To Carry a Light into Darkness — California Governor Jerry Brown Promises to Fight Like Hell Against Trump’s War on Science

“If Trump turns off the satellites, California will launch its own damn satellite.” — Jerry Brown

“Creating lists of employees smacks of McCarthyism and should cease immediately.”The Union of Concerned Scientists

“Fear is palpable among U.S. climate scientists over Trump moves” — The Japan Times

“Assaults on science are characteristic of non-democratic, authoritarian, fascist governments. We worry it is going to get worse.” Dr Peter Gleick

“We’ve got more sun than you’ve got oil.” — Jerry Brown

*****

Donald Trump hasn’t even taken office yet. But the war on climate science that he promised on the campaign trail has already begun. And in response, the good and necessary resistance is starting to form.

Last week, PEOTUS sent a chill through the scientific community when his transition team delivered a 74 question document to the Department of Energy asking for the names of all personnel who’ve worked on climate change or who attended U.N. climate talks within the last five years.

stand-up-for-science

(Demonstrators protest in support of scientists outside the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco on December 14. Attacks against climate scientists have hit a fever pitch since the election of Donald Trump. Image source: Buzzfeed.)

Almost immediately after the letter’s delivery, The Union of Concerned Scientists made the following response:

 “The Union of Concerned Scientists strongly condemns the effort by the President-elect’s transition team to seek the names of federal employees who have conducted climate research and worked on issues such as the social cost of carbon. We cannot imagine any legitimate purpose to this inquiry…

“This action should not be viewed in isolation. The Trump transition team is teeming with individuals with a proven history of attacking climate scientists and undermining climate science. Several transition team members now overseeing federal agencies have harassed scientists based on their research and have long signaled a desire to dismantle federal climate science research. Over the past few years, Congress has increasingly singled out specific government employees when their work is politically inconvenient.

Creating lists of employees smacks of McCarthyism and should cease immediately. And Department of Energy employees should resist complying with any demands that would compromise the independence of the agency’s experts.”

The Department of Energy subsequently refused to provide the names requested. But the impact of the circulated questionnaire was profound — prompting protests and a swell of outrage from scientists, journalists and concerned citizens. Workers and officials at DOE expressed fears that Trump was developing an enemies list. And, considering the purges and attacks on scientists that occurred in numerous countries around the world following the election of climate change deniers during recent years, these fears were sadly quite valid.

Eliminating NASA Funding, Death Threats on Twitter

In a separate but related instance, Trump Administration officials reportedly stated that they intended to eliminate NASA’s climate research funding. Not only would this result in a purge of climate scientists from U.S. government offices. It would also precipitate the loss of climate monitoring satellites and the potential loss of decades of scientific data collected by some of the top researchers in the world. Concerned that scientists would be suddenly expelled and that critical data would be lost, as happened during similar purges that occurred in Canada and Australia under climate change deniers Stephen Harper and Tony Abbott, workers for various agencies began frantically copying data in order to ensure its preservation.

Meanwhile, instances of politically motivated threats against climate scientists mounted. Peter Gleick, a hydro-climatologist and co-founder of the Pacific Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, reported to the Japan Times that he received death threats in the form of pictures of guns posted to him after he tweeted critically about threats of violence to scientists made by Brietbart on Twitter.

Jerry Brown, Governor of California Vows to Fight Against Trump’s Anti-Science Agenda

Concern for scientists as a class increasingly victimized by political extremists like Trump hit a fever pitch this week at the American Geophysical Union Conference in San Francisco. There, hundreds of pro-science protesters marched outside as the meeting halls swelled with over 20,000 worried scientists and their supporters.

Among the attendees was Governor Jerry Brown of California who delivered this impassioned speech:

(Jerry Brown has pushed for pro-renewable energy, pro-climate response policies in California for decades. He has vowed to defend both science and progressive values from an impending assault by Donald Trump. Video source: YouTube.)

Brown highlighted the tremendous danger that human civilizations now face. The oceans are rising and acidifying, the weather is worsening, habitats, food and water sources are being destroyed. He also noted that in order to prevent climate harms, people would have to face down both “big oil” and “big financial structures that are at odds with the survivability of our world.”

Brown called on scientists and their ‘truth teller and truth seeker’ supporters to fight back.  And, in doing so, he pledged the aid of California’s scientific and legal communities saying: “We’ve got the scientists and we’ve got the lawyers and we’re ready to fight back. We’re ready to defend.”

Brown cited past major environmental achievements by California including 28 percent renewable power generation, a goal to hit 50 percent in the coming years, and zero emissions vehicle and mileage standards that became the benchmark for the nation. Unlike Trump, Brown pledged to fully support international climate agreements and to work with over 200 states to help to reduce harms from climate change. Touting California’s 2.1 trillion dollar economy, Brown stated — “We will persevere. We will prevail.”

But Brown’s highest points involved his pledge to launch satellites if Trump shuts down NASA climate monitoring systems and to pit California’s economic might as a renewable energy power against the old fossil fuel interests. Brown stated:

“Well, I remember back in 1978, I proposed a Landsat satellite for California. They called me Governor Moonbeam because of that. I didn’t get that moniker for nothing. And if Trump turns off the satellites, California will launch its own damn satellite. We’re going to collect that data. …

“We’ve proved in California that the economy grows… in part because of the rules and the climate policy that we’ve adopted… and California is growing a whole hell of a lot faster than Texas and we’ve got more sun than you’ve got oil.”

Carrying a Light in the Darkness

Brown, in his support of the U.S. scientific community and in his pledge to continue progress for renewable energy sets an example for us all. His leadership serves as a light in a dark place and during a dark time. But many, many of us will have to follow his lead if we are to have much hope of making it through this difficult time. We need to all be ready to fight. To speak out. And to commit substantial resources to the effort.

The times of comfort are over. And if we are to prevent a worst case scenario for our climate we will have to face down the very real human monsters than have now been revealed to us. But we should console ourselves at least, in this. There is good in the world. There are the greatest causes in all of the vast arc of history to champion here and now. There are the good and innocent living among us that we now have the honor and the privilege to protect and defend. And there can be no better, more just thing, for us to do now than to unite in what is a very real fight to defend not only clean energy, not only the great enlightenment that has been gifted to us by the sciences, but to, in doing so, protect both the future of humankind and of life on Earth itself.

Links:

Jerry Brown’s Speech at the AGU Convention

The Union of Concerned Scientists

Fear Palpable Among US Climate Scientists

Climate Scientists Split Over How to Survive Trump

Hat tip to Josh

 

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177 Comments

  1. Jerry Brown’s speech is pretty invigorating. Don’t skip it!

    Reply
  2. I’m starting to download GISS anomaly maps. Who knows what future use they can have.

    Reply
  3. Genomik

     /  December 15, 2016

    Wow that’s a highly inspirational speech! Jerry Brown is becoming a leader for climate science. I love his rationality and logic and urge to fight. HUZZAH!
    He’s right in saying many climate scientists are not voiciferous enough! More people need to become client scientists and get the word out instead of being cowed by the denialists.

    Reply
  4. I guess it’s one silver lining if the good people get organised and make political action relevant and achievable for people in all walks of life. Too much is a stake now and our sights have been cleared.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  December 17, 2016

      Of course it’s long overdue that the non-psychotic fraction of humanity is being forced to defend itself. For thirty years the Right have had the field to themselves, lying, disinforming, threatening, vilifying, while the decent human beings have been impotently and pointlessly appealing to science, evidence, rationality and humanity, which plainly, the forces of environmental devastation do not possess or recognise.
      We MUST face the fact that our enemies, and they are as much our enemies as the Nazis were during WW2, are immune to rationality and truth. The leading lights of the denialist industry are Evil, and must, in my opinion, one day, face justice in trials for crimes against humanity. The masses of lumpen idiots and ignoramuses must, in contrast, be given every chance to recant and join the huge majority of humanity who know that the climate is being destabilised. We must remember that anthropogenic climate destabilisation denialism is more or less a phenomenon of the Anglosphere, under the malignant dominance of the Right, and brainwashing malevolences like Rupert Murdoch and his Evil Empire.
      While we need to treat denialist foot-soldiers with humanity, it will also be important to work together on ecological repair, political agitation, food-growing, renewable energy, tree-planting etc, and self-defence. Before this battle is won, if it is, we will face desperate, violent, aggressive forces, who have barely begun to persecute science, truth and environmentalism, so we’d better get prepared.

      Reply
  5. As we enter a new era of wanton disregard for the murdering Earth by the new administration I now wonder how long it will be before the BIG collapse with massive droughts and starvation. These are truly dark times as regards to the murdering of our Earth and I wonder how much longer this disregard for the ecological will continue to support life as we know it. I’m so glad I have no children the inherit this horrific mess created by hubris and greed and wanton destruction of our only home. Colonizing space is a ridiculous pipe dream for people who’d rather dream than face the harsh reality on the near horizon. Hell the new administration doesn’t even give a crap or look at what’s going on everywhere in the world including the USA. Over my 62 years here in the southwest I’ve certainly notice a major change starting in the late 70’s and it just keeps getting worse. I’ve done all I can but of course it certainly isn’t enough.. It will take strong leadership to effect REAL change and I hope it’s not too late for the children of today will certainly live in a different world than mine. Peace; The ‘Ol Hippy

    Reply
    • Collapse won´t reach everyone at the same time. For those in Syria, it already happened, for those in other places, it´s somewhen in the future still. For countries like the USA, or my home country Brasil, it won´t happen at the same time in the whole country… those countries are simply too big for that.

      That´s a factor for resilience, actually, if well played. When tragedy strikes one part of a nation (this can and should happen internationally, but it´s FAR easier when the ones that need help are from the same country), others can help with money, goods, water, etc., so that people can get to their feet again. That´s the only way I see for civilization to continue, actually: we won´t dodge all bullets, there will be tragedies and deaths, but as long as the people who are ok right now aid the ones hit by tragedy the latest, we will all keep going.

      Reply
  6. Well said John

    Reply
  7. climatehawk1

     /  December 16, 2016

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  8. Phil

     /  December 16, 2016

    Are there other states that are likely to join California? That is one way some progress is being made in Australia – States setting their own more ambitious renewable energy targets.

    Reply
  9. redskylite

     /  December 16, 2016

    NASA needed as never before – November’s NASA/Goddard GISS Land/Sea temperature anomaly show the hottest Southern Hemisphere increase on record at +0.75°C, this at a time when NOAA report “Antarctic sea ice extent was 5.7 standard deviations below its 1981–2010 November average. The chance of that happening is 1 in 100,000,000!” The sleepy Southern Pole is beginning to awake.

    In the North NASA report the second warmest November since records start (1.16°C), this during a mild outgoing La Niña phase. Global also second warmest (0.96°C), yet the next government are equating NASA to Flat Earthists and threaten data. My God – time for the protesting spirit to emerge and overcome.

    “There was an overwhelming science that the Earth was flat, and there was an overwhelming science that we were the center of the world. We get a lot of things wrong in the scientific community.”

    “It’s called ignorance,” New Day co-host Chris Cuomo interjected. “You learn over time.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/?utm_term=.f677bbfe06f4

    Reply
  10. redskylite

     /  December 16, 2016

    The Arctic is shouting and now the Antarctic is joining in . . how many hints do we need ?

    Recent estimates suggest that global mean sea level rise could exceed two meters by 2100. These projections are higher than previous estimates and are based on the latest understanding of how the Antarctic ice sheet has behaved in the past and how sensitive it is to future climate change. The projections pose a challenge for scientists and policymakers alike, requiring far-reaching decisions about coastal policies to be made based on rapidly evolving projections with large, persistent uncertainties.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/pu-rsl121416.php

    Reply
    • “Recent estimates suggest that global mean sea level rise could exceed two meters by 2100”

      I’m not convinced it will take that long… From what I understand, the projections largely assume gradual melt based on temperature rise, but anyone who has thawed a freezer may have observed how towards the end big chunks drop off.The same principle might apply to much larger ice sheets. I appreciate scientists are aware of moulins and the effects of lubrication from below, but I’m not convinced they factor adequately in the projections.

      Plus there’s the massive amount of ice below sea level in Greenland and probably the same goes for some of the Antarctic. It will only need a comparatively small rise in sea level for sea water to spill over the edge of the ‘bowl’ and then there will be a constant attack from below as well as from above. That too is probably not reflected in the models, never mind a zillion other feedback loops, so we may have nowhere near that much time.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  December 16, 2016

        The chances of having your house burn down due to electrical fire is so infinitesimal that smoke detectors are hard wired in, yet we buy insurance against that outcome. SLR is guaranteed and still the talk is about defence. Where the only logical move is retreat. We have to stop pouring resources in to the protection of sand castles. Orderly retreat is really the sensible move now. What will happen to the economy of any country when the banks suddenly stop giving mortgages to high risk zones, which will happen immediately after insurance becomes unavailable. I fully expect the government will bail out the big companies and leave Jane and John Q public to absorb the losses just as in the housing melt down of ’08. How well with the rest of the population in any country respond to the retreat of thousands and probably more, into their territory with no job and no money? Because the monies went to the big guy’s and not the little people. This could be a tipping point that creates an internal strife which will lead down an even darker road. I’ll leave that to your imagination.

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        • Cate

           /  December 16, 2016

          Shawn, spot on. Societal collapse is the biggie. We understand the geophysical impacts of climate change (sea level rise, drought, floods, species extinctions, extreme weather, permafrost thaw, etc), but it’s the societal impact of climate change that is going to clean the clock, especially here in the privileged West— the food and water shortages, plant and animal extinctions, rampant migration/immigration, disease, breakdown of various social systems, and of course, conflict—revolution and war, on a global level. Figuring out how to work together globallly is now required, not optional, if we are to avoid human extinction.

        • Well said, and we may have caught a first glimpse with the conflict in Syria. There have been suggestions that climate change was a contributing factor, for example John Kerry:

          “I’m not telling you that the crisis in Syria was caused by climate change,” he said. “But the devastating drought clearly made a bad situation a lot worse.” (http://time.com/4077597/kerry-climate-speech/)

          There’s also a paper that assesses “a connected path running from human
          interference with climate to severe drought to agricultural collapse
          and mass human migration” (http://www.pnas.org/content/112/11/3241.full.pdf)

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  December 16, 2016

          Thanks for the link to the PANS paper Sammy very interesting analysis. We will soon be able to copy this paper for other global locales, just change the date and place names.

      • I agree. The state up until now has been one of in which inertia favors the glaciers keeping still and staying put. But now the state is starting to flip to where inertial favors glaciers melting and moving into the ocean.

        We don’t know all the mechanisms involved. But what we do know is that nature favors long periods of homeostasis and short, brief periods of rapid transition to a new homeostasis. Once you flip that switch, things can get moving rather rapidly.

        In the sciences, right now, we’re also experiencing a similar switch. The old guard of those who favor slow transitions and slow impacts is starting to give way to a new group that has begun to point toward the new, more dynamic state. This transition could take a couple of decades to complete. So we have an issue where the science is going to struggle to keep up with events. Add to that the destabilizing pressure of attacks on scientists and of climate change denial at large and it’s a very difficult environment to manage.

        Finally, I think temperature is a good threshold to look at when we are considering glacial change. And it appears that things really speed up in the temperature range of 1.5 to 2 C above 1880s. We’re approaching that bottom range now and things are starting to look quite concerning.

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        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  December 17, 2016

          The transition will occur, ‘One funeral at a time’, as paradigm shifts in science tend to do. Given the fact that the IPCC Reports have consistently under-estimated the rate and extent of climate destabilisation for twenty years or so, I fully expect these prognostications to be out by decades.

  11. It was a pretty rough month for me after the election. For just the past few days I’ve finally been feeling back to my old self, even though the daily stream of outrages continues unabated,

    Here’s the beginning of my recent essay “Requiem for the Republic” on where we sit at this dismaying point in history and how humanity has been here before, many times:

    “The clock relentlessly marked out its hours, circling round from each day’s jarring dawn to the slow darkness of another evening, then to the hours of unconscious respite and fitful dreaming amid this long bleak nightmare. For about a month after I crawled into bed at 8:00 PM on November 8 and finally got up in shock late the next morning, the dark hand was pressing down, more days than not.”

    http://blog.edsuom.com/2016/12/requiem-for-republic.html

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 16, 2016

      Thank you for that, Ed. Disturbing subject, but a good read.

      Reply
    • Thanks for this, Ed. In any case, I would add the nuance that populism isn’t the problem here. It’s more something akin to Nazism or white supremacy in some strange American admixture of fossil fuel special interest cocktail. In other words, what gave rise to Trump was not populism — or the push for equality. It was the loss of equality and the pandering to the irrational fears of some of the victimized.

      Reply
      • Hatrack

         /  December 18, 2016

        Margaret Atwood referred to the Known Fruits (which is essentially prosperity gospel) and the Petro-Baptists in the Madd Addam books, and that’s been the better part of ten years ago. And just last weekend, I saw “The Moral Case For Fossil Fuels” on the shelf at at Barnes & Noble.

        Once again, science fiction shows the way . . .

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  December 23, 2016

          Hatrack, in Australia, the denialist fanatics, in the ruling regime (a farrago of Trumpistas before Trump even crawled out of the primordial ooze)and its propaganda allies (particularly the Murdoch cancer) this garbage about coal and ‘morality’ is commonplace. It is based on the fossil fiends’ supposed care and concern for the global poor, who need, ‘clean, cheap, coal’ for power. Regretably, their every other policy, domestically and overseas, is antipathetic to the poor, who are targeted for the greatest spending cuts and the most vile, humiliating, disempowering and plain vicious policies imaginable. Policies that grow worse every year, while the rich enjoy numerous tax rorts and ‘incentives’. The startling disconnect between self-serving words and concrete actions is NEVER dared to be mentioned by the MSM reptiles, of course.

      • mark ó dochartaigh

         /  December 18, 2016

        The false populism of the tRümpenproletariat who do not desire freedom, but only desire just masters.

        Reply
  12. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 16, 2016

    I normally try to stay away from the discussion of politics in other countries, as I don’t feel I know enough about it. My attention to it is only how it may play on world economic stage without attempting to get in to deep. The following two links have a lot to say about the US situation that are very interesting to both lines of thought:

    Donald Trump, as Politico points out, is already at war with labor, and prospectively with those “failing government schools,” and the American safety net, and the environment, not to mention the planet — and that’s before we even get to actual war, which will be overseen by a crew of Islamo- and Irano-phobes. If, as Klare points out today, Trump himself has a serious case of nostalgia for the America of his youth (and mine), with its untrammeled growth and its fossil-fueled wonders, don’t think that nostalgia doesn’t reign in military affairs, too. In that case, however, it wouldn’t be for the oily vistas of the mid-twentieth century, but perhaps for the age of the Crusades. Tom

    Drowning the World in Oil
    Trump’s Carbon-Obsessed Energy Policy and the Planetary Nightmare to Come
    By Michael T. Klare

    Full article:
    http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/176222/tomgram%3A_michael_klare%2C_donald_trump%27s_energy_nostalgia_and_the_path_to_hell/#more

    and

    Donald Trump’s brazen choice of an utterly unqualified ExxonMobil pollutocrat to be his Secretary of State should kill off any comparison of him to even above-average presidents, let alone those on Mount Rushmore.
    Amazingly, former House Speaker John Boehner said last week that President-elect Donald Trump “kind of reminds me of Teddy Roosevelt.” Last year, Forbes tried to label him “the 21st century Theodore Roosevelt.” Even Vox tried to argue the case earlier this month.
    In truth, the only way Trump could possibly remind us today of the quintessential progressive is to remind us how far the GOP has drifted from its conservationist roots and how desperately we need a Teddy Roosevelt now.

    Full article:
    https://thinkprogress.org/trump-the-anti-teddy-roosevelt-753c595c1459#.ilxutl43b

    Reply
    • Trump is the anti-Roosevelt. Could anyone imagine Trump busting up oil trusts?? Give me a break. He’s 100% their absolute representative. The most Trump has in common with Roosevelt is moreso as a dark reflection. He is bizarro Roosevelt with white supremacists and science haters as supporters. He is the anti-modernity. He is the anti-civilization. The President standing against the forests and the natural wealth and the preserved heritage for future generations that Roosevelt worked so hard to endow as a public trust to our peoples.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 17, 2016

        Trump is simply the epitome of the malignant narcissism of the USA’s mostly hereditary ruling parasite caste. They have thrown up a huge number of real monsters over the years, but this is the first time one has decided to rule personally, rather than through political hirelings. I have no idea what Trump will do when his phony promises made to sucker the losers meet reality, geo-political, ecological and economic, but I doubt that it will be a pleasant experience.

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  13. Raul M

     /  December 16, 2016

    There is still some time for Obama to declare and stay in the Whitehouse. It does have the best storm shelter.

    Reply
  14. Cate

     /  December 16, 2016

    So. After the balmiest November on record in most areas, Winter with a capital W and a great big bang has arrived in the Great White North. From sea to sea, Canada is shivering in the grip of a polar outflow that has brought snowfalls more typical of January-February out here on the Far Eastern Edge. The Weather Network predicts a “classic” Canadian winter and for the Atlantic provinces, an “active” storm season with plenty of variation in wind direction and precip types, so lots of snow followed by rain followed by freezing temps again, and again, and again. Oh joy.

    https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/winter-forecast-2016-2017-temperature-precipitation-canada-classic-storms/74825/

    Reply
    • The Arctic heat pump is forcing the cold air over land. When it encounters the massive columns of warm air rising off the heated waters, the storms will tend to be more intense, more powerful than what we’ve been used to overall. The big conflict between hot and cold has begun. We know the ultimate winner. But winter will not go down without a fight.

      Reply
  15. Ryan in New England

     /  December 16, 2016

    Robert, thank you for covering the Trump disaster and all of the disastrous implications that come along with it. His appointees and agenda are an absolute worst case scenario for climate change, and anybody who may think this blog should be a place free from politics needs to recognize this. This isn’t a political discussion. It is still a conversation about climate change, it’s just more focused on the reason why our emissions won’t be making a dramatic decline anytime soon. I think the most important aspect of climate change right now that needs addressing is the incoming Trump administration. And every signal that has come from him and his team so far regarding fossil fuels/climate is terrifying and troubling in the extreme.

    So thanks again for doing such a great job writing about the most important issue facing the US and the world.

    Reply
    • If we are only quiet public servants relegated to simply and dutifully reporting climate change while not also reporting how these changes are being driven socially and politically, then we are failing our communities, our nation, our world. If we cannot clearly define why our politics is causing this — for it is. It absolutely is. Then we cannot change. So, despite the ridiculous resistance to actually looking at the truth for what it is — we must tell it. And the truth is that Trump and the people who support him are doing everything in their power to lock in a climate change disaster from which there will be no possible escape. They are enhancing the problem. They are fighting to give it more fuel. And if there are politicians out there who oppose him then we must have the intestinal fortitude to support them. To speak out on their behalf and to be willing to exist in a diverse coalition with a common goal — using every means possible to slake or halt this growing climate nightmare.

      The struggle to address climate change is absolutely political. But we didn’t make it that way. The fossil fuel industry and its backers in their insistence on an insane continuation of business as usual extraction policies and on doing everything they can to force it down our throats through loading the political deck, through promoting climate change denial, and through regulatory capture have made this in every way the absolute worst kinds of politics. Now they pander to white supremacists, people who send death threats to scientists, and people who sympathize with Nazis. Can there be any clearer signal as to who it is who is making this political? Who it is who is polluting the politics which at this time should be very clear in pushing to prevent a climate disaster through every means possible?

      I thank you, Ryan, but I also have to call BS on this whole notion that politics doesn’t matter. That it’s somehow not related to climate change. Politics — in the form of a vast malfeasance and failure of leadership gave us this problem. And there will be no way for us to rationally address it without an amazing level of clear headed and virtuous political activity to oppose those now seeking to lock in devastating and deadly harm.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 17, 2016

        Trump is the inevitable apotheosis of capitalist kakistocracy-the rule of the worst in society enabled by their money power in an economy (there is no such thing as society, as Thatcher declared)where everything, even the fate of humanity, is a commodity to be sold to the highest bidder. As long as capitalism exists it will, it must, seek to turn everything living into the dead stuff of money, and concentrate it in as few hands as possible. Those who say that it can be ‘reformed’ are, at best, mistaken.

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      • Correct, politics matters immensely. That is why the fossil guys are making their last stand with Trump and Putin.

        Reply
  16. Ryan in New England

     /  December 16, 2016

    Here is a Guardian article about the scientists in San Francisco protesting the Trump administration’s ideas for energy/climate policy, and the horrors of Trump.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-administration-anti-environment_us_58507c5ae4b0ee009eb44512

    Reply
  17. If my previous horrible experience is any indication, Trump and his new administration are at the “Global Warming isn’t happening, don’t look!” stage where they have to destroy any evidence that it is. As things become more obvious that it is they will then start looking for some way to reset everything back to the beginning. The only way I can see them being able to do that is start World War III. A nuclear war would be a simple way they could hide the effects of Global Warming, plus it would free up lots of areas for oil and mineral exploration.

    Reply
    • It seems to me that these fossil fuel folks are crazy. And they seem to have a strange love for all things destructive. I think I’m out of being shocked by their capacity to do harm. It’s not a question of if — but when and in what terrible new form.

      Reply
  18. coloradobob

     /  December 16, 2016

    British Gas’s parent company, Centrica, has given tens of thousands of dollars to a US thinktank that denies climate change and is backed by Donald Trump’s energy secretary.

    Direct Energy, a US energy company wholly owned by Centrica, donated $20,000 to the Texas Public Policy Foundation (TPPF) in 2010, according to tax filings.

    The Austin-based thinktank has rubbished climate change science, argued the Paris climate deal would “wreak havoc” in the US economy and said the idea of keeping fossil fuels in the ground was a “ridiculous construct”.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/dec/16/centrica-has-donated-to-us-climate-change-denying-thinktank

    Reply
  19. Tigertown

     /  December 16, 2016

    960 mb cyclone in the Bering Sea.

    Reply
  20. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 16, 2016

    “As far as divestment goes, I think it does two things,” Allstadt said. “One, it starts making it more expensive for the oil and gas and coal companies to finance their projects. By increasing their costs of financing, by driving down their stock prices, it starts to have some impact. It also has an impact on the Board of Directors, many of whom are not from inside the industry. When they see lots of foundations selling off the stock, they start asking questions.”
    Divestment campaigners aren’t just urging groups to divest from fossil fuels, however — they are urging those groups to take that divested money and in turn invest it in renewable energy, a strategy they are dubbing “divest/invest.” It’s what Allstadt did when he divested his shares of ExxonMobil — and what $1.2 trillion in divested assets have down worldwide, according to the Arabella report.

    https://thinkprogress.org/divestment-growth-in-the-age-of-trump-f7831db85cdd#.4f0bxwfw7

    Reply
    • This becomes a more essential way to resist Trump’s anti-climate policies and to support competition by renewables. It also casts a dark pall of immorality over the entire fossil fuel industry. Which has become a more and more apt response as time has moved forward.

      Reply
    • I think divestment is the ultimate weapon, which is why most of my tweets end with #divest. No one wants to be the last person invested in fossil fuels. The more investors divest, the more will divest, like Senator Inhofe’s snowball rolling downhill. When serious money understands that investing in fossil fuels is a dead end, the game is up.

      Reply
  21. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 16, 2016

    If we can’t burn oil, it’s not worth very much. If we can’t defend coastal real estate from rising seas (or even insure it, for that matter), it’s not worth very much. If the industrial process a company owns exposes them to future climate litigation, it’s not worth very much. The value of those assets is going to plummet, inevitably… and likely, soon.
    Currently, though, these assets are valued very highly. Oil is seen as hugely valuable, coastal real estate is seen as hugely valuable, industrial patents are seen as hugely valuable.
    When there’s a large difference between how markets think assets should be valued and what they are (or will) actually be worth, we call it a “bubble.”
    Experts now call the differences between valuations and worth in fossil fuel corporations, climate-harmful industries and vulnerable physical assets the “Carbon Bubble.” It is still growing.
    And here’s the thing about bubbles: they always pop.

    View story at Medium.com

    This one ties nicely with the above.

    If the media doesn’t stop printing things that aren’t true, they are no different than fake news sites. It is no longer tenable — if it ever was — for the Washington Post to run nonsense headlines that haven’t been fact-checked, like “Trump’s climate plan might not be so bad after all,” from long-debunked purveyors of misinformation like Bjorn Lomborg.
    It is no longer tenable for USA Today to keep running “opposing view” opinion pieces based on widely debunked misinformation alongside their “Our view” opinion pieces based on actual climate science. But they’ve already done it three times since September.

    .https://thinkprogress.org/the-war-on-science-by-trump-86418d7d0d35#.bsxb4pazb

    Reply
    • Excellent article. And it’s worth thinking a thing or two about how this is fodder for big shorts and other forms of vulture capitalism.

      Reply
  22. Seasonal weather in Souhern Arizona continues, days of 60s , some 70s, and cold nights. We had a soft rain locally and cold air about 60 degees comes Saturday and some nights in the high 30s. I am enjoyign it immensely and also have two weeks off from regular schedule of working and class work.

    Thank you again, Robert and commentators for the information here.
    Trying to keep a level spirit and head these days.
    Sheri

    Reply
    • Thanks for the report, Sheri. I’m sure it’s a welcome respite. I hope it lasts for at least a decent period of time before the next abnormal spell.

      Reply
  23. Bluesky

     /  December 16, 2016

    I think I did it right this time, if we loose 200,000 km2 antarctic sea ice on average from now on and up till new year (17 days), we may not be 50% under the record like I said yesterday, but it will be 47% lower compared to the 1981-2010 average. Down from 7,3 to 3,9.

    See a graph here,

    ?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Reply
    • Bluesky

       /  December 16, 2016

      Arhg I was wrong again, god damn! Only down by 36,37% compared to 1981-2010 average, maybe I should just watch what youre others are saying and stop comment in here 🙂 but still 36% is a big drop..

      Reply
  24. Wow. Just wow.

    Reply
  25. I have been hanging around for a few years now. This website and group of commentators is still the only way I have of keeping up with the breadth of climate and climate-related information and change in any reasonable fashion, much less a clear and balanced one. Certainly the only one musically themed. My admiration and many thanks to you all.

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  December 19, 2016

      Yes it filled a hole when climate progress bizarrely shut down all its great regular commentators. And now it’s far far better for quality discussion and links. Robert has created a great resource.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  December 23, 2016

        Nothing ‘bizarre’ about Climate Progress’s actions at all. They sold out, as Grift did to AgriBusiness and the GE Moloch. Robert, here, seems strangely incorruptible, the dear fellow.

        Reply
  26. An Urgent letter from Emma Thompson & Danny Glover

    Dear Real News viewers,

    We all have causes we care passionately about, but nothing is as urgent as the climate change crisis. According to many scientists, the very existence of human civilization is at stake.

    We believe the proposal below from The Real News Network to create a Global Climate Change Bureau deserves your attention. It is a critical link in the effort to fight for effective action to reduce and eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and transition to an equitable, environmentally sustainable economy.

    We live in momentous times. The fate of future generations is in our hands. We urge you to read the proposal and support the effort with your talents, enthusiasm, and donations.

    Please give as much as you can and share the proposal with your friends, colleagues, and family.

    We wish you a happy new year. Let’s make 2017 the year that the Global Climate Change Bureau becomes a reality so we can reach more people on this crucial issue.

    Thank you,

    Emma Thompson
    Danny Glover

    http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2940

    Reply
  27. Warm ocean water is slamming into — and melting — the biggest glacier in East Antarctica

    “Scientists at institutions in the United States and Australia on Friday published a set of unprecedented ocean observations near the largest glacier of the largest ice sheet in the world: Totten glacier, East Antarctica. And the result was a troubling confirmation of what scientists already feared — Totten is melting from below.

    The measurements, sampling ocean temperatures in seas over a kilometer (0.62 miles) deep in some places right at the edge of Totten glacier’s floating ice shelf, affirmed that warm ocean water is flowing in towards the glacier at the rate of 220,000 cubic meters per second.

    These waters, the paper asserts, are causing the ice shelf to lose between 63 and 80 billion tons of its mass to the ocean per year, and to lose about 10 meters (32 feet) of thickness annually, a reduction that has been previously noted based on satellite measurements.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/16/warm-ocean-water-is-slamming-into-and-melting-the-biggest-glacier-in-east-antarctica/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 16, 2016

      I shared your link at Cat 6 –

      Quoting 75. daddyjames
      So basically, the Totten is rotten.

      Reply
    • If that isn’t bad enough, they’ve now found some 55 so-called englacial lakes under the Roi Baudouin ice shelf in Antarctica:

      “Researchers haven’t directly linked the effect to anthropogenic climate change, but note that further warming will likely increase melting in the region. This melting could exacerbate the structural weaknesses of the Antarctic ice shelf, which was once considered rock solid, and cause large collapses. This so-called “hydrofracturing” can dump huge deposits of glacial ice into the ocean, driving up sea levels in the process.”

      http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/1213/Hidden-lakes-in-glaciers-point-to-further-Antarctic-melting

      Reply
  28. Trump, through the lens of the carbon bubble.

    Trump, Putin and the Pipelines to Nowhere

    You can’t understand what Trump’s doing to America without understanding the “Carbon Bubble”

    View story at Medium.com

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 16, 2016

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 16, 2016

        A image posting tip :
        If the link looks like this – https, drop the “s” and it will post. I noticed that a few days back on a graph someone put up.

        Reply
      • Some pretty valid points and spot-on artwork. Fox et all probably are still shocked by the monstrosity they’ve created. Those further to the right are the hackneyed flesh of the thing. Republican assault on democracy continues in NC.

        Furthermore —

        So a lot out in the media today that has provided further confirmation for the CIA report. In particular, both the FBI and the CIA have found that DNC and RNC emails were hacked. Keith raises the very valid point that RNC emails could be held as blackmail material for Trump and republicans. So yes, it does look like we have a President that is beholden to Russia and we have clear evidence that Trump is already acting in a manner that favors Russian interests vs American interests by publicly attacking the CIA and by posting Rex Tillerson, ‘Friend to Russia,’ as America’s face to the world in the form of Secretary of State. Keith’s statement that Donald Trump presents a clear threat to US democracy also cannot be taken lightly. Trump has failed to address the US press for 140 days, showing contempt for the US public and to the established free press which are inherent elements of our democracy. He has instead relegated his communications to contemptuous Tweets — his crap stream soda straw of 140 characters per each unchallenged, unquestioned utterance. CIA experts, meanwhile, have compared the Russian hacks to a political 9/11. But they may ultimately be even more damaging.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  December 17, 2016

          Well, there’s a lot of shouting in that vid, which is not to my taste, although I am clearly not of the target audience for this interesting piece, but that’s all aside. If this is true, it is truly shocking and frightening.

          Interesting to note that this article on the very same topic showed up in Macleans, “Canada’s national newsmagazine”, on the same day. The writer comes at the topic from a slightly different angle, marshalling all the evidence he can find for the theory of Trump as puppet leader in a Russian coup. Compelling, for sure, and if true, how is meddling in another country’s elections anything but a violation of that country’s sovereignty and thus an act of war?

          http://www.macleans.ca/news/world/russias-american-coup/

  29. Vic

     /  December 16, 2016

    A new study suggests that when talking to conservatives about climate change,

    “The framing should call for a return to the more desirable past, compared to an avoidance of the less desirable future,”

    https://cleantechnica.com/2016/12/15/may-talking-climate-change-wrong/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 16, 2016

      So calling them will fully ignorant is off the table ?

      Reply
      • Vic

         /  December 16, 2016

        I think I partially got through to my conservative dad not by calling him wilfully ignorant but by showing him how conservatives were being wilfully ignorant. It took a few years of chip, chip, chipping away though. Could be he put those solar panels on his roof just to try and shut me up.

        Reply
      • some conservatives are willfully ignorant but the suggestion of this study is that we might find a first agreement and start breaking willful ignorance if we talk about how things used to be better than they are now. I have tried just telling them to smarten up and that approach does not seem to work. I guess we could mix it up and go with: I think you are as dumb as a box of rocks and rocks used to be smarter than they are now. go for it!

        Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  December 16, 2016

    Another article about just how much money is being spent in South Fla. to buy some very expensive brooms to sweep the ocean back –

    Trump Rejects Climate Change, but Mar-a-Lago Could Be Lost to the Sea
    Floridians in Palm Beach spend millions to deal with rising seas.

    Donald Trump shelled out $409,759 for property taxes in 2016 on Mar-a-Lago, his oceanfront club above billionaire’s row in Palm Beach, Fla. Some of those tax dollars will go toward combating the ravages of climate change, a phenomenon the president-elect has dismissed as a hoax. Trump tweeted in 2012 that “the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese” to make U.S. industry less competitive. ………………………….. That’s not stopping officials in Palm Beach from preparing to deal with its effects. This year, the town overhauled 12 pumping stations to push storm runoff up a huge pipe to the Intracoastal Waterway under a 20-year, $120 million infrastructure plan to deal with increased rainfall and street flooding, among other issues. Palm Beach’s system can now suck up almost 1 million gallons of runoff a minute. “I just deal with the reality that sea levels are rising,” says Palm Beach Town Manager Thomas Bradford. “I don’t want to rile people up about it.”

    Link

    Reply
  31. JPL

     /  December 17, 2016

    Hey CB,

    It’s Friday night. Wanna grab the 3rd rail for a minute?

    Best,
    John

    Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    This runs for ever –

    This is us how we still see our selves

    All Summer Long- Beach Boys

    Reply
  33. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Don’t Worry Baby

    Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Trust me , the Trump vote thinks we are going back to that Beach Boys world. That is over 50 years ago. Boy are they in for a shock.

    Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Reply
  36. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Funny how old songs these are , well they carry an modern message.

    Reply
  37. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Now, back to the rape of the Earth. in real time .

    Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    One more song
    Jefferson Airplane – Volunteers (with Lyric)

    Reply
  39. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    We are Volunteers of America.

    Funny how old that is, and how new it seems.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 17, 2016

      I remember Mississippi Burning. How can we focus the young now is a real problem. But if we can , well game over. Just like back then.

      Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    I am old. …….. toothless, hairless, and helpless. but my mind runs on like a fine Swiss watch . Missing it’s minute hand.
    On Antiques Roadshow, I’m worth about 39 bucks.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 17, 2016

      And I’m a certified Texas jackass. Which drops that watch to 24 bucks,

      Reply
  41. coloradobob

     /  December 17, 2016

    Did this make anyone smile ?
    I’ll need detailed numbers in the morning.

    I’m really trying to make people smile, while the monster eats their ass.

    Reply
    • Yes 😀 scribblers rule, ok!!! wish we/you really did…

      thank you x10

      too much 😦 4 me lately – my 6 yr relationship ended tue (AGW strikes again)

      Reply
    • Cate

       /  December 17, 2016

      cb, as we say on the Rock, I dies at you! 😀

      Reply
  42. Thanks for the tunes Bob. Trump’s trying to get us back to Beach Boys utopia, but we’re getting him as #NotMyPresident for a Hunger Games world b/c big daddy oil pushed driving the T-Bird for far too long.

    Reply
  43. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 17, 2016

    The U.S. solar industry just experienced a quarter of record-breaking growth, with 4,143 megawatts (or million watts) of solar capacity added between July and September. That’s a 99 percent increase over the previous quarter, and a 191 percent increase over the same time period last year…..

    “We do not anticipate the Trump presidency impacting negatively or positively the growth of solar,” Kimbis told the Washington Post. “In fact, we think that no matter who’s in the White House, the solar industry is going to continue to grow tremendously.”

    https://thinkprogress.org/solar-third-quarter-growth-fe41b8358936#.hv0ni0eic

    Reply
  44. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 17, 2016

    Westerners too often regard pollution in Asia as a far-flung curiosity — a tragedy to be pitied from a safe distance.
    But when someone throws a dirty plastic spoon into the Java Sea, it doesn’t just float in place. Currents can carry it around the world and back in just 25 years.
    All the while, it’s disintegrating into toxic crumbs. The ocean and its creatures are now awash in chemicals oozed by plastic — and it’s seeping into human bodies from Bali to Boston.

    “Have you checked your son’s sperm count lately?”
    That’s how Ebbesmeyer, the oceanographer, will sometimes greet audience members who come to hear his lectures on ocean debris.
    “If you want to see how fast you can stop a conversation, try talking about sperm counts,” he says. “That’ll do it.”
    Awkward, perhaps, but not nearly as unpleasant as the fall of humanity.
    Studies indicate that, in the last 50 to 70 years, human sperm has grown less potent. One of the more comprehensive studies, conducted in France, shows sperm counts plummeting by 30 percent in less than two decades — and it’s continuing to drop.

    https://gpinvestigations.pri.org/climate-change-meet-your-apocalyptic-twin-oceans-poisoned-by-plastic-51102a73a4f7#.rabvnyqu0

    Reply
  45. Reblogged this on uddeer and commented:
    Trump wants to know who at the Energy Dept worked on climate change –Hmmm–.

    Reply
  46. wharf rat

     /  December 17, 2016

    “To hold warming to 2 degrees, he says, we need to improve energy efficiency by 2 percent a year. Every year, in other words, the amount of energy we would need to achieve a given task—cooling a house, driving to the grocery store, washing our clothes—needs to drop by 2 percent. The world currently averages an energy improvement rate of about 1 percent a year, said Kammen. That’s not enough, clearly. But California improved energy efficiency at a rate of 4 percent a year for an entire decade, Kammen stresses. And China achieved a rate of 5 percent over a similar time frame. It’s doable—if governments are determined to lead. But it would help—a lot—if markets were structured to encourage the trend.”

    =

    Matter of Degrees: How Hot It Gets Still Depends on Us

    By Andrew Leonard

    http://alumni.berkeley.edu/california-magazine/winter-2016-reality-bites/matter-degrees-how-hot-it-gets-still-depends-us

    Reply
  47. Cate

     /  December 17, 2016

    My generation remembers the Cuban missile crisis, the fallout shelter instructions mailed to every household. Then came the JFK assassination, Vietnam, Birmingham, MLK, RFK….. We grew up standing on that brink.

    Reply
    • Mark in OZ

       /  December 18, 2016

      Is the truth Cate and if there’s anything I learned, it was not being afraid to stand up and push back against the ‘system’ ( as it was called back then) and show real resistance.

      Looking back, that willingness to make a stand was taught by example from those in the old neighbourhood who learned it from the above generation and so on. It’s a lot more than a gesture to reveal one’s position; it’s a requirement considering the stakes, and an obligation to those that stood before us.

      Too many remain confused by powerful denier campaigns that soothe their very real fears but their alarm remains- the sense of deceit cannot be entirely covered. Sincerity and resolve and their accompanying force of ‘hope’ are very powerful messages and a true enemy of the manipulators.

      Reply
  48. coloradobob

     /  December 18, 2016

    ExxonMobil helped defeat Russia sanctions bill
    The company’s formidable lobbying operation cleared the way for outgoing CEO Rex Tillerson to help restore a program worth billions of dollars as secretary of state.
    ExxonMobil successfully lobbied against a bill that would have made it harder for the next president to lift sanctions against Russia, clearing the way for the oil giant to restart a program worth billions of dollars if Donald Trump eases those restrictions as president.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/12/exxon-mobile-russia-sanctions-rex-tillerson-232770

    Reply
  49. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 18, 2016

    The aligning interests between Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russia’s choice for U.S. president (Donald Trump), and Big Oil represents the gravest threat to humanity (and democracy) since the rise of the Axis powers in the 1930s.

    https://thinkprogress.org/trump-putin-and-exxonmobil-team-up-to-destroy-the-planet-fb88650acfa1#.6s4zen4o3

    Reply
  50. utoutback

     /  December 18, 2016

    Here is why DT’s energy policies will be a disaster for both the planet and the FF industry. From Mother Jones:
    “Trump’s plan will undoubtedly prove to be an enigma wrapped in a conundrum inside a rolling set of contradictions.”

    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/12/oil-donald-trump-climate-change-EPA-rex-tillerson

    Reply
  51. cushngtree

     /  December 18, 2016

    SNL’s HRC skit to an elector. (hope this works)

    Reply
  52. Bluesky

     /  December 18, 2016

    ‘Like watching a train wreck’: Blogger quits writing about climate change.

    When Neven Curlin began his Arctic Sea Ice blog in 2010, it was a labour of love. Though he isn’t a scientist, as an environmentalist he had a natural interest in the state of Arctic sea ice and how it was being affected by global warming.

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-december-15-2016-1.3896671/like-watching-a-train-wreck-blogger-quits-writing-about-climate-change-1.3898022

    Reply
    • utoutback

       /  December 18, 2016

      This is a serious loss. Yet, I completely understand. There are times I swear I will just eliminate all bookmarks on my computer related to CC because it is just too depressing – particularly with the new US administration. But….. Knowledge is power. I hope we can continue to be a resource in the ongoing fight to save our civilization and the many species that are now threatened.
      If I see one more picture of starving polar bears (as I did today in the NYT) I’m going to scream. To be Swiftian about it, the way to save the bears is to feed them climate deniers.

      Reply
  53. New Sea-Level Rise Projection Raises Threat to World’s Coasts

    Nicholls said such considerations as the deterioration of dikes will drastically change the sea-level rise prediction. A side-by-side comparison with the traditional model showed that the new systematic model determined there could be much wider, and more devastating flooding.

    “You can see that it’s a rather different picture from the bathtub model, the area could easily be flooded so much more,” Nicholls said. “This is just one realization of what might happen, there are a lot of different pathways. But the point is that you’re getting a much richer, more detailed picture of what might happen.”

    http://www.livescience.com/57216-sea-level-rise-projections-threaten-coasts.html

    Reply
  54. Cate

     /  December 18, 2016

    Food. Climate change will come home to our dinner tables in many ways. Food will not only become more expensive, certain foods will become scarcer or will disappear from store shelves. Supply may become unstable as extremes of weather bite key food production areas. Lifestyles will be transformed: we will spend a greater proportion of our income on food and more time preparing it, as we go back to cooking from scratch in our own kitchens. Many are already doing this of course –some of us have been doing it all our lives—, but many more may be obliged, willy-nilly, to give up the ready meals, fast food, and dining-out habits.

    On a global scale, the UNEP urges all countries to formulate a strategic response to this mounting issue.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/The-Bite/2016/1217/How-climate-change-could-affect-food-prices

    Reply
  55. I have read through most of this wonderfully intelligent discourse, and have to say how much I value everything that everyone has said here . You guys give me hope! For the last 15 years or so I’ve been doing my best to live sustainably as I can, because the writing has been on the wall for quite some time. I have grease and dirt under my fingernails because I’m tackling living sustainably head-on. If you’re curious to see what I’ve been doing here’s the link:
    http://www.arttec.net/SustainableLiving/index.html

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      Guy Marsden

      Welcome , I ‘ve not read your link yet. But I am one of the darkest thinkers here. So being old ……….
      I place a lot thought on light these days, And your kind words are truly light.
      When I was very young I worked in the “Whole Earth Access Company” store . At 940 Pearl St. in Boulder. That would be 48 years ago, To say we were head of the curve would be serious understatement. But we helped to found what Boulder is today, so there’s that. And I did get to see Bucky Fuller before he died.

      So I understand where your’s, Seal’s, and so many others , efforts to bend the curve come from. There’s more in this army than we know. Scattered all over the world. And each of our pup tents has an effect on the people around us.

      Once again welcome , now to your link.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  December 19, 2016

      Amazing and full of good ideas – many thanks!

      Reply
  56. Cate

     /  December 18, 2016

    in the Arctic today: the daily mean temp above 80N is still levitating well above the historical average.

    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

    Reply
  57. coloradobob

     /  December 18, 2016

    Climate Change is Strongly Linked to Increased Conflict

    Warmer temperatures translate to an uptick in violence. A 2013 review paper published in Science examined 60 papers across various disciplines that correlated extreme weather with violence. The trend was remarkably consistent: More heat equals more conflict. “It was striking for us to read about everything from Hindu-Muslim riots in India, to land invasions in Brazil, to crime in Australia, to civil war in Africa, domestic violence in the U.S.,” lead author Edward Miguel tells Inverse. “Nearly all of them showed this relationship where higher temperature was associated with more violence.”

    https://www.inverse.com/article/25318-aleppo-syria-conflict-climate-change

    Reply
  58. coloradobob

     /  December 18, 2016

    Climate change denier who says no one can explain global warming gets completely schooled by someone explaining it

    The key point in this whole exchange is this comment –
    Wait for it …………..
    Lorrie Goldstein, who writes for the daily tabloid the Toronto Sun in Canada, thought it would be a wise move to challenge the science behind climate change and global warming on Twitter of all places.

    In a tweet posted last week, Goldstein said: “Next time a Social Justice Warrior tells you “science is settled” on global warming, ask them to explain the science. Then watch the fun.”
    Holiday Li’l Tree does, blow by blow. And then she add’s this :

    Holiday Li’l Tree🌭☃ ✔ @karengeier
    .@sunlorrie there you go, you colossal donut.
    9:43 AM – 10 Dec 2016
    Holiday Li’l Tree🌭☃ ✔ @karengeier
    .@sunlorrie I mean, I’d tell you to read, but you’re the editor of a paper designed for illiterates

    Link

    Made my day.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      you colossal donut
      Like the writer on the link above , I just love it’s pityness ?

      I plan to use this going forward, on various other threads .

      Reply
      • islandraider

         /  December 19, 2016

        I’m kinda partial to the:

        “Keep digging in that pile of manure… you’ll find that pony!”

        A friend of mine uses that one sometimes when dealing with liars online!

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  December 19, 2016

          “Keep digging in that pile of manure… you’ll find that pony!”

          It never failed when confronting stupid.

    • Agreed, excellent stuff.

      Reply
  59. Matt

     /  December 19, 2016

    OT, some good news????

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-19/india's-plan-to-step-away-from-coal-casts-doubt-on-adani-mine/8131240

    “When the then Minister for Resources Josh Frydenberg approved the Adani mine in north Queensland 14 months ago, he argued it had to go ahead because India desperately needed it for energy.

    “I think there is a strong moral case here, it will help lift hundreds and millions of people out of energy poverty, not just in India but right across the world,” Mr Frydenberg said.

    Mr Buckley said the International Energy Agency (IEA) had forecast that hundreds of gigawatts of new coal-fired power plants would be built in India in the next few decades.

    “The Indian Energy Ministry is saying that is absolutely wrong,” he said.

    “He instead articulates a plan that involves building 215 gigawatts of renewable energy, building another 20 gigawatts of hydro, building five gigawatts of nuclear, building a bit more gas, and dramatically elevating the importance of energy efficiency and grid efficiency in order to diversify India rapidly away from coal.””

    Reply
  60. Vic

     /  December 19, 2016

    This snippet comes from an article published about a month ago,

    “National Geographic’s “Before the Flood,” produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, has reached more than 60 million people worldwide and surpassed a record-setting one billion minutes viewed across linear, digital, streaming and social platforms — making it arguably one of the most watched documentaries in history and the most watched NatGeo film ever.”

    http://www.indiewire.com/2016/11/before-the-flood-climate-change-documentary-record-60-million-views-1201747088/

    Too bad we’ll probably never know what the total number of downloads was as National Geographic have since placed it behind a paywall and deleted the original free version.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      Well I watched the numbers for a few days , and it did very very well . And it was not Al Gore with a lazer pointer. It was Leo at the end of the ice , hearing narwhals call to each other.

      And like all cats in a bag. You put it on the net , there gone.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  December 19, 2016

      That’s our Rupert. Sorry, I mean, ‘That’s your Rupert’. ‘Living’ proof of the existence of the Devil.

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      I see this on all the treads now that I look at. A Climate article is posted the colossal donuts show up in force in the comments. They are on the march. With the same old chants, “One World Government”, “It’s Cycles”, “Greedy Scientists”. and the always popular ……” Liberal retards”.
      They really believe coal mining is coming back to West Virginia.

      I keep thinking of the Harness Makers in 1895. Tens of thousands took care of horses. Horse shit was about to over take Manhattan. Just getting the feed into the city was a real problem.

      We’re at same point . Where the old world you grew up with is about to be eaten by the future.

      Reply
  61. June

     /  December 19, 2016

    This is a hopeful sign.

    If Trump Cuts Funding For Climate Science, Wealthy Donors Will Spend Billions, Says US Science Academy Chief

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/peteraldhous/science-has-wealthy-friends?utm_term=.oazpy92x6#.bk1lXa0Ap

    Reply
  62. coloradobob

     /  December 19, 2016

    We’re at same point . Where the old world you grew up with is about to be eaten by the future.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      Coal mining ain’t coming back to West Virginia. I’d put wind farms on all those flat mountain tops , with fields of solar panels under them.

      No one ever died because a solar panel exploded , and trapped 86 miners under ground. No one ever died , because a solar panel melted into the Earth. And poisoned the Pacific Ocean for as long as we can see.

      Bend the curve.
      Bend the curve.
      Bend the curve.

      Reply
  63. coloradobob

     /  December 19, 2016

    I am the resident jackass here. But I am not a fool . I’m a crazy old man.

    Bend the curve.
    Bend the curve.
    Bend the curve.

    Reply
  64. coloradobob

     /  December 19, 2016

    Garth Brooks 4th from the right played with the Call. After the Band broke up ………..

    Garth never quit.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      Left not right , 4th from the Left So sorry , right and left seem to be flying away.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 19, 2016

        Garth lied to to his parents to join the Band. Then they released Music From Big Pink.

        And he was front and center with Chest Fever. This is him front and center.

        Reply
  65. Genomik

     /  December 19, 2016

    Many of you will know this already but it’s a great article looking forward at the confluence of CC and the fossil fuel carbon bubble. He says if we get off carbon soon we can have a smooth landing regarding economic consequences of an exploding carbon bubble.

    However, between trump and Putin we stand to double down on a catastrophic exploding carbon bubble with trillions of dollars in losses.

    It’s a nice concise article giving an economic argument that might resonate with readers. I’ll send this one around a bit.

    Seems like author is a Futurist which is good because they need to be here more. They can’t just celebrate AI, robots and cool tech and call themselves futurists if they leave CC alone.

    View story at Medium.com

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 19, 2016

      This why I drink, and post hope. . And post Hell in a Bucket.

      We are an army of weenie fairies. They are the most powerful force the planet has ever seen. They make the Roman Empire look like walk in the park. And they have won .

      Make no mistake it’s that bad.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 19, 2016

        For Putin , Trump, and Tillerson life is good. The rest of us, more Hell Comes to Breakfast.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  December 19, 2016

          Buckle your chin straps, make sure your seat back trays are in their up right and locked positions , do not inflate your flotation device before exiting the cabin.

        • coloradobob

           /  December 19, 2016

          Bend over and kiss your world good bye.

  66. Vic

     /  December 19, 2016

    Days of torrential rain have caused severe flooding and landslides in parts of Fiji. Riverine flooding is expected to worsen in the coming days. The damage bill is expected to run into the hundreds of millions of dollars, adding to the bill of $1.3 billion, left by the category five Cyclone Winston which hit the archipelago in February.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-19/days-of-torrential-rain-causes-severe-flooding-in-parts-of-fiji/813184

    Reply
  67. Vic

     /  December 19, 2016

    The Water Chapters – Trailer – By Gideon Mendel

    Reply
  68. Ryan in New England

     /  December 19, 2016

    I just had the morning news on and they’re making a big deal out of this particular batch of cold air that has spilled down from the Arctic. One sentence caught my ear because of how stupid it sounded (to me). The newscaster reading the script about the cold made it sound shocking that “dozens of record cold temperatures were recorded across parts of the midwest!” Wow, I thought. Dozens of cold records? lol That’s NOTHING! What about the thousands of record highs last month!? What about the 48:1 ratio last month of record highs to lows? What about the fact that this cold still hasn’t caused us to see more record lows than highs? It made me think of a recent blog post by Jeff Masters.

    “Still more record highs than lows for December thus far
    Largely because winter warmth is a welcome arrival to many, record highs in winter don’t grab the same attention as record lows. This week has already seen quite balmy conditions across the Gulf Coast and Southeast, and the region will see a brief recovery in temperatures over the weekend in between cold blasts. Monday’s high of 81°F was the warmest December day on record in Galveston, TX, in data going back to 1873. On the national scale, this warmth has actually been more exceptional than the cold observed further north. According to preliminary data from NOAA, the first few days of December (Dec. 1 – 12) saw 104 daily record highs in the U.S., but only 67 daily record lows. That ratio will tighten or even flip over the next few days, but don’t expect anything as out-of-whack as the 48-to-1 ratio of U.S. daily record highs to lows that occurred in November.”

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/nonhistoric-highawareness-winter-weather-grips-us

    I still can’t believe we saw a 48:1 high/low ratio last month. I remember the late Winter/early Spring heat wave of 2012 we saw something like an 11:1 ratio and I recall everyone being shocked by it, and using it as a bright shining example of what we expect from a clearly warming climate. But 48:1!? That’s just nuts!!

    Reply
  69. Spike

     /  December 19, 2016

    Relevant to your recent Sudan article Robert. “Only a few children make the two-hour walk from Siraj Alnour – home to about 220 families – to a village that has a school. The scorching temperatures so exhaust and dizzy the children that they often have to be put to bed after school. Others are told to play only in the sparse patches of shade offered by thorn trees”

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/dec/19/sudan-faremers-battle-climate-change-hunger-desertification

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  December 19, 2016

      Was just reading this article myself. Another “breadbasket” of the world (Sudan’s eastern state of Gedaref, nicknamed “the granary” for its vast rows of sesame, sorghum and millet) where it is becoming ever more difficult to grow crops. Expanding deserts, rainfall becoming more intense and increasingly erratic with long dry periods interrupted by intense downpours that wash away topsoil rather than filter down into the ground, more intense heat and associated evaporation, along with deforestation and increasing human populations.

      Reply
      • Spike

         /  December 19, 2016

        More on Africa here. “In 2050, when the population of Africa is two and a half times larger than now, the continent will scarcely be able to grow enough food for its own population. Even if much higher yields are achieved on all current cropland, further expansion into uncultivated areas is likely and very risky due to biodiversity loss and increased greenhouse gas emissions.”

        http://www.wur.nl/en/newsarticle/Can-Africa-feed-itself.htm

        Reply
  70. Ryan in New England

     /  December 19, 2016

    Joe Romm on why Rex Tillerson is the worst possible candidate for Secretary of State if we want any chance of a livable climate. It’s also known thanks to a leak that Tillerson is the one who is in control of a Russian/US oil company based in the Bahamas.

    1 The lies of ExxonMobil are unique in the annals of climate and corporate history (see here and below).
    2 ExxonMobil is the only major fossil fuel company whose future is inextricably tied to Putin, to ending sanctions on Russia that “put Exxon at risk” (to quote the Wall Street Journal), and to continued, warming-driven melt of Arctic ice.
    3 Tillerson personally negotiated with Putin a monster $500 billion deal for Arctic drilling that was “expected to change the historical trajectory of Russia,” before sanctions killed the deal. His rise as Exxon’s ‘Russia czar’ coincides with Putin’s own rise as the leader of Russia. Tillerson is so wedded to Putin, the Guardian just reported, that he “is the long-time director of a US-Russian oil firm based in the tax haven of the Bahamas”!

    https://thinkprogress.org/exxon-ceo-trump-worst-nominee-for-climate-40c00f67ccfe#.amf8ralgq

    Reply
  71. Cate

     /  December 19, 2016

    ME:
    Dr Hayhoe, Dr Thomas Crowther headed up a study at Yale Climate and Energy Institute, just published in Nature, on carbon in soil locking in 1C of warming to 2050. I would be interested in hearing your thoughts on the implications of that study. Thank you.

    KATHERINE HAYHOE:
    I am co-authoring a follow-up study that uses physical modeling rather than a statistical regression model to estimate soil carbon emissions. I’ll post here when it is accepted!

    —on her FB page. 🙂

    Reply
  72. wharf rat

     /  December 19, 2016

    Lamp From Micro Algae That Destroys The Carbon Dioxide From The Air (VIDEO)

    Car exhaust contribute 25% to the annual emissions of carbon dioxide. French biochemist Pierre Calleja, who 20 years working with microalgae, designed fascinating ecological lamp that can illuminate streets and parking lots while it cleans the air of carbon dioxide.

    The lamp works without power requirements, and even without solar energy, and it powered by green algae that glow. The lamp uses energy produced by the algae during the process of photosynthesis, while algae feed on carbon dioxide from the air outside.

    http://planetscitech.com/lamp-against-carbon-dioxide/

    Reply
  73. Cate

     /  December 19, 2016

    What surprises lurk within the climate system?

    New article by Katherine Hayhoe and Robert Kopp.

    Dr Hayhoe introduces the article on her FB page. Note her last sentence here:

    “By digging up and burning massive amounts of carbon that would otherwise remain locked underground, we are conducting an unprecedented experiment with our planet.
    For generations, our civilization has been building a climate debt, borrowing from the stability of the future to power the economic growth of the present: and this debt is now coming due.
    Inhabitants of Arctic villages and low-lying coastal areas will soon become the world’s first climate refugees; for many of them, it is too late to preserve their homelands. For many more of us, the time to act is now—because the further and the faster the Earth’s climate system is pushed, the greater the risk of surprise.
    My latest article with Bob Kopp lays out what these surprises might look like in stark terms. I usually try to be hopeful: but when I look at the science of what’s happening to our planet, it’s hard.”

    This link contains a PDF to the article.

    http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/12/120202/meta

    Reply
  74. Arctic ice melt ‘already affecting weather patterns where you live right now’

    “A couple of years ago this was the main criticism on any such links, that the physics was not well understood,” he said. “But the big question [now] is, how important are these mechanisms?”

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/dec/19/arctic-ice-melt-already-affecting-weather-patterns-where-you-live-right-now

    Reply

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