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Honoring the Spirit of the Wind — A Farewell to Fellow Climate Scribbler David T. Lange II

Over the following days everything in PDX dried out — the air, trees, soil. There was a snapping sensation as all moisture was expelled. Like … second crack (coffee roasting). I felt it. It smelled acrid… It’s no wonder the Pacific Northwest is burning in explosive wildfires.David T. Lange in his description of impacts caused by the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge during 2015.

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To say that climate change is a crisis intertwined with a vast, burning-driven damage to human, plant, and animal bodies caused by particulate air pollution and its related 7 million annual (human) deaths is the very epitome of understatement. No-one knew this better than my good friend and fellow scribbler David T Lange.

wildfire-smoke-portland-oregon-2015-dt-lange-under-the-dome

(David T Lange took this photo from beneath the hot dome of the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge during the summer of 2015. At the time, wildfire smoke from blazes sparking off in nearby forests ranging from British Columbia and down into Washington, Oregon and California had painted the sky a pasty pink and gray. In posts to this blog, David often described the air quality due to anomalous wildfires, stifling heat, and local air pollution as acrid and choking. Image source: DT Lange 2.)

On November 9, 2016 this sensitive and perceptive soul passed away suddenly due to cardiac arrest and organ failure. To members of this blog, David’s loss was conspicuous. Up until the point of his jarring absence in late October, he had posted over 9,200 comments during his two-and-a-half year period as a contributing member.

David’s blog handle was Wind Spirit Keeper. But I think of him more as a benevolent spirit surfing the spectral winds of the internet. One who provided a seemingly endless stream of helpful information and discussion. The value of his thoughts and research to this community could well be described as immeasurable. And I did my best to highlight his concerns in the over 250 blog posts in which he received a citation for his valued thoughts and contributions. It is an understatement when I say that he will be sorely, sorely missed.

A Concerned, Sensitive Soul Suffering From a Lung Condition and Breathing Acrid Fumes Beneath the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge

David (known affectionately as DT to his fellow scribblers) suffered from lung problems for years and had often said that his movement to Oregon was a quest for cleaner air. But during 2014 and 2015 a western drought featuring unprecedented tree deaths and associated with an odd climate change related Jet Stream feature called the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge (RRR) generated powerful heat domes and sparked numerous wildfires that conspired with already prevalent local emissions to take that coveted Oregon clean air away.

In one of DT’s first comments here (on April 29 of 2014), he noted:

The ‘interesting’ weather will commence here in Portland on Wednesday and Thursday with highs in the upper 80s… As I write, the whole western sky is half dome of gauzy Mylar haze that is likely from the fires and dust storms in Siberia and China — plus whatever is added the atmosphere in the Northwest.

Later that summer, the heat and dryness would spark an odd outbreak of wildfires throughout the Pacific Northwest (see image below). An event that validated DT’s concerns along with those of many fellow bloggers, commenters, weather/climate observers and scientists.

massive-fire-complexes-in-washington-oregon-and-bc

(Large wildfire complexes burning throughout Washington and Oregon during July of 2014. The extreme warmth and drought sparked fires on land — harming air quality. Meanwhile, the heat produced algae blooms, worsened low oxygen ocean environments, and greatly contributed to mortality among sea life in waters ranging from California to Alaska. Image source: LANCE MODIS/RS Files.)

The 2012 to 2015 RRR event appeared odd to DT. And like many climate researchers, he suspected that the RRR was induced by global warming. More to the point, I think the effects related to the RRR scared him on a visceral level. He could, after all, feel the damage being done to his sensitive and weakened lungs far more keenly than a healthier person would.

An Imperiled Life Reaching Out to Help Others

The above is just a small snap-shot of the various prophetic worries DT gave firm if wise voice to here. Others included the related death of trees due to a fossil fuel burning linked ozone pollution, the spurring of low oxygen dead zones in the ocean caused by combined warming and nutrient seeding, how polar amplification could be driving weather extremes in the middle latitudes, and the overall failure by the global community to move as strongly as possible to deal with the combined problems of pollution and climate change were the constant underlying themes of his work and expression.

david-lange

(David Lange was born in 1948 on December 30th and passed away on November 9 of 2016. He was a passionate and insightful climate observer and an articulate writer. A fellow surfer, David [known here as DT] possessed an intuitive understanding of the natural world. It could be better said that he lived his life ‘in the zone.’ We scribblers here will sorely miss his wit, candor and kindness. A bright light has been extinguished and the world is now the darker for his loss. Image source: David T Lange II.)

To my eye, DT’s passion for posting such thoughts was driven by compassion and concern related to his own life experience. Compassion for those who, like him, suffered from lung ailments that were likely worsened by particulate pollution. Concern that under climate change — the heat, the worsening wildfires, the loss of trees and the ramping up of environmental toxins would add to human emissions to substantially worsen today’s already lethal air quality problems.

It is difficult for me to express with words how selfless, noble and valuable such a form of expression is. A lesser voice would have collapsed — choked by a dwindling circle of fear and isolation as the ability to breathe waned. Instead, DT used his last years to speak out. To lift his voice not only in a cry for help, but to use the shout-out in most noble way imaginable — speaking up to help others. To send the very clear signal that all was not right — not just with his own lungs, but with the still living but now struggling atmospheric lungs of our world. The ones we all rely on.

That, I think, was the message he was sending us. And he used his final efforts and last breaths to do it. It was a gift beyond measure. The precious wisdom of his final words and actions given to us. Ones we will ever-after honor and treasure.

Links:

David T Lange 2

LANCE MODIS/RS Files

The Ridiculously Resilient Ridge

When April is the New July

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

Hat tip to Cate

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132 Comments

  1. Andy_in_SD

     /  January 9, 2017

    Going to miss DT, rest well.

    Thanks for sharing this Robert.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind thoughts, Andy. Had trouble keeping it together while writing this one. It’s tough for me to describe how much I’m going to miss DT. How much I appreciate all his help and how deeply I feel his loss.

      Reply
  2. A real shame and great loss both to this blog and to the rest of us he leaves behind. Thanks Robert.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind thoughts, DD.

      I’m going to go ahead and leave this forum open to anyone who wishes to post a memory of DT. I think there’s so many great things we could remember and share.

      Reply
  3. Cate

     /  January 9, 2017

    Beautiful, Robert. Tears now. Thank you for such a moving tribute. Somewhere, I know, he’s grinning and quietly sending you a high-five.

    Reply
    • That means a lot coming from you, Cate. Could totally see him sending along the high five. That and posting this shot of 40 foot waves in an associated very extreme storm off the UK right now.

      Reply
  4. Witchee

     /  January 9, 2017

    He was the first person I encountered who saw the skies as I did, and was troubled by them, too. (Where are the skies of yesteryear?) So often we struggle to find words to express what we see, and how we feel, and what really matters. His was a voice that will be missed.

    Reply
    • He certainly was a sky-gazer. Had an amazing capacity for linking what’s happening locally to the overall global dynamic. If you look up, you’re viewing a window of the global circulation pattern. DT knew this intuitively.

      Reply
  5. Suzanne

     /  January 9, 2017

    Well done Robert. Thank you. We needed this homage to DTL.. a true CC warrior. I miss him.

    Reply
    • Yeah. I hear you, Suzanne. It’s important to pause and reflect on what gives us meaning here. DT was a vital part of what made us who we are.

      Reply
  6. utoutback

     /  January 9, 2017

    dtl lives in this blog and the legacy he has left.
    Gone, gone.
    Beyond, beyond.
    RIP

    Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  January 9, 2017

      Before I saw your post I had thought of the mantra of prajnaparamita from the Heart Sutra in connection with DT. “Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate Bodhi Svaha” translated “Gone Gone Gone beyond Utterly Gone Beyond. Awakenment Hail!” I think it sums him up beautifully, as he had let go of all preconceptions, and saw and spoke the truth of our situation.

      Reply
  7. Shawn Redmond

     /  January 9, 2017

    A fine and fitting post Robert.

    Reply
  8. climatehawk1

     /  January 9, 2017

    Well done, Robert. Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  9. eleggua

     /  January 9, 2017

    Thank you, Robert, for this beautiful elegy to David.
    He did his best to balance the dark with light, and that’s well reflected in your post.
    He is dearly missed here, too.

    “I’m a bit of a Colorado Okie. My name at birth was David Lang. My mother was 16 and unwed. I am the product of a weekend fling with a Paul Lang who I never met. A few years later my mom married a man who adopted me and I got his last name.
    When I was 35 I changed my name back to my original (almost). I added the ‘e’ to Lang out deference to Dorothea because of the empathy of her photography on many subjects including Manzanar (Which I also have a connection with — as well as photography.)”
    – David T. Lange, March 2, 2015

    Reply
  10. eleggua

     /  January 9, 2017

    Thank you, Robert, for this beautiful elegy to David.
    He did his best to balance the dark with light, well reflected in your post.
    He is dearly missed here, too.

    “I’m a bit of a Colorado Okie. My name at birth was David Lang. My mother was 16 and unwed. I am the product of a weekend fling with a Paul Lang who I never met. A few years later my mom married a man who adopted me and I got his last name.
    When I was 35 I changed my name back to my original (almost). I added the ‘e’ to Lang out deference to Dorothea because of the empathy of her photography on many subjects including Manzanar (Which I also have a connection with — as well as photography.)”
    – David T. Lange, March 2, 2015

    Reply
  11. Ailsa

     /  January 9, 2017

    Thank you Robert.

    Thank you DT.

    Reply
  12. Ryan in New England

     /  January 9, 2017

    Beautifully written, Robert. Thank you so much for this post, I think all of us that had come to know DT really needed it. Up until I learned of his passing I had assumed we would all see his posts return in time…I believe in his last post he said he was “on the mend”. I really am heartbroken to lose such a kind and wise soul as DT. 😥

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  January 9, 2017

      I tried to make a frown face with tear emoji, but apparently I did it wrong :.(

      Reply
    • I think you got it right, Ryan. Showing up just fine here.

      He did say he was on the mend and communicated the same to me on Twitter. One reason why this was so much of a shock for me. I think he wanted to return but had reached a hard limit. We are left to carry his torch now.

      Reply
  13. Greg

     /  January 9, 2017

    Good to see you back Robert. David would find this more than fitting. A tribute he is worthy of. I no longer see the sky or the trees the same since I began to digest and internalize his wisdom. Unfortunately, the skies are hazier and the trees are more and more worrisome when Inlook at them now. They seem to topple so easily from winds and rains. He would have noted the loss this weekend of the very large and famous Sequoia that you could drive through.

    Reply
  14. JPL

     /  January 9, 2017

    I enjoyed engaging with DT on the blog here. It was great to have a sharp guy a few hours south of me here in the Pacific Northwest to compare notes with. He is missed.
    Robert, you’ve created a space for a great community here. Thanks for that! We need it now, more than ever!

    John

    Reply
    • Thanks, John! In the spirit of DT, I promise to do my best to keep it up. Can’t really do it if I run myself into the ground. But I do think I will post an open comments thread in the future when I do take a break.

      Currently, I am not looking at any real breaks for the next six months. And I will do my best, again, to cover as much as possible. Any links and observations in comments would be very helpful as well!

      Reply
  15. Mark in OZ

     /  January 9, 2017

    A very moving tribute Robert for a beautiful soul!

    DT always found time to respond to other scribblers in the most patient and instructive way which reflected his kindness, sincerity and wisdom.

    I’m certain DT would have marvelled at and identified with the legendary Chinook salmon that exist in the region where he last called home.

    These marvellous creatures can migrate upstream 3000km’s in the Yukon RIver and also ascend 2100 m while travelling 1400 km’s via the Columbia and Snake to spawn and create the next generation.

    While these feats may seem astonishing, they are just obeying the commands of life; as did DT and his lasting contributions.

    Reply
  16. Greg

     /  January 9, 2017

    President, yes still, President Obama penned a piece in Science today:

    The irreversible momentum of clean energy
    Barack Obama
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/01/06/science.aam6284.full

    Reply
    • I hope he’s right. Will try to help to drive the clean energy juggernaut forward again this year. It’s our main weapon for reducing pollution and helping to mitigate climate change impacts at this time. We really need a full support for this broader initiative. Oddly, there’s a synergy between market innovation, individual action and demand, and government law-making on this one. That’s one of the aspects of clean energy that makes it so much more resilient than it was in the past. I wouldn’t say it’s unstoppable. But it is quite a bit stronger than it was in the past.

      Some related good news:

      https://cleantechnica.com/2017/01/10/wind-energy-delivers-christmas-records-uk-scotland/

      Reply
  17. JPL

     /  January 9, 2017

    I suspect DT’s sooty finger would have clicked on this informative, short Ted talk on improving indoor air quality:

    Reply
    • My wife and I keep an a number of succulents, including aloe, which is supposed to be very good for indoor air quality. I also think that doing work to care for plants at home and creating living spaces is a kind of spring-board for learning skills to help care for the natural world. I generally think that people could start thinking about creating and maintaining alive environments — indoors and out — and that this area is one that is ripe for quite a lot of innovation.

      Here’s a good resource for the larger effort — including great links for more info.

      https://www.asla.org/climatechange.aspx

      Reply
  18. Nancy

     /  January 9, 2017

    What very sad news. Thank you for this tribute to DT, Robert. I know it was difficult for you. I hope his loved ones come here to see how much David was admired.

    Reply
  19. I’m very sorry to hear this. He was a great contributor here.

    Reply
  20. Abel Adamski

     /  January 10, 2017

    Thank you Robert for a eulogy from the heart and soul.
    D.T was someone I had great respect for and I would pick out news items re clouds, nature and the little creatures with him in mind.
    His wisdom and compassion will be sorely missed.
    For example what has been happening re noctilucent clouds

    Fare thee well DT,

    Reply
    • Thanks Abel. I don’t think the noctilucent cloud phenom has been nailed down yet. But it’s something DT would have definitely honed in on. Prime suspects are expanding troposphere height, increased atmospheric methane, a cooling mesosphere, and possible added particulates.

      “It has been proposed that the relatively recent appearance of noctilucent clouds, and their gradual increase, may be linked to climate change.[52][53] The author of the first cited study, atmospheric scientist Gary Thomas of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, has pointed out[2] that the first sightings coincide with both Krakatoa and the nascent Industrial Revolution, and they have become more widespread and frequent throughout the twentieth century, including an uptick between 1964 and 1986. The connecting of global warming and noctilucent clouds however, remains controversial.[2] Gary Thomas may have penned his paper after Wilfried Schröder, who might hold the distinction of being the first to explain noctilucent clouds as “indicators” for atmospheric processes (Gerlands Beiträge zur Geophysik, 1971, Meteorologische Rundschau 1968–1970).[54] Most recently in 2012 Lonnie Cumberland’s physics PhD work supported viewing noctilucent clouds as a possible Miner’s Canary for climate change as her third conclusion as a sign of increasing the presence of water in the high atmosphere.[55] NASA scientists speculate that methane may be driven higher into the mesophere where noctilucent clouds form by climate change and through reactions that end up producing water at such altitudes.[56]

      Climate models predict that increased greenhouse gas emissions cause a cooling of the mesosphere, which would lead to more frequent and widespread occurrences of noctilucent clouds.[50] A complementing theory is that larger methane emissions from intensive farming activities produce more water vapour in the upper atmosphere.[14] Methane concentrations have more than doubled in the past 100 years.[3]

      Tromp et al. also suggest that a transition to a hydrogen economy would result in an increase in the free hydrogen concentration of the atmosphere by 1 ppm, which would increase the number of noctilucent clouds.[57] ”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noctilucent_cloud

      Reply
  21. Matt

     /  January 10, 2017

    A fantastic contributor who taught me so much through his postings.
    I will remember DT the most for the amazing way in which he would post information on consequences relating to AGW that I would never have even thought of… He had an amazing way of bringing my attention to the complexities and vulnerability of the global systems.
    Will miss him heaps

    Reply
  22. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    I’d get up at 4 AM , and wander over here, and there was flurry of comments from DTL.
    And I’d think –
    Who is this guy ? Because they were so wide ranging, so far flung. And because they threw off intellectual sparks .
    I would post something , and he would come back with three links fleshing out that comment.
    I never dreamed he was so ill. Until he came back from a trip to the hospital in early Fall.

    I think the Irish do it best, when death comes to their door , some food, some music, some whiskey, and tales of the love one lost.
    ——————
    I have been a real jerk here lately . But I came across this today, and it explains so much of what we all are trapped in –

    I’m not alone in struggling with feelings of despair, confusion, frustration and even depression where reporting on climate change is concerned, either.

    On Friday, Eric Holthaus, a fellow climate reporter who’s written for Slate and the New Yorker, among others, took to Twitter to discuss his battle to come to terms with the severity of climate change at this point in time.

    Eric Holthaus ✔ @EricHolthaus
    I’m starting my 11th year working on climate change, including the last 4 in daily journalism. Today I went to see a counselor about it. 1/
    4:51 PM – 6 Jan 2017

    http://mashable.com/2017/01/09/emotional-toll-climate-reporting-trump-era/#ctx4cTMNOaqE

    This exchange DTL would have posted , like a duck on June bug.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 10, 2017

      Thank you for your beautiful post Bob…and for the link to Eric’s post. It was eye opening and heartfelt. My husband and I made a conscious decision 35 years ago to have only one child..and our concerns for the planet was the reason. I wonder if I had to make that decision in 2017, if I would have the courage to even have a child at all.

      As an “old timer” who fights against the despair of seeing next to nothing being done about CC year after year. Who struggles to hold on to the hope that our species will wake up in time and do the right thing. I want to say finding this blog, and all of you…has made fighting against the despair and hopelessness…much easier. I miss DT and his wisdom…It hurts knowing he is gone, but I am so grateful that I got a chance to “know him” here at this safe place. And I am grateful for you and for all the other Scribblers. Thank you all. And thank you Robert for providing this safe place for those of us that have made CC a priority in our lives. A place that is free from deniers and filled with intelligent, thoughtful people.

      Reply
      • June

         /  January 10, 2017

        CB and Suzanne, I think you speak for all of us.

        Reply
      • Green and good things exist in this world. They just need a place with light and water and truth and comfort in which to grow and flourish. The more of us who join together in trying to create these spaces for each other, the more we will tend to send out roots and shoots. A forest is a cooperative. The most essential elements of nature are. We can do this for the human environment. I think that’s something worth fighting for. Love is something worth fighting for.

        Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  January 10, 2017

      Well said, Bob. I will really miss DT and his many insightful, wisdom packed posts.

      And Suzanne, I think I am currently where you and your husband were 35 years ago. I’m a few weeks away from my 36th birthday, and it seems like all of my peers are having children. As for me, I have been in the no-child camp for quite a few years now, and it used to be solely because of the grim future we are guaranteeing ourselves by not dealing with climate change. However, since Trump and the Republicans have taken over, I have literally lost all hope for any kind of better future, and feel very confident that the future of the US, and the entire world, will be full of misery and suffering. I simply cannot create a thinking, feeling individual who will have to suffer through the painful, conflict filled decline of civilization. I do not have the ability to ensure my child has a better life than me…or even a life as “good” as mine. I will not have a kid and keep my fingers crossed that things work out. I look around at those still having large families and just shake my head. What the hell are they thinking? Don’t they know what their children will have to endure?

      We are no smarter than yeast. Breeding without thinking about it, increasing our numbers and polluting our environment until it literally kills us. Every species in overshoot experiences a population crash, and we are no different. If we don’t have the smarts to control our numbers, then we definitely won’t have the intelligence to find ways of sustaining these numbers. I’m not giving up fighting for a better future, but I must admit that I don’t feel hopeful.

      Reply
      • Mark in New England

         /  January 10, 2017

        Well said Ryan. I reluctantly made the same decision with my wife, but feel pained at times holding the babies of friends and relatives. I believe I would have made a great father, sharing my love of the outdoors and Nature with my kid(s), if they didn’t succumbed to the electronic artificial reality that rises as the real Reality falters. It’s tragic that being informed makes us fear for their future.

        Reply
        • Suzanne

           /  January 10, 2017

          Ryan and Mark…I understand why you are conflicted. We are biological beings..and can’t deny that “breeding” is a part of being human. Then throw in the conflict between our rational and irrational selves..and boy oh boy..a fertile (excuse the pun) field ripe for conflict ensues.
          Consider…fostering or the “big brother/big sister” program. There are many children out there…already here..in need of “good and caring people”. As a former Social Worker I can say…you might be shocked by the sheer numbers of children in need of a few hours of stability and caring by adults that they are not able to get from their own families.
          Some times just a few hours a week by a caring person…can have a greater impact and change the future of a neglected child. Just something you might consider.

        • Suzanne

           /  January 10, 2017

          And just one more thing. I have several “old timers” in my orbit who made the decision to not have children or only one child years ago..and none have regretted that choice.
          Trust yourself.

      • Restraint is a key variable to resiliency. Population restraint is an essential element of this. But it’s also a very personal decision. I wouldn’t say that the future is completely hopeless. But the present political situation puts us in a rough spot. We will all have to become good rebels now.

        Reply
    • Thanks for this, Bob. I think my first hint that he was suffering was his subtle statements concerning why he had moved to Oregon. That and the very descriptive posts concerning air quality in his local region. He wrote in a way that seemed to describe how the poor air made him feel. This to me was a mark for concern. Kept it under my hat b/c that kind of stuff can be personal. But I thought it was time to talk about it now. DT, like the rest of us, was a creature of his environment. And whether we realize it or not now, harm to environment is harm to us. DT, I think, just felt it more than most.

      As for the statement by Holthaus… I feel his pain. I think, when confronting climate change, we have to focus both on the problem (which can seem, at times so large and diffuse and insurmountable as to be overwhelming), and on how we can create progress in dealing with the problem to try to make it more manageable. If we only focus on the harm that is coming, it will take us down. Humans, like all life, need to sense that experience can improve and that harm to vital life can be prevented. Otherwise, we fade out. We need to keep the enriching our outlook. And when the situation is most grim, it is most important to remember how essential hope becomes.

      It’s not ‘hopium.’ Hope is a survival trait. Hope is morale. Without it, we quit functioning. Without it, we fold up and collapse.

      I’m going to twitter now to send Eric a little something. I hope it helps. I encourage others to do the same.

      Reply
  23. Griffin

     /  January 10, 2017

    I don’t have the right words to say right now so I will just say that you sure did do it right here Robert. Thank you for this. DT will be very much missed, he was a staple of good reason and engagement. I would have liked to have met him and been able to talk. Hopefully someday I will.
    Thank you for doing this post so that we could all read about it in the best way possible.

    Reply
    • Thanks for this Griff. I think you and so many here inspired DT to do what he did. So you were a part of it. And you now have the opportunity, we all have the opportunity, to take the good example of his life and to carry on as he would have. As he would have had us do.

      Reply
  24. I have been a long time lurker here and have made a connection with many of you, Thank you all for this , it often feels I am alone in my constant search for truth . I am sure many lurkers feel the same as I . You will be missed and have touched more than you know Mr.Lange , I feel like Ive lost a long time friend , Thank you Robert for bringing us together , Thank all of you , so much!!!
    Keep on rockin Bob !!

    Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Pioneer Cabin tree bites the dust
    The most famous victim of the weekend storm was the Pioneer Cabin tree in Calavares Big Trees State Park, iconic for the passageway carved into its base in the 1880s. It was one of the oldest and most venerable of the “drive-through” trees that were a California staple for decades until the rise of environmental consciousness put them out of style. Located in a grove of dozens of giant sequoia trees, some believed to be as old as 2000 years, Pioneer Cabin tree was barely hanging on. Joan Allday, a volunteer at the state park, told SFGate that “there was one branch alive at the top.” A combination of high wind and sodden soil dealt the tree its final blow early on Sunday afternoon. Calaveras Big Trees Association has a memorial page on Facebook in honor of the felled giant.

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/winter-storms-hustle-across-united-states-ice-potential-rears-its-hea

    Reply
    • Mark in New England

       /  January 10, 2017

      And most people think “Nothing to see here” – Climate Change – bah humbug!

      Reply
    • DT and Pioneer Cabin.

      “So far I have felt …like an old tree that it losing all its leaves one by one: this feels like an axe-blow near the roots.”

      Reply
  26. Jay M

     /  January 10, 2017

    energetic jet stream line with low arctic sea ice conditions, it seems:
    http://cci-reanalyzer.org/wx/fcst/#GFS-025deg.WORLD-CED.WS250-SNOWC-TOPO

    Reply
    • Tigertown

       /  January 10, 2017

      Looks fat. No?

      Reply
    • The North Atlantic is a real mess. Trough digging all the way down to the Antilles while the front face runs up into the Barents. Big 955 mb low running in toward Scandinavia. 40+ foot seas yesterday off Scotland.

      At the 250 mb level it looks like a big omega pattern with a very high amplitude wave running from around 20 N to 60 N or higher.

      Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    The most famous victim of the weekend storm was the Pioneer Cabin tree in Calavares Big Trees State Park, iconic for the passageway carved into its base in the 1880s.

    You know we were really on a rampage back then . We had just shot every buffalo to supply the British Army with harness leather. One bullet at a time. We killed 40-50 million animals in 20 years.

    This is why I hate the puny human argument. Like mankind is as but a flea on the face of Earth.
    Fleas don’t use gunpowder on your dog .

    Reply
    • terrasapien

       /  January 10, 2017

      We slaughtered the buffalo for sport and amusment. Once the railroad came through the plains, men could sit in comfort in the coaches and shoot from their seats having beverages with friends. Sometimes the train would stop so the men could cut down the herd leaving the carcasses to rot on the ground. The buffalo were docile and didn’t even run away. There were millions of them and it seemed an endless bounty. That mindset lives today as a hundred car coal train burns every ten minutes in the US and the lights at night can be seen from space.

      Reply
    • Life has always affected the Earth — changed its atmosphere, altered its climate, created and destroyed environments, driven extinctions. Humans are a very powerful life form. The scale to which we can affect change is amazing. Those who do not see this aren’t dealing with reality. The human capacity for self-destruction and environmental harm is something that the Earth has never seen before. And considering the cataclysms that have afflicted the Earth over its billions-years span, that’s really saying something.

      Some thoughts from Oppenheimer more than a half century ago:

      “We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.”

      “There are children playing in the streets who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.”

      https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Robert_Oppenheimer

      Reply
  28. Suzanne

     /  January 10, 2017

    An interview my husband and I enjoyed over the weekend with Yvon Chouinard at Climate One. Also, my husband is just now reading his book “Let My People Go Surfing” which he says is very good.

    Reply
  29. Beautiful tribute, Robert. Even if we could engineer cooling to counteract the GHGs we would need to stop emitting CO2 to save the oceans from acidification. The oceans are being damaged by increasing temperatures, acidity and sea level. All the world’s surf spots and beaches will be impacted by sea level rise.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the kind words and good thoughts here, Fish. All of which ring true to me. I have a few I’d like to add as well below…

      So I recently learned of Saba — it’s one of the world’s most pristine reefs. Situated about 30 miles south of St. Maarten in the Lesser Antilles, it contains a still vital reef structure mostly unharmed by acidification, ocean temperature change, climate change or human impacts. Saba is not our canary. That would be the GBR and Kiribati. Saba is the reef that, if it goes down, will signal the death knell for pretty much all the reefs in the world. We might still be able to save Saba. I’m not so sure about the GBR. But we need to act now. We need to stop burning fossil fuels as swiftly as possible. The oceans as we know them don’t have another decade or two to wait for us to get our act together.

      Reply
  30. 44 south

     /  January 10, 2017

    I wasn’t going to comment here again, despite my best intentions I am now so pissed at human beings, I struggle to contain my anger, which, as is not uncommon, is often misdirected.
    By chance I read the wits end tribute to DT just yesterday, and was grateful to see a photo of the man. I had imagined him a more fleshy, “button down” character and liked him more for seeing him.
    I suspect too after reading his letter to never to be born future generations, that he was as doomer as I, but nicer and kinder.
    As someone said, the last of us are unlikely to be the best.

    Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Watching PBS –
    CONTAINMENT
    How can we contain some of the deadliest, most long-lasting substances ever produced? Toxic remnants from the Cold War remain in millions of gallons of highly radioactive sludge, thousands of acres of radioactive land, tens of thousands of unused hot buildings, and some slowly spreading deltas of contaminated groundwater. Governments around the world, desperate to protect future generations, have begun imagining society 10,000 years from now in order to create warning monuments that will speak across time to mark waste repositories.
    http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/films/containment/

    Reply
    • So we need this for survival. We need to be able to think and plan and inact policies that last for hundreds and for thousands of years. We need to not just think of the 5th generation going forward, but the 50th. This is a hard pill to swallow for some. But I think it is important to shine a light on what a benevolent, responsible human civilization looks like while we still have any vestige of human civilization remaining.

      Reply
  32. Nice thoughts on DT, Robert. May he have peace now.
    Sheri

    Reply
  33. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    So much to change , so little to try.
    Now back to finding our next nickle next week. It’s that what it’s all about ?

    Raping the Earth for every drop of wealth ?

    Reply
  34. Anna

     /  January 10, 2017

    One thing that I appreciated about DT was his emphasis on pollution. Too often when we talk about global warming we focus on reducing fossil fuel use solely because of climate change. My husband, for one, gets irritated about the singular focus on climate change because we can then disagree about whether humans cause global warming (and nothing is done), when we should all agree that we want to reduce fossil fuel consumption for other reasons, such as to reduce pollution and improve the livability of our towns and cities, which have been designed for and cater to the automobile culture. When we talk about pollution, it’s often about extremes, like the terrible air after a huge wildfire or smog in Beijing from coal plants. DT would often notice pollution in the sky in Portland or Santa Barbara on “normal” days and find signs of environmental distress in trees in his neighborhood. I appreciated his attention to these issues because those seemingly small things add up to one huge problem that can more easily be dismissed. I will miss him.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 10, 2017

      Anna, well said. I agree 100%. DT was so good at reminding us that CC is not just the big picture effects that were important, but the “fallout”….and how they effect the day to day living of those we share this planet with whether plant or animal.

      Reply
    • The two are inextricably related in a forest and trees kind of sense. Some are better at seeing the forest, some the trees.

      Reply
  35. Matt

     /  January 10, 2017

    From the arctic sea ice forum (contributor bbr 2314)

    I know its 9-10 days out but surely not possible? after 4 days of extent retreat (IJIS) the damage a system like this could cause?
    CB has a phrase that would describe it.
    P.S. Robert, would it be possible to have an open thread so we could chuck all our non DT related posts to?

    Reply
    • I wouldn’t bet on any of the details but both the GFS and ECMWF have deep lows entering the Arctic from the Atlantic side carrying heat and water vapor towards the Siberian side of the Arctic ocean. There’s going to be one more devastating hit on the sea ice in the Barents and Kara seas when the warm winds and huge waves slam the ice edge. And warm Atlantic water is being driven towards the Siberian shelf along the continental slope in the Arctic ocean.

      This has been a shocker of a winter in the Arctic.

      Reply
      • Thanks for this, Matt and Fish.

        Matt — I’m working on a new post for today. Until then, you can absolutely consider this to be an open forum for discussing climate events. I hope that’s a clear enough answer for your question.

        Fish — Great points here.

        Would add that with the cold centering more toward Greenland, North America and Siberia and with the North Atlantic and Barents so relatively warm, there’s a great deal of fuel for these kinds of storms. The continent/glacier to ocean dipole sets up a prevalence for these kinds of systems which the models appear to be picking up.

        What concerns me most is that this year the pattern has been pretty well established since Fall and it appears to be re-asserting again in these model runs. If this is the case, then we can expect another period of severe warmth in the 80 N region.

        With regards to warm water heading toward the continental shelf region — this is certainly something to keep an eye on. I know that much has been said to discredit concerns over sea bed responses to warming in the form of clathrate thaw. And the issue is now more polarized than ever. The science has retreated to its various silos over this particular gray area. We will need observational evidence to break the current deadlock. The mainstream view will tend to dominate until we are surprised by outcomes — or not. Sad situation really. I’ve tried to communicate well on this subject. But the all-too human response to a gray area is to either exaggerate the threat or to categorically deny it. Talking about possibilities is the mature approach. But that has tended to be tough for obvious reasons.

        Reply
  36. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Raping the Earth for every drop of wealth ?

    I’ve run that marble around my head. The rich will die as fast as the rest of us.

    Cold comfort for madness. ,

    Reply
  37. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Cold comfort for madness.

    Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    I am bankrupt , in words, feelings , thoughts, I am lost . I am alone. I am scared .

    Reply
    • Bob — you are not alone. We are here. We are listening. We hear what you have to say. And your words mean much to us. You are essential to this discussion. To our response as a people, as a world. Never forget how important you are.

      Reply
  39. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Your all alone, my life rings are gone,

    Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  January 10, 2017

    Reply
  41. Ridley Jack

     /  January 10, 2017

    I never met DT since I’m very new to this blog only been reading Mr Scribble posts for the past 6 months or so, my condolences to Mr.Scribble and to the others that knew him. If you look at our species history the two words life and death are so different but so similar. It looks like you can’t have one without the another. (in a broad way of looking at it). Creation of Magic then Creation of Religion which lead to the Creation of Science. If I had to pick one of the most important creations of our world I would put the creation of fossil fuels on my list. Its the backbone that humans were able to flourish in which before was a slow process for us. Agriculture, Tools/Technology Blossomed. Which starting as a brilliant innocent invention, this idea/platform lead in a short period of time (since industrial revolution) an explosion of our specie. Most Countries have Culturally differences, but despite the differences, fossil fuels have also been there to get a developing nation to a developed nation which is every or most countries goals. You don’t meet that many people in your life that want to care for the planet because I myself, to be honest, never really cared for nature when I was younger I’m still considered young 23 years old currently but, still to this day If I had to ask myself do I care for nature or do I care for my what I put into my wallet. To end my point, I have respect for people that take time out of there lives to think of the well-being of nature and the current moment in our species history we need more people like that going forward in the future as our own survival depends on it, the irony that a fossil fuel called carbon dioxide creates life and then a form of life uses carbon dioxide to a point where they could become extinct.

    Reply
  42. Very moving and thoughtful, Robert. Thanks for sharing, DT Lange was a great, much missed contributor here.

    Reply
  43. Just want to say thanks to Gail at Witsend, who’s post first brought us the news of DT’s passing.
    David T. Lange, Au Revoir

    Reply
  44. danabanana

     /  January 10, 2017

    Thank you David T. Lange for all your time an efforts fighting the ill that is AGW.

    Reply
  45. Vic

     /  January 10, 2017

    DT Lange. Wise, caring, generous, prescient.
    A gentleman, a teacher, a leader.

    Reply
  46. Cate

     /  January 10, 2017

    A little postscript to last week’s story about all the dead herring and shellfish washing up on the Bay of Fundy shore of Nova Scotia. Now this, much farther north in the Gulf of St Lawrence:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/norris-point-dead-lobsters-wash-1.3927658

    Worth noting that long stretches of the west coast of Newfoundland are sparsely settled. This lobster kill was noticed in one tiny community, but there are hundreds of uninhabited coves on that coast where the same phenomenon might happen with no-one to see.

    The Nova Scotia seafood kills remain unexplained, but probably environmental, something to do with water temps and storms, and now the same explanation is being tentatively offered here. The thing is, we’ve always had cold water and stormy weather here, so the focus should be, what’s different now, what’s changed?

    The elephant in the room.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  January 10, 2017

      A little annoying isn’t Cate. Here in N.S. still no clue. If I were a betting man I would put it up to anoxic. St Mary’s Bay is a long way from the tidal power experiment and it’s free standing in the channel between Cape Split and Cape D’or. The first one was destroyed by the current. No dikes or funnels of any sort involved. Just a turbine lowered to the sea floor. Back to the fish kill there is a lot of agriculture around the entire area so an algae bloom diminishing the oxygen content is possible and probably hard to prove after the fact. On the northern peninsula of Newfoundland not so much. I had the good fortune to have travelled
      the peninsula many times and it is sparsely populated for sure. the interview raises some questions for me though: “Bob Hooper, a retired marine biologist who spent his career working in the surrounding area, said he’s seen “several dozen” events of this kind.

      “I’ve never seen such a concentration of dead lobsters at one time, but I’ve seen a lot of mass mortalities over the years,” he told the Corner Brook Morning Show.”

      Several dozen events? I know a number of folks up and down that coast and they have told me lots of tales but none that I recall about mass mortalities, outside of seal pups being crushed in early ice break ups.

      Reply
      • Thanks for this discussion, guys. Will take a look.

        Reply
      • Cate

         /  January 11, 2017

        Shawn, I found it funny that while others who live in the area have “never seen anything like it”, this guy claims to have seen it “dozens” of times. Go figure.

        Reply
  47. Mark in New England

     /  January 10, 2017

    I will really miss DT. He was very passionate, and personal, in his first hand reports from the front lines. Upward and Onward DT!

    Reply
  48. Thanks Robert…….and Gail,the great tree expert..

    Reply
  49. My wife 🙂 discussing nitty-gritty of energy efficiency in this local TV clip.
    http://www.mynbc5.com/article/upper-valley-towns-band-together-form-weatherization-program/8579974
    So much to do, so little time. Keep the faith, folks.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 10, 2017

      Well done, and a reminder how acting locally on CC and environmental issues are powerful.

      Reply
    • Nancy

       /  January 10, 2017

      Great program. It’s so cheap and cost effective to tighten up your home. I live in NH and wonder how families afford to heat these drafty old homes. Wouldn’t it be great if the federal gov’t had a national program for energy efficiency? It would provide good local jobs and huge savings for homeowners. Such a simple idea. In the meantime, it’s wonderful that community volunteers are doing this work.

      Reply
      • This is what leadership looks like. If it has to come from the bottom up, then so be it. But one way or another it needs to happen. But, yes, a national policy and a broader national policy framework would be amazing.

        Reply
  50. Genomik

     /  January 10, 2017

    RIP DT! When I first found this blog, the community and comments were a big part of why I’ve stayed here. Keep it all up.

    Another fallen comrade is the Pioneer drive thru tree of calaveras County, killed in this storm. Seems it was stressed by the drought and then the big storm finally broke it.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/09/508919216/iconic-sequoia-tunnel-tree-brought-down-by-california-storm

    Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  January 10, 2017

      See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/17/nyregion/a-600-year-old-oak-tree-finally-succumbs.html?_r=0

      The giants are dying. There is something Lord of the Rings-esque about our ancient trees no longer finding this world hospitable. Magic leaves the world in the face of Man and his machines.

      Reply
      • wharf rat

         /  January 10, 2017

        For David and the trees…

        Reply
      • “Tom’s words laid bare the hearts of the trees and their thoughts, which were often dark and strange, filled with a hatred of things that go free upon the earth, gnawing, biting, breaking, hacking, burning: destroyers and usurpers. It was not called the Old Forest without reason, for it was indeed ancient, a survivor of vast forgotten woods; and in it there lived yet, ageing no quicker than the hills, the fathers of the fathers of trees, remembering times when they were lords.” JRR Tolkien

        Cumbersome machines running on fossil fuels is the big problem. It’s all the burning, breaking, and hacking. With burning as the worse and the thing that really needs to stop as soon as possible. If we want to save the trees, there needs to be less of that.

        Reply
  51. RIP D.T.

    Reply
  52. wharf rat

     /  January 10, 2017


    Global surface temperature data 1966-2016 from NASA GISS, broken out by years with El Niño warming influence, La Niña cooling, or neutral, with linear trends for each category. Created by Dana Nuccitelli.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2017/jan/10/conservative-media-cant-stop-denying-there-was-no-global-warming-pa

    Reply
  53. Shawn Redmond

     /  January 10, 2017

    This is outside my country but reading here and other posts this may be of some assistance to readers here:

    http://www.uncommonthought.com/mtblog/

    Even if you are paying only cursory attention to what is happening in the United States (i.e. word of mouth news consumption) you likely have at least a vague sense of unease. If you are paying acute attention to the arc of events, you are likely somewhere way north of nervous.

    What is happening with Trump and his congealing administration, and with the Republicans in the House and Senate (with a few exceptions), is unprecedented. We have a President-Elect who is off the rails. He still refuses to disclose his income tax reports, and even more alarming, this disregard of the peoples right to know is being permeated through the people he has put forward to head critical departments are also being forced through without proper documentation or any effort at vetting them, nor allowing the time to do so.

    Action: Call your Senators and tell them that you want potential Cabinet members to be fully vetted BEFORE confirmation hearing are held.

    The proposed appointees meet with the committee that oversees the agencies they are to lead. Therefore you should attempt to contact the members on those committees, or at least the Chair of those committees. Unfortunately, they make contacting representatives difficult by limiting contacts only to those in the Congressperson’s or Senator’s district. Therefore you might need to find out where their local office is and use that zip code to contact them.

    I am trying to put together the contact info below. Check the committee web pages to see who is on the various committees.
    http://www.uncommonthought.com/mtblog/

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 10, 2017

      Called both my U.S. Senators today…one Dem and one Rep. What we know for sure…calling is the best way to get their attention. BTW…call their local state offices. They “must” take those calls.

      Reply
      • Thank you for your activism Suzanne. I think I may have to dedicate my next book to you and Bill McKibben both 😉

        Reply
        • Suzanne

           /  January 10, 2017

          Thanks Robert. I am at a point in my life where I have the time, so making the most of it. I have made my travel plans for the March on Washington. My first march in D.C, only the third time I have been there. I have a terrible time with crowds (agoraphobia), so I am getting WAY out of my comfort zone..but feel to the depths of my soul that we are at a critical juncture and I just can’t in good conscience sit idly by and watch. I feel I must try to do everything possible in my own little way to fight for the survival of this beautiful planet and for all the living things on it.
          Locally, in WPB at the “sister rally” (my husband is going to that one) they are expecting any where from 600-1,000 people (fingers crossed).
          Gives me hope. And after the November 8th…I will take hope wherever I can find it.

          Let’s just keep our fingers crossed that these marches on the 21st get lots of “good” media attention.

    • Thanks for this, Shawn. It’s something we all need to do. Every concerned person and every concerned organization.

      We should also be clear that the republican government as it stands is not representative of the people or the will of the people. Trump lost the popular vote by north of 3 million. And republicans often occupy gerrymandered districts that would not exist under normal democratic practices. Furthermore, voter suppression in key states has also created a populace to elected official disconnect.

      What this means is that we have more power than we realize. We have the numbers to make a huge difference. All it takes is the political will, a little organization, and the conscious effort of action on our part. We should be lobbying Congress with ten times the volume of special interests. And we have that capability.

      It would be difficult for elected leaders to not be changed by such a broad response. We have the capability to do this. And we have the moral imperative. So lets get out there.

      Reply
  54. George W. Hayduke

     /  January 10, 2017

    Thanks for this Robert, after reading DT’s blog he really got me looking at the sky and the cloud patterns. He will be missed.

    Reply
  55. eleggua

     /  January 10, 2017

    Love is something worth loving for.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    “The time has come to educate people, to cease all quarrels in the name of religion, culture, countries, different political or economic systems. Fighting is useless. Suicide.”
    – Dalai Lama

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    ‘At the end of the talk someone from the audience
    …asked the Dalai Lama:
    “Why didn’t you fight back against the Chinese?”

    The Dalai Lama looked down, swung his feet just a bit,
    then looked back up at us and said with a gentle smile,
    “Well, war is obsolete, you know.”

    Then, after a few moments, his face grave, he said,
    “Of course the mind can rationalize fighting back…
    but the heart, the heart would never understand.
    Then you would be divided in yourself… the heart and the mind
    …and the war would be inside you.” ‘

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    “You never change the existing reality by fighting it.
    Instead, create a new model that makes the old one obsolete.”
    – R. Buckminster Fuller

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    “I better quit my talking ’cause I told you all I know
    But please remember, pardner, wherever you may go
    The people are building a peaceful world, and when the job is done,
    That’ll be the biggest thing that man has ever done.”
    – Woody Guthrie

    Reply
    • We’re in a fight, Eleggua. It’s a non violent fight. But it’s a fight nonetheless. And it’s the most worthwhile fight to be fighting.

      Reply
  56. Cate

     /  January 10, 2017

    Are we at 1.5C or not?

    Close enough, says the EU’s Copernicus Climate Change Service.

    http://climate.copernicus.eu/news-and-media/press-room/press-releases/earth-edge-record-breaking-2016-was-close-15%C2%B0c-warming

    Reply
    • Thanks for this Cate. Looking like +1.2 vs 1880s to me. This is pretty amazingly bad and blows any hiatus argument clean out of the water. Warming is following or now a bit ahead of the 37 year trend line. It hasn’t deviated much at all if you compare La Nina to La Nina years and El Nino to El Nino years — which would be the way to compare apples with apples.

      We can definitely say that we are in the Eemian temperature range now. But that the global energy imbalance is now more typical of the Middle Miocene. We’ve pushed things pretty far and we haven’t even really seen the whole tip of the iceberg.

      Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  57. Bluesky

     /  January 10, 2017

    By the way, regarding temperatures I bump into this graph to day not the first time though, but some guys were talking about that in 1880 we were in a cold period, are we only at around 1C over the ‘long term’ baseline then and not 1.3C? I have to look at this climate change from both sites you know, but I’m with you guys in here all the way.

    https://xkcd.com/1732/

    Reply
  58. Ailsa

     /  January 10, 2017

    I entered a very cursory comment early in this thread, because I really didn’t trust myself to respond. Now, having considered, I want to add my thoughts in a bit more depth. Somehow, with DT’s last few posts, I felt a sense of dread. He was uncharacteristically brief. Something was off.

    His passing is huge. To me, this community of Scribblers “for environmental, social and economic justice” is a lifesaver, expressing and confirming like nowhere else that which I KNOW is right. On a deep instinctual visceral level. And also very importantly on a factual level.

    DT felt like the ‘elder’ here. Wise, compassionate, firm. I have been deeply affected by his loss, although I only ‘knew’ him for the last year or so. I hope and believe that his passion, integrity and intelligence have held and inspired many more hurt, lost and alone souls like myself.

    Much much love and best to his close family and friends, be they human or animal or other.

    Reply
  59. Didn’t know him or his work, but it is a big loss! RIP!

    Reply
  60. cwlongway

     /  January 12, 2017

    I am grateful to “the Spirit of the Wind” for being a guiding force in our blog. I remember DTL mentioning that he felt bad that he never was able to get an education. Previously, I had thought that he was a retired professor by his writing style and content. Now that I know more details of his life, I do understand. I will remember him as a professor emeritus and much more.
    Thanks to those who have encouraged us from the Buddhist tradition. We do need a Jewish comment if someone can share one. A few thoughts that may help:
    (From the Hindu tradition) “Death is not extinguishing the light; it is only putting out the lamp because the dawn has come” — RabindranathTagore
    (From the Christian Tradition) ‘God has chosen the foolish to outwit the wise, the weak to overpower the strong, and the things that do not exist to put out of existence the things that do.’
    — Holy Apostle Paul (my paraphrase)
    The words from Paul are ones I think of when I feel powerless facing the next presidency. We need things from the world invisible to change the horrible things that are happening in the world that we can see. Let us honor DTL’s memory by not giving up.
    I worry that members of this blog could pass and we do not ever find out. It would be a good idea to have a way of contacting individuals that do not show up. One idea I have had is to open an emergency thread on Neven’s or some other site where we can rejoin if we were to loose RS.

    Reply

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