Rendered Uninhabitable by Heat — It’s Not Just Sudan, Parts From North Africa to the Middle East are Under the Gun

“North Africa is already hot and is strongly increasing in temperature. At some point in this century, part of the region will become uninhabitable.”Dr. Johannes Lilieveld

“The number of climate refugees could increase dramatically in future. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and the Cyprus Institute in Nicosia have calculated that the Middle East and North Africa could become so hot that human habitability is compromised.”The Max Planck Institute

****

Heatwaves so hot that it’s impossible to perform any activity outdoors without threat of injury or worse. Raging dust storms that make the very air unbreathable. Massive droughts that wreck agricultural productivity and biodiversity altogether. Sections of Africa and the Middle East are currently getting a taste of these new, dangerous climate conditions. But their frequency could increase by five fold or more over the next 30-40 years — threatening harm, government collapse, and the forced dislocation of millions.

Sudan Could be Made Uninhabitable by Climate Change

Due to human-caused warming, these kinds of events are already happening in places like Sudan with increasing frequency. And a recent report by CNN shows that this North African state is under threat of becoming uninhabitable to human beings due to climate change.

africa-areas-most-vulnerable-to-climate-change

(A new infertile crescent. Climate change increases desertification risks for semi-arid regions across Africa. Image source: Grid-Arendal, Columbia University and CNN.)

Drought has impacted agriculture to the extent that 1.9 million people in this nation of 40 million could face hunger over the next couple of years. A further 3.2 million face water shortages. And in the ironic juxtaposition that often comes with climate change — since 2013 about 600,000 people have been displaced due to the deluges that have more and more often come at the end of the long, dry periods.

For Sudan, the problems are just beginning. By mid-Century surface temperatures in the region could warm by between 1.1 and 3.1 degrees Celsius. And so much additional warming will multiply the occurrence of the kinds of harmful heatwaves, droughts, and dust storms that are happening today many times over. In the end, Sudan is at risk of being abandoned as its lands are taken in by a climate unfit for human habitation.

500 Million People Under Extreme Heat and Drought in Africa and Middle East by mid-Century

But it’s not just Sudan that’s facing a flip into nation-wrecking climate conditions. By 2050, extreme heat related events will be happening five times more frequently as the Earth warms up along a desiccating crescent in Africa and onward throughout a good chunk of the Middle East. During summers, by mid Century, temperatures throughout this vulnerable zone could be as much as 5 degrees Celsius hotter than they are today.

increased-warm-days

(Temperatures are set to rise to extreme levels across Africa and the Middle East due to fossil fuel burning and related Earth System warming. The impacts produce a high risk for mass migration away from these regions as hothouse conditions take hold. Image source: The Max-Planck Institute.)

Including Sudan, more than 500 million people live in this region. And according to the Max-Planck Institute, extremely hot days — of which there were 16 each year within this vulnerable area from 1986 to 2005 — will increase five-fold to 80 by 2050 and up to 118 to 200 by 2100.

Added extraordinary and persistent heat will bake moisture out of soils, ruin forests, and advance deserts. It will produce days when wet bulb temperatures approach or exceed the limit of human endurance (35 C) time and time again. Such a high prevalence and intensity of adverse conditions will make the current problems faced by the region seem mild and moderate by comparison. In the end, numerous places are likely to become basically unlivable.

Call For Action

Given the coming hardship and what is likely to be a preventable mass migration, scientists and environmentalists are calling for action. CNN and others have highlighted a need for aid to Africa and the Middle East. But as helpful as aid is to those desperate and struggling to survive, the primary driver of the whole problem is human-based fossil fuel emissions. And unless that stops, this region and its highly vulnerable peoples, among others around the world, will be very hard hit.

Michelle Yonetani, a senior advisor on disasters from the Internal Displacement Monitoring Center noted that encouraging governments to increase commitments to act on climate is “perhaps one of the most indirect ways [to help], but [it is] globally the most important. Now really is the time to push governments to act…” Otherwise, vast regions within Africa and the Middle East face destabilization, collapse, and mass migration over rather short time horizons.

Links:

Climate Change Could Render Sudan Uninhabitable

The Max Planck Institute

Internal Displacement Monitoring Center

Grid-Arendal, Columbia University

Hat tip to TodaysGuestIs

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299 Comments

  1. Looking at that map reminded me of this one.

    “When you map the targets of Western drone strikes onto the region, you see that ‘many of these attacks – from South Waziristan through northern Yemen, Somalia, Mali, Iraq, Gaza and Libya – are directly on or close to the 200 mm aridity line.’ The red dots on the map above represent some of the areas where strikes have been concentrated. To me this is the most striking attempt yet to visualise the brutal landscape of the climate crisis. ”

    Reply
  2. climatehawk1

     /  December 9, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  3. More and more millions of refugees from hellish lands ruined by our global fossil fuel addiction. And the northern hemisphere’s more northerly nations will have millions of internal refugees as they retreat from flooded towns and cities along the coasts. Where will they all fit?

    Reply
  4. Multiple choice question: “Where will they all fit?”
    A) Mass graves
    B) Davy Jones’ locker
    C) Soylent Green factory
    D) Composting Farms
    E) All of the above

    Reply
    • Jimbot

       /  December 10, 2016

      Ask the admin in Haiti/Ukraine/Syria/Libya/Iraq/Rwanda..or there’s the Hiroshima option, instant carbon vapour.

      Reply
  5. Hatrack

     /  December 9, 2016

    Cross-posted to Democratic Underground.

    Reply
  6. coloradobob

     /  December 9, 2016

    The Race to the Bottom.

    Reply
  7. I just have to give vent…

    I do wish scientists, academia, and their organizations would learn to use English to say what they mean. Instead they camouflage the significance and complicate understanding with polysyllabic obfuscation.

    Consider one of the opening quotes in this post, which concludes:
    “…the Middle East and North Africa could become so hot that human habitability is compromised.” — The Max Planck Institute

    What they really mean is “…the Middle East and North Africa will become so hot that, in some areas, no human will survive.” Why don’t they just say that!?

    Sir Winston Churchill ( a clone of whom we could really use about now) knew very well the importance of directness and simplicity. Imagine how much less the impact if, in his first speech on taking office as Prime Minister, he had said “I have nothing to contribute except exsanguination, exertion, lacrimation, and perspiration.” instead of the stirring call to arms – “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.”

    Some “toil, tears and sweat” we really need – hopefully there will not be too much blood.. but I don’t know…

    Reply
    • Robert – thank you for so consistently telling it like it is.
      Dave

      Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 9, 2016

      Totally agree Dave. I have been saying this for years. These scientists have to learn to be much better communicators. It is frustrating. I did read awhile back that they were now working on messaging…but IMO they have a ways to go to be more effective. Don’t they understand we live in a ADHD world?

      Reply
      • Actually, they could all take a lesson from Trump, who is great at saying things with a simple vocabulary. I’ve learned from him. It’s not that hard, really–when you’re writing and think of a word that’s long, just think about whether there is a shorter, simpler one that means almost the same thing. I think that will get you about 80% of the way down the road–the rest would be word ordering, but word choice is a big deal.

        (Note how few big words I used in writing this.)

        Reply
      • T-rev

         /  December 10, 2016

        >These scientists have to learn to be much better communicators.

        I think that’s a little unfair, it takes decades of specialty to become expert in their chosen field, it takes decades for (good) journalists to become expert in their field and you want them to be both ?

        I think quite the opposite, it really is incumbent upon a countries citizens to understand what the scientists (of all disciplines) are saying. It always amazes me some folk will spend an inordinate amount of time understanding the intricacies of some game played by burly men in tight uniforms running around with a dead pigs skin and yet no attention is paid to even the simple parts of science. Perhaps Carl Sagan said it best

        “We’ve arranged a global civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technology. We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”
        ― Carl Sagan

        There are a few standout out scientists who are communicators: Isaac Asimov, Carl Sagan, Neil deGrass-Tyson, Brian Cox etc but they are the exception.

        Reply
        • Back in the 90s when I was reading The Economist, I was always impressed at how good the science articles were in that general news magazine. Later I learned that, instead of the standard general-news practice of using a journalist with some scientific savvy, they instead hired a scientist and taught him journalism.

    • Drew

       /  December 10, 2016

      The truth is very little of real research makes definitive statements. It generally points out correlation.

      This site though, does a superb job pointing out causation.

      Reply
    • Dan Borroff

       /  December 10, 2016

      Dave; Excellent points! I got interested in mass communication many years ago and was blown away by how much influence a few people could have on the public when the messaging was simple and evoked imagery. I ended up working with a group of people that were mentored by the head of the department of communication at the University of Washington. Also, for many years I had a client who branded the major tech companies in the Seattle area. What you’re describing is very critical to our future. Most climate scientists are clueless but there are exceptions. Prof. Steven Schneider of Stanford was a wonderful communicators. He told me that all his students had to take communications classes so there must be some out there. Catherine Hayhoe is another exception. I love her ability to reach religious people. If you can get through to them there is hope.

      Reply
      • T-rev

         /  December 10, 2016

        >He told me that all his students had to take communications classes so there must be some out there.

        back when I did my science degree decades ago it was a requirement of the course, I suspect it still is now. However, one semester does not an expert communicator make. We’re here because Robert is a good communicator but he doesn’t hold a Ph.D in atmospheric physics for example. You can tell that because of some of the liberties he takes with the science in order to be a great communicator (that’s a compliment not a criticism ha ha)

        and once again I am going to disagree and say the duty is on us. How can you vote in a democracy if you have no basic understanding of things like politics, science, economics (for example some understanding of our fiat monetary system) etc ?

        This blog from a physicist occasionally brings up the issue of science and communication

        https://andthentheresphysics.wordpress.com/

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  December 10, 2016

          So teaching billions to understand how to interpret science would be easier than giving a few thousand scientists a thesaurus?

    • I wish someone in the media could show emotion that things are bad.Several years ago I heard Richard Ellis was interviewed on NPR,,He said w great emotion it was too late for Polar Bears.He did a lot of work for Nat Geographic,has a great book re the wonder of Polar Bears “On Thin Ice.The Changing World of Polar Bears:” Was an “A Ha ” moment for me ..I sent him am email,thanking him for showing such passion..Gave me a gut feeling..I got it.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  December 10, 2016

        I agree. We need those in the Climate Science field to show emotion on what is going on. That is not the same as being alarmist. Just showing the world how “real” this issue really is on a personal level would… IMO have a lasting impact.

        Reply
  8. coloradobob

     /  December 9, 2016

    DaveW / December 9, 2016
    I just have to give vent…

    Well there’s a lot of that going around Here’s mine, I was looking over my images , just so you folks know I was a rather good leather artist. once upon a time.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 9, 2016

      My other one , I really did hunt dinosaurs .

      Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 9, 2016

      Bob..Beautiful. My husband does leather work too..and admires your work….A big “well done” from him. 🙂

      Reply
  9. coloradobob

     /  December 9, 2016

    There’s an old Stones song that fore shadowed our times.

    Reply
  10. Since we seem to be a bit unhinged by Robert’s most recent report, I would mention, from a very selfish viewpoint, THAT’S SOME PRIME COFFEE GROWING ACREAGE, and I’m out of here when the coffee supply run out…..

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 9, 2016

      “Since we seem to be a bit unhinged by Robert’s most recent report,”

      I beg to differ , I’ve been unhinged since 1867. And I was born in 1949.

      Back to your point –

      Which means those coffee farmers hit the road along with everyone else. From the birth place of coffee.

      Reply
    • Marcy,
      As a fellow caffeine addict, I quite understand. Considering trying to wean myself off coffee (learn to drink more water- LOL) because pretty soon it will be either unavailable, or priced right outta sight!

      Reply
      • Dave, there are some mornings (and they’re becoming more and more frequent) that a splendid cup of coffee is the only reason I get myself out of bed. Water just ain’t gonna do it!

        Bob, my coffee is my connection to those people of the world such as in Ethiopia, Indonesia, Costa Rica. Do you remember the scene in “Sideways” where she talks about how she drinks the wine and thinks about the hillside where the grapes grew, the people who picked the grapes…?

        Reply
  11. coloradobob

     /  December 9, 2016

    My first Bear 339 video , I had a new MAC. and I was really going after this shit.

    Reply
  12. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    You know Hitler came to power by election , not by coup . And this just came over the web –

    Exxon C.E.O. Said to Be Top Contender for Secretary of State; Giuliani Is Out

    Reply
    • Dave Person

       /  December 10, 2016

      Hi Bob,
      No Hitler was appointed chancellor by Hindenburg, to whom he had lost the previous election for president of the German republic garnering about 37% of the vote. Hitler and his armed thugs intimidated Hindenburg to relinquish more power to the chancellor such that when he died, Hitler was in control of the government. He was not elected to lead any government.
      dave

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 10, 2016

        I stand corrected. But he did not shoot his way to power, as he tried before. He bullied his way. Either way. we have a lunatic coming to power.

        It a bit like when Caesar showed up . The strong man will make everything right.

        Trump is not Caesar, Caesar tamed France.

        Reply
  13. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    The rich in Germany backed Hitler, thinking they could control him.

    I am waiting for him to form his own army.
    I am waiting for him to burn the Reichstag.
    I am waiting for him to invade China.

    Reply
    • George W. Hayduke

       /  December 10, 2016

      He already has his own army, every time he sends out a tweet his followers go after his victim of the day. Hitler went after the labor unions after coming into power, sound familiar?

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 10, 2016

      The analysis of the finance numbskulls.

      https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/china-set-to-rescue-australia-s-economy-at-just-the-right-time-002042281.html

      “Surging coal and iron ore prices have helped ease an erosion of national income Down Under and, together with a slower slide in mining investment, signal better prospects ahead.

      Australia can thank its No. 1 trading partner, whose old economy is reviving as fiscal stimulus gets smokestacks billowing again. Traditional Chinese industries seen as proxies for growth, such as electricity and rail cargo, have collectively bounced back to the highest level in three years”

      Consumer goods or preparations for war and or climate mitigation, more than likely a combination of the latter after the Trump Victory

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 10, 2016

      They backed Hitler to invade Russia and destroy communism and socialism. He did their bidding and it destroyed him.
      He also had Rich US, French and English backers also

      Reply
  14. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    A power drunk megalomaniac is now running this most powerful country on Earth.

    Buckle your chin straps .
    Make sure your seat trays are in their upright , and locked positions.
    Do not inflate your flotation devices before exiting the aircraft.

    Reply
  15. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    My hell comes to breakfast comments over these last few years makes me a jackass profit.

    It the age of Trump , I am happy to be a jackass profit.

    Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I am thinking of Ho Chi Min. As young man he was turned away from the Treaty of Versaille.

    He beat the French, he beat the Japanese. he beat the French, he beat the Americans.

    And what did he get for it ? Vietnam is most bombed place on the Planet. More weapons were dumped on Vietnam than all our weapons in WW 2.

    He won. His country is a mess, but it’s their country.

    This pissing contest between old men, really needs to stop.

    Reply
  17. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    The end of the world.

    This where we are. To split hairs, is really pretty silly. We have made some really bad choices. I am so glad I get to die.

    Let the billionaires scrape the Earth for every last nickle. They ain’t flying to Mars. any time soon. That’s what they all fail to understand. . What will a trillion dollars do you on bald planet ?

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      This is the best I can write.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 10, 2016

      What they always wanted.
      To stand proud with erect phallus in hand proclaiming I am the Greatest there will never be anyone greater than ME to an empty world

      Reply
      • Syd Bridges

         /  December 10, 2016

        Time for a Shelley sonnet, methinks.
        OZYMANDIAS

        I met a traveller from an antique land,
        Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
        Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
        Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
        And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
        Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
        Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
        The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
        And on the pedestal, these words appear:
        My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
        Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
        Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
        Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
        The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

        Reply
  18. Suzanne

     /  December 10, 2016

    Dr. Robert Davies this November lecture “The Great Big Context of Climate Disruption”

    Lays out the scenarios with great graphics of what we can expect if we do nothing v.s what we can expect if we act. How we can mitigate the existing known damage through a planetary boundary framework. Looking at the problem of CC in a holistic manner.
    Does his best not to sound like an alarmist…while at the same time making clear we are in big trouble if we don’t get busy mitigating the damage that already exists.

    Reply
  19. Suzanne

     /  December 10, 2016

    Boy oh boy…those voters who thought the Lunatic was a “populist” …I have some swampland to sell them. Just saw this:

    “Exxon Mobil Corp Chief Executive Rex Tillerson emerged on Friday as President-elect Donald Trump’s leading candidate for U.S. secretary of state, a senior transition official said.”

    This Regime thus far is filled with Crony Capitalist Billionaires…Racists…Wall Street…and Climate Change Deniers. Just boggles my mind that anyone believed voting for this Con Man was a good idea.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      They always believed that Bush 43 was too “lite” . , Well here we go.

      Reply
    • I know Rex Tillerson primarily from his role in a Climate Crocks (Peter Sinclair) video.

      Reply
      • Yes, it’s the adaptation meme, coming from Tillerson. It’s kind of like appointing Satan to be the choir director. Another great contribution to the catastrophic fall of civilization and probable death of the biosphere, coming from Trump.

        Get ready for one climate change denier talking point after another, for the next 4 years, at least.

        Union of Concerned Scientists: ExxonMobil Reports

        http://www.ucsusa.org/search/site/ExxonMobil%20reports#.WFAdrrIrKM8

        One way for humanity to adapt to these disaster capitalist Vampire Bats From Hell would be to nationalize ExxonMobil, JPMorgan Chase, and other traditionally Rockefeller controlled mega-corporations and mega-banks, and break the power of the Rockefeller / CFR clique. Then, nationalize coal fired power plants in the U.S. and forcibly convert them to BECCS (Biomass Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage) power plants. Nationalize ExxonMobil and convert it forcibly into production of algae based fuels and use their technological expertise to capture natural gas (methane) and engage in carbon neutral remediation of that methane by CCS. Publish ExxonMobil’s proprietary information about the location and amount of methane hydrate deposits, so that the scientific community can decide how best to remediate them.

        Somehow, I don’t think that’s what he meant by adaptation.

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 13, 2016

      There is a long and shady history
      https://www.google.com.au/search?q=major+jordan+diaries&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gfe_rd=cr&ei=hz1PWMLbAtCnvwSJprOIDQ

      Major Jordans Diaries
      From the Wikepedia entry
      Lend-lease officer

      Despite his age, in 1942 Captain Jordan returned to the service. On account of business experience, he was assigned as a Lend-Lease control officer in the U.S. Army Air Corps, with rank of captain. In 1942, Jordan oversaw deliveries of aircraft and other supplies at the Newark, New Jersey airport. With the opening of the ALSIB route via Alaska, Major Jordan was transferred to Gore Field, Great Falls, Montana, the last air transshipment station within the United States. In both locations, he interfaced primarily with Colonel Anatoli N. Kotikov of the Red Army. The two became friendly and Kotikov warmly recommended Jordan’s promotion. There was no indication that Jordan impeded Soviet activities, but he maintained careful records and often questioned the particulars of shipments.

      Jordan later said he became alarmed at the extraordinary amount of supplies and unusual diplomatic immunity cargo going through Great Falls, Jordan began spying by keeping a detailed “diary” (actually three ledgers) in which he registered all he could discover about the Lend-Lease cargo. He claims that several times he cut open (without authorization) large numbers of “black suitcases” – sealed Soviet diplomatic cargo carried aboard aircraft being flown to the Soviet Union (Soviet crews taking over the aircraft at Fairbanks). When he advised superiors about the extraordinary nature of the cargo, he was repeatedly told to remain quiet. Major Jordan was noted for maintaining good relations with Red Army officers, and by his own account was more of a problem for lax and incompetent U.S. officers.

      In 1944, Major Jordan returned to business, and although he had a sideline as a public speaker, he attracted little attention until 1949 when interest in Soviet nuclear espionage was at its peak. After President Harry Truman announced the first Soviet atomic bomb test, Jordan consulted his ledgers. He found that uranium, heavy water, other nuclear weapons related materials, and related schematics and papers had gone through Great Falls to the USSR. Jordan served in the Air Corps on United Nations duty from 10 May 1942 to spring 1944, being discharged from the service on 4 July 1944. At that time he did not understand the nature of many nuclear-related cargoes.[2]

      Reply
  20. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    This the Key ,all these miners , and drillers that think past is the future. It is not. We all know that. They remind me of the harness makers in 1895.
    25 years later, no one was making harness. Henry Ford was spewing out Model T’s and paying the best wages anyone had ever seen.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      I say this because none us saw Ford in 1895. We were all up to our ankles in horse shit.

      Reply
  21. Cate

     /  December 10, 2016

    Signs and wonders: a wild Canada goose lays a clutch of eggs in December. In Winnipeg.

    “This really caught our attention because it’s you know four to five months sort of out of sync with when these birds are normally nesting,” said Baldwin.
    Baldwin said typically the bulk of Canada geese will begin their migration by mid November. Due to weather, the decision was made to obtain a permit from the federal government to remove the eggs in an effort to encourage the bird to migrate.
    “It’s just really an uncommon thing to have a winter, a December goose nest,” said Baldwin. “It’s so uncommon that we’ve done some reviews in the literature, spoken to biologists across the United States and we can’t find any published account of nesting Canada geese beyond September.”
    He said there’s no way to know for certain what caused this rare occurrence, but points to the unusual weather during the fall as a possible factor-“….such as the “warmest November on record in 144 years of record-keeping.”

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/goose-december-eggs-winnipeg-1.3890263

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      And then they die. Because nature is now a 52 card pick up.

      Nature is confused , nature is on the run .

      We think we live with beach boys in our car ads. . Those days are gone forever over a long time ago.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  December 10, 2016

        Cate its most likely it has to do with lighting. Having a little experience with raising fowl, ducks, pheasants, turkeys, chickens and so on it requires 14 hours of daylight to trip a gland through their eye to start the egg producing process. Over wintering in the northern cities combined with warmer than normal temps and nights that can be as bright as any dull day and a good supply of feed should do the trick. In my barn where water would freeze solid every night a small light was all it took to keep my Indian Runner ducks laying all winter. As well as the chickens. My pheasants and turkeys where in a different building and I didn’t try forcing production from them.

        Reply
  22. Cate

     /  December 10, 2016

    Speaking of Hitler and coups—–it’s looking a bit banana republic down there, friends.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/donald-trump-military-appointments-1.3888439

    “The procession of former military officers nominated for top jobs in Donald Trump’s administration is raising concerns over whether the appointments could defy an American constitutional tenet: civilian oversight of government.
    A niggling question, Kohn says, is whether the U.S. government will be able to maintain civilian control over military affairs — or whether that doctrine gets “diluted” by having “the three generals in three extremely key positions.”
    The democratic principle of civilian control over the military assures that strategic policy-making rests in the hands of private elected citizens, while the armed forces take a subordinate role. The dynamic is meant to protect against a possible coup or military dictatorship.”

    Reply
  23. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Nature is confused , nature is on the run .

    Reply
  24. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I still write to the point.

    Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Humor ?

    Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Then of the world , billionaires strip the Earth in the hunt for the last nickle.

    Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I’m am as mad, crazy, sad, and lazy as anyone here.

    I never dreamed of this world. Like Jimmy Reed so drunk he couldn’t play. Like Muddy Waters in a Purple Pontiac, station wagon, with a tiny trailer behind.

    Reply
  28. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    My plan was to die much younger. Life is a funny ole’ dog.

    This gives me ass hole status .

    Reply
  29. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I will never forget Jimmy Reed under a bare 50 watt bulb, in the back of the Vulcan Gas Company. Alone, and drunk.

    Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Hell has a way eating us all.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      Too dark ?

      Everything is oakly doakly. , Eat every toy you can , burn ever gas molecule you can. Buy the biggest truck you can. Fuck the the future. They are not my embers. or sons and daughters.

      Let them sort it out. We were given a rich world , we rook everything we could. Now it’s your turn. Fuck you future.

      Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Too mad ?

    Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Years ago, I was in the yard in Phoenix. I backed under a trailer, late at night, and I headed over the Mogollon Rim. I put Madonna on . It was just what I needed.

    Reply
  33. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I have a toilet paper story out Lewiston Idaho . to Vegas as well . I hauled a lot of toilet paper into North Vegas.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      Those 18 wheeler’s you run with. Many of them are full of paper towels , TP. Adult diapers , and 80,000 pounds of beer.

      Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Never enter a large city at 3 pm, unless you pee first. Period.
    Always swim with the flow. They’re leaving town at 5 pm, you’er driving into town at 5 pm.
    The principal of the 7 P’s.
    Proper, Prior, Planning, Prevents, Piss, Poor, Performace

    Reply
  35. Andy_in_SD

     /  December 10, 2016

    None of this ends well as far as I can tell.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      No Andy unless we all stand up at once. And I’m too old to led the mob.

      Reply
    • Humans are so bad at dealing with this. Global climate change is a problem for everybody, so we’re sure somebody else will deal with it. On top of that, between the CO2->warming time lag and the tiny contribution most of 7 billion make to the problem, it’s very hard to make the problem real to us in the face of mortgage payments, caring for parents/kids, Aunt Patootie’s cancer, cousin Hubie’s drug addiction, the town’s budget crisis or your best friend losing his job.

      (test)

      Reply
  36. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    I pulled another great one out of the past –

    Reply
  37. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    This the music that stood against greatest bombing campaign the world has ever seen. It was only thing that said, NO.

    Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Where the young are I have no idea. But it’s their world not ours. And they better come soon.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 10, 2016

      I mean having an I Phone with VR on a peeled grape , and a Jelly Fish sea, ain’t gonna really do you that much good. , now is it ?

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 10, 2016

        It just dawned on me , we are so far from nature, we think we can live on a peeled grape.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  December 10, 2016

          Now, I’m really am depressed. We won’t stop the crash of Nature, we’ll SnapChat it behind us. With the hashtag Last Lion .

  39. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Sweet Jesus. What a mess this is. To have come this far, and set fire to our own home.

    Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Madness… Madness

    Reply
  41. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    My pathology doesn’t wake me up screaming, I just wake up trying to get to Denver from Boulder on foot. And I never ever make it.

    Reply
  42. coloradobob

     /  December 10, 2016

    Well I am not a cheerleader, never have been , There ain’t a perky bone in my body. But in my old age I have looked for hope for the heart , sadly I have failed. I may just try waking up screaming.

    Reply
  43. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Yeah it can get worse
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/09/trump-transition-team-for-energy-department-seeks-names-of-employees-involved-in-climate-meetings/?utm_term=.444e856c66d2

    Trump transition team for Energy Department seeks names of employees involved in climate meetings

    Donald Trump’s transition team has issued a list of 74 questions for the Energy Department, asking agency officials to identify which employees and contractors have worked on forging an international climate pact as well as domestic efforts to cut the nation’s carbon output.

    The questionnaire requests a list of those individuals who have taken part in international climate talks over the past five years and “which programs within DOE are essential to meeting the goals of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan.”

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 10, 2016

      This is also being reported at Bloomberg and today on the online front page at the NY TImes (right under the story about the Russian involvement in getting the Lunatic elected)

      Energy Department employees, who shared the questionnaire with The New York Times and spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, described the questionnaire as worrying. Mr. Trump has just tapped Scott Pruitt, the attorney general of Oklahoma and a climate change denialist, to head the Environmental Protection Agency, and the president-elect has made it clear he intends to roll back eight years of regulatory efforts by President Obama that aimed to control planet-warming emissions.

      Reply
  44. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Some forms of life can adjust, but the up the foodchain consequences may not be pretty
    It is the little things
    http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-discover-mutated-fish-that-have-become-8-000-times-more-resistant-to-toxic-waste

    Researchers have discovered that a fish living off the east coast of the US has evolved to be 8,000 times more resilient to toxic waste than normal fish.

    The small striped ‘mud minnow’, or killifish, is known for living in heavily polluted estuaries such as New Jersey’s Newark Bay and Virginia’s Elizabeth River. And scientists have now shown that it survives thanks to an extreme mutation that lets them endure toxic waste.

    The killifish is a favourite among aquarium owners for its small size and beautiful colours. It’s also a favourite for ecologists as an indicator species, acting as an aquatic canary in polluted environments.

    “You see killifish at these sites that are extremely tolerant of some very nasty chemical pollutants,” environmental toxicologist Andrew Whitehead from the University of California, Davis, told National Geographic.

    The mix of dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and heavy metals in these sites were anywhere up to 8,000 times the level that would make most killifish go belly-up. Just like Blinky the three-eyed fish from the Simpsons, these fish were thriving in a toxic soup.
    .
    .
    While it’s a clear win for the killifish, it might not be so pretty for its predators. The small fish is chow for bigger fish and birds – there’s no telling what effect the concentration of heavy metals and PCBs will have on the rest of the food web. Including us apex predators right up the top.

    Reply
  45. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Meanwhile in the what could go wrong department

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-10/world-first-png-seabed-mining-project-forges-ahead/8107934

    The world’s first project to mine the seabed for minerals is expected to begin operations in Papua New Guinea in early 2019.
    Key points:

    Nautilus Minerals is seeking to mine copper and gold from the seabed
    The seabed is said to have high-grade metal deposits
    Investors call for a stable political environment in PNG

    Nautilus Minerals is the Canadian company in charge of the Solwara 1 project, which will see copper and gold deposits mined from the seafloor at a depth of 1,600 metres, 30 kilometres off PNG’s New Ireland Province in the Bismarck Sea.

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 10, 2016

      A relevant point in the article is we are running out of mineable grade minerals

      Speaking at a conference about mining in PNG, he said a big incentive for mining the seabed is the higher concentration — or grade — of the metal deposits.

      “The grades of the Solwara 1 deposits [are] 7.2 per cent copper. If you look at the average grades of copper in terrestrial copper mines, it’s now less than 0.7 per cent copper,” Mr Wright said.

      “Yes, you can still find copper on land, but as grades fall you’re going to have to clear more land … relocate more communities, you’re going to have to store more tailings, you have to dispose of more waste … accessing an ever-decreasing resource with ever-increasing costs.”

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  December 10, 2016

        Canadian mining companies are among the biggest and dirtiest, so mining the sea floor would be a good idea for them. Just leave the tailings behind and say they are being environmentally friendly.

        Reply
  46. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    What it takes to keep the wheels turning
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-10/photographing-worlds-most-dangerous-mines-hugh-brown/8083616

    Life and death in the world’s most dangerous mines

    Hugh Brown risks his life to document the men, women and children who mine precious minerals by hand in brutal conditions. He’s encountered the “coal mafia”, braved the “mountain that eats men” and been interrogated over terrorist links — and he isn’t done yet.

    “Literally the smell of death was everywhere.”

    Hugh Brown has recently returned from one of the world’s largest silver mines — Bolivia’s Cerro Rico. It roughly translates to “rich mountain” but also has a much darker moniker — the “mountain that eats men”.

    It’s an ancient death trap that has claimed the lives of as many as eight million miners in the past 471 years.
    The Perth-based photographer says the 4,824-metre-high mountain in the southern highlands is “like a piece of Swiss cheese” and is “actually physically collapsing in on itself”.

    “There are so many holes, but the holes haven’t all been mapped so nobody knows what holes are where. There are also toxic gases, and people dying in blasts, and people falling off ladders,” he says.

    It is known as the mountain of silver

    Reply
  47. “Now really is the time to push governments to act…”

    The question is how. For governments to act, you you either need a lot of power or a lot of people who want this, and, as Brexit, the US election and the general mood across Europe show, the trend goes in the wrong direction.

    Why do populist, right-wing politicians have such a mass appeal against lots of good reason? To my mind, one of the key factors is how they present their case. They tap into people’s emotions, which appear to play a big role in memory formation and decision making (see for example http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1515900/). It’s a bit like eating something rich, yummy and unhealthy, even though reason says it’s not a good idea. Only it goes much deeper and the consequences are potentially so much worse.

    This in turn would suggest the best arguments alone will not reach the many people needed to really achieve the badly needed changes in the probably short time left.

    Reply
  48. “Now really is the time to push governments to act…”

    The question is how. For governments to act, you you either need a lot of power or a lot of people who want this, and, as Brexit, the US election and the general mood across Europe show, the trend goes in the wrong direction.

    Why do populist, right-wing politicians have such a mass appeal against lots of good reason? I believe one of the key factors is how they present their case. They tap into people’s emotions, which appear to play a big role in memory formation and decision making (see for example http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1515900/).

    It’s a bit like eating too much of something yummy, rich and incredibly unhealthy, even though reason says it’s not a good idea – but it just feels good. Only populist appeal goes much deeper and the consequences look to be so much worse.

    The best arguments alone will probably not reach the many people needed to really achieve the badly needed changes in the probably short time left. We need to find ways to engage people emotionally as well.

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  December 10, 2016

      I reckon Elon Musk knows how to tap into people’s emotions via their memories. See how he used the set of Desperate Housewives to showcase his new solar roof product. See how he taps deep into the alpha male’s mind by offering the quickest production car money can buy. Like all good inventors he uses whatever tools he has at his disposal.

      Reply
  49. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Those Glacier avalanches in Tibet
    http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2016/12/scientists-think-they-know-what-caused-that-terrifying-tibetan-avalanche/

    But a new study, led by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ohio State University, argues that the July 17 ice slide looks less like a case of glacial surging, and more like a case of way too much water seeping to the bottom of the glacier, causing it to detach from bedrock and slide downhill.

    “Given the rate at which the event occurred and the area covered, I think it could only happen in the presence of meltwater,” study co-author Lonnie Thompson, who used computer models to recreate the avalanche, said in a statement.

    How could so much meltwater have accumulated at the bottom of the Aru Glacier? Nobody’s certain, but Thompson and his colleagues are wagering that an unusually wet spring and long-term warming trends are to blame. Prior to the July avalanche, the nearby meteorological station of Nagri recorded its highest rainfall totals in the last six years. And average temperatures in this part of Tibet have risen rapidly, about 1.5C over the past 50 years — although this past summer was relatively mild.

    Reply
  50. Cate

     /  December 10, 2016

    So in this context, Canada’s new “pan-Canadian climate framework” looks so puny. It aims to meet our Paris targets and produce 90% of power from renewables by 2030. Each province will have a different regime, tailored to their own needs and priorities. Eleven of thirteen premiers have signed and the two that declined have their reasons—Manitoba wants more for its health-care crisis and Saskatchewan is just not convinced that a carbon tax works to reduce emissions and knows that its own carbon-rich industries will suffer in competition with the US. In their cases, the federal govt will impose a carbon tax by 2018.

    So it’s a tiny step but here’s the thing: it’s a step in the right direction. It’s not nearly big enough or fast enough, but we can work on that. We have something to push them on now.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-premiers-climate-deal-1.3888244

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 10, 2016

      At least your country is going in the right direction. It’s nice to know the entire world hasn’t gone completely crazy like this country has gone with CC Denial-ism.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  December 10, 2016

        Suzanne, I agree, and we will all be watching to see exactly how this carbon price works in Canada, what regimes provinces will choose, what works best to reduce emissions, and so on. I was delighted to hear the Yukon premier affirm that 100% of the carbon fee will be rebated to the people, which is how it is supposed to be done, according to Dr Hansen.

        The problem is that in Canada we are still subsidising fossil fuel extraction to the tune of $3 billion a year, so that has to stop if carbon pricing is going to work at all.

        https://citizensclimatelobby.org/carbon-fee-and-dividend/

        Reply
  51. Ryan in New England

     /  December 10, 2016

    Since the Trump presidency is the greatest threat to preserving a livable climate, I consider this to be relevant to this comments section. This doesn’t relate directly to climate, but concerns those who are doing their best to ensure catastrophic warming is guaranteed.

    The CIA confirms that Russia did indeed interfere in the US election, and they did so in order to get Trump elected.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/obama-orders-review-of-russian-hacking-during-presidential-campaign/2016/12/09/31d6b300-be2a-11e6-94ac-3d324840106c_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_russiahack-745p%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.b1368b0507de

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 10, 2016

      Just noticed this was linked to up thread. Sorry folks. Guess I have to read the comments BEFORE I post links to news 😉

      Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 10, 2016

      Ryan…No worries..this story has to be seen and talked about as much as possible. This is a coup by a foreign hostile power. Can you imagine what would be going on if it were found out that Russia had done the same to get Clinton elected? This should not be a partisan issue…it should be an American issue…but I am afraid after reading the Lunatic’s response..that will not be the case. They are already dismissing this..and trying to invalidate the CIA.

      Unless we have a video of Putin giving the orders to his hackers…most Americans, I am afraid will just shrug and move on to the next shiny object. I hope I am wrong.

      Reply
  52. “The Canadian government on Friday reached a deal with eight of the 10 provinces to introduce a landmark national carbon price”

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-environment-idUSKBN13Y2N0

    Reply
  53. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Considering the appearance of a climate science and scientist witch hunt, I am reminded book burning went along with that, There were concerns raised by Australian scientists if republicans gained power, all our scientific records and data re the environment and climate science are stored on American Servers, along with other countries as well as the US’s, may be a good idea to ensure the safety and integrity of all those many decades of hard work by dedicated researchers and scientists is safely away from the philistines, after all they would want any evidence that disagrees with their beliefs to just go away.

    Reply
  54. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    http://www.newshub.co.nz/world/paris-suffers-worst-smog-in-10-years-2016121016

    Paris suffers worst smog in 10 years
    Saturday 10 Dec 2016 4:51 p.m.
    Paris has been hit with its worst air pollution in over a decade. The smog has reached levels of pollution that are over three times the internationally-agreed safety limit – and worse than Beijing’s.
    The air pollution has been blamed on a combination of factors – vehicle emissions, the use of wood fires for heating, and windless conditions.
    As the smog continues for the third winter night, authorities are taking desperate measures.
    On alternating days, cars with odd and even-numbered licence plates have been banned from entering the city centre.
    This is only the fourth time in 20 years that Paris has imposed this car ban. It is also the first time it has been applied on consecutive days.
    Public transport has also been made free in an effort to reduce vehicle use, and older vehicles which pollute the most will be permanently banned.

    Reply
  55. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Completely OT, but interesting
    http://newatlas.com/graphene-silly-putty/46877/
    In collaboration with Prof. Robert Young of the University of Manchester, an AMBER team led by Prof. Jonathan Coleman added a relatively small amount of graphene flakes to some of the putty (AMBER is an Irish materials research center, hosted by Trinity College Dublin). The resulting material, called G-putty, is electrically conductive.
    What’s particularly interesting about it, though, is the fact that its electrical resistance increases noticeably in response to even the tiniest deformation or impact. When Coleman and postdoctoral researcher Conor Boland (seen above) placed it against the chest or neck of test subjects, for instance, it was easily able to measure breathing, pulse and blood pressure.
    It could even detect the footsteps of small spiders walking across its surface.

    According to the researchers, it is hundreds of times more sensitive than traditional sensors used in applications such as medical devices.

    Reply
  56. Abel Adamski

     /  December 10, 2016

    Just for the comments. EV doesn’t have a market. ?
    http://newatlas.com/toyota-tnga-engines/46830/?li_source=LI&li_medium=default-widget
    Pick of the crop
    AugureDecember 9th, 2016
    Well done Toyota…for 3 persons who’ll give a shit while the rest of us is investing in electric motors.

    Reply
  57. Dave McGinnis

     /  December 10, 2016

    Try leaving out all use of the verb “to be” in your writing. It forces one to choose a better verb and automatically eliminates all passive voice. Instead of saying in a god-like tone, “Rain will begin at 11 am,” I would say, “Radar trends suggest….” This gives the source of our inference and pictures us diligently sitting at our screens. English w/o “to be” is called E-prime.

    With that and good old Anglo-Saxon English in place of the latinate, we scientists can communicate clearly. I learned quickly that meteorology has no use if you can’t get your message across.

    Reply
  58. Thank you for posting this worrying report. The Sudan’s climate has noticeably become much harsher in the last couple of decades. The province of Khartoum, for instance, no longer has the winter season. Concerns about drought in the west and east of Sudan have remained a perennial concern since the 1980s. Unfortunately, town planning and architectural hasn’t really begun to face the changes that a hotter climate will bring.

    Reply
  59. CB: The Reichstag already got burned down; Sept 11 2001. By our friends Saudi Arabia. And yeah, the wealthy industrialists in Germany supported Adoph as did the wealthy industrialists in the US along with the wealthy Wall St. bankers like Prescott Bush (HW & W learned it on daddy’s knee!) in the attempted coup of FDR in 1934 stopped by Marine Brig. Gen. Smedley D. Butler.

    You go ‘head and vent. We all need to do this now and then or we will burst like soap bubbles.

    And as I said in my last vent-rant, Trump has his army. Lots of them around here, and they all have AR-15s and AK-47s. And bibles, lots of bibles. In many ways Pence is even scarier than Trump but nobody is paying attention to him.

    CB, it’s ‘prophet’ not profit because we ain’t gonna make a flipping dime off this shee-it. My longest friend nicknamed me the ‘Surfer Cassandra’ in the 80s….it ain’t no fun being right.

    I’m really glad I’m not a coffee drinker but do drink tea due to my Japanese stepmom’s influence. Lot of non-caff and herbal mostly, though. But I am going to miss the HELL out of chocolate since that is under serious threat. Imagine never tasting chocolate again…

    AndyinSD: Nope, it doesn’t. And the last time I skated the Boardwalk in Mission Beach where I grew up was 2001 when I went to bury my last relative down there, I didn’t even recognize the place and said the same thing; this place didn’t turn out well. It’s not the place to be with the climate going off a cliff but then, where is?

    Coup in the US? That happened in 1963, folks. CIA & LBJ took care of that. It’s been mostly downhill since. Oliver Stone said it best in his documentary/movie JFK. The Magruder film shown in it was staggering in the lie the US told the people. JFK was shot from the front right. Obviously as his forehead blew completely apart in slow motion.

    Trust ANYTHING the CIA says? Are you nutz? They lie and murder and assassinate and false flag attack and all the rest. JFK wanted to cancel their ticket, planned to end the Vietnam war, and they cancelled his. And Director Dulles who JFK fired got to ‘investigate’ his assassination. How’s that for serious irony?
    _________________

    And we shouldn’t forget the blueprint of this US coup d’etat:

    “Rebuilding America’s Defenses” – A Summary
    Blueprint of the PNAC Plan for U.S. Global Hegemony

    Some people have compared it to Hitler’s publication of Mein Kampf, which was ignored until after the war was over.

    Full text of Rebuilding America’s Defenses here AT LINK

    By Bette Stockbauer

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article3249.htm

    _____________

    Reply
    • entropicman

       /  December 10, 2016

      I hate to be picky, but a bullet leaves a small entry wound and the shock wave then blows out a large exit wound.

      If Kennedy’s forehead blew out, then he was shot from behind.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 11, 2016

        entropic, a piece of the occipital bone from Kennedy’s skull was found where he was shot. It comes from the back of the skull. As Zapruder film and the eye and ear-witnesses show (all the amateur films show the crowd turning and pointing to the ‘grassy knoll’)Kennedy was shot from in front, the killer shot at least.

        Reply
  60. New Rogue Anti-Russia Committee Created in “Intelligence” Act

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/12/06/new-rogue-anti-russia-committee-created-in-intelligence-act/

    I don’t know why we didn’t pick playing with live electrical wires and call that “intelligence” instead of the stuff we do. I think I’ll stick with calling what the U.S. government does “counter-intelligence.” So, here’s the latest from the counter-intelligence community.

    Section 501 of the Counter Intelligence Act creates a “Committee to Counter Active Measures by the Russian Federation to Exert Covert Influence Over Peoples and Governments.”

    This is followed by Section 502 which limits Russian and only Russian diplomats in the United States to traveling no more than 25 miles from their offices.

    I suspect there may have been a Section 503 in an earlier draft that required CNN to show a photo of Vladimir Putin without his shirt and make fun of him at least once every 4 hours. If so, that section would have been stripped out as unnecessary.

    The establishment wants more and more hostility with Russia. Trump wants to ever so slightly tweak the establishment and focus more hostility on China. That shift is obviously not one toward enlightenment. But when there is a chance for better relations between the U.S. and Russian governments, Congress should not be allowed to inject its counter-intelligence.

    Of course countering active measures by the Russian Federation to exert covert influence over peoples and governments sounds like a good thing. But it’s not a good thing if those active measures do not exist. This is like putting weapons in space to “counter” others doing it, when nobody else is. It’s offense under the banner of defense. And offense will be taken.

    It’s also not a good thing if the active measures (real or imagined) are not countered in the wisest manner. One way to counter assassinations, for example, would be to expose them, prosecute them as crimes, and seek reconciliation. Another would be to empower a special committee to engage in “counter-assassinations.”

    Contrary to good liberal faith, there is zero public evidence that Russia has been engaging in these activities listed in the Counter Intelligence Act:

    (A) Establishment or funding of a front group.
    (B) Covert broadcasting.
    (C) Media manipulation.
    (D) Disinformation and forgeries.
    (E) Funding agents of influence.
    (F) Incitement and offensive counterintelligence.
    (G) Assassinations.
    (H) Terrorist acts.

    Are there Russian front groups in the United States? Name one. Prove it. Is there covert broadcasting underway? Is that where you broadcast to nobody? Presumably it is where you create television and radio content purporting not to be Russian but actually serving the Russian government. Where is that? May we see a 30 second clip of it, please? Has the media been manipulated? By disinformation and forgeries? Expose one, for godsake, this is an emergency! Don’t let those forgeries go on deceiving us a moment longer! “Funding agents of influence” sounds more like overt broadcasting. Russia does do that using Russian television and radio networks (something the United States would never ever engage in!) — but how will this committee counter those? “Incitement” to what? “Offensive counterintelligence”? Offensive to whom? “Assassinations”? Of whom? Has someone been assassinated? “Terrorist acts”? Wouldn’t we, almost by definition, have heard of these?

    Now I realize that most people don’t give a rat’s ass about stirring up hostility with the other major nuclear nation. So, here’s another problem with this bill that people may want to object to, as they should. This committee is empowered to do anything the president tells it to, and it sends occasional reports to Congress, not the public. Most, if not all, of the people it counter-intelligently counters will not have anything to do with the Russian government.

    The Washington Post has already published a ludicrous but dangerous list of supposed Russian front group media outlets. If this committee does the same, and especially if it does so in secret, what recourse will the falsely accused have? This committee, selected by presidential appointees, will not be publicly accountable.

    If the New-McCarthyite Anti-Russia Committee secretly labels you a Russian agent and accuses you of media manipulation, will it then manipulate the media to destroy your reputation? If it accuses you of “disinformation and forgeries” will it “counter” that with disinformation about you and forgeries incriminating you? Will it confiscate your funding as being that of an “agent of influence”? What will it do if it accuses you of assassinations? And will all the Russian agents of influence turn out to be Democrats during Republican presidencies, and vice versa?

    Presumably the CIA hasn’t challenged Congress to a duel over this new committee horning in on its territory because it’s not technically supposed to spread its counter-intelligence domestically. Same with USAID and the rest. And the FBI is not supposed to be at war with foreign nations. But the lines between the military policing of the globe and the police militarization at home are ever blurring. And that’s part of what’s wrong with this bill. All’s fair in war, meaning there is no requirement of fairness. Don’t expect any. Resist instead.

    Reply
    • MartinS

       /  December 11, 2016

      Sorry, you sound very ill-informed.

      Russia uses swarms of paid trolls (you can spend time talking to them in various internet enclaves), spreads conspiracy theories (such as Pizzagate), encourages white nationalism (the alt-right), supports right-wing groups burgeoning in Europe, hacks, and much, much more.

      Are you familiar with Aleksandr Dugin, perchance? Here’s his words from his ultra-influential text-.

      Russia should use its special forces within the borders of the United States to fuel instability and separatism. For instance, provoke “Afro-American racists”. Russia should “introduce geopolitical disorder into internal American activity, encouraging all kinds of separatism and ethnic, social and racial conflicts, actively supporting all dissident movements – extremist, racist, and sectarian groups, thus destabilizing internal political processes in the U.S. It would also make sense simultaneously to support isolationist tendencies in American politics

      Reply
      • Have to agree with you here. The various intel agencies are in agreement that Russia interfered with the US election. The primary difference is that the FBI believes it was ‘meant to sew discord’ while the CIA says ‘nope, it’s pretty obvious that the aim was to elect Trump.’ In any case, I don’t see any McCarthyism popping up. It’s more just the usual racism and Islamaphobia. However, if you have a real example where a sitting President has a conflict of interest in that he is more willing to support Russian policy than he is willing to support domestic intelligence agencies, then yes, we have a pretty glaring issue.

        Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  December 11, 2016

      At least thermo-nuclear war with Russia will takes our minds off the anthropogenic climate destabilisation Holocaust.

      Reply
    • Marcusblanc

       /  December 11, 2016

      I’m no expert on US politics but I’m posting another article by David Swanson on counterpunch, to add some context on his viewpoint. He is quite annoyed!

      ‘In all seriousness, there is very likely Russian propaganda to be found somewhere, since Russia tried to hire me a-year-and-a-half ago to produce it. I turned them down and blogged about their offer. Quite likely not everyone turns them down. But even voter fraud or intelligent Washington Post articles can be found eventually if you look hard enough.’

      http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/11/29/how-i-produce-fake-news-for-russia/

      Reply
  61. Jimbot

     /  December 10, 2016

    Thanks for another great, cutting edge article RS.

    Some debate this past summer as to whether or not the highest ever world maximum temperature record was set ( for modern human times ). A couple of days of Death Valley-like max temperatures and there goes the crops.

    This article goes into politics of denial etc.

    http://foodassets.com/blog/2016/12/07/crisis-of-conscience/?utm_content=buffer723cb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    An opinion in the comments from blog admin, with which I agree:


    admin says:
    December 8, 2016 at 3:57 am

    I suppose it depends on your perspective and how you approach this. The conscience do too little. The consciousness required is lacking (replaced as you say, by fear). The unconsciousness exhibited prevents internal growth and external actions. But – in ALL cases, it all still too little, still governed by fear, and the outcome remains the same (from all groups, throughout history).

    If this were not so – then we would not be in the predicament we find ourselves in. The world would be a very different place. There have been plenty of warriors of conscience, and much done for consciousness, especially in these later years. But it has not been enough, nor will it ever be. That is the part that is most misunderstood.

    Humans are not going to solve this. We will pretend we can, we will even act like we can, but this is a first-rate deception. It is more then hopium too, it is writ large in actions taken (and still yet taken).

    Once we began this particular trajectory, there was no turning back, no sudden dawning of awareness and turning away. Nor will there be any late-hour confessions or forgiveness of execution. This is what eludes most writers today, they continue to appeal to self-deception. Our trajectory is absolutely certain, and so is our actions, all by virtue of themselves, contribute to the execution.

    That is another critical point missed by the hopiate. They embrace the delusion that the answer to the predicament lies in more, not less. Unfortunately, we’re even past that attempt now. “

    Reply
    • danabanana

       /  December 12, 2016

      “Humans are not going to solve this.”

      It’s all about the Dopamine…

      Reply
    • Maybe we won´t. Probably we won´t. But we have to fight to solve this (actual fighting probably not the best move, as cooperation may yeld better results). When you known that the alternative is death, for you, for your loved ones, even for most of the biosphere… when one realises that, there´s two alternatives: to quietly go down and give up or to fight until the end (the third, fleeing for Mars, is going to be an beautiful epic fail, but if enough billionaires embark on it, maybe it will be carbon negative… in the creepy sense).

      And while +2C goals are probably an impossibility, +3C is better than +4C is better than +5C etc, and +7C or more aren´t backed in yet. There´s something to fight for.

      Call it hopium, but opium is better than cowardice.

      Reply
  62. Cate

     /  December 10, 2016

    NBC has apparently reported that Tillerson gets the nod for Secretary of State.

    http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/309813-trump-picks-exxon-ceo-tillerson-for-secretary-of-state-report

    Reply
  63. Ryan in New England

     /  December 10, 2016

    8 of 10 Canadian provinces have signed on to a carbon tax. It’s a small step, but it’s a start. We need all the help we can get now that Exxon-Mobil’s CEO will be our next Secretary of State.

    Under his plan, carbon pollution would cost C$10 (£6, US$7.60) a tonne in 2018, rising by C$10 a year until it reaches C$50 in 2022. The provinces can either implement a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade market.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/10/canada-sets-first-national-carbon-price-of-c10-a-tonne

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  December 11, 2016

      It remains to be seen how well this will work. Trudeau has already approved two new pipelines and is quite happy to continue the $3 billion annual subsidies to the fossil fuel industry in Canada. this new “framework” is aimed at meeting Paris targets by 2030—targets which have already been shown to be far below what is necessary. So on balance, this is a pretty typical Justin Trudeau trick, to appear to be doing something while really you’re doing not very much at all but talking a big line.

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 11, 2016

        You’re absolutely right, Cate. In the grand scheme of things this won’t do anything. Global emissions are still through the roof, and America now has hardcore deniers running the show. I fear things are only going to get much, much worse in coming years.

        Reply
        • I disagree Ryan, I think in the grand scheme of things every action like this does do something. It might not be enough, and it is probably too little too late, but it does do something. Every town, city, state, province, or nation that starts to put a price on carbon pushes things in the right direction, and once there’s a critical mass that gets it going, it will turn faster and faster.

          And Canadian politics is such that individual premiers can effectively derail any national program like Mr Wall in Saskatchewan is threatening to do. Trudeau and the Liberals still have a battle on their hands to get this weak level of climate action going. I’m also not sure Mr Wall is smart enough to realize that he’d be better off joining a cap & trade regime and building renewables (it’s a windy province, so tons of jobs) and collecting those carbon credits, instead of trying to put carbon capture onto existing coal plants.

          Cate is right too, it’s a typical Trudeau trick, as they’ll be able to tout a national carbon price and look good for it, while the expanded pipelines make sure that more of the oilsands product gets exported and avoids a direct carbon price. The emissions from the extraction process will get priced, but not the actual product itself.

  64. entropicman: Go rent Oliver Stone’s movie JFK. The Magruder film is shown in the order it was filmed, not as it was cut up and originally shown out of sequence to the public to bolster the bullshit conclusion of the Warren Commission. Watch the entire sequence, the bullet that hits him in the throat he has time to grab his neck, then JFK’s right forehead is a frontal impact as his body slams sideways and back into her from the bullet entering and blowing out the back left side quarter of his skull. Don’t take my word for it (or Oliver Stone’s experts). Show this sequence to someone that knows about head shot bullet wounds and ask the question. It was more like a documentary that a movie. And nobody really cares anymore because it’s old history and we have enough on our plate as it is. But the same crap is going on now as it was then. Different decade is all.

    Jimbot: RS always does cutting edge posts as is pretty much everything that all the other good people here are posting in response to his posts. Your take on denial and looming consequences…chilling thoughts.

    RS: You keep doing what you do even if it does tend to shock. We all need to use whatever our skills are as best we can for the best possible benefit and if it all blows up in our face, well, we stood up and tried. Giving up sucks.

    DAPL & Trump:

    Just days after Standing Rock Sioux tribe members celebrated a victory in halting the pipeline, Trump’s team announces their controversial plans.

    In the most recent attempt to strip Indigenous people of the riches buried under their ancestral lands, a new coalition of advisers on Native American issues to President-elect Donald Trump has suggested privatizing tribal lands.

    http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/After-Standing-Rock-Victory-Trumps-Team-Announces-Retaliation-20161206-0005.html?utm_source=planisys&utm_medium=NewsletterIngles&utm_campaign=NewsletterIngles&utm_content=14

    Reply
    • So much of what T***p seems to be proposing, and who he hopes to see in key positions (congressional approval assumed in GOP gov’t) will irritate so many people, that I am starting to wonder if his intention is create major resistance and upheaval in the US in order to be able to impose martial law.

      Reply
      • Vic

         /  December 11, 2016

        Like an enhanced version of Naomi Klein’s shock doctrine where the doctrine itself serves as the shock.

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  December 11, 2016

          The shock doctrine, which progressively impoverishes the very many to enrich the very few beyond the dreams of avarice, must end in revolt, or extermination. Yet the elites show NO signs of backing off, rather they seem obsessed with accelerating the process. Trump, the Great Flatulence, CANNOT deliver on his lies, and, indeed, his policies can ONLY impoverish the losers even more, so, somethings gotta give.

  65. Cate

     /  December 11, 2016

    Keep an eye on the ASIF: 2016/2017 freezing season thread. Especially the past few days (pages 25, 26, 27)

    Gut-wrenching stuff. The ice edge in the Chukchi has actually retreated in the past week. Hudson Bay is still mostly open water. “Thickest ice set to go out the Fram…” “Volume, area, extent all at record lows.”

    What is happening?

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  December 11, 2016

      Oh Cate, you as well as everyone here know full well what’s happening. The IPCC gypsy fortune tellers thought they were telling their great great grand children’s fortune when they gave their predictions for next century. Turns out they were giving their own.

      Reply
  66. Tigertown

     /  December 11, 2016

    Antarctic SIE has lost over 2 million km*sq since Dec 1st, in only 9 days. With just the normal rate of melt, which usually slows down in January, it is quite possible for a new record minimum by mid-February. There is a chance of going under 1 million km*sq…

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  December 11, 2016

      TT what do you make of this hole on the eastern side. I’ve been watching it grow for some time now. It looks like melt from up welling and but for a few shots in March of last year, and just barely, it doesn’t seem to have existed. A new hole at the leading edge of an outlet glacier?
      http://www.arctic.io/explorer/aKemW/2016-12-10/9-S69.40888-E39.56217

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  December 11, 2016

        I believe that is rock formations. There are some in that area and are probably at a higher elevation. The apparent growing is probably ice and snow melting from the exposed peaks, making more area visible. The angle that we see these from the satellite makes them look funny.

        Reply
  67. redskylite

     /  December 11, 2016

    Thanks Robert for yet another brilliant piece, narrating the latest findings of a vulnerable part of our planet. I spent a third of my working life around the empty quarter in Saudi and the U.A.E. Those desert folks have a code of hospitality and will invite passing travelers (including pasty Englishmen like me) to share their shade, d food and drink. Beats me how they survive the heat now, never mind in the future. We must stop burning fossils, every post you make emphasizes the need. You are a brilliant example.

    Don’t worry four years will slip by, individual states and business will make progress, then we will resume with sanity. We’ve seen it before in Canada and Australia. In the end sense will prevail.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 11, 2016

      Thank you for your insight..and for the great video. Cheers

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  December 12, 2016

      Sorry, red, but ‘sense’ died out in Australia about twenty years ago. From 1996 to 2007 we had John Howard as PM, who was convinced, and still is, that climate change is a Communist conspiracy to destroy capitalism. Then we had a once in a lifetime unstable narcissist, Rudd, who declared climate change the greatest moral challenge of the age. But once the Murdoch cancer intensified its long campaign against climate science into full jihad mode, he turned tail and ran, and was overthrown. His successor, Gillard, our Hillary Clinton (they’re great pals)brought in a carbon tax, but never fought for it, so when the Murdochites appealed to the sub-median 50%’s greed as well as stupidity, she was swept away, and we got the ‘full quid’, Tony Abbott, a truly fanatic denialist. He still runs the Government through a puppet formerly known as Malcolm Turnbull, who has adopted ALL Abbott’s ‘policies’ ie extreme opposition to renewable energy, pushing coal-mining, ignoring the death of the Great Barrier Reef etc. We’ve been through a Hell of ignorance and stupidity on the march, urged on by a diabolical Rightwing MSM, and we seem to be sinking even deeper. The genocidal zealots were ecstatic when Trump won. We are your future.

      Reply
  68. This is going to force even more people into cities, perhaps the WWF’s 2050 estimate is low?

    Reply
  69. Something I realized last night in meditation. I remember all these feeling welling up inside. They were the same emotional tearing when Reagan won in Nov. 1980 and started to list his coming cabinet. Anybody else remember that? Holy crap!

    Cathy McMorris-Rodgers is James Watt in a dress!

    Pulled off the shelf my copy of:

    100 WATTS: The James Watt Memorial Cartoon Collection pub 1983, KHYBER PRESS

    All I have to do is cut and paste her face in…

    Shawn Redmond: Yeah, we all know where this bus is heading. Cate is no dummy, none of us are. It’s just hard to wrap our head around the horror of it all…

    Reply
    • wili

       /  December 11, 2016

      Yes, I’ve been thinking the same. Dark days are here again. Some want to say, “We’ve survived this before.” But I wonder who they mean by ‘we.’ Reagan initiated the age of widespread homelessness in America, and many did not survive that experience, and they’re still dying in the streets needlessly. Bush’s economic crash similarly destroyed many lives, and is still doing so. Trump’s crew is likely to turn nearly all of us homeless.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 12, 2016

        wili, remember, history repeats ‘..first as tragedy then as farce’. The Final Trump is nothing if not farcical.

        Reply
  70. wili

     /  December 11, 2016

    Another great and disturbing post. And here’s a (probably) dumb question regarding the first map. It was my impression that zones would be expanding out from the equator toward the poles. If so, why doesn’t that mean that rainforests would be expanding from the Congo vicinity northwards into the Sahara and southward into the Kalahari?

    Reply
    • Tigertown

       /  December 11, 2016

      The zones that are expanding are further away from the equator,and not right at it like the Congo is. When saying expanding from the equator, it is implying [from the direction of] the equator outward. In the Northern Hemisphere, the Northern boundary is expanding in the northern direction. In the Southern Hemisphere, the southern boundary is expanding to the south.

      Reply
    • wili
      A number of factors apply. To some extent, local deforestation and land use change affect (reduce) precipitation. Also, as Tigertown says, the basic global climate zones are expanding towards the poles, but not starting at the equator – has to do with the overall global air circulation patterns – more information is available at Wikipedia about the effect on Hadley cells from global climate weirding / disruption.

      Reply
    • entropicman

       /  December 12, 2016

      The tropical rain forest gets much of its rain from the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone. This belt of low pressure rising air forms under the sun when it is at the zenith and moves North and South with the Sun. The ITCZ about 20N latitude In June and 20S in December.

      Since the ITCZ stays within 20 degrees of the Equator and the rainforest is dependant on the ITCZ, the rainforests cannot move any further.

      Reply
      • Add to that that while tree planting and allowing the forest to recover areas are useful, it takes 50+ years for a somewhat functional rainforest to establish itself, and for the full force of the feedbacks that keep the forest alive to kick in. For example, fallen foliage and fauna keeping the soil fertile even if it´s shallow , aerossols produced by the trees atracting rain so that it doesn´t get too dry, etc.

        Also, for some of those feedbacks, area is tauntamont. The Amazon troubles, for example, these repetitive dry spells that are coming once every 5 years since 2005, aren´t just a product of global climate change. The huge deforested area is affecting bioaerossol formation and the functioning of aerial rivers.

        Wrestling area from humans to give back to nature is a complicated matter. Plus we´re not going to have 50+ years of somewhat stable climate so soon.

        Reply
  71. humanistruth

     /  December 11, 2016

    Please consider my musings about cause and effect links between ideas and climate change. The Day Philosophy Leaked into the Air http://atheistnexus.org/group/philosophy/forum/topics/the-day-philosophy-leaked-into-the-air

    Reply
  72. Ryan in New England

     /  December 12, 2016

    Good piece by Joe Romm on the Trump, Tillerson, Putin alliance.

    The aligning interests between Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russia’s choice for U.S. president (Donald Trump), and Big Oil represents the gravest threat to humanity (and democracy) since the rise of the Axis powers in the 1930s.

    So much is explained by Trump’s Secretary of State choice. Media reports now say it will be Rex Tillerson, CEO of oil giant ExxonMobil, which had made a $500 billion oil deal with Putin that got blocked by sanctions.

    Stalling the biggest oil deal ever did not just “put Exxon at risk,” as the Wall Street Journal reported in 2014. MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow explained last week this deal was so big it was “expected to change the historical trajectory of Russia.”

    And if the sanctions are lifted — something a new Secretary of State could help make happen — it would pay off big time for Exxon. As Bloomberg explained in an October piece, “Exxon Faces Collateral Damage From a New Cold War,” the company’s “project queue for 2018 onward is weighted to resources challenged by low prices or higher costs, such as LNG and oil sands.”

    https://thinkprogress.org/trump-putin-and-exxonmobil-team-up-to-destroy-the-planet-fb88650acfa1#.9ogaro47j

    Reply
    • What is so good about it? It only shows there is huge DEMAND for fossil fuels by “consumers” who voted in their short-term self interest (surprise!). Reducing the problem of climate change to 2 people and one oil company is not helping much I think…

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  December 12, 2016

        That is why the Carbon tax and regulation is so important

        Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 12, 2016

        I think you misunderstand me. I am not saying any of the disturbing information contained within the article is “good”. I am not saying it’s “good” that our highest levels of government are composed of oil executives, or that their close ties to Russia are “good”. Or that this administration will do everything it can to increase fossil fuel production is “good”.

        What is “good” about Joe Romm’s article is the fact that it was written. Everyone at this blog is fighting to reduce CO2 emissions and transition to a future powered by renewable energy. A major part of that fight is making the general public aware of who and what the impediments to that transition are. In addition to that, we must continuously work to inform the public about climate change, the very real dangers and problems created by climate change, and why we must do all we can to stop it. That is essentially why this blog exists (I think Robert would back me up on this point). So when an article is written pointing out that those who will soon be in charge have a very intense desire to expand oil production through their close ties to Putin and affect national policy accordingly (while also having devastating effects on the climate) I feel like it deserves to be shared.

        Reply
  73. Master’s site is saying subzero F temps by Tuesday (-22’C +/-). Not only the Blob off the coast affecting the Inland PacNW but now that Arctic Blob of heat is pushing frigid Siberian air this way. From the wettest October ever recorded to having a grand total of three inches of snow fall over the last few days at 2,340 ft elevation. Not much for mid-December and it’s going to be far too cold to snow when that hits… Hoping for a real snowpack this winter. The forest really needs it.

    I have a wild bunny trying to nest under stuff stacked in the carport. Dogs are going crazy chasing the little prints going in and out. And had a moose shouldering her way through the edge of the treeline this afternoon, crackling branches and snorting clouds of breath at the dogs. There is still life going on all around.

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had some system of government in place that would not allow the psycho turds to always float to the top of the toilet bowl. This James Watt cartoon collection has brought back a raft of bad memories and now McMorris-Rodgers is going to be filling his shoes. There weren’t any funny cartoons unless you have a taste for irony…

    CRAP.

    Reply
  74. Troutbum52

     /  December 12, 2016

    Good news, Al Gore will be making a new movie on Climate Change. According to the Wash Post, “Paramount Pictures and Participant Media announced Friday that the follow-up to the 2006 Oscar-winning documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth” — in which filmmaker Davis Guggenheim documented Gore’s traveling slide show on global warming — will follow the former vice president as he travels around the world exploring advances and challenges in the fight against climate change.”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/12/10/goremoviesequel/?utm_term=.3e56150403b5#comments

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 12, 2016

      I don’t know…maybe I am wrong..but I think Al Gore has really tarnished his public image when it comes to CC. Yes, we need a strong spokesperson on CC issues…a great communicator…with money and clout behind him/her. I think we need a new face…not someone with as much baggage as Gore. We need someone who “walks the walk”…and I am not sure that Gore is the best role model for that message.

      Reply
  75. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    Just released at BBC 8 hours ago:
    “Methane surge needs ‘urgent attention’
    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38285300

    Scientists say they are concerned at the rate at which methane in the atmosphere is now rising.

    After a period of relative stagnation in the 2000s, the concentration of the gas has surged.

    Reply
    • danabanana

       /  December 12, 2016

      “One of the most important of these is the destruction process involving the so-called hydroxyl radical.
      The concentration of this chemical species in the atmosphere might also be changing in some way.
      According to the ERL editorial, there needs to be a particular push on understanding such methane “sinks”. ”

      Noctilucent Clouds are the result of this process which then carries on to destroy H2O. I think we will find that we are bleeding elemental hydrogen into space…

      Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  December 12, 2016

      > “CH4 is about 30 times better than CO2, over a century timescale, ”

      Over a 20-year timeframe (our critical window to fix this mess) that figure is a whopping 86.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  December 12, 2016

        As the level is rising, forget the over x years time frame which would be valid if it were decreasing at the appropriate rate.
        The figure that MUST be used in this increasing circumstance is the instantaneous one which is over 120

        Reply
        • bostonblorp

           /  December 13, 2016

          So yeah, going by that graph and rounding around a bit, we’ve seen a 500ppb increase of CH4 since ~1970 which equals 50ppm of CO2e which plonks us around 450ppm of CO2e, not counting, of course, the other CO2e gasses out there which I have read will have us ~500ppm by 2019.

          I’m honestly getting a bit numb. I have highly educated and intelligent friends who get AGW and yet nobody changes their lifestyle in any meaningful way. They will fly to exotic places for fun, buy fancy cars that get low gas mileage. It’s hard to feel any sense of optimism in this species when there isn’t a behavioral change amongst those who should know better.

          Of course there is good out there and renewables are on the way up but I feel like we’re just going to bounce around from emergency to crisis and back while heat, SLR, and God knows what else makes a mess of the world.

        • danabanana

           /  December 13, 2016

          @bostonblorp

          “I have highly educated and intelligent friends who get AGW and yet nobody changes their lifestyle in any meaningful way. They will fly to exotic places for fun, buy fancy cars ”

          … all about the Dopamine 😉

      • Schmidt recommends using a GWP of near 60 for CH4. That yields +0.6 ppm CO2e per year over past two years from CH4 alone.

        Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  December 13, 2016

      No mention of submarine clathrates or Arctic sea ice loss in this article. Typical Guardian, a ‘curate’s egg’-‘Good in parts’, but not the Fully Monty.

      Reply
  76. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Bill Gates and investors worth $170 billion are launching a fund to fight climate change through energy innovation

    Bill Gates is leading a more than $1 billion fund focused on fighting climate change by investing in clean energy innovation.
    The Microsoft co-founder and his all-star line-up of fellow investors plan to announce tomorrow the Breakthrough Energy Ventures fund, which will begin making investments next year. The BEV fund, which has a 20-year duration, aims to invest in the commercialization of new technologies that reduce greenhouse-gas emissions in areas including electricity generation and storage, transportation, industrial processes, agriculture, and energy-system efficiency.

    http://qz.com/859860/bill-gates-is-leading-a-new-1-billion-fund-focused-on-combatting-climate-change-through-innovation/

    Reply
  77. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Meet the Arctic’s New Top Predator … Killer Whales

    There’s no doubt that melting sea ice in Hudson Bay is threatening endangered polar bears, but it might also be harmful to beluga whales, seals, narwhals and other marine mammals, scientists are warning.

    The reason? Melting ice caused by climate change is carving huge swaths of open water for longer periods of time, providing Atlantic killer whales more access to the bay and its rich stocks of prey.

    http://www.ecowatch.com/atlantic-killer-whales-arctic-2132103947.html

    Reply
  78. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Ice loss spreads up Antarctic glaciers

    The scale and pace of change now taking place in West Antarctica is captured in a new, long-term satellite record.
    Scientists have combined nearly a quarter of a century of observations to show how the region’s great glaciers are losing height by up to 7m per year.
    The satellite data also traces the way this thinning behaviour has spread up the length of the ice streams.
    The glaciers concerned all terminate in the Amundsen Sea and are significant contributors to global ocean rise.
    Their names are Pine Island, Thwaites, Pope, Smith, and Kohler.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38256932

    Reply
  79. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    Donald Trump: “Nobody Really Knows If Climate Change is Real”
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-climate-change_us_584d5cf2e4b0bd9c3dfd3473?nedi66ipka603sor
    ____________________
    IMO…if the Lunatic and his Fascist Regime are allowed to proceed with their proposed policies and denial we will see the acceleration of the catastrophic effects of CC by decades. It truly may be game over for our species a lot sooner than we imagined.

    Reply
  80. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    “Will Trump Scrap NASA’s Climate Research Mission” at ProPublica.org
    https://www.propublica.org/article/will-trump-scrap-nasas-climate-research-mission

    Trump’s most visible advisor on space policy has been Bob Walker, a former House Science committee chairman who is now a space-policy lobbyist pressing to move “Earth-centric” and “heavily politicized” climate science out of NASA altogether. And Christopher Shank, who was chosen by Trump to lead the transition at NASA, is a seasoned strategist who has expressed strong skepticism about the severity of global warming.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 12, 2016

      And here is a 30 minute video interview at Pro Publica on this topic. NASA and it’s Earth Science research

      Reply
  81. BBC: Methane surge needs ‘urgent attention’

    Prof Jackson was speaking ahead of this week’s American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in San Francisco where methane trends will be a major point of discussion.

    With colleagues who are part of an initiative called the Global Carbon Project, he has also just authored an editorial in the journal Environmental Research Letters (ERL).

    This paper makes a clarion call to the scientific community to address the knowledge deficit that surrounds CH4.

    Agriculture is blamed. Ha. Ha.

    Reply
  82. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    Today at the Guardian:
    “All-star cast of Climate Deniers Fills Trump Cabinet”
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/12/trump-administration-climate-deniers?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+USA+-+morning+briefing+2016&utm_term=203790&subid=16620791&CMP=ema_a-morning-briefing_b-morning-briefing_c-US_d-1

    Trump is assembling an all-star cast of climate change deniers for his transition team – often placing them at the heads of key agencies responsible for monitoring or dealing with global warming. The heads of transition teams for Nasa, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Interior and the Department of Energy, as well as his nominees to lead the EPA and the Department of the Interior, are all skeptical of the science of human-caused climate change. For instance, Myron Ebell, head of the EPA transition team, has said that the scientific consensus on climate change is “phoney”, while another member of the team David Kruetzer, of the conservative Heritage Foundation, has erroneously claimed there has been “global cooling” in recent years.
    ________________________

    Reply
    • Nancy

       /  December 12, 2016

      I’m shaking, I’m so angry. How can the US go in such a wrong direction? We used to be so proud of our science community. Remember how proud we were as a nation to land on the moon? Now scientists are regularly smeared like used-car salesmen.

      This group of deniers should be in jail, not heading up the EPA and Energy Department! Can we survive 4 years? Will the Democrats in congress work overtime to defeat these bastards at every turn?

      Reply
      • Ryan in New England

         /  December 12, 2016

        It’s enough to make you want to cry. I’ve been finding it really hard to stay positive since the election. And every day the news seems to get worse. Trump and his administration quite literally have the potential to ensure that our global civilization doesn’t last until the end of this century. We are essentially witnessing the takeover of our government by a group of right-wing fascists who intend to eliminate what few government programs remain. The people Trump has chosen to lead various departments and agencies don’t believe in the purpose of the departments they will soon control. A labor secretary that doesn’t believe in labor laws. An EPA head whose life’s purpose has been to fight the EPA. An education secretary who doesn’t like public schools and wants more religion in schools. A treasury secretary who couldn’t be more of a Wall Street insider. It’s all very Orwellian and the worst part is the ramifications for our climate. Children 50,000 years from now will feel the effects of a Trump presidency.

        Reply
        • Nancy

           /  December 12, 2016

          Ryan, you’re being optimistic. Will there be any children in 50,000 years? I wonder if there will be any children in 50 years.

        • June

           /  December 12, 2016

          I think you’re right, Ryan. Their intent, now that they have control of all three branches of govt is to essentially destroy any agencies that serve the common good as quickly as possible. By doing it all at once they have opened up so many different ” battle fronts” that they are bound to succeed in many of them despite massive opposition.

        • Suzanne

           /  December 12, 2016

          Ryan….This Fascist Regime will accelerate the catastrophic effects of GW…by decades…to the point that our children and grandchildren may not survive.

      • Nancy,
        Ditto. I give him two years or less before something blows up.

        Reply
        • Suzanne

           /  December 12, 2016

          Just 5 minutes ago…Carly Fiorina…just left Trump Tower saying….she had a great meeting with Trump about “our adversary China”…..

          I am as scared now about a nuclear bomb being dropped as I was during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He seems hell bent to start a war with China …which means N. Korea too.

        • Nancy

           /  December 12, 2016

          There’s a news report that 10 Electoral College voters are demanding more info about the Russian hacking of the election. I’m not sure if and how this would work, but maybe there is a tiny possibility that this POS will not become POTUS next month. Stay tuned.

      • Suzanne

         /  December 12, 2016

        Nancy,
        Who would have believed it possible that scientists…are so under fire that a “Client Scientist Legal Defense Fund” would have to be established? I truly feel like we have gone into some kind of new Dark Ages…

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 13, 2016

        Nancy, back in 1971 the Powell Memorandum outlined how the rich owners of US society (who are psychopaths) could take back control of society, principally by controlling the brainwashing of society through ‘think-tanks’ and the MSM. Their great success is based on the undeniable fact that 50% of the population is of below median intelligence, and are ruthless indoctrinated by the entirely Rightwing MSM, the advertising Moloch, PR and ‘entertainment’. Moreover across the Anglosphere there have been ruthless efforts for decades to destroy public education, and ‘dumb-down’ the rabble. Here in Australia this effort is led by the Murdoch MSM cancer, and has been notably effective. A dumb populace, ignorant and greedy, will deny science, because they hate ‘smart-arses’, ‘know-it-alls’ and ‘experts’. I imagine that the Chinese look on at our forcible group self lobotomisation with dismay and disbelief.

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  December 13, 2016

          Maybe not MM the Chinese have a habit of learning from old ways.
          “Everything under heaven is in utter chaos; the situation is excellent,” Chairman Mao Zedong wrote in a letter to his wife on July 8, 1966.”

  83. Thinking about the political landscape in the US and the ever-increasing polarity and division evident, maybe it’s time for the west coast and northeast to consider secession. This would free up progressive states to pursue science and technology unfettered by primitive, greed-driven socio-economic philosophy and intentional ignorance, while the center of the country could continue it’s pursuit of 19th century excellence (although it might be said that that’s actually not fair to the population of the 19th century, who were generally far more open to scientific discovery than much of what we’re seeing today).

    Reply
  84. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Activists Tell Scientists To Download Climate Change Data Before Trump Deletes It
    9:15 AM 12/12/2016
    Environmental activists are afraid the Trump administration will alter or delete data sets scientists use to track global warming after the president-elect takes control in January. …
    More see link above.

    The Daily Caller

    Reply
  85. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    FEMA’s Director Wants Capitalism to Protect Us From Climate Change

    EXPOSED
    FEMA’s Director Wants Capitalism to Protect Us From Climate Change
    24DEC 12, 2016 8:00 AM EST
    a | A
    By
    Christopher Flavelle
    In January, Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Craig Fugate gave states a choice for dealing with climate change. Option A: Do nothing about the rising toll of extreme weather, and hope Congress’s threats to restrict disaster aid — by raising the damage threshold required to receive that aid — never come to pass. Option B was more interesting.

    FEMA suggested what it called a disaster deductible: State governments would be on the hook for some of the cost of cleaning up after hurricanes, floods and other calamities. But they could lower that deductible by taking steps to reduce their exposure — for example, by passing tougher building codes.

    States balked. But as climate change puts more property at risk, the pressure to reform federal disaster policy will only increase. Fugate spoke with me last week about social welfare for developers, the futility of regulating where people can build, and why this issue won’t go away once Republicans are in charge. Our exchange has been condensed and lightly edited.

    Link

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 12, 2016

      Why is that so hard to change?

      Because we won’t call people out and say they’re socialists.

      Who’s socialist?

      The builders and developers and all the people running around saying they’re capitalists and they’re Republicans and they’re conservatives, and it’s all about individual freedoms and making money and growing the tax base, and all the bullshit they throw at people, convincing them this is an economic boon activity. It’s nothing but socialism and social welfare for developers when you subsidize risk below which the public gets a benefit from. They’ve got to be called out.

      Property rights and all of that are such a powerful argument in many parts of the country, I don’t want to get into the argument about telling people where they can and can’t build. What I want to talk about is, Why are we subsidizing that risk?

      Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Craig Fugate

      Reply
  86. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    On man is this creepy or what –

    This stunning Antarctic lake is buried in ice. And that could be bad news

    Video footage from inside borehole showing an englacial lake 4m below the surface. ……………… The researchers had traveled to investigate what had been described as a nearly 2 mile wide “crater” in the shelf, glimpsed by satellite, which some sources believed had been caused by a meteorite. To the contrary, they found that it was a large, 10 foot deep, icy lake bed. In its center, meanwhile, were multiple rivers and three moulins that carried water deep down into the floating ice shelf.

    And even this, perhaps, was not the most dramatic finding. The researchers also drilled through the ice and found what they called “englacial” lakes, sandwiched between the surface of the ice shelf and its base, which is in contact with the ocean beneath it. They found 55 lakes in total on or in the ice shelf, and a number of them were in this buried, englacial format. The video of one such discovery, of a crystal blue lake four meters below the ice shelf surface, is shown above, and an image from the video is below:

    Link

    Reply
  87. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Shrinking mountain glaciers are ‘categorical evidence’ of climate change, scientists say

    A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience, uses a new statistical method to analyze the retreat of mountain glaciers all over the world, from Russia to South America. It concludes that their shrinking represents “categorical evidence of climate change.”

    “It’s the first time that’s somebody’s done a formal climate change attribution study of mountain glacier length changes,” said Andrew Mackintosh, a glaciology expert at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand who was not involved with the new study.

    Link

    Reply
  88. Counterpunch’s Jeffrey St. Clair’s comments the other day; Deep Irony:

    +Cockburn and I used to run a little betting game called First Blood. The goal was to pick the number of days it would take for a new president to launch his first lethal bombing raid or missile strike. Generally, it took less than a month. I give Trump two days.

    Of course, in the age of drones the kill order can come in a matter of seconds and, unless Trump decides to target an American journalist on book tour in France, we might not know about the carnage for weeks.

    + A new poll suggests that nearly half of all Americans now support torture. Let’s see how they feel six months from now after the new Congress allows bill collectors to use waterboarding to extract their monthly payments…

    + Over the last 35 years, the American economy has almost doubled in size. But nearly all of that growth has been seized by the top two percent of wage earners. More than 50 percent of working Americans have experienced no growth in their wealth at all. These are the wages of Clinton/Obama neoliberal economics at work. Trump will almost certainly exacerbate these trends. But who among us could rationalize more of the same?

    + Dr. Ben Carson believes that housing for the poor is a malicious form of socialist coddling and indoctrination. His first act as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will be to rename his agency the Department of Tent Cities and Sidewalks.

    + Some of my friends on what might loosely be described as the anti-interventionist right look at the Trump cabinet and see a gathering of peaceniks. (Of course, some of these people also thought the invasion of Grenada was a rescue operation.) When I look at Mattis, Flynn and Pompeo, I see a cabal of fanatics who are gearing up to go to war against Iran with the same fervency that charged the Bushies’ mad drive to take down Saddam.

    + In Nicolai Gogol’s 1842 masterpiece, Dead Souls, a disgraced bureaucrat named Chichikov, who has been fired for corruption, goes from town to town across the vast Russian steppe, buying up the souls of dead serfs, which he hopes to profit from in a mad scheme that prefigures the deal-making of modern day arbitragers.

    Now we have our very own Chichikov in the figure of House Speaker Paul Ryan, who in a speech to CPAC (Conservative Political Action Committee) last week, said that the programs which provide poor children (America’s serfs-in-training) with free school lunches leave them with “empty souls” and should thus be terminated.

    This is, of course, a textbook case of Freudian projection, where Ryan displaces his own vacuous moral character onto the defenseless kids he is about to screw over for his own political enrichment. Make America Great Again: Starve the Children!

    Reply
  89. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Museveni redirects road funds to support drought-stricken Uganda

    Crops in many parts of Uganda have been destroyed due to prolonged drought caused by changing rainfall pattern, floods and landslides, according to the UN food agency FAO which warned of impending food crisis early this year.

    The government acknowledged in November that over 1.3 million Ugandans are already in need of urgent food aid as a result of starvation caused by climate change.

    Link

    Reply
  90. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Great time of the year, the studies for the AGU are popping up like mushrooms –

    Antarctic Ice Sheet study reveals 8,000-year record of climate change

    They discovered that the centuries-long phases of enhanced and reduced Antarctic ice mass loss documented over the past 8,000 years have had a cascading effect on the entire climate system.
    Using sophisticated computer modelling, the researchers traced the variability in iceberg calving (ice that breaks away from glaciers) to small changes in ocean temperatures.
    “There is a natural variability in the deeper part of the ocean adjacent to the Antarctic Ice Sheet that causes small but significant changes in temperatures,” said co-author Andreas Schmittner, a climate modeller from Oregon State University. “When the ocean temperatures warm, it causes more direct melting of the ice sheet below the surface, and it increases the number of icebergs that calve off the ice sheet.”
    Those two factors combine to provide an influx of fresh water into the Southern Ocean during these warm regimes, according to Peter Clark, a paleoclimatologist from Oregon State University, and co-author on the study.

    Read more at: Link

    Reply
  91. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    As the Arctic warms, the oil industry adapts to sustain ice-road season in Alaska

    Alaska’s North Slope oil industry is battling back as Earth has warmed, adopting new techniques to allow operators to start building ice roads as early as they did in the cooler 1970s to move the drilling rigs and people needed for winter oil exploration.

    The result is ice-road construction seasons that have become reliably longer in recent years — and an unmistakable irony, with the oil industry working to expand the winter season for finding the petroleum that contributes to more climate-warming, greenhouse-gas emissions that shrink the season.

    Link

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 12, 2016

      From the article,

      Those changes come as temperatures on the North Slope have increased. A report released in 2013 by the National Weather Service showed average October temperatures in the region’s largest community, Barrow or Utqiagvik, northwest of the oil fields, rising by about 10 degrees between 2000 and 2010, to about 25 degrees.

      A 10 degree rise in 10 years! Even is it’s Fahrenheit, that’s a remarkable increase.

      Reply
  92. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    We need some good news….and here is some from 350.org (I will take it when I get it) :
    A new report released today with our friends at Divest-Invest shows that the divestment movement doubled in size since 2015. 688 institutions across 76 countries who represent more than $5 trillion worth of assets have committed to divest!

    Reply
    • Fantastic. We definitely have our work cut out for us with Trump coming in. But past successes give some reason for cautious optimism. I think what we should realize is that the power of divestment + nonviolent resistance is significant, even in the face of the kind of political darkness we appear to be heading for.

      Reply
  93. Another indication that in 2016, things are very wonky in the Arctic – cumulative Freezing degree days are off the chart:

    More details at ASIF Forum.

    This (most probably) means that coming into 2017 melt season – the ice that we do have will be much thinner than “normal”, hence much more susceptible to melt. A new regime in the north?

    Reply
  94. Suzanne

     /  December 12, 2016

    Video Series at CNN worth checking out:

    “Vanishing: The 6th Mass Extinction”
    http://edition.cnn.com/specials/world/vanishing-earths-mass-extinction
    We’re entering the Earth’s sixth era of extinction — and it’s the first time humans are to blame. CNN introduces you to the key species and people who are trying to prevent them from vanishing.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 12, 2016

      Thank you for that, Suzanne. I still don’t understand why more people are not devastated by this mass extinction. Or any extinction. The phrase “extinction is forever” is true but fails to grasp the magnitude of the situation. It took tens of millions of years to develop the complex and diverse ecosystems we find throughout the world, and the millions of species contained within them. When a species vanishes never again, for the entire lifetime of our planet (and possibly the universe) will another polar bear, or golden toad, or elephant or giraffe evolve. And those are just the iconic species. Millions of interdependent species that get overlooked will also vanish forever, and they will never evolve again, because it took billions of chance encounters all happening a certain way to produce the outcome we see around us. That will never ever happen again.Which is why I firmly believe extinction is the most immoral crime human beings can ever commit.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  December 13, 2016

        I don’t know why people aren’t more concerned or even “awake” to it either Ryan. There was an article linked here a little while back about the effect of high CO2 on human health. One of the effects was on human cognition. I some times wonder is that a factor in all this idiocy denial and apathy we are now encountering? Or are homo sapiens just not so “clever” after all?

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 13, 2016

      The video about the coral was very disturbing. The poor villagers don’t know why it’s happening, did nothing to cause it, but will be among the most affected by it. Their entire way of life will soon be impossible.

      One thing I noticed, the Vezo fishermen don’t know why the coral is bleaching, but they have noticed that it happens during the hot season. Sadly, scientists know all too well why the coral is bleaching/dying.

      Reply
  95. anthropocene

     /  December 12, 2016

    Highly recommended listening – an hour of your life well spent. Touches on many issues which have been discussed here: dealing psychologically with climate change, alternate economies, population, Guy McPherson/doomsday scenarios. Will definitely be seeking out David Fleming’s work.

    http://www.ecoshock.org/2016/12/david-fleming-dark-optimism.html

    Reply
  96. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    by ROBERTSCRIBBLER on NOVEMBER 23, 2016

    Climate Change Has Left Bolivia Crippled by Drought

    So as is my habit, I’m on 2 threads at the same time . And at the Cat 6 ,
    And there’s some comments on the mountain glacier paper up thread.
    Quoting 42. JohnLonergan, ……………..comes along with the details of the ………………

    The World’s Highest Elevation Ski Resort = Chacaltaya, Boliva @ 17,785-Feet | Closed Due to “Unprecedented” Glacial Retreat”

    With great graphics. Of just what this was, really worth a look . I mean nothing should be melting at that altitude.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=3522#commenttop

    Reply
  97. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Those melt ponds in East Antarctica below the ice.

    by ROBERTSCRIBBLER on NOVEMBER 28, 2016

    Did Föhn Winds Just Melt Two Miles of East Antarctic Surface Ice in One Day?

    Link

    That paper today from East Antarctica. Confirms his first post. Scribbler out thought himself with this post . I read it when it first appeared. We did see melt ponds. But they drained in just hours. Some of his readers claimed ” cloud shadows”. Well they were wrong , and he was right once again.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  December 12, 2016

      Bob….Here is a little longer video from the scientist who found that lake under the Antarctic Ice that you referenced above. Thought you might like to check it out.

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 12, 2016

      ” cloud shadows”

      I’ve been looking at sat, images for well well over a decade. I thought this whole idea sucked. I know what ” cloud shadows” look like. But I thought , hey there’s people brighter than me . Turns out These are fast draining lakes In a new form we’ve never seen before in Antarctica.

      If I had a nickle for every time RS has posted , and 3 weeks later a paper is confirms him. I’d about 50 cents.

      Reply
    • Ha. I guess I should trust my instincts more. Looks like I need to update again.

      Reply
  98. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Scribbler has his toes over the edge. And he still as all Ten of them.

    Reply
  99. Abel Adamski

     /  December 12, 2016

    The first steps in Global control of the internet and the availability of information.

    http://www.recode.net/2016/12/12/13919952/net-neutrality-fcc-rosenworcel-trump-senate

    Now with Rosenworcel out and Chairman Wheeler expected to leave the agency in January, the stage is set for a 2-1 Republican majority at the FCC next year. And President-elect Trump, an opponent of network neutrality, is geared to pick new leadership to reverse the rules.

    Without network neutrality, internet providers will be able to create a two-way toll, charging subscribers to access the internet (which it already does) as well as charging websites for prioritized access to reach their users.

    That means that smaller, new online businesses that can’t afford to pay to reach users at faster speeds will be relegated to the slow lane, making it difficult to compete with already established sites — especially if websites that are already extremely profitable, like Facebook, get to set the price.

    Their focus is business accessing customers and potential customers.
    Mine is the costs that will be forced onto sites we use all the time and their sources of data and information.

    An insidious form of censorship as well as anti the very free trade/level playing field the conservatives state is a core principle of their beliefs

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 13, 2016

      Very frightening. I fear we will soon look back at the very dark year of 2016 as the good ol’ days.

      Reply
  100. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Bob Dylan wins the Nobel . Trump wins the Presidency.

    How crazy is that ?

    Time for a tune .

    Reply
    • Witchee

       /  December 13, 2016

      Not to mention the Cubs winning the world series- that is the most telling sign of The End.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  December 13, 2016

        Funny you should mention the Cubs. I was born in Chicago and raised to be a Cubs fan. But when they went to the series I was not rooting for them….for just this reason….the weird Election Cycle. So, when they did win…I had a terrible sinking premonition..I could not even feel happy for the Cubs.

        Reply
  101. coloradobob

     /  December 12, 2016

    Now the real sand in my craw tonight, Namely the old trope , “climate has always changed”

    Ice ages have been linked to the Earth’s wobbly orbit—but when is the next one?

    http://phys.org/news/2016-12-ice-ages-linked-earth-orbitbut.html

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 13, 2016

      In December 1976 they published a landmark climate paper in Science, showing that climate records contained the same cycles as the three parameters that vary the Earth’s orbit: eccentricity, obliquity and precession (shown in Figure 1). Eccentricity describes the shape of the Earth’s orbit around the sun, varying from nearly a circle to an ellipse with a period of about 96,000 years. Obliquity is the tilt of the Earth’s axis of rotation with respect to the plane of its orbit, which changes with a period of about 41,000 years. Precession refers to the fact that both Earth’s rotational axis and orbital path precess (rotate) over time – the combined effects of these two components and the eccentricity produce an approximately 21,000-year cycle.

      Read more at:Link

      Reply
  102. Abel Adamski

     /  December 13, 2016

    An Interesting article
    http://www.recode.net/2016/12/12/13917798/elon-musk-might-skip-trump-tech-summit

    Actually, Elon Musk might skip Trump’s tech summit (Update: Now he’s in.)

    The invite for the tech event came from Trump’s chief of staff, Reince Priebus, as well as his son-in-law and chief-whatever Jared Kushner and, of course, the now tech-biquitous Thiel.

    Those close to the process said that Thiel — who is on the Facebook board with Sandberg — and others helping Trump reach out to the tech community had a hard time convincing them to attend, largely due to his persistent public hostility to one of the U.S. economy’s few bright and innovative arenas.

    In addition, most of Silicon Valley’s leadership backed Trump rival and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and were even more supportive of outgoing President Barack Obama.

    Tech companies also stand on the other side of a myriad of key issues from Trump, including immigration reform, encryption and a range of social concerns. But those involved said that tech leaders had little choice in accepting the invitation, even if they wanted to decline, opting to engage now even if they later oppose Trump.

    Whether it is just going to be a media-saturated geek reality show episode (my vote) or a substantive discussion (um, no, no, no — let’s recall “the cyber,” shall we?) is still to be determined. And Musk’s presence would certainly give the gathering a touch of both glamour and heft, so I’m rooting for him to Iron Man in.

    Reply
  103. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    Reply
  104. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    If we have merely delayed the next ice age, we will still be in the Quaternary Period – the last 2.58m years defined by the ice age cycles. But if we have stopped the ice ages, humans will have caused a much greater change and so have entered the Anthropocene period as some argue. If I had to put money on it, I’d say the Earth has experienced its last ice age for a very, very long time.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-12-ice-ages-linked-earth-orbitbut.html#jCp

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  December 13, 2016

      CB and the statements before that

      “Therefore, the researchers’ next step was to understand the relative importance of ice sheet, ocean and atmospheric feedbacks. They discovered that greenhouse gases had an important role in controlling climate. In particular atmospheric carbon dioxide had to be low enough for the planet to start cooling before it could tip into an ice age.

      So how can all this help us understand future climate? One idea is that small increases in greenhouse gases due to the expansion of agriculture that started 8,000 years ago have in fact delayed the next ice age. What’s more, if we continue emitting greenhouse gases at the same rate, we might have put off the next ice age for at least half a million years.”

      Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-12-ice-ages-linked-earth-orbitbut.html#jCp

      Reply
  105. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    “The climate has always changed, it always will”. This 7th grade comment needs an answer we can all use. Short to the point . and with deep back ground.

    I am working on that tonight. Why I never hacked-up this answer. years ago , I will never know.

    This one needs a simple answer everyday.

    Reply
    • Hey CB,
      I’d like to think 7th graders are smarter. Only a fully growed adult would
      1. Put a fuel line through a gas tank in an airliner (or anywhere else)
      2. Aver that stratospheric testing of atomic bombs is safe because ‘the tropopause will keep it out’.
      3. Put an oil pipeline (any pipeline, but particularly a hot one under pressure) under the intake of the fourth largest reservoir in the US.
      I’m not sure anyone should be let loose until they are at least 50.
      🙃 😏 😒 😞 😠 😮 😯 😶 😔 😣

      Reply
  106. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    I’m playing a lot of the Band in my head. But I saw Garth Brooks . Then we go the Call

    Reply
  107. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    Garth Brooks lied to his family so he could join the Hawks. Who joined Bob . Who was the Band.

    Here he is in all his finest –

    Reply
  108. Ryan in New England

     /  December 13, 2016

    All of Trump’s appointees to agencies relevant to climate change/environment deny basic science and are all very pro-fossil fuel.

    Trump has assembled a transition team in which at least nine senior members deny basic scientific understanding that the planet is warming due to the burning of carbon and other human activity. These include the transition heads of all the key agencies responsible for either monitoring or dealing with climate change. None of these transition heads have any background in climate science.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/dec/12/donald-trump-environment-climate-change-skeptics

    Reply
  109. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    Brain dead old man crash . Garth Hudson .

    Reply
  110. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    Ryan in New England

    For years here , I have said , “Hell comes to breakfast. Well now we are here ” , we are all at the table. And what do we do? I am as clueless as as you.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 13, 2016

      Being an old husk , I can say …………….. Fight, fight , fight. Being an old fool , I can say . lay down and quit.

      Reply
  111. coloradobob

     /  December 13, 2016

    Just so you all know, my last dump was almost white. How I can still type,
    is really pretty crazy. My end really sucks,
    I had planned to die 20 years ago with a lot more teeth, and a much better hair line.

    And I am still here . Remember the seven P’s .
    I did none of them .

    I’m sitting here waiting for Hell and breakfast.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 13, 2016

      And I never asked what a breakfast in Hell would taste like. So that is kinda freakin’ me out. Who wants to spent eternity eating Bay Leaves?

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 13, 2016

        Sorry I’m just pushing all of you. Do end up in Hell eating Bay Leaves for Breakfast.

        Reply
        • Mark in OZ

           /  December 13, 2016

          That ‘push’ is what all the best coaches do CB; training the next group to discern what to do and what not to do. I’ve never minded. Has done many a lot of good, I reckon. Apart from the occasional chatter /dialogue on the RS citizens band, we’re mainly alone and within our own thoughts on this ‘highway’.

          Thanks for keeping things ‘lively’ and informative as we all travel to and from our departures and arrivals. And wrt the choice between ‘fighting’ or ‘quitting’, it all comes down to the size of the fight in the person; and not the other way around. When /if that time comes, be assured there’s many who’ll be willin’! Just show us a sign- double flash of your trailer lamps as you overtake would suit!

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il9VFC6-Inw ( Little Feat- you know the one)

  112. Andy_in_SD

     /  December 13, 2016

    World’s largest reindeer herd plummets

    The world’s largest wild reindeer herd has fallen by 40% since 2000, scientists have warned.

    They say that the animals, which live in the Taimyr Peninsula in the northernmost tip of Russia, are being affected by rising temperatures and human activity.

    This is causing the animals to change their annual migration patterns.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38297464

    Reply
  113. Vic

     /  December 13, 2016

    I managed to find some real news. It’s from Democracy Now, featuring Joe Romm, Bill McKibben and others talking about the Rosneft/Exxon/Putin/Trump thing.

    Part 1

    Part 2

    Reply
  114. John McCormick

     /  December 13, 2016

    America wrapped in the warm blanket of an oligarchy.

    Reply
  115. More good coverage of T’s Rex:

    Reply
  116. Suzanne

     /  December 13, 2016

    The WP is reporting today that the Energy Dept will not release some requested information by the Lunatic’s transition team:

    “The Department of Energy received significant feedback from our workforce throughout the department, including the National Labs, following the release of the transition team’s questions. Some of the questions asked left many in our workforce unsettled,” said Eben Burnham-Snyder, a department spokesman. “Our career workforce, including our contractors and employees at our labs, comprise the backbone of DOE (Department of Energy) and the important work our department does to benefit the American people. We are going to respect the professional and scientific integrity and independence of our employees at our labs and across our department.

    “We will be forthcoming with all publically-available information with the transition team. We will not be providing any individual names to the transition team.” Burnham-Snyder’s email had the last sentence in boldface for emphasis.

    Reply
  117. Suzanne

     /  December 13, 2016

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/13/scientists-are-frantically-copying-u-s-climate-data-fearing-it-might-vanish-under-trump/

    Alarmed that decades of crucial climate measurements could vanish under a hostile Trump administration, scientists have begun a feverish attempt to copy reams of government data onto independent servers in hopes of safeguarding it from any political interference.

    The efforts include a “guerrilla archiving event” in Toronto where experts will copy irreplaceable public data, meetings at the University of Pennsylvania focused on how to download as much federal data as possible in the coming weeks, and a collaboration of scientists and database experts who are compiling an online site to harbor scientific information.

    Reply
  118. Jeremy in Wales

     /  December 13, 2016

    Some good news, the USA enters the 1990’s
    https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/dec/13/wind-farm-projects-clean-energy-environment
    Now the bad news Bick takes the USA back to the future, probably 1910 (coal power and Russia as an ally).

    Reply
  1. New Research Shows Global Warming Could Turn Tropics Into a Sweltering Dead Zone | robertscribbler

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