying tickets and making plans to come for it and bringing families. That they can feel the momentum building. Looks like we are heading that way January 21. Everyone invited! Very inspiring.

    Reply
  45. bostonblorp

     /  November 13, 2016

    I admire RS’ intractable instinct to keep fighting in the face of an ever-darkening future. While it is unquestionably noble to keep “raging against the dying of the light” I am a weaker sort and now believe there are only two routes out of chaos.

    The first (and hopefully sooner than later) is a truly cataclysmic event that shocks the world into mobilization. Mobilization the likes of which one only sees during times of war. I don’t know what it will take given the alarming news posted here on a near daily basis. But something that stuns even the most ignorant “skeptic.”

    The second, which is a bit of a Hail Mary, is that market forces rapidly not only obviate the need for new carbon positive energy sources but render the existing polluters expensive, antiquated and eager to be retired. We are seeing good things with the price of solar but unless we get drop-in replacements for the jet engine, the super-tanker engine, the coal oven, etc, in the next ten years then I fear the inertia of geophysics will carry us beyond our ability to back-pedal.

    I suppose the ugly third option is Nature rebalances and wipes 90% of the populace out.

    May my epitaph be “Old fool who doubted mankind and died in a hut in Nova Scotia while the world entered a new golden age.”

    Reply
  46. Looks like 1’C should have been the absolute maximum, at least according to this OZ scientist. Not good, not good at all.

    Study: Climate change already dramatically disrupting all elements of nature
    Study in journal Science says every aspect of life on earth impacted — from genes to entire ecosystems

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-11/wcs-scc111016.php

    Study in journal Science says every aspect of life on earth impacted — from genes to entire ecosystems.

    Impacts to humans include increased pests and disease outbreaks, reduced productivity in fisheries, and decreasing agriculture yields 80 percent of 94 ecological processes already show signs of distress. Authors say responses observed in nature could be applied by people to address mounting issues

    “Policy makers and politicians must accept that if we don’t curb greenhouse gas emissions, an environmental catastrophe is likely,” — senior author Dr. James Watson of WCS and University of Queensland

    NEW YORK – Global changes in temperature due to human-induced climate change have already impacted every aspect of life on Earth from genes to entire ecosystems, with increasingly unpredictable consequences for humans — according to a new study published in the journal Science.

    The study found a staggering 80 percent of 94 ecological processes that form the foundation for healthy marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems already show signs of distress and response to climate change.

    Impacts to humans include increased pests and disease outbreaks, reduced productivity in fisheries, and decreasing agriculture yields.

    “There is now clear evidence that, with only a ~1oC of warming globally, very major impacts are already being felt,” said study lead author Dr Brett Scheffers of the University of Florida. “Genes are changing, species’ physiology and physical features such as body size are changing, species are rapidly moving to keep track of suitable climate space, and there are now signs of entire ecosystems under stress.”

    Said the study’s senior author, Dr. James Watson from the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Queensland: “The level of change we have observed is quite astonishing considering we have only experienced a relatively small amount of climate change to date. It is no longer sensible to consider this a concern for the future. Policy makers and politicians must accept that if we don’t curb greenhouse gas emissions, an environmental catastrophe is likely.”

    But the study also points to hope as many of the responses observed in nature could be applied by people to address the mounting issues faced under changing climate conditions. For example, improved understanding of the adaptive capacity in wildlife can be applied to our crops, livestock and fisheries. This can be seen in crops such as wheat and barley, where domesticated crops are crossed with wild varieties to maintain the evolutionary potential of varieties under climate change.

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 13, 2016

      If I recall correctly (I have a sieve for a mind so most details slip through leaving only large vague chunks of thought), 2C was never a scientific target, it was a political choice, from when, Kyoto? Someone–RS–knows. But back in the earliest warning days of climate change, scientists like Dr Hansen were saying 1C tops, and the political types said, What? You’re joking, that can’t be true, pick another number. And they did. And now that we have blown past 1C and have 2C in our sights, some articles in mainstream media are starting to float the 3C to 6C balloon. It’s all about frogs in the pot.

      Reply
      • Steven Blaisdell

         /  November 14, 2016

        3C to 6C? That’s a death sentence to the biosphere, and (metaphorically) everything in it.
        After 11/8/16, I now have no doubt: many, many humans are going to die, starting far sooner than anyone thought possible. I’m going to see this take hold in my lifetime. The next four years are going to be a disaster for the US and the world; I’m fighting like hell here in TX to turn this state blue, but it’s looking more and more like a rear guard action to save as much as possible for my child.
        It’s funny. American evangelicals have feared with every Democratic administration the coming of the apocalypse; yet here we appear to have the very thing and it’s at the hands of….I hope I’m wrong. I hope forces in this country far greater than myself rise to this occasion. I hope this invasion of vandals is only venal, and not sociopathic. We shall see.

        Reply
    • …a little problem with the degree thingie. Should be ~1ºC, yes?

      Reply
  47. 44 south

     /  November 13, 2016

    Good people.
    We were “dog tucker” before Trump and we are just a little more certainly that now.
    There is a perfectly good theory that claims we could no more avoid our fate than the rabbits here can stop breeding.

    The amount of BS following the election prompts this final comment from me.
    You Tube Debbie Lusignan /aka the
    sane progressive. Her “General Election Fraud run down with Richard Charnin ” I think is both accurate and entertaining.
    What more could be hoped for in the end times.

    Reply
  48. Another look at the report mentioned by seal:

    link

    Reply
  49. Suzanne

     /  November 13, 2016

    Kate McKinon as Hillary on SNL’s cold open last singing Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”…
    Very moving and appropriate for how many of us are feeling…

    Reply
  50. Suzanne

     /  November 13, 2016

    Hillary’s lead is growing in the popular vote. I hope everyone has signed the ban the electoral college petition. But…we have to take action now and not let anyone forget…the majority of Americans wanted Hillary for POTUS.
    In the meantime…a “Women’s March on Washington” for the day after the Inauguration is being planned. And it isn’t just for women..I hope everyone will check it out and then share this…We CANNOT sit idly by and let our ADHD nation forget nor ignore the Tyrant that is to be our next President.
    https://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/?active_tab=about

    I still feel like I have been hit in the gut…and the person’s fist is still in my gut. But I swear, on all that I hold dear…I will not just sit by and whine…I will fight to stop this abomination with my last breath.

    Reply
  51. In case someone is on doubt, there is no Trump in Germany:

    “The government is now calling for German industry to cut its CO2 emissions by 20 rather than 30 percent by 2030 compared with 2014, according to the document which was seen on Friday.”

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-climatechange-accord-idUSKBN1370JX

    Alex

    Reply
  52. Suzanne

     /  November 13, 2016

    NoDAPL..in South Florida. Events all over the nation for this Tuesday, November 15…in front of Army Corp of Engineer offices….I hope you will go and find an event in your hometown. We need the numbers on Tuesday so the media gives this more attention.
    This can be another way to stand up against corporations and government collusion….and for those minorities who are the ones who always suffer as a result:
    https://actionnetwork.org/events/nodapl-south-florida-against-pipelines/thankyou#tab_info

    Reply
  53. John McCormick

     /  November 13, 2016

    Suzanne, we are with you: “I will fight to stop this abomination with my last breath.”

    Reply
  54. John McCormick

     /  November 13, 2016

    Systems going dark! This is the beginning of that abomination’s shredding our children’s future.

    Read: and talk about:

    bostonblorp / November 13, 2016

    That’s nuts. Unless we’re talking about over 500TB of data we could easily crowd-source the funding to host that outside of the US. No problem. I could build the system to accommodate such in a week if someone put up a cc. I have managed multi-petabyte storage before and that was before the huge convenience of the cloud.

    Reply
  55. So much bad news, thought I’d throw some good out this morning:

    Obama administration suspends Pacific trade deal vote effort

    http://www.rawstory.com/2016/11/obama-administration-backs-off-pacific-trade-deal-vote-effort/

    U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration has suspended its efforts to win congressional approval for his Asian free-trade deal before President-elect Donald Trump takes office, saying on Friday that TPP’s fate was up to Trump and Republican lawmakers.

    Administration officials also said Obama would try to explain the situation to leaders of the 11 other countries in the Trans-Pacific Partnership pact next week when he attends a regional summit in Peru.

    Obama’s cabinet secretaries and the U.S. Trade Representative’s office had been lobbying lawmakers for months to pass the 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership deal in the post-election, lame-duck session of Congress. However, Trump’s stunning election victory that sends him to the White House in January and retains Republican majorities in Congress has stymied those plans.

    “We have worked closely with Congress to resolve outstanding issues and are ready to move forward, but this is a legislative process and it’s up to congressional leaders as to whether and when this moves forward,” USTR spokesman Matt McAlvanah said in a statement.

    On Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would not take up TPP in the weeks before Trump’s inauguration and said its fate was now up to Trump. House Speaker Paul Ryan had earlier said he would not proceed with a lame-duck vote.

    Trump made his opposition to the TPP a centerpiece of his campaign, calling it a “disaster” and “a rape of our country” that would send more jobs overseas. His anti-free-trade message and pledges to stem the tide of imported goods from China and Mexico won him massive support among blue-collar workers in the industrial heartland states of Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, helping to swing the election his way.

    Trump has said he will scrap TPP, renegotiate the 22-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement and adopt a much tougher trade stance with China.

    The TPP agreement, negotiated for more than five years and signed in October 2015, was aimed at reducing trade barriers erected by some of the fastest growing economies in Asia and boosting ties with U.S. allies in the region in the face of China’s rising influence.

    White House Deputy National Security Advisor Wally Adeyemo told reporters on Friday that Obama will tell TPP member countries at the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation summit that the United States will remain engaged in Asia, and that it recognizes the benefits of trade and such deals still make sense.

    “In terms of the TPP agreement itself, Leader McConnell has spoken to that and it’s something that he’s going to work with the President-elect to figure out where they go in terms of trade agreements in the future,” Adeyemo said. “But we continue to think that these types of deals make sense, simply because countries like China are not going to stop working on regional agreements.”

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  November 13, 2016

      The TPP was a secret pact that effected the total take-over of the states involved by US corporate capital, that shredded environmental and labour protections, that established secret corporate Star Chambers over the domestic legal systems, that would have caused the privatisation of all public institutions in health, education, housing etc, and that sneaked in bans on BDS campaigns against Israel. And which is unambiguously targeted against China. Obama’s support is taken for granted, as is Clinton’s, despite her denials, but why is Trump opposed? It is the parasitic ruling elite’s dream come true. It WILL be back, under a new name, nothing more.

      Reply
  56. Second article; both candidates were so hated that look who REALLY won the US election. In a sense this actually gives one hope as to the intelligence of the US voters because they refused to ‘vote for evil.’

    I do think that It is far past time for a ‘NONE OF THE ABOVE’ box on every ballot, don’t you think?

    Actually, ‘Nobody’ Won the 2016 Presidential Election — and It Was a Landslide

    http://theantimedia.org/nobody-won-2016-election-landslide/

    “Nobody for President, that’s my campaign slogan,” Nick Cannon asserted in “Too Broke to Vote,” his viral criticism of the American electoral process from March of this year. Now, it turns out nobody for president won the 2016 election in a landslide.

    According to new voter turnout statistics from the 2016 election, 47 percent of Americans voted for nobody, far outweighing the votes cast for Trump (25.5 percent) and Hillary (25.6 percent) by eligible voters.

    And the “I voted for nobody” group is actually much larger than the 47 percent reported because that number only includes eligible voters. How many millions of Americans under the legal voting age — not to mention the countless millions who have lost their voting rights — voted for nobody, as well? Factoring in those individuals, around 193 million people did not vote for Trump or Clinton. That’s nearly two-thirds of the population of the United States.
    Nobody also seemingly won the presidential primaries, with only 9 percent of Americans casting their votes for either Trump or Clinton.

    Today’s paper, an unintentional reminder to look at third party candidates like @GovGaryJohnson or @DrJillStein. pic.twitter.com/vC6KnbIq7h

    — Edward Snowden (@Snowden) August 1, 2016

    So when does nobody take office? Nobody won the majority of votes in the primaries or the general election, and the two main candidates who were running didn’t “win” the popular vote — they simply slightly outcompeted each other considering neither garnered over 50 percent of the eligible voters’ ballots.

    That’s where the real debate begins.
    As I wrote back in August when the primary voter turnout rates came in, one could argue that Trump (and Obama) do not have a legitimate mandate to rule over the people of the United States. Trump did not win the majority of Americans’ votes — not even close.

    When all Americans are included, Trump only garnered the votes of about 19 percent of us. This means the United States will be ruled over by a small minority of voters who elected someone to continually impose their political positions on the other 81 percent of us.

    Of course, as is the case with Democrats looking to assign blame for Hillary’s loss, pundits and political pontificators argue the people who didn’t vote have no right to complain about the outcome. After all, a non-vote or a vote for a third-party candidate was, in actuality, a vote for Trump. But that logic is flawed. The majority of Americans don’t vote anymore because the political system no longer represents them. We’ve been disenfranchised by decades of corrupt, unrepresentative politicians.

    The United States, according to a highly-cited academic study, is effectively an oligarchy “elected” by a minority of voters ruled by a smaller minority of disliked politicians who represent an even smaller minority of billionaires and special interests. You know it, I know it, hell, even former U.S. President Jimmy Carter knows it. The majority of Americans voted for nobody not because they don’t care or because they are apathetic — they voted no confidence in a political system that forgot about them a long time ago.

    Reply
  57. Greg Palast has been warning for years about systemic voter suppression, for example, using the Crosscheck system to fraudulently purge names from voter registration lists.

    From his latest article this week:

    On Tuesday, we saw Crosscheck elect a Republican Senate and as President, Donald Trump. The electoral putsch was aided by nine other methods of attacking the right to vote of Black, Latino and Asian-American voters, methods detailed in my book and film, including “Caging,” “purging,” blocking legitimate registrations, and wrongly shunting millions to “provisional” ballots that will never be counted.

    https://zcomm.org/znetarticle/the-election-was-stolen-heres-how/

    Reply
  58. bostonblorp

     /  November 13, 2016

    More bad news regarding the world’s coral reefs.

    “Climate change has destroyed half of Japan’s major coral reef”
    http://www.indialivetoday.com/climate-change-has-destroyed-half-of-japans-major-coral-reef/59133.html

    Reply
  59. Suzanne

     /  November 13, 2016

    The losses for 2016 just keep piling up…My rock heroes just keep leaving us….

    One of the worse weeks of my life…

    Reply
  60. Jimbot

     /  November 13, 2016

    Cate,
    The BC West Coast herring roe fishery, since the late 60’s, ( for the sushi market ) is another example of over-fishing and insanely short-sighted policies leading to decimation or maybe centimation of the area population. Or maybe it was done on purpose for some kind of hidden agenda.

    Reply
  61. Good news to counterbalance a bit all the bad ones: http://www.wikiparques.org/guarda-parques-nao-abandonam-parque-do-rio-preto-ao-fogo/

    In Portuguese, sorry. But it’s a beautiful story. Firefighters in the State Park of Rio Preto, in Minas Gerais, despite not being paid for 3 months (the economic crisis in Brasil is dire, right now, and some state governments, like Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais are in bankruptcy) fought and managed to control in a day a huge fire that threathned the park. Only 1ha of protected land was destroyed, though 185ha were burnt outside the park before the firefighters managed to stop the fire.

    Reply
  62. Jimbot

     /  November 13, 2016

    We can’t forget this Leonard song.

    Reply
  63. We were certainly warned of exactly what would happen:

    http://michaelmoore.com/trumpwillwin/

    Reply
    • Dave Person

       /  November 13, 2016

      HI,
      Michael Moore had it so right. I understood that after working so many years as a scientist among rural people. It is the same with climate change. Very few climate scientists (or scientists of any sort), environmentalists, and activists resonate in rural America.

      dave

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 14, 2016

        So true, Dave. Like the islands in the Pacific. They have no idea why they are being driven from the homes.

        Reply
  64. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Roll away the stone –

    Reply
  65. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    A word about Leon Russell –

    Several years ago he came to town to play. I saw him on a red “Lark”, an old man transport driving near the curb. On Buddy Holly Ave. I left him alone. I knew he was having moment with time and space. Even as I wanted run up, and to kiss his ring.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  November 14, 2016

      Thanks for sharing Bob. He and Leonard Cohen..two of my personal rock heroes…both taken in the same week. The week that I feel as though I had been hit in the gut…and the fist I was hit with remains. I have been fighting all week to stay focused on moving forward, and not to succumb to my grief, but hearing about Russell today… was bridge to far…just so depleting..
      2016 can’t end soon enough.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 15, 2016

      They have been spared the suffering of the future

      Reply
  66. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Compromise ?
    Sounds good to me . So what should I do? Just lay down and accept the rape of the Earth , so billionaires can keep score in a pissing contest for dollars ?

    We ain’t all moving to Mars folks. Like we all did to Fla. It’s a much longer trip. And we’ve made that into it’s second bust. The King Tide tonight is just another chink in that wall. The little Dutch Boy is trying to grow fingers tonight, all over the state. While the moon is perfect over my house, sea water there is creeping into places it’s ever reached before.
    I find it interesting that the laws of physics will never compromise with never ending growth on our sweet blue marble.

    Reply
    • I always have to wonder where these billionaires, and their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren are planning to go if the current trend pushes the planet into another permian-level extinction event. Do they have some off-planet getaway that we don’t know about? Do they expect to buy their way out of compliance with the laws of physics? Maybe hire lobbyists to convince the planet to exempt them from the catastrophe? Such profound short-sightedness.

      In other news, it lookl like the Antarctic is losing extent at a record rate, well below any previously measured years, and well below the 2 std deviation band.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  November 14, 2016

        Yeah, falling like a rock
        That has me wondering, usually the ice melt provides that skin of fresh water which freezes at 0C keeping a substantial ice sheet, is it just warmer winds or has the ice melt on and under Antarctica slowed down. ?

        Reply
    • Greg

       /  November 14, 2016

      CB, you wax poetic. Keep it up. Just reading your words, no matter the content, is somehow comforting in an increasingly alien world. Does DT live in Portland?

      Reply
  67. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Well, Trump is going to hire the most extreme people he can find. And there is this call to compromise. For years the Right has pointed to Chamberlain , now we must lay down like him.
    What a crazy fucking world this is.

    Reply
  68. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Hitler didn’t over throw the government, he won the election. One month later he burnt the Reich Stag to the ground, and called for special powers to defeat the commies.

    Watch next spring, Trump will need these powers.

    Reply
  69. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    I am shell of my self, but I am still mad as hell.

    Reply
  70. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Leon Russell and Glen Cambell both played on all that early Beach Boy stuff.

    Reply
  71. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    And all that cultural stuff means zip. because morons in the Heart Land are too stupid to see the change. Mr. Trump is not going to turn back the hands of time. The forces lose in the world will run over them. and him like a cross town bus.

    Reply
  72. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    To see the world as it is, and not how I wish it is.

    Funny as may seem that was my goal 50 years ago.

    Reply
  73. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    The great thing about hell at breakfast, Burger King is selling 3 pancakes for 89 cents.

    This means farmers are leaving their land. All over the Earth small farmers are leaving their land, In the US we are one fungus away. So go eat 3 pancakes for 89 cents. While you can.

    Reply
  74. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    We are all dancing on a false edge of fallacy.

    Reply
  75. lesliegraham1

     /  November 14, 2016

    Arctic temperature anomaly forecast to break the 7C barrier on Sunday.

    Reply
  76. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
  77. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
  78. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    The message of this election seems to be that there is some deep wisdom in the “heartland”, Bullshit.
    These are the folks who drag us down. CHANGE, Don’t have 3 kids in West Virginia, and lose your marriage. Obama didn’t do that , you did. .

    Reply
  79. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    I made some really shitty choices in my life, Doctor Trump is going to set it all right , by ripping apart 2 million families. Then I will feel better.

    Reply
  80. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    I will never compromise with the rape of the Earth.

    EVER.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 14, 2016

      ” President-elect Donald Trump’s decision to appoint Stephen Bannon as his chief strategist in the White House” ……………….

      I’m not going to compromise with the new Fascists .
      EVER.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 14, 2016

        These men are pigs , Gracie Slick was a rebel.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  November 14, 2016

          The only other woman I ever wanted to BE. Feed your head. Feed your head.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 15, 2016

          I had a Pappa John Creech album that I bought because Gracie was featured on it, he was a magician with that violin, Danny Boy was sheer magic, he made that instrument talk.

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 15, 2016

        • Abel Adamski

           /  November 15, 2016

          Two of his best
          The singing fiddle in Somewhere over the Rainbow and Danny Boy

    • Scott

       /  November 14, 2016

      One good thing…I’ve come to learn and see that it takes surprisingly few people to shut down…well pretty much anything. 20 or 30 motivated protesters can cause quite a lot of chaos. As this catastrophe starts rolling, we all need to do what we can to monkey-wrench the entire United States of America. Shut it down.

      Reply
  81. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Looking at that nose, let’s hope his drug test comes up clean.

    chief strategist in the White House

    Reply
  82. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    When I heard Leon was dead, that set head to rattling to the best song of time. I found it .

    DELANEY & BONNIE . Comin’ Home –

    Reply
  83. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 14, 2016

      Joe Cocker was about to go tour, his band crapped out , he called Leon Russell, and we got this

      Reply
  84. coloradobob

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 14, 2016

      Not to worry. Justin Trudeau is all for re-opening the NAFTA. This means that bulk water exports from Canada will be on the table again. Trump and Trudeau will agree it’s an idea whose time has come—lots of fresh cold Canadian water piped to the poor parched south-west, and lots of money for Canada! Win win!!

      Reply
  85. What can we do to revert the warm up of the planet? Not only to stop the effects but to reverse!

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 14, 2016

      Wenda, one step at a time.

      The first step is

      STOP BURNING FOSSIL FUELS NOW.

      This means no new pipelines, no new drilling, no new petro-infrastructure. It all stops now.

      But because this is not happening yet, we the little people of the world have to join together and demand it. Join 350.org and add your voice and support to making our governments do the right thing for all life on this planet.

      This is just for starters.

      Reply
  86. Greg

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
  87. Greg

     /  November 14, 2016

    Hollywood Florida – what a moon did this morning in climate 2.0

    Reply
  88. Greg

     /  November 14, 2016

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  November 14, 2016

      The Arctic daily mean for 80N over at DMI continues to stagger about in no-man’s land.

      http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

      We have 10C here today with a forecast for next week hitting 14C, and lots of southerly winds keeping frosts at bay. Bizarre weather for this place, this time of year.

      Reply
  89. DAPL:

    From the Kabul River to the Water Protectors of Standing Rock:

    http://ourjourneytosmile.com/blog/2016/09/kabul-river-and-standing-rock-sioux/

    Reply
  90. The article about the Kabul River to Standing Rock:

    Where to Turn
    by Kathy Kelly

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/11/14/where-to-turn/

    In July 1941, Albert Einstein, ten months a US citizen, wrote Eleanor Roosevelt asking her, as First Lady, to raise with the president the matter of lifting bureaucratic hurdles so that Jewish refugees threatened by Hitler’s final solution could be granted entry into the U.S. “I know of no-one else to whom to turn for help,” he wrote. But the U.S. government chose not to heed Einstein’s appeal. The following year, some 2.7 million Jews—nearly half of all Jewish victims of the Holocaust—were annihilated.

    Throughout 2016, as millions overseas faced First-world refugee policies with consequences ranging from the cruel to the brutal to the lethal, it has seemed increasingly unlikely that any U.S. voice – save, perhaps U.S. citizens’ voices raised in unlikely unison – could sway the U.S. White House to give comfort to those fleeing the chaos and death that U.S. wars have sown in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    “We need to have people who mean something to us,” Bernard Cooke once wrote. “People to whom we can turn knowing that being with them is coming home.” His words make me think of Zekerullah, a coordinator of the Afghan Peace Volunteers’ “Street Kids School.” He recently stood in front of the dried up, stench ridden, polluted Kabul River, filming a video encouraging Standing Rock indigenous activists never to give up, even in the face of armed police, and never to let what happened to the Kabul River befall their beautiful Missouri.

    Kabul is the safest place in Afghanistan, a “Ka-bubble” governed in partial, fragile security by the U.S.-allied local government. The Afghan Peace Volunteers, mainly based in Kabul, are no strangers to fear, penury, loss and the dangers of living in a war zone, in a poisonous atmosphere. Yet instead of exacerbating divisions, they have befriended child laborers, street vendors and trash collectors, by creating a school which now serves 100 children. This enables them to catch up with the state schools’ math and language curriculum while compensating their families with monthly donations of rice and oil.

    A 2016 Human Rights Watch report notes “At least a quarter of Afghan children between ages 5 and 14 work for a living to help their families. Many are employed in jobs that can result in illness, injury, or even death due to hazardous working conditions and poor enforcement of safety and health standards.”

    “In 2014 the Afghan government published a list of 19 hazardous occupations prohibited for children. These jobs include carpet weaving, metal work, and brick making. Children working in the carpet sector, for example, face physical injury such as carpal tunnel syndrome, neuralgia, and swollen finger joints from long hours sitting at the loom and performing repetitive motions with sharp equipment. They also risk eye strain from close work in poor lighting, and respiratory problems from inhaling fine wool dust. Children employed in brick kilns also risk respiratory illnesses and heat stroke. Children working in the metal industry are exposed to dangers such as cuts and burns from welding and cutting sheet metal.”

    Multiple wars have ravaged Afghanistan. Rivers are poisoned, irrigation systems ruined, and flocks depleted. Education and health care systems have collapsed. Afghans throughout the country have faced steadily rising unemployment while regular attacks and explosions have forced many hundreds to flee their homes each week. Thousands of Afghan families poured meager savings into helping at least one member flee the country. An estimated 213,000 Afghan people made it to Europe in 2015. Some 2.7 million Afghans have been exiled for decades. In Pakistan 1.6 million found shelter and 950,000 fled to Iran. Now, Afghans in Europe, Pakistan and Iran are being pushed back into Afghanistan. They must join the 1.8 million people who are already internally displaced refugees.

    At a time when Afghan refugees most need compassion, they are among the millions being told to go back where they came from, even if they face death and destitution upon return. In coming months, Afghanistan’s internally displaced refugee population is likely to double, with estimates that as many as 3 million people will be living in tent like shelters. Bracing themselves for a cold winter, many will lack fuel, blankets, food, jobs and potable water. Already, Afghanistan has the highest rate of infant mortality in the world, —112 deaths for every 1,000 live births. 97,000 children suffer from severe acute malnutrition. The children in refugee camps who do survive often become their families ‘main income earner.

    Today, around the world, is Armistice Day. The day originally commemorated the end of the nightmare that was the First World War. Following that slaughter, the U.S. and 80 other countries ultimately ratified the Kellogg-Briand pact, which outlawed war. It would be near the end of the Korean War that Republican President Dwight Eisenhower would issue his “Chance for Peace” address, saying:

    “Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.”

    In a winter seemingly robbed of hopes, as the Standing Rock protesters dig in to defend their shore of the Missouri river, we can’t switch on a news program without wading in what seems a poisoned river; so many fictions uttered that it’s tempting not to even try refuting them, –just tally them. We in the U.S. witness rebellions from various sides of our cultural divisions while many urgent causes which this historical moment brings are completely ignored, not to be discussed. Afghanistan is not discussed. Our patterns of consumption, militarism and pollution continue to devastate our battered environment, but relationships between militarism and climate change are barely researched. We in the U.S. could assume responsibility for the suffering U.S. wars have caused. We could pay reparations to those whose lives have been forever altered by U.S. arrogance and the horror that is war. Instead the U.S. government finds itself beholden to weapon makers and military contractors, bankers and energy magnates, as well as campaign donors who constrict the official discussion in every election to a maddening choice between rival desperations, with more war always the consequence.

    On this Armistice Day, we face the troubling fact that U.S./NATO plans for bases and military exercises call for spending on the Pentagon’s “European Reassurance Initiative” to quadruple, climbing from $789 million in 2016 to $3.4 billion in 2017. Much of this additional funding will go to the deployment of an additional armored-brigade combat team in northern Europe.

    World wars have caused much darker days before. People in comparatively wealthy areas of the world may be spared future days of comparable horror. But there is a peace treaty that needs to be established between all U.S. people who would rather not see their children sent off to war in Iraq or Syria or Russia, who would rather not see the earth reduced to ashes and their children to penury at the whims of the well-connected and the mighty. And there is an urgently needed peace to be forged between the U.S. and the refugees of our U.S. and NATO warmaking overseas, even as we resolve to end further violence and pay reparations so that displaced people can live dignified lives with the hope of one day returning to their homes.

    Many U.S. people awoke this week with a new understanding of the dangers facing our common life together. These battles we fight are not a game, and they can escalate into even direr realities.

    I look to Afghanistan, I look to the simple facts faced by the Standing Rock protesters, and I know we must look back to the sorrows which so much of the world will commemorate today. These sorrows, so painfully real, can help all of us yearn above all for an understanding by people worldwide, and here in my own frightened, divided country—an understanding that we live in a real world, beset with multiple wars, and must at last turn to each other, prepared to live more simply, share resources more radically, and abolish all wars in order to build a real peace.

    Reply
  91. June

     /  November 14, 2016

    Jamie Henn from 350.org is helping to rally the climate troops, giving us energy to keep fighting, because it really is fighting for our lives and the life of everything on the planet.

    How To Fight For The Climate During A Trump Administration

    …But when you’re trapped in a burning building and the door has been barred, you don’t just sit on the floor and watch the flames: you put out what you can and start looking for the windows.
    Our planet is that burning building and it’s time to double down on our role as firefighters.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jamie-henn/how-to-fight-for-the-clim_b_12961480.html

    Reply
  92. Svante Törnquist

     /  November 15, 2016

    So sad if the Puffins suffers! What a beautifully written post, Robert. I especially liked:

    “If they could speak, a lovable breed of northern bird would tell us their own tale of tragedy and loss at the hand of global heat. And if we could hear the sad tale of their own great plight, our hearts and minds might not be so hard or so cold.”

    This summer I were with my family in Norway to visit the Puffins. A truly religous experience! In the evening we just sat in the grass watching hundreds of Puffins flying around and some landed just a few feet from us. It was a restricted area with clear markings where you were not allowed to pass. Nad the Puffins didn’t seem to bother. My children sat for an hour completely quiet just watching. I stark memory for life!

    Here is an album with photos, enyoy!
    https://flic.kr/s/aHskNC5ZqQ

    //embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

    Reply
  93. hesperidean

     /  November 30, 2016

    I have always loved puffins – so sorry to hear of their decline

    Reply
  1. From the Bering to Maine, Hot Oceans Are Killing the Puffin | robertscribbler | GarryRogers Nature Conservation
  2. For The Arctic Ocean Above 80 North, It’s Still Summer in November | robertscribbler
  3. For The Arctic Ocean Above 80 North, It’s Still Summer in November | RClimate
  4. Para O Oceano Ártico Acima de 80 Norte, Ainda é Verão em Novembro

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