Chilean Wildfires are Worst to Ever Strike the Country

Drought in Chile has now lasted for more than a ten years.

Yearly precipitation deficits have ranged from 30-70% for most of central Chile for the last decade. But the ongoing drought’s intensity has increased since 2011. The result has been “an unprecedented drought in terms of intensity, spatial and temporal extent.”

Over recent days, the forests of Central Chile appear to have finally succumbed to the unprecedented and unrelenting punishment. One by one, massive wildfires ignited through Chile’s bone-dry woods — scorching hillsides, decimating more than 100 vineyards, and resulting in the tragic loss of four firefighters. As of today, more than 85 wildfires have burned approximately 190,000 hectares of land — or about 733 square miles.

This charred chunk of Chile more than half the size of Rhode Island represents the worst fire disaster in the state’s history. Now, nations are scrambling to help Chile respond to the crippling disaster as more than 35 large fires continue to rage out of control.

President Michelle Bachelet, visiting the hard-hit Maule region, stated to Reuters:

“We have never seen something of this size, never in Chile’s history. And the truth is the (firefighting) forces are doing everything that is humanly possible and will continue to do so until the fires are contained and controlled.”

chilean-wildfires-worst-to-ever-strike-country

(NASA satellite shot of massive wildfires burning in Central Chile on January 21 of 2017. Image source: LANCE MODIS.)

These massive fires serve as the most recent book-end to a crippling climate change related situation that has been impacting Chile and larger South America for years. The fire situation has obviously been set in place by current ‘Mega Drought’ conditions. A drought period that “stands out not only in the historical record but also in precipitation and stream flow reconstructions for the last 1000 years.”

It’s a drought situation that’s replete with climate change related signals. Negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) values helped to push Chile into a dry phase through 2012 even as drying was considerably stronger than during past negative PDO periods. As PDO flipped to positive from 2013 onward, related El Nino conditions failed to bring expected rainfall to the state and drought conditions worsened. Due to these factors, climate researchers note: “there is an strong suggestion that anthropogenic climate change is [at least in part] responsible for the present Mega Drought.”

south-america-rainfall-deficits

(It’s not just wildfire-ravaged Chile. Large regions of South America are also experiencing severe drying which is helping to increase wildfire risk. Such drying is a feature of human-caused climate change in that human-forced warming due to fossil fuel burning increases evaporation rates and related stress to forests even as it drives fundamental alterations to precipitation patterns that can substantially worsen drought and wildfire intensity. Image source: NOAA.)

Climate change also appears to be driving drying in neighboring South American states like Brazil and Bolivia — where severe droughts and related warming are drying up massive lakes and helping to worsen the wildfire situation in the Amazon Rainforest. In Bolivia, drought has combined with a climate change driven removal of key mountain glaciers that has produced an endemic state of water scarcity. In Brazil, warming and deforestation are combining to remove a large portion of the atmospheric moisture plume that the great Amazon Rainforest provides. So the historic Chilean wildfires should also be considered in the larger context of ongoing South American droughts related to climate change.

Links:

The Current Mega-Drought in Chile — Is the Future Now?

NOAA

LANCE MODIS

Chile Battles Devastating Wildfires as International Help Pours In

More Than 100 Vineyards Decimated in Worst Wildfire Disaster in Chilean History

Four Firefighters Die in Chilean Wildfires

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

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308 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  January 26, 2017

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  2. Cate

     /  January 26, 2017

    Reposting this here so it doesn’t get overlooked. Robert mentioned this a post or two ago—and here he is. 🙂

    Alex’s guest is Risk analyst, published author, & host of Robert Scribbler’s Blog. From the worst to glimmers of hope, the hunt for climate truth. Plus 2 short clips: Michael Mann: when money buys anti-science; Jennifer Francis on new Arctic feedback. Radio Ecoshock 170125

    Reply
    • Thanks for posting, Cate. Will be putting together a related blog as well. Lots of stuff covered here. Put in a good word for DT. Hope I did him justice.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  January 26, 2017

        It was a great interview Robert. And your kind and insightful sentiments about DT were spot on. I think he would have been pleased.

        Reply
      • Josh

         /  January 31, 2017

        Robert, after listening to you on this episode of Ecoshock, I just wanted to say thank you for everything you are doing both here and elsewhere. Your passion for our future in the face of everything is truely inspiring.

        Reply
    • Very good radio blog, I listened to it all!

      Reply
  3. Like the surfers in “Endless Summer”, fire fighters can spend the entire year moving from wildfires around the globe. 😦

    Reply
  4. Vic

     /  January 26, 2017

    Currently on Amazon.com’s list of best selling books…

    #1 1984 by George Orwell

    #7 It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis

    #10 Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

    #19 Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

    https://www.amazon.com/best-sellers-books-Amazon/zgbs/books/ref=zg_bs_nav_0

    Reply
  5. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Scientists’ March on Washington
    The responsible application of science to government

    What is the Scientists’ March on Washington
    Welcome! We want to thank you all for your incredible outpouring of support for this march. We are working to schedule a March for Science on DC and across the United States. We have not settled on a date yet but will do so as quickly as possible and announce it here.

    Although this will start with a march, we hope to use this as a starting point to take a stand for science in politics. Slashing funding and restricting scientists from communicating their findings (from tax-funded research!) with the public is absurd and cannot be allowed to stand as policy. This is a non-partisan issue that reaches far beyond people in the STEM fields and should concern anyone who values empirical research and science.

    There are certain things that we accept as facts with no alternatives. The Earth is becoming warmer due to human action. The diversity of life arose by evolution. Politicians who devalue expertise risk making decisions that do not reflect reality and must be held accountable. An American government that ignores science to pursue ideological agendas endangers the world.

    Please bear with us as pull together our mission statement and further details. Many more updates to come on Monday.

    Link

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 26, 2017

      Scientists planning their own march in Washington

      Their Twitter feed

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  January 26, 2017

        I think we will be seeing more and more of these protests. Trumplethinskin’s fragile ego can’t stand people standing up to him.

        Reply
        • Steven Blaisdell

           /  January 27, 2017

          Yes. It will force some kind of extreme response, whether a series of personal meltdowns, a crackdown on civil liberties, or both. I have zero expectation that a government controlled completely by reactionary authoritarians will hesitate at all to apply ‘extraordinary measures’ in the face of unrelenting activism. All the more reason to force their hand….

      • Good to see! Bob, can you even remember a time when the scientific profession got politicised?

        Strange days indeed.

        Reply
  6. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Santiago (AFP) – Six people — among them four firefighters and two police — have now been killed battling vast forest fires in central Chile, officials said.

    Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Extreme weather has cost Europe more than £330bn and the lives of 85,000 people since the 1980s
    ‘The scale of future climate change and its impacts will depend on the effectiveness of implementing our global agreements to cut greenhouse gas emissions’

    Link

    Reply
  8. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Braving 15-metre high waves on board Antarctica research vessel
    Al Jazeera joins 55 scientists who will be conducting 22 science research projects along the way to Antarctica

    In the coming hours, we will pass through the Polar front, the area where Antarctica’s cold waters well up and push back the warm waters from the north, creating a barrier that is believed to help keep the continent cold.

    In the space of a few foggy kilometres, the ocean temperature drops to just 4C. The Polar front is considered to be the point at which we will truly be entering Antarctic waters. At that point, we will be subject to the continent’s extreme weather.

    It is here that the real expedition begins.

    Link

    Reply
  9. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Antarctic bottom waters freshening at unexpected rate
    Shift could disturb ocean circulation and hasten sea level rise, researchers say

    During the austral summer of 2016, they joined the crew of the research ship R/V Revelle and cruised north from Antarctica to Australia, braving frequent storms to collect samples every 30 nautical miles. In a shipboard lab, they analyzed the samples using data from conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors, which measure the water’s salinity, temperature and other properties, with support from study co-author Courtney Schatzman of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who processed the raw data.

    The team found that the previously detected warming trend has continued, though at a somewhat slower pace. The biggest surprise, however, was its lack of saltiness: AABW in this region has grown fresher four times faster in the past decade than it did between 1994 and 2007.

    Link

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  January 28, 2017

      I too saw that article and the point that left that bruise between my eyes.
      “The biggest surprise, however, was its lack of saltiness: AABW in this region has grown fresher four times faster in the past decade than it did between 1994 and 2007.”

      May explain why SLR is slightly slower than expected and a massive caution.
      To my uneducated thinking, Antarctic ice sheets being melted from underneath hundreds and thousands of feet below the surface with the resultant fresh water having less volume, especially at 0-4C. But leaving it open for that now undermined ice sheets and glaciers to slowly or not so slowly crumble.

      For that measurable effect in that volume of water, that would have to be a hell of a lot of ice, and note it is not surface melt , it is deep water up-welling to the surface

      Reply
  10. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Florida corals tell of cold spells and dust bowls past, foretell weather to come
    Evidence confirms a centuries-old sea temperature cycle linked to rains, droughts and hurricanes

    US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Link

    Reply
  11. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

    Rachel Carson
    1:53:11Video duration: 1:53:11 Aired: 01/24/17 Rating: NRVideo has closed captioning.
    Rachel Carson is an intimate portrait of the woman whose groundbreaking books revolutionized our relationship to the natural world. When Silent Spring was published in September 1962 it became an instant bestseller and would go on to spark dramatic changes in the way the government regulated pesticides.

    http://www.pbs.org/video/2365935530/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 26, 2017

      A great profile of what courage looks like , in a time when we all are fumbling for it. The echoes from this time are very familiar in today’s world.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  January 26, 2017

      Amazing that her work led to government action, something that is becoming inconceivable in the Anglosphere currently.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  January 26, 2017

        Yes! Watched it on Maine PBS out here on the Rock. Always loved her writing—especially “The Edge of the Sea” but never knew much about her. What an inspiration.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  January 27, 2017

        The hard Right hate Carson with a vicious passion. They even tried to accuse her of causing the deaths of millions, from malaria, when DDT was, supposedly, ‘banned’ from use in mosquito eradication in the poor world. As if Rightists care whether the poor live or die! But just the sort of ‘fake news’, ‘alternate facts’ and hatred they have been spewing at environmentalists for decades. And, of course, in the poor world that leads, in thousands of cases a year, to murder of the defenders of Life on Earth.
        I read somewhere where Carson said that, when she came under attack for her work, from capitalist interests, she took the time to listen to the Beethoven Violin Concerto, in particular the first movement, which restored her strength of purpose and faith in humanity. And very good advice that is, during times of woe. Surely Beethoven and all the other greats did not exist for the likes of Trump to destroy all their works and all the good that humanity has achieved, amongst the catastrophes.

        Reply
        • Steven Blaisdell

           /  January 27, 2017

          Hate is their oxygen, hate born of existential terror, narcissistic self interest, and imperialist entitlement. It is amazing how narrow, selfish, and cruel the human can be.

    • Ryan in New England

       /  January 29, 2017

      I saw this film too. Always loved Rachel Carson but this gave me a greater appreciation of her. Very relevant in today’s world, as scientists are muzzled while an alternate reality is declared from the highest levels of government. We need her strength, courage and dedication now more than ever.

      Reply
  12. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    The Trump administration’s feud with the National Parks Service is absurd
    We’re in for a long four years. Time to go to a National Park, admire the majesty of nature and take a deep breath in the fresh air
    The Guardian, Frances Robinson, Thursday 26 January 2017 00.15 GMT
    … As one wag on Twitter noted, picking a fight the National Park Service in your first week is “like starting a new job and kicking the office cat to death.” …
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jan/25/national-park-service-trump-twitter-campaign-spreads

    Reply
  13. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Watch a Massive Fire Tornado Sweep the Outback

    The whirling storm extended more than 3,000 feet into the air.

    This “gob-smacking vision of an incredible natural phenomenon” was made on a camera mounted on a Department of Parks and Wildlife fire truck at Watheroo.

    Link

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  January 26, 2017

      And that was just a baby compared to what touched down in Canberra in 2003.

      “It was just under half a kilometre in width before it hit the city…”

      Reply
  14. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    NASA joins US scientists rebelling against Trump administration
    January 26th, 2017 at 9:03 am – Author Jon Martindale
    United States scientists are continuing to defy gag orders from the newly inaugurated U.S. President, Donald Trump and his administration, with now seemingly someone from NASA speaking out online. Using the Twitter account @RogueNASA, one “government employee” is speaking out on climate change and government oversight.

    Link

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 26, 2017

      Here is a list of some more of the “Rogue” twitter accounts. I would ask that people support these rogue accounts and show solidarity. I came across a few more online.
      @AltForestServ
      @AltNatParkSer
      @altUSEPA
      @Alt_CDC
      @AltHHS
      @alt_fda
      @Alt_NIH
      @altusda

      Reply
  15. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Exxon Praises ‘Monumental’ Paris Agreement in Signal to Trump
    by Brian Parkin and Tino Andresen
    January 25, 2017, 9:05 AM CST

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-25/exxon-praises-monumental-paris-agreement-in-signal-to-trump

    Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Gag Order Or Not, Here’s Why Trump Cracking Down On Government Science is So Scary

    You may have seen news about a crackdown on communications between USDA (and the EPA, HHS, and Department of the Interior) and the public. In this latest affront, the administration on Monday directed the USDA to stop all “outward-facing” communications. But by Tuesday night, the gag-order had been “rescinded.” So what’s going on? And what could happen if scientists can’t speak to the public?

    Modern Farmer

    Reply
  17. Cate

     /  January 26, 2017

    https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-long/people-sea-ice-see-cracks-forming

    A moving article about how the people of a mostly Inuit community on the Labrador coast are adapting to loss of sea ice and the effects of that loss on their traditional culture.

    Reply
    • I heard Inuit voices speaking out against the Greenpeace protest of ff industry. I hear them.

      It is up to government to provide alternative employment, and this also applies to the effects of disruptive technologies.

      But they won’t. I have never seen such a failure of the Left.

      Reply
  18. bostonblorp

     /  January 26, 2017

    Tragic development for such a beautiful country.

    This is why reforestation as a carbon capture method gives me pause. With weather patterns tilting all around it’s hard to feel confident that forests will either have the right conditions to grow and if they do whether they won’t burn at a later date.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  January 27, 2017

      Boston, we MUST reforestate, no matter what possible dangers lie ahead. Forests, soils, sea-grass meadows, grasslands are all vital carbon sinks, and the planet was once green and blue. Fear of fire seems to me a very bad reason not to reforest.

      Reply
      • bostonblorp

         /  January 27, 2017

        Yes, for sure, I did not mean to reply we shouldn’t try, we must. I only worry about in an all-eggs-in-one-basket sense with regards to carbon capture.

        Reply
        • John B Davies

           /  January 27, 2017

          I agree. Reforestation is essential!

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  January 28, 2017

          boston, the point, I think, is that we need as many eggs and baskets as we can get. Your point is cogent, but we have to do our best and hope for the best.

    • There are strategies to reforest more resilient forests. Basically:

      1. *Reforest with as much biodiversity as possible.* Here in Brasil, the minimum number of species in a reforestation program should be 80, I´m using 104 native species and 40 exotics on my personal reforestation effort. For different ecossystems, the numbers may be smaller, but still, the more species, the better.

      2. Use the right mix of pionner (fast-growing, soft wood, sun-loving, will live for decades – 50%), secundary (fast growing but shade loving, carpentry quality wood but not so durable, will live for centuries -37,5%) and climax (slow growing, fire-resistent hard wood, shade loving, will life for millenia – 12,5%) species for the beggining of your forest.

      3. Plant pioneers in the borders, secundaries next and climax species in the most secluded places. Spacing should be adequate to the tree´s size, but don´t copy commercial plantations, their spacing is for easy use of machinery. Small trees may thrive in a 2mx2m spacing, and 4mx4m is adequate for most big trees (climax species that grow more than that in the long run need pionner species as neighboors), when a plant and care by hand method is being used. This close spacing will shade the underbush, keeping humidity under the canopy. Dry underbush catches fire easily, but wet underbush doesn´t.

      Alternatively, instead of carefully placing saplings, use a mix of seeds (right proportions of pioneer, secundary and climax still). Throw them in circles, spiraling your way out from the center of the area you´re reforesting. Cover them with a 5cm layer of compost. Let the trees be wherever they sprout (I´ve seem results of this method, 5 years old forests unbelievable thick, but I´ve never used it myself. This method is cheaper than using saplings, though, and results seem more resilient).

      4. Give a good start for the baby trees, with a 60cmx60cmx60cm hole filled with half compost half earth (compost first, earth on top) initial hole to plant. Plant when there´s still at least 2 months of rainy season left. If rain is missing in a day, water the saplings for the first 15 days, for the next 6 monts, water only if more than 15 days have passed without rain. After, in a normal world, one wouldn´t need to water trees at all (as long as the right species were planted in the right place). Considering climate change, you may break this rule if a bad drought is on. But don´t water directly. Bury a raw ceramic 1L bottle each 10 square meters, and fill it with water. Put a cap in the bottle in order to keep mosquitos out of it. Fill it again when it´s empty. Control ants for the first 3 years (it´s possible to use a mechanical device that will stop ants from climbing the trees, avoiding chemical controls), as well as vines. After the first 3 years, trees should need no further aid, except for pruning (if you´re wanting more fruit). Nature will select the right species, substitute trees that die with a different kind, or leave the open space if it´s excessively shadowed. In close spacing, tree´s leaves will compost into soil (don´t remove the forming soil).

      5. When trees have at least 25cm of circunference around the chest area (DAP in portuguese… you measure the circunference of the tree in a height that´s easy to reach, equivalent to the right of your chest. Yes, that will vary from person to person, but not so much, it´s a way to evaluate a trees maturity. ), add epiphites. Bromelias, orchids, vines, etc. Keep epiphites strictly native. They´ll atract local fauna, pollinators, carnivores that control plagues, etc.

      6. For a changing world _ and this one is quite polemic _ consider adding a few trees adapted to hotter conditions to your mix (or simply different conditions… climate weirding, after all), instead of going all native. Don´t do this in protected areas without scientific studies first. There´s no longer pristine environments… every place in Earth has human fingerprints, but we´ll need biodiversity to survive. Sometimes an ecossystem may have lost an species, but adding of an “invasive” helps it as a whole (an amazing example is the Pantanal. Some tree species there needed herbivore megafauna to reproduce. The big sloths and toxodons went extinct in the Pleistocene, but the climax trees lived on… without being able to reproduce and create more saplings. Then, humans brought cows to the place… and cows ingest the seeds like toxodons once did and new saplings are being born. Toxodons and giant sloths would have been better, but cows will do.).

      7. *Reforest with as much biodiversity as possible.* – This one gets mentioned twice, because it´s that important.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  January 28, 2017

        I’ve found that placing charcoal, saturated in water soluble nutrients overnight, in the base of the planting hole, then covered with dirt before planting, gives trees a real kick on. It’s good for vegies, too. And companions for the frost tender, to protect when young (and fix nitrogen by using legumes)seems to increase the survival rate. Local reforesters have found ‘deep planting’ by planting Australian native saplings deeper than the usual method, also works for some natives, as it does with tomatoes. I experimented with jacaranda, Tipuana, Catalpa and Koelruteria last spring and all are doing well, but after a record wet winter.

        Reply
        • Great tip, I’ll try it when planting my next saplings! Adding charcoal to the soil also helps with carbon storage 🙂

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  February 7, 2017

          Good luck umbrios. I’m losing a few trees this year, despite good, indeed, exceptional rainfall. But the weather is so unstable, going from 19 C with rain to a string of 40s in just two days etc. And now the latest study says that, living in a eucalypt forest, more or less, we must EXPECT to be burned out in the near future. I’m afraid the eucalypts will have to go-we missed it by about one kilometre, thanks to a wind change, a couple of years ago. And it’s the eucalypts and pines, planted in place of the native forests courtesy of Pinochet and the Chicago Boys, that are burning Chile down, right now. They’re born to burn.

  19. Suzanne

     /  January 26, 2017

    “For Justin Trudeau, Canada’s leader, Revival of Keystone XL Upsets a Delicate Balance”

    Boy oh boy….what a disappointment he must be for Progressive Canadians…

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  January 26, 2017

      Suzanne, you said it. Huge disappointment. But no surprise at all.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  January 27, 2017

        Cate, he just had to look over the border to see the Master at work.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  January 27, 2017

          mm, he didn’t even have to wait for Trump. He just kept following all the old Harper policies and programs. The only difference is the pretty face and the rock-star antics.

      • Suzanne

         /  January 27, 2017

        Cate,
        Just came across this news that went viral about the Women’s March held at Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia..and thought of you. It just warms my heart, and gives me hope.

        Reply
  20. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Predicting where seas are rising fastest

    The year 2016 was the hottest ever recorded, marking the third consecutive year of record warm temperatures on the Earth’s surface, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. Of the 17 hottest years in history, 16 have been since 2000. Scientists are unequivocal: we humans are behind global warming.

    As a result, polar ice is melting and the seas are rising faster than at any time in at least 2,800 years. The sea level has climbed by up to nine inches since 1880 and by three inches since 1993, according to research published in Nature.

    Link

    Reply
  21. utoutback

     /  January 26, 2017

    Off topic – but interesting.
    While the new regime ignores CC coastal states are beginning to take actions to deal with threatened coastal communities.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-26/trump-wants-to-downplay-global-warming-louisiana-won-t-let-him

    Reply
  22. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Floods lash Bolivia and Peru
    Torrential rains lead to widespread flooding across parts of central South America.

    Link

    Reply
  23. John B Davies

     /  January 26, 2017

    It seems probably true that the dryer conditions Chile is experiencing are not a drought but a permanent change in the climate to much dryer conditions. The same may also be true for other parts of South America.

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  January 26, 2017

      Swinging to the extremes and hovering there indeed. Also it seems, the extremes are becoming closer and closer in proximity to each other. Wet, wet on one side and dry dry on the other.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  January 27, 2017

      John, Chile’s predicament has been worsened by massive clearance of native woodlands to be replaced by fire prone and water-guzzling plantations of eucalypts and pines. The policy was imposed under neo-liberal capitalism during the Pinochet dictatorship and the tutelage of Milton Friedman and his ‘Chicago boys’. The loss of bio-diversity and increased wildfire potential has been balanced by the huge profits enjoyed by two lucky oligarchical families who control much of the plantation acreage.

      Reply
  24. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    How A Deadly Heat Wave Led To Disastrous Floods 2,000 Miles Away

    Scientists would link Ladakh’s catastrophic flood to a historic heat wave that killed tens of thousands of people in Russia, 2,200 miles away. For weeks, Russia had been experiencing a heat wave that brought the highest temperatures the nation had seen since record keeping began in 1879. Moscow, where high temperatures in during its warmest months of July and August are typically around 73 degrees Fahrenheit, hit 100 degrees; the Siberian city of Omsk hit at least 96.6 degrees — its average high in August is 72. With the heat wave came drought and nearly 600 wildfires across 480,000 acres. The country, known for its blistering winter cold, was boiling that summer. Russia hadn’t seen anything like it in at least 1,000 years, the head of the Russian Meteorological Center said at the time. When it was over, an estimated 55,000 people were dead, killed either by heat stroke or from conditions such as heart and asthma attacks made more likely by the heat.

    Kristen Rasmussen, an assistant professor of atmospheric sciences at Colorado State University, helped make the connection between Russia’s heat wave and Ladakh’s rains. By collecting data from a NASA satellite called the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, “we were able to see what kinds of storms and what kinds of systems we typically expect in the climatology,” she said. The satellite also lets scientists see when weather patterns are atypical, so they can better examine them. And the 2010 Ladakhi rains were atypical.

    Link

    Reply
  25. Suzanne

     /  January 26, 2017

    At Scientific American…”The War on Facts is a War on Democracy”
    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/the-war-on-facts-is-a-war-on-democracy/

    There is a new incumbent in the White House, a new Congress has been sworn in, and scientists around the country are nervous as hell.

    We’re nervous because there seems to be a seismic shift going on in Washington, D.C., and its relationship with facts, scientific reality, and objective truth has never been more strained.

    Already, in the opening days of his administration, Mr. Trump’s Press Secretary, Sean Spicer, willfully ignored clear, empirical evidence about the size of the inauguration crowds, and bristled at the suggestion experts said they were smaller than in years past. He seemed almost paranoid, and insinuated that a media conspiracy—rather than simple arithmetic—was trying to embarrass his boss. And the Trump Administration continues to claim, without any evidence, that widespread voter fraud cost Mr. Trump the popular vote, even though this has been thoroughly debunked by numerous, bipartisan sources—including his own lawyers.
    —————————————————————
    Beginning to look like I will be spending a lot more time in D.C than I ever thought possible. I know Environmentalist/CC groups are hoping to have a big protest in April too. Looking like we will be replaying the 60’s after all….(sigh).

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  January 27, 2017

      I disagree. ‘Democracy’ under capitalism is a Big Lie in itself, the ultimate ‘Fake Reality’. Under capitalism you get plutocratic, kleptocratic, oligarchy but not ‘democracy’ in any meaningful sense. The MSM has been spreading fake news for decades, and ever worsening. Trump is just another descent further into the Pit of pathocracy, rule by psychopaths, Trump being naked and self-parodic while earlier versions have been more or less disguised, from Reagan’s smooth, Hollywood charms, to Clinton (Bill’s) ‘triangulation’ con-trick. The system was also known to the ancient Greeks as a ‘kakistocracy’, or the rule of the worst, but that is just another word for capitalism. The War on Facts is a War on Science, Rationality, Sanity and Humanity, but not ‘Democracy’ as such. Poor old democracy has been moribund for decades.

      Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Hurricane Matthew Destroyed 177 Miles of East Coast Dunes, USGS Says

    https://weather.com/news/news/hurricane-matthew-dune-damage-usgs-report

    Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    New Weather Satellites Can Spot Floods Before They Happen

    With GOES-16’s 16 channels—two visible, four near-infrared, and 10 infrared, which you can see above—plus the heightened resolution, scientists can monitor everything from poisonous sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanic eruptions to melting snowpacks. “With this kind of resolution, if you were in New York City and you were taking a picture of Wrigley Field in Chicago, you’d be able to see home plate,” says Eric Webster, vice president and general manager of environmental solutions and space and intelligence systems for Harris, which built the GOES-16 payload. In order to amp up the amount and fidelity of data this much, GOES-16 is much bigger than its predecessors, too: Harris had to develop a nano-carbon composite material—Webster calls it “carbon cardboard”—to save launch weight and keep thermal expansion from messing with the focus.

    Reply
  28. Robert in New Orleans

     /  January 26, 2017

    Hey Bob, your slacking….

    We have officially gone done the rabbit hole.

    Reply
  29. Cate

     /  January 26, 2017

    Maybe too far OT because not on climate per se—delete as desired, Robert.

    This is an address by Chris Hedges given at “Inaugurate the Resistance” in Washington, DC last Saturday. He speaks of the necessity for resistance and how it must come about—from the bottom up, as a grassroots movement. Standing Rock is the template.

    “Our only hope now is an unwavering noncooperation with the systems of corporate control. We must rebuild … democratic institutions from the ground up. We must not be seduced into trusting the power elites, including the Democratic Party, whose seven leading candidates to be the next chair of the Democratic National Committee demonstrated the other night at George Washington University that they have no interest in defying corporate power or backing democratic populism. We must also acknowledge our own failures on the left, our elitism, arrogance and refusal to root our politics locally in our communities. Rosa Luxemburg understood that unless we first address the most pressing economic and physical needs of the destitute we will never gain credibility or build a resistance movement. Revolt, she said, is achieved only by building genuine relationships, including with people who do not think like us. Revolt surges up from below, exemplified by the water protectors at Standing Rock.”

    http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/revolt_is_the_only_barrier_to_a_fascist_america_20170122

    Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    A must read –

    What The ‘Rogue’ EPA, NPS and NASA Twitter Accounts Teach Us About The Future Of Social

    Yet, in conversations this afternoon with colleagues in the cyber security realm, a common theme that emerged was how dangerous this proliferation of unofficial social media accounts speaking on behalf of U.S. government agencies is from a cyber standpoint. In short, since we have no idea who is behind these accounts, we have no idea whether they truly are run by agency employees or whether they have been set up by hackers looking to spread ransomware, surveillance software, botnet infections or other harmful software by riding on the immense popularity of these sites and the lack of the authoritative “blue checkmark” proving who is who. Indeed, already @RogueNASA has been joined by @Alt_NASA, and numerous other resistance-style accounts are popping up.

    In such a frenetic fast-paced environment, imagine a new @NASAResistance account being registered by a set of hackers who at first tweet out a flurry of climate change or science-related tweets, linking to agency publications and data sets, then gaining a large follower base. Quietly, the account then copies legitimate PDF and Word files, infects them with malware then links to them, riding the wave of current interest and popularity to generate a high volume of clicks. All it would take is a few well-timed tweets (perhaps right after a news report claiming the EPA was about to delete all of its climate data?) to result in tens of thousands of well-meaning citizens downloading a virus to their computer. Or, instead of sending links to virus-infected files, anti-climate change activists could post real data and publications, but make subtle changes to them, adjusting a few numbers here and there in ways that would not immediately be detectable. In the urgent grab-it-all-before-its-gone world of volunteers quickly downloading everything they can, one could easily propagate these modified files far and wide. If enough time elapses before anyone spots the errors, or if scientists begin to publish using their local copies without verifying them, it could undermine trust in the data.

    Link

    Reply
    • Genomik

       /  January 27, 2017

      If somebody told me 10 years ago new media could be so massively manipulated as it is today i wouldn’t have believed them, but its true. Ergo this is not only possible, its probable.

      Reply
      • Cate

         /  January 27, 2017

        Exactly. And perhaps—-I’m speculating now—-all the more pretext for a CEO who hates the media, and whose chief advisor has just told the media to “shut up”, to attempt to start taking control of news dissemination under the guise of “protecting” Americans from these evil “rogues”….It sounds impossible, but a year ago, so did “President Trump.”

        Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    New pictures out of Chile –

    Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Chile Wildfires Destroy Town as Record Heatwave Stokes Blaze

    Up to 1,000 homes destroyed overnight, with seven now dead
    Over 100 fires remain active, according to the forestry agency
    Wildfires raging across central Chile burned the rural town of Santa Olga last night as temperatures hit record highs and authorities struggled to cope in a country accustomed to natural disasters.

    “Thousands of people have lost their homes,” Valenzuela told Radio Cooperativa. “There are areas that have been completely abandoned and handed over to the fire. Unfortunately, they are being razed to the ground.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-26/chile-wildfires-taking-ever-increasing-toll-of-lives-and-homes

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 26, 2017

      About 260,000 hectares have been consumed by more than 100 separate fires, ……………….. 1,004 square miles

      Reply
  33. Tigertown

     /  January 26, 2017

    I am beginning to doubt that the surface concentration of CO2 spikes showing up on Earth NS are a fluke. These first started on the 23rd and gradually spread out like some kind of smog.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  January 26, 2017

      I was just looking at that to TT. Most of the northern hemisphere 30 degrees on north over the land masses and the Arctic ocean are 445 and up. The Southern ocean and Antarctica are showing over 435. WTF!!

      Reply
    • Tigertown

       /  January 26, 2017

      I checked and it is not high enough to cause immediate harm to people, but still, what is causing it to be held near the surface that way and what else is being held down with it. We have had discussions on the ASIF about the moisture not letting heat escape from the surface, having a blanket effect. Maybe something similar. Smog is usually bad on foggy days, hence the name. If this is a related phenomenon, it will progressively get worse.

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  January 26, 2017

        P.S. At first glance these seem like ridiculous numbers in ppm, but earlier this month the surface concentration in for example Atlanta was between 410 and 420 on any given day. Now it is 457, so that is not an unbelievable amount. We are used to discussing atmospheric amounts which are just over 400 ppm now and don’t jump as easy and quickly as surface amounts are capable of.

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  January 26, 2017

          What seems odd to me is the fact it seems global as opposed to regional. I can understand high readings in high density urban settings. This must be somewhat unusual.

      • Tigertown

         /  January 26, 2017

        Apparently a recent adjustment in satellite data accounts for 32ppm, an adjustment by Earth NS that continued to be made after the raw data got corrected. But here is the observation I just posted.

        “If you go back several months into last year say for example 7-28-2016, and pick a set of co-ordinates, say 43.98 N by 89.66 W and check the surface concentration of CO2, it is 387 ppm. Advancing gradually in time, you can watch it grow. It now reads 462 ppm, which would be 430 ppm adjusted. So if what you are saying about the data being corrected is true, which I don’t doubt, then the fluke was simply an advance warning of where we are headed.”

        Reply
    • JPL

       /  January 26, 2017

      Perhaps following Trump’s coronation the planet has decided how to deal with our species (the CO2 equivalent of ‘release the hounds’). 😉

      I’m curious, is there any (proven or theorized) relationship between global average CO2 surface concentrations and atmospheric levels? Perhaps the surface averages could be a leading indicator of where atmospheric CO2 levels will be in x amount of time, or vice versa. Just a thought.

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  January 27, 2017

        I don’t know much about that, but I do know that too much CO2 can be deadly to trees and plants that normally need it to thrive. I am thinking that in the past, it distributed more easily than it is now. Perhaps RS might have the right connections to investigate further, if he chooses to.

        Reply
  34. Jeremy in Wales

     /  January 26, 2017

    Again been looking at the Nasa Worldview site of Antarctica (before that is taken down) and spotted this massive breakup of sea ice along Enderby Land (?). This is the position on 22 Jan 2017
    http://go.nasa.gov/2kpQ7Lv
    This is the position on 26 Jan 2017
    http://go.nasa.gov/2kpQupk
    One ice flow seems to be 50 miles long!
    The large polynya seems to be crucial to the breakup.
    This is the peak of the summer heat in the S. Hemisphere pole so I am sure this happens regularly but my instinct is that this is multi-year ice. Anyone know or can point to knowledge on this? Thanks

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  January 26, 2017

      Try this link Jeremy. Going back through the last three March’s to and including 2014 the ice shelf is there. Last year the land fast ice to the right is gone all the way to Point Ann, however the ice in front of the Shirase glacier is fast. I notice the hole in front of the glacier is open almost to the glacial front. In todays shot there is to much cloud cover to say for certain but it looks like some previously calved bergs may be starting to come lose. Looks like some leads opening but it might be a bit early to say.

      https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-01-26&z=3&v=1163824.6268348086,1613289.1988915699,1695792.6268348086,1956329.1988915699

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  January 27, 2017

        Looking at the ice in front of the Shirase today there is definitely a lead running through what I’m pretty sure is MYI right up to the face of the glacier. As Jeremy pointed out yesterday there are some large pieces moving out to sea from the ice shelf that look to be 2YI if not MYI. I find this interesting mostly from the amount of drift that they have in such a short time. Looking at the winds on both Earth NS and Climate Reanalyzer they should stay put or nearly so for a bit. What’s moving them so quickly out to sea? Having only a birds eye view it would seem there is a very strong current at work below the ice. The open water to the right of the glacier appeared in MYI quickly early this season and has grown at a seemingly fast rate.It also appears to be happening in a manner that would suggest up welling. Where is this current coming from? It seems to be a new phenomenon as I can’t find any similarities in the recent past.

        https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-01-27&z=3&v=1163836.4947525903,1635194.4918012165,1695804.4947525903,1978234.4918012165

        Reply
        • Jeremy in Wales

           /  January 27, 2017

          Thanks Shawn.
          So the Shirase is one of the fastest moving glaciers in Antartica, 2.3 km per annum at the grounding line, and showed a lot of retreat in the 1960s and 70s when most other in Antarctica were stable. It went back some 38-40 miles.
          https://inis.iaea.org/search/search.aspx?orig_q=RN:24050147
          “The Shirase Glacier drainage basin in the Queen Maud Land ice sheet is drained by a fast-moving ice stream with a flow rate of 2-3 km yr-1 at the mouth of Shirase Glacier. In order to predict likely ice sheet responses to future changes in climate, it is essential to understand the controls on ice stream motion. In the upstream region of the Shirase Glacier drainage basin, the ice sheet has thinned by approximately 1 m yr-1. The possible cause of thinning is basal melting at the ice-bedrock interface. Since thinning began, the Shirase Glacier has been flowing as a fast-moving ice stream to the mouth of this drainage basin. At the mouth of the ice stream, the Shirase Glacier crosses the grounding line and a 15-km-wide floating ice tongue extends 80 km to the north. At the grounding line the mean velocity is 2.5 km per year, the ice thickness is about 500 m and gradually decreases towards the front. The positions of the front of the ice tongue have been determined since 1957 by ground survey and recently by LANDSAT MSS and TM, and MOS-1 MESSR satellite images. Since 1957 the ice tongue has been retreating to the mouth of Shirase Glacier and at present there is no ice tongue evident in MOS-1 MESSR imagery obtained in February 1989 by the Multi-purpose Satellite Receiving System at Syowa Station. In summer, Luetzow-Holm Bay remains covered with thick landfast sea ice, preventing the ice tongue from flowing seaward by ice stream motion. However, since 1957 the floating ice tongue has disintegrated three times, in the middle of the 1960s, 1980 and 1988, due to the retreat of the fast ice in Luetzow-Holm Bay. Annual mean air temperatures at Syowa Station since 1957 have increased by approximately 1C, and 1980 was 2C higher than the average annual temperature”

          It seems to have advanced signifigantly, as stated above as this Google animation shows:

          So this is an incredible dynamic system.

          None of this explains why there is open water close to the glacier calving front or why there appear sto be an open lead to the sea. Maybe the shape of the seabed topography leads to upwelling or could significant amounts of water as basal melting be coming down with the glacier?

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  January 27, 2017

          Thanks for this Jeremy. It does state that it collapsed three times in the past, when to the land fast ice melted out. Well, as we can see it’s melting out now so can we expect the tongue to retreat this year? It will be interesting to watch over the rest of the melt season.

      • Shawn Redmond

         /  January 29, 2017

        Here’s another link that I find quite good:
        http://www.polarview.aq/antarctic

        Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    Ground water pumping …………..
    Arizona Geological Survey finds new fissure in Pinal County

    The Arizona Geological Survey has discovered a new crack in Pinal County.

    The Geological Survey announced Monday that they found the fissure, which they explored with drone video. The fissure is about 25 miles south of Arizona City.

    The fissure is believed to have formed between March 2013 and December 2014. It is more than half a mile longer than other fissures in the area.

    This thing is 2 miles long.

    Link

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 26, 2017

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  January 26, 2017

        Incredible ain’t it! Water is going to be one hell of a problem. The inflow of moisture to the west coast and snows in the mountains is a welcome relief. My worry based solely on personal observation around my area, is when we have a few drier than normal years the snow melt that would go into our rivers and streams is soaked up by the drier than normal ground. This is relieve for the forests but doesn’t show up in the bogs and streams. It may work differently in the west, but if it does melt as slowly as hoped there may be less flowing to reservoirs than the math would show.

        Reply
  36. coloradobob

     /  January 26, 2017

    A few of the Cat 6 readers are on this story as well .

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 26, 2017

      “Get ready little lady , hell is coming to breakfast”

      Lone Wati

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  January 26, 2017

        This Fort McMurray all over again , except their vines were lost , small framers lost 120 year old vines. The government is moving in heavy equipment to bury the dead livestock. Who knows that number.

        Reply
  37. A bit of good news: paleoclimate study using speleothems suggests that the Amazon Forest may be more resistent to savanization than previously thought: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v541/n7636/full/nature20787.html

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  January 27, 2017

      Not to be to cynical but they didn’t mention anything about the logging trucks back then. I’m finding the paleo climate to be less and less representative of what is happening here and now. It may well give us a good idea of how things will look with x amount of x gases in the atmosphere. I don’t think it reveals much about the trip between the different states. Are we on a slow boat to China or the Concorde, maybe an ICBM. The human element, I think, is proving to be a giant skew on the way things progress.

      Reply
      • He, I known. This is how the forest could be, and shows that the Amazon maybe could resist the climate change blow… if it was the only one. But considering that some $#@¨* politicians from Rondonia have defended that savanization is inevitable, so they should be considered “Cerrado” already and “benefit” of laxer laws. By law, in Brasil, one can deforest up to 20% of his property if in the Amazon biome, and up to 80% in the Cerrado biome. Most deforestation here is illegal, true, but ruralists try the most incoherent schemes to legalize it, as they sometimes are caught red-handed. This study is an important political tool to show that the “inevitable” isn´t.

        Reply
      • +1
        Speed matters.

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  January 27, 2017

          umbrios I’m reading Half-Earth by Edward O. Wilson at this moment. His criticism of restoring any specific ecological area is, what went missing in the first place? When the habitat is removed or several of the indigenous species are wholly removed or almost what else is gone that we know nothing about. There may be and probably are tens of thousands of small things that were dependent on the larger undisturbed picture. We can, maybe, put back the trees and some of the larger biota but will the small things return and if not how much of a bearing will this have on the long term outcome. This idea is amazingly complex. In his words a scientist could spend their entire career on studying just a single species and still know nothing about its relationship to its larger surroundings.There are thousands of bits of flora and fauna in museums the world over waiting to be classified and then named. Thousands more yet to be discovered and goodness knows how many we’ve already rendered extinct before we even knew they were there. The small things are what will get us all eventually.

        • I agree, Shawn. Whatever natural habitats we still have left should be protected, we already have far less of those than what we need. My work is actually about this, as an environmental criminologist in Brasil. I known that an restored landscape is further from the ideal than preserving what we already have, that all primary ecossystems are critical, and far more valuable than secundary ones.

          But right known, we need both those things, preserving what still exists and restoring land to as close as we can to natural (and stop using fossil fuels, and diminishing consumism, and keeping the human babies number at two or less, preferably less, by couple, etc.).

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  January 30, 2017

          Agreed umbrios. I’ve done a lot of reforestation on my woodlot. It’s doing fine but it’s never the same.

      • Shawn Redmond

         /  January 30, 2017

        Agreed umbrios. I’ve done plenty os reforestation on my own land. We have good regrowth but it will never be the same.

        Reply
    • If the reduction in rainfall coincided with temperature decreases, then total net evapotranspiration may not have changed very much. Tropical land temperatures decreased during the ice ages, but it varies based on elevation. Sea surface temperatures were only 1-2C cooler than preindustrial, but an inland area like the Amazon would have had a climate that was between 2-4C cooler. The higher elevation areas (>2500m elevation) had large temperature drops of 5-7C, enabling large alpine ice caps to persist, which undoubtedly cooled their neighboring regions and probably allowed for more temperature variability than there is today.

      Jet streams would have been located much closer to the equator than they are today. In the case of South America and the north/south orientation of the Andes, the displaced jet would also mean that cold mid-latitude anticyclones would have penetrated considerably further north than they do today, with a low level barrier jet developing along the lee side of the range after frontal passages (much like we see in the mid-latitude Rockies today). The result would be cool airmasses making it periodically into the Amazon during austral winter. In fact, with continental ice sheets and widespread seasonal snowcover as far south as central Mexico during the last glacial, there would have been a period during austral summer when cold fronts could periodically intrude from the north as well.

      With the cooler temperatures, even a drop of 40% in rainfall may not change the water balance much. Consider a place like Manaus, at the center of the forest. Its average temperature is 26.7. During the last glacial maximum, that would have been closer to 22-23C. Definitely warm enough for a tropical rainforest, but much less water is needed to maintain that biome at that temperature. This is a bit simplistic, because other factors (like increased plant stomata at lower CO2, photosynthetic efficiency) can confound, but the basic point stands. Temperature definitely needs to be factored in.

      Reply
      • Yes. Also, in the Amazon ecossystem, most tree species also appear in the Atlantic Rainforest biome (83% of the tree species appear in both biomes), and Atlantic Rainforest can withstand cooler temperatures (there are areas of Atlantic Rainforest that withstand a few days of snow each year). The contrary is also true, Amazon and Atlantic Rainforest tree species can withstand some very high temperatures, as long as there´s enough moisture in the soil for their metabolisms to cope (dry spells in the Amazon have killed a lot of trees, but hot waves without drought seldom kill trees).

        Forests in South America were once a great continuumm, that sustained its climate (at least rainfall averages) by itself. If that continuum was allowed to be restored (and areas that still show it, like most of the Amazon outside the Arch of Fire, were preserved) it could act as an stabilizing factor for the climate of the continent, making South America a bit more resilient to the climate change that´s enveloping the whole world (sea.

        We just need to change the minds of our lawmakers from “we need to get rid of that “mato”, populate to keep it” to “we need to preserve our natural riches”. This is slowly happening, but it´s another one of those “we get to live” x “burn baby burn” races…

        Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    There was troll on Cat 6 today . Writing teenage quips about Chile. And as I have done for years , I took the bait. But after all these years I baited him.
    I didn’t attack his mother, or quote Bugs Bunny to him . Finally after he stuck , and stunk up the thread others called for the mods to give him a time out. The mods over there are a faceless crew , as you will see below. I post what follows as a record here of their actions today. We had a great thread underway , when this kid showed up and started lighting farts, when got called he claimed “freedom of speech”. I post this here to see if what follows get’s me banned.

    I love this thread , Cat 6. Nothing on the web comes close to it’s power , and graphic richness . If you don’t watch this , you ain’t keepin’ up.
    Now my archive where they wi;; ban me for a few hours.

    The fires in Chile –
    This Fort McMurray all over again , except their vines were lost , small framers lost 120 year old vines. The government is moving in heavy equipment to bury the dead livestock. Who knows that number.

    A word to the mods , when these folks come on, and “make fun” about human death and suffering . On a scale we’ve never seen , and you fail to take them down , you fail us all . When 270 sq miles burns in one night . that’s not toy or a game.
    Now , I’ve had pleasure of being banned here many times for up to 39 hours. But I never made “fun” of human death and suffering . I deserved every ban I received. I broke the rules. But this display today was really sickening. And knowing all the rules , and where the lines get drawn . I tried to skate line. But this was really sad. My blood was boiling when teenage thinking was being “witty” about 270 sq miles of peoples homes burning to the ground.

    Not I’ve dinged you in the past , and have been banned for that. And you can ding me now. But this was not your finest day.

    Reply
  39. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Well. my comments worked . They like it …………..If they don’t zip your gone.

    Now for something old that is new here.

    Children Of The Sun

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 27, 2017

      I wish the solar companies would ban together on Sunday morning and run this with their ad.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  January 27, 2017

        Children of Sun , Children of Sun , Children of Sun , Children of Sun ,

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  January 27, 2017

          I am in Handsome Dick Stalder’s Cabin cabin 47 years ago. At 10,800 feet. He is making jewelry under the light of solar power, at Slaughterhouse Creek, Colorado. He was a genius/ artist He made his solar power plant by grit , brains, and guts.

  40. Matt

     /  January 27, 2017

    Sorry to be OT here but….With Trump desperately trying to save face with his whole “Mexico will pay for the wall” thing, he is now proposing the 20% tariff on imported Mexican goods. This does not surprise me… What does, is that I am yet to see any media outlet actually analyse this and come to the only conclusion they can, and that is if you put the tariff on, then it is Americans not Mexicans paying for the wall!
    WTF are his advisors and republican representatives so moronic that that cannot figure this one out?
    Tariffs are used to discourage local consumption of imported goods by taxing (yes it really is that easy to understand) and hence making it more expensive for end buyers (Americans) to purchase the product. This is supposed to have the effect of making the local product relatively cheaper (in practical sense it never really works the way it is intended).

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 27, 2017

      Guacamole goes up 20%. We pay for it , not Mexico.

      This guy is …………… “Cheetoe Boy Putin’s Orange Poodle”/

      Reply
    • Phil

       /  January 27, 2017

      Yep, Americans will be the ones paying the tax via higher prices for goods imported from Mexico to pay for the wall.

      Reply
    • I have a theory about the wall, and about our recent increase in right wing authoritarian, isolationist governments.

      The theory is that the Trump supporters who are also climate change deniers are secretly terrified of global warming. In their denial, they want Trump to protect them from global warming and its effects, all the while both he and they deny it exists.

      Consciously or subconsciously, the Trump supporters are afraid of millions of brown skinned people streaming north under the pressures of global warming. So, the wall is both a symbolic and a practical barrier against global warming induced mass migration from Mexico and Latin America. This fear expresses itself as a xenophobic reaction toward Mexicans and foreigners in general, given strength by hysterical denial.

      The fervently suppressed fear and uncertainty of populations is what is driving this trend toward authoritarianism, isolationism, and nationalism, I think.

      It’s scaring me that authoritarianism, nationalism, and isolationism are the natural human responses to threat, but cooperation, science, and socialist regulation of industry are probably the best ways to fight global warming.

      Online book, full of insights – The Authoritarians, by Dr. Bob Altemeyer:

      http://members.shaw.ca/jeanaltemeyer/drbob/TheAuthoritarians.pdf

      Reply
      • A lot of Trump’s actions make more sense, looked at in the light of hysterical denial.

        Trump is supposed to protect his supporters from global warming, and from the idea that the American Way might be killing the planet.So, he has to deny global warming exists, and at the same time take measures to harden the country to get ready for the mass migration effects they subconsciously fear. The world is going to turn into a much less friendly place, his supporters fear, and so they want a more nationalistic, militaristic, and isolationist society, that puts America first.

        Jeezus! In the long run, the truth is always friendly! It’s a lot easier just to admit error, admit the reality of reality, and get the Hell over it! Then do what really has to be done!

        Reply
        • I´ve just seem an online article on Big Data that adds another layer on why Trump won the election: careful use of Big Data to aid both on winning votes and for vote supression in chosen districtes, in order to take full advantage from your districtal system.
          http://motherboard.vice.com/read/big-data-cambridge-analytica-brexit-trump?utm_source=mbnl

          On “why those people choose like that” remember that knownledge bias may color as “illogical” things that are logical to other persons, who may not have acess to all that you known. The kind of news that we receive here in Robert´s site is extraordinarily good and rare, and a lot of people “out there” don´t known about things that here are common knownledge.

          Most people today depend on social media and the internet for news, and these two create “bubbles” of common thought, where our social nature throwns us on positive feedback loops that make it seems that everybody we known thinks the same. Add to that the data that people voluntarily give to all, and the tools to use that data, so that each bubble is targeted with the “right” news (compelling them to vote for someone, to go vote, to not go vote, etc), and those news being chosen scientifically to match receptor and text by psycopaths (as Mulga always remembers)… this was an unfair battle. The admirable thing is that Trump still lost the popular vote, so we can keep our faith in humanity for a bit longer.

      • The effort to quiet the EPA and probably eventually NASA makes more sense if looked at in the light of cognitive dissonance.

        Information about global warming increases the fear of Trump supporters, so they have to seek out and destroy the source of that cognitive dissonance. if they can destroy the source of the cognitive dissonance, then their fundamental belief system is once again secure…for a while.

        Reality is going to keep intruding, though. So, there might be some sort of hysterical paroxysm in our future, I think – a truly hysterical use of nuclear weapons, for example.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  January 28, 2017

        Altemeyer’s observations are plainly accurate. I noted the authoritarian type at Sunday School, school and among our neighbours long before I had the words to describe it. They are just one end, the destructive one, of the human spectrum. If you follow the currently trendy neuro-physical theories, they are they way they are because their brain is configured to make them greedy, bullying, empathyless and groveling to power and sadistic towards the powerless. Their neurological configuration is easily discernible on fMRI scans, and no doubt derives from heredity, epigenetic effects on gene expression, nurture, socialisation and indoctrination. And we ought never under-estimate the malevolent effect of brainwashing by the MSM, advertising and ‘entertainment’.
        Trump is simply the most psychologically disturbed extreme of this Rightwing authoritarian to come to power, so far, in the USA. He’s rather reminiscent of Berlusconi, although less intelligent, I would say. We had a proto-Trump here as PM, in Tony Abbott, playing out his psychopathy on a smaller stage, and he still controls the regime from the wings (thanks to the impotence of the multi-millionaire bankster, Turnbull, who took his place)railing against climate science, renewable energy, gay marriage etc, all the usual stuff one expects from God-bothering Rightists. To humanely eradicate this type from humanity is required to avert an inevitable self-destruction, if it is not here already, which would necessitate ending poverty and childhood abuse, physical and psychological, and creating a society based on sharing, mutual respect, compassion and non-violence. Such Paradises have been proposed for millennia, with no apparent good effect, so far.

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  January 28, 2017

      The Guardian has a good piece on it, pointing out Mexico is the US’s 3rd Largest Trading Partner and exports massive amounts to the US as well as imports massive amounts. A large percentage of their exports contains up to 40% plus of imported US components, so will hurt US manufacturers and workers.
      Mexico will more than likely just impose import and export tariffs on US products
      Mexico will more than likely seek arrangements with other countries such as China, maybe reducing their reliance on US military hardware etc.
      Short term hit to Mexico but the long term gains and new partnerships could be long term benefit. Besides how would the US take China building Naval facilities and military facilities (just training the Mexican military of course in the time honoured US tradition)

      As pointed out in the Chelsea Manning article. Trump appears to be just blindly following the Rupert Murdoch News Ltd Fox News line so we know who is actually running the country and who to blame for the consequences

      Reply
  41. Jay M

     /  January 27, 2017

    northern hemisphere summer just seems like nothing to look forward to

    Reply
  42. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    The “No Nothings” , we really had a political party called this . When Irish famine was hurling tens of thousands refugees into this country.

    When you hear the phrase , “They came for religious freedom”. It was because they were being driven out of their homes. Muslims, and Atheists didn’t do this. Christians did this.

    And America got the “No Nothings”, and starving Irish . This wall deal is a very old question.

    We’ll have to kill off some Sioux to make room for them.

    Reply
  43. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Guts kids , Gurts

    Reply
  44. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    I think really old people like me , should think about monks in Vietnam .

    They changed the world

    Reply
  45. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Why die at home ? Or worse in the hospital . Give your body some meaning . I say this as an old man who has the power of a kitten with leukemia.

    Reply
    • Elders have the power of wisdom, and that´s one you surely show. Wisdom is as badly needed in this world as protests, or maybe more.

      Reply
  46. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    I don’t subscribe to the after life , I will not be joining DTL to smile down on all of you.
    We are dead as a boot.

    Only the living change the world. Balls in your court kids. I had my fun.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 27, 2017

      My turds turned from yellow to white, that can’t be good.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  January 28, 2017

      CB
      When I called my Wendy a Special One , I was being extremely serious.
      I will not go into all the details or the history, but she was told much and when her beloved “Aunty” was dying of cancer, comatose in a hospice, we came home and she prayed and prayed that she would not be taken so soon. That night she had a dream where she saw her Auntie Anne sitting up in bed, still extremely frail eating a hearty breakfast.(she was a 6ft strongly built imposing lady with a heart of gold and I recognised her as my mother in law)
      A voice told her her prayer has been heard and Anne will be with you for 1 Week, Wendy was concerned and asked that she suffer no pain, she was told she will not have any pain. We rushed in at 6 am , meeting tyhe priest at the door as he came to perform the last rites, Wendy told him of the dream, and he just said it is impossible, the mind can play tricks at times of stress. But sure enough Anne was sitting up and eating a hearty breakfast. The priest (a friend of Annes and someone we knew well who also officiated at Wendy’s funeral) asked is Wendy into witchcraft. Duhh.

      However Anne pulled Wendy aside when no one else was around and asked her not to bring her back again, it was so wonderful and she was so happy on the other side, she was finally with the only man she ever loved who was her fiancee who died in WW2.

      It is the character of the person and their intentions and actions. Whether you are aware or not your life is actually filled with love, love of what you do, Gods creation, music, beauty, life and people and all the little and big critturs.
      You have lived life to the full and enriched so many lives, I hope you continue that path for many years to come, but have no fear for what follows, I have it on good word it is wonderful and you will be busy as all get out (to coin a phrase) with whole new endeavours your experience has equipped you for .

      God is real, but not necessarily as popularly portrayed, he is everything that is. Fight on the great war started some years ago.

      Fight on and I ask all Scribblers and watchers to send CB some love and energy and pray for strength and health to last as long as it is needed. Whether your beliefs are that way or not , just do it and believe in what you are doing

      Reply
      • Mark in OZ

         /  January 29, 2017

        That’s a beaut experience Adam!

        Don’t we all just ‘know’ there’s an indescribable mystery that exists all around us. It will continue to be scarce while we (society) obsess over stupid money.

        For CB, I’ve borrowed a talisman agate from the Upper St Croix River. Some day the stone will return to the riverbed. Strength, wisdom and longevity’ is its speciality. I just sent ‘it’ on the network AA just described.

        Reply
  47. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Reply
  48. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Sonny Curtis , a Lubbock Boy, I printed shirts for . He wrote ” I fought the Law”. and the Mary Tyler show.

    Reply
  49. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Life is crazy old dog

    Reply
  50. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Reply
  51. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    coloradobob / January 27, 2017
    Sonny Curtis , a Lubbock Boy

    Reply
  52. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    His manger contacted me over 30 years ago , he told me the Irish were poor. And we needed to keep the cost down. There’s about 6 dozen of them. It’s a really cool shirt. I busted my ass .

    I made really cool prints for lot’s of cool people. And I busted my ass to do my best.

    Reply
  53. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    The Joe Ely I spout a about , here’s the posters I printed by hand

    Reply
  54. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    We rode to LA in Black over Yellow Dodge Charger, The only tape we had was the Jefferson Airplane . Many years later , I was friends with the song writer who wrote the best cut on that album. That was 50 years ago ,

    How do you Feel

    Reply
  55. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    Now I am a toothless old rat . Waiting for the end.

    Reply
  56. coloradobob

     /  January 27, 2017

    50 fucking tears. . sorry tears, sorry years .

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 27, 2017

      Sorry fears, It was tears, fears, and years. The Album is 50. You can drive all the way to LA, on this one , I did.

      Reply
    • We have to remember that Earthnullschool, while using NASA data, is a private effort, apparently mostly the effort of one guy – Cameron Beccario. It’s a wonderful job, but there are occasional bugs in the site. The results do not appear to be real.

      Here’s what he says in his “Important note about CO2 concentrations”

      “about CO2 concentrations
      While implementing the visualization of CO2 surface concentration, I noticed the NASA GEOS-5 model reports a global mean concentration that differs significantly from widely reported numbers. For example, from the run at 2015-11-23 00:00 UTC, the global mean is only 368 ppmv whereas CO2 observatories report concentrations closer to 400 ppmv. GEOS-5 was constructed in the 2000s, so perhaps the model does not account for accumulation of atmospheric CO2 over time? This is simply speculation. I am just not certain.

      To bring the GEOS-5 results closer to contemporary numbers, I have added a uniform offset of +32 ppmv, increasing the global mean to 400 ppmv. This is not scientifically valid, but it does allow the visualization to become illustrative of the discussion occurring today around atmospheric CO2. Without question, I would welcome a more rigorous approach or an explanation why the GEOS-5 model produces the data that it does.”

      It almost looks like NASA finally caught on to the fact that the GEOS-5 data had to be corrected, so they corrected the data, and now Beccario’s correction is being added on top of the corrected data?

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  January 27, 2017

        Surface concentration of CO2 has gone up to ridiculous amounts in some places over 2016, even if you subtract 32 ppm.

        Reply
    • However it happened, it is a glitch. It appears to have happened on January 23, 2017, the values jumped suddenly by 35-40 ppm.

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  January 27, 2017

        I don’t doubt the 32 ppm glitch, but the at the rate it is going up per month , that just gives a preview where will be in about six months. Many places that were under 400 ppm earlier last year are reading in the 460’s now and adjusting down 32, still leaves them in the 430’s. I know all about the big jump on the 23rd and agree that it is probably spurious, but the gradual growth the whole year before was not.

        Reply
        • Likely you’re right, I think.

          It’s a shame NASA doesn’t hire Cameron Beccario to present their data for them.

          If there is a NASA earth sensing program tomorrow.here in Mangostan.

        • Actually, I should be more clear. The ground measurements are the best measurements. If the satellite data disagrees with the ground measurements, believe the ground data, I think. Until Trump supporters get their hands on the ground stations…only joking, I hope.

          In this case, before we believe the long term growth, we need some verification, I think.

    • Some months ago I was checking CO2 levels for a while on Earth Nullschool. Just on my memory those in the eastern US were not above 410, and most about 400 or so, in other words about in line with the Mauna Loa levels + urbanization. This jump of 50 ppm or in such a short period of time must be some kind of glitch. I hope so, anyway.

      Reply
      • Tigertown

         /  January 28, 2017

        Earth Null School has removed the extra 32 ppm of sc CO2 from their model and the numbers showing now are actual and they are still not good, some places are as high as 440 ppm plus in Asia, Europe, and Putin Land.

        Reply
        • Tigertown

           /  January 28, 2017

          NY city is at about 428 ppm, Atlanta about 425 ppm, and the rest of the U.S. between 420 and 428 ppm. This thing with checking levels at Mauna Loa which is 13,678 ft above sea level and putting that out as a standard of where we are at is a bunch of crap.

        • Tigertown

           /  January 28, 2017

          Sorry, the observatory is not at the top, but at 11,150 ft.

        • Tigertown

           /  January 28, 2017

          From Germany:

        • Tt,
          Please give link to the German chart. Look at the 400 line in summer. Serious looking stuff.

        • Leland Palmer

           /  January 29, 2017

          Hi Tigertown-

          Yes, the earthnullschool data looks better now. These might be the real NASA numbers. Some forested areas in South America and Africa, apparently during early afternoon, are going down to about 380 ppm CO2. The Eastern U.S, Europe and China have high readings up to 440 ppm, Mauna Loa via Earthnullschool is reading about 412 ppm. Most of the earth surface area is ocean, of course, and wide areas of the ocean are right around 404 ppm.

          The daily swing from Manua Loa ground readings as of a couple of days ago was between about 405 and 409 ppm, so that checks out, roughly.

          So, it all looks plausible on Earthnullschool now, maybe slightly high, but roughly plausible, I think, within a few ppm.

          Earthnullschool was correcting by adding a fixed 32 ppm to the GEOS-5 data, and that almost certainly is not scientifically correct. Maybe that is why the high readings look higher now.

          The northern hemisphere boreal forests are not sucking down CO2 as fast now, that it is winter. But the tropical forests are still absorbing a lot of CO2, peaking during what is likely the afternoon, at peak photosynthesis times. It’s still looking scary, of course.

        • Looking for confirmation of the earthnullschool data via other satellite data, I found this:

          https://atmosphere.copernicus.eu/maps/global-carbon-dioxide-forecast#2._carbon_dioxide_at_surface_%5B_ppmv_%5D_(provided_by_cams,_the_copernicus_atmosphere_monitoring_service)/1/23/0

          This is the EU data from Copernicus, with the current interactive map, set to surface CO2 concentrations. So far as I can tell, it seems to correspond to the levels now shown by earthnullschool.

          It’s kind of neat to watch it when the forward arrow button located at the lower left of the map is activated. It takes it a while to load, but once it does it shows several days of CO2 readings in an animated presentation. It shows CO2 levels falling in the tropical forests, as they take in CO2 during the day, and then high CO2 levels at night in those forests, swinging from the 380s to maybe the 420s during the course of the day. It shows the high CO2 levels up to maybe 440 ppm from the industrial areas especially China.

          The button in the upper right gives access to different layers in the atmosphere.There are zoom tools to look at specific areas. Great interactive map, now apparently agreeing with earthnullschool.

          It seems possible that they are getting their data from some of the same satellites, though.

        • Oh, when you follow the link, it doesn’t preserve the layer settings, so you have to use the button on the upper right to pick the surface concentration layer, to correspond to the earthnullschool map, I think.

        • Tigertown

           /  January 30, 2017

          @Leland Palmer
          I use their ocean models all the time, but didn’t know they has this. Thanks.

  57. Suzanne

     /  January 27, 2017

    People’s Climate March has been announced for April 29, 2017.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/peoples-climate-march-washington_us_5888d9b4e4b0441a8f723bf8

    Reply
  58. June

     /  January 27, 2017

    Jeff Masters latest post on Cat 6 blog.

    “Dante’s Inferno” in Chile: All-Time National Heat Record Smashed by 6°F

    https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=3548

    Reply
    • John B Davies

       /  January 27, 2017

      Remember even the Pacific Decadal Oscillation has been modified by anthropogenic Global warming so though this oscillation is responsible for some of the change in Chile this oscillation itself has been modified by human behaviour.

      Reply
  59. Suzanne

     /  January 27, 2017

    CDC abruptly cancels long planned conference on climate change and health…at WP:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/23/cdc-abruptly-cancels-long-planned-conference-on-climate-change-and-health/?utm_term=.1b3343bab334

    With little warning or explanation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently canceled a major climate change conference that had been scheduled for next month in Atlanta.

    The Climate and Health Summit, which had been in the works for months, was intended as a chance for public health officials around the country to learn more about the mounting evidence of the risks to human health posed by the changing climate. But CDC officials abruptly canceled the conference before President Trump’s inauguration, sending a terse email on Jan. 9 to those who had been scheduled to speak at the event. The message did not explain the reason behind the decision.

    Reply
  60. wharf rat

     /  January 27, 2017

    Reaching global warming targets under ice-free Arctic summers requires zero emissions by 2045
    January 27, 2017

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-global-ice-free-arctic-summers-requires.html#jCp

    Reply
    • And then significant negative emissions after 2045 to make even that calculus work. In other words, exceedingly unlikely at this point.

      Reply
      • The study assumes that the worst case is “September Ice Free” in 2040, with no further worsening (e.g. August becoming fully ice free). In this worst case, the carbon budget for 2 degrees is cut by 50% – including overshoot then negative emissions.

        Given current observations of the sea ice, 2040 looks very optimistic; 2030 or earlier is very probable. Then a worsening due to feedbacks as August, then July etc. become ice free. Anything like that would mean that we already overshot the carbon budget, if I understand the paper correctly.

        Over on the Arctic Sea Ice Forum, some very good (and very alarming) work on the heat imbalance effects of the albedo change as the Arctic ice disappears.

        Reply
  61. Shawn Redmond

     /  January 28, 2017

    Peace, a drought of a different sort:
    The United States has spent several generations being the anointed arbiter of peace between Israel and Palestine. How sincere that effort has been is certainly debatable as it has consistently stood as a defender of Israel and a critic of Palestine and all aspects of self-rule. With Trump’s stated policy towards Israel any idea of honest broker has been thrown to the winds. Now Palestine has made overtures with Russia. Things could get very interesting as it is increasingly looking like Trump believes that Russia is suddenly going to be the dear friend of the United States. Is the baton passing, and where is China?

    http://www.uncommonthought.com/mtblog/archives/2017/01/27/the-paris-peace-conference-signaling-an-end-to-a-western-dominated-era.php#more-22181

    Everywhere there is turmoil and fracture the timing couldn’t be better. The one superpower/bully is tearing itself apart from the inside out. Grab a stick and stir, there will be a lot of coin and influence to be gained here. Just keep the distractions coming. Putin is an excellent gamer, prepare to be played.

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  January 28, 2017

      where is China
      Where the US has been for many years, but smarter, building relationships and selling weapons of war as well as investing in mining, infrastructure and industry in second and third world countries. When I was in China in the early 80’s I noted so many young African and Middle Eastern and Non Chinese Asians around Beijing Nanjing etc. Our Guide told us they were students, on fully paid for educational grants at Chinese universities, they spent a substantial amount of the time billeted with different Chinese families, learning the language and culture etc. Those young people are now the bureaucrats, business leaders, government officials etc, whilst the west was more focussed on making money out of educating the children of the well off
      Mexico and South America’s will be a golden opportunity for Chinese Diplomacy and assistance and arms sales

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  January 28, 2017

        Not early 80’s. early 90’s, though other members of the group had been on a tour early 80’s and had noticed the same thing then

        Reply
        • entropicman

           /  January 28, 2017

          In Africa the Chinese have been investing heavily in local infrastructure of all sorts as a quid pro quo for access to the various natural resources that the Europeans used to exploit. There are also a lot of Chinese workers settling there.

          European colonialism has gone, but a more subtle oriental colonialism is well under way.

  62. Cate

     /  January 28, 2017

    Rachel Carson, The Edge of the Sea, published 1955:

    “…it became clear by about the third decade of the twentieth century that Cape Cod was not the absolute barrier it had once been for warm-water species attempting to round it from the south. Curious changes have been taking place, with many animals invading this cold-temperate zone from the south and pushing up through Maine and even into Canada. This new distribution is, of course, related to the widespread change of climate that seems to have set in about the beginning of the century and is now well-recognised—-a general warm-up noticed first in arctic regions, then in subarctic, and now in the temperate areas of northern states….”

    Reply
    • We can’t say that there were not people who were warning us, and here we are 60+ years later with Trump the Denier.

      Reply
  63. I tried to watch he PBS recent documentary on Rachel Carson’s life and hsd work, Edge of the Sea and Silent Spring but in about 10 min I turned it off. It actually hurt too much to watch it remembering whzf is happeninv to the climateand ofher eventx in politics this past week.

    Reply
  64. Tigertown

     /  January 29, 2017

    Posted by JayW on the ASIF.

    From the National Weather Service in Anchorage.

    “SEA ICE OUTLOOK FOR WESTERN AND ARCTIC ALASKAN COASTAL WATERS
    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ANCHORAGE ALASKA
    1040 AM AKST THURSDAY 26 JANUARY 2017

    …JANUARY 2017 MONTHLY SEA ICE OUTLOOK…

    LOOKING AT THE BIG PICTURE…SEVERAL STRONG STORMS HAVE MOVED
    NORTHWARD THROUGH THE BERING SEA AND CHUKCHI SEA THIS WINTER…AND
    HAVE DESTROYED A LARGE AREA OF SEA ICE EACH TIME. SEA SURFACE
    TEMPERATURES CONTINUE TO BE ABOVE NORMAL ACROSS THE ICE FREE AREAS
    OF THE BERING SEA. THEREFORE THE EXISTING SEA ICE IS THINNER THAN
    USUAL THROUGHOUT THE BERING SEA AS WELL AS THE SOUTHERN CHUKCHI SEA.
    AS OF JANUARY 25TH…THE ICE EDGE STRETCHES FROM ROUGHLY 75 NM SOUTH
    OF GAMBELL TO 45 NM SOUTH OF CAPE NEWENHAM.”

    Reply
  65. Tigertown

     /  January 29, 2017

    Posted by Neven on the ASIB.

    Reply
  66. Ailsa

     /  January 29, 2017

    Climate Change Conversation feat. Richard Alley & Michael Mann (January 2017)
    I hour, covers a lot of ground, including scientific and political stuff, and in layman’s terms.

    Reply
  67. Shawn Redmond

     /  January 29, 2017

    And for your daily dose of optimism I present this link:
    https://thenearlynow.com/seize-the-future-cb964ecb0792#.x49igwj52

    The problem with looking at the future these days, is that we’re used to trying to spot future trends and connect them with the past. But in a time when the future breaks with the past, that practice doesn’t work. In a time of discontinuities, what you need isn’t trend spotting, but new intuitions. Today, all good foresight — I’ll go so far as to say — works to develop intuitions about how change works, now. To develop intuitions, we tell stories.
    I’ve taken all that foresight and worldbuilding we did, and cross-pollinated it with a cautiously optimistic take on a Post-Trump America. I’m very happy to say that I think it works.
    We are witnessing the collapse of the high carbon economy. It will stagger on for years, but it is in the process of falling apart. The whole 20th century model of prosperity that it fueled is going down with it. At the same time, the realities of planetary crisis, political evolution and technological acceleration mean that the new world that’s coming into being is coming way faster and way harder than anyone thought. This new world may have been set in motion by activists and advocates for the greater good, but it’s logics are in many ways disruptive, discontinuous and aggressive. The transition to sustainability we’re seeing is not going to feel like a soft landing.

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  January 30, 2017

      I think Steffen is right – the issue now is whether the cost decline of clean tech will be fast enough to drive the emissions reductions through despite political resistance. As Chris Goodall said, the fossil industry is in denial. Looking at BP he says, “nor does it say why, if EVs are cost competitive, that only a tenth of incremental sales are electric over the next couple of decades.” And “even though BP shows renewables as by far the cheapest source of power in China, it assumes that they will represent only about 19% of power generation in 2035, up from about 7% today.” https://www.carboncommentary.com/blog/2017/1/26/2017-bp-energy-outlook

      I gather when railways arrived in the UK they were bad mouthed by canal owners, who lobbied hard but fruitlessly against their adoption.

      Reply
      • I can’t see such a slow increase in EV sales. With not that much more cost, it’s nearly fuel cost fee, 200 mph range, quiet, better pickup, almost no maintenance, and lasts essentially forever. In fact, what, besides nostalgia, and towing (for a while), is going to support CVs?

        Reply
      • On the other side of the equation, it’s my understanding that the trucking industry lobbied very successfully to take business away from the railroads in this country, despite rails’ higher efficiency and (I presume) lower cost). Could be wrong, just something I read a number of years ago.

        Reply
  68. Suzanne

     /  January 29, 2017

    “New” BBC Documentary 2017…Prof. Michael Mann on Climate Change, What the Science tells us: (Just published on Youtube)

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  January 29, 2017

      23 minutes in the interviewer asks Mann what we can expect if we continue to do nothing…Dr. Mann points to several Hollywood movies including Mad Max and Soylent Green…

      Reply
    • anthropocene

       /  January 31, 2017

      Hi Suzanne, I haven’t had chance to listen to all the podcast but since it’s Michael Mann it’s certain to be good stuff. But I’m pretty sure the programme has nothing to do with the BBC. Don’t believe everything you read on the internet! This appears to be the source: http://www.elephantpodcast.org/about.html Anyway, it’s good that there seems to be another climate podcast starting. I still miss “The Climate Show” 😦

      Reply
  69. Suzanne

     /  January 29, 2017

    “Standing Up for Science” at YaleClimateConnectons page on Youtube:

    We are at war with the Anti-Science Oligarchy of this new Regime

    Reply
  70. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    Search for the Super Battery
    Explore the hidden world of energy storage and how it holds the keys to a greener future. Airing February 1, 2017 at 9 pm on PBS

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/super-battery.html

    Reply
  71. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    GM’s Chevrolet Bolt electric car wins North American Car of the Year

    General Motors picked up the crown jewel in the trifecta of trophies Monday for its new long-range electric car, the Chevrolet Bolt.

    The Bolt was named North American Car of the Year, beating two conventionally powered luxury sedans, the Genesis G90 and the Volvo S90, in an announcement delivered at the North American International Auto Show.

    Link

    Reply
  72. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    Nature doesn’t listen to AM talk radio, read the Wall Street Journal, or watch Fox News.

    Reply
  73. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 29, 2017

      My mother’s flowering quince has buds on it. When I was growing up in this house 50 years ago , they showed up 5 weeks later.

      Reply
  74. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    I’ve riffing on trees as well ……….

    Quoting 374. NativeSun:

    It is nice to be warm in the winter, so I hope it stays this way.

    Clearly you’re not a apple grower, or own a grove of maple trees . The cold of winter is essential to many types agricultural pursuits. And it has clearly been shown in forests of Western North America, that the pests that eat trees are having a field day , destroying tens of millions of acres of forests.

    After the pine beetles swept through , which now raise two crops of young a season . We are now seeing the next invasion , eating other types of trees.

    All because the old cold is gone, and many, many, more of these creatures survive the winter.

    Beetle Increase Kills Thousands of Acres

    WESTERN SLOPE, Colo.-

    The Colorado State Forest Service and the U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, conducted a forest health aerial survey for last year, which resulted with an increase in the spruce beetle and the Douglas-fir beetle.

    The spruce beetle populations have impacted 350,000 acres in the higher elevations, mainly effecting the southern and central parts of the state.

    As for the Douglas-fir beetle, which kills mature Douglas-fir trees, the 2016 survey showed an increase on the Western Slope with roughly 19,000 acres impacted. These beetles have been found in small pockets spreading from Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin counties, and most of the Gunnison Basin.

    Link

    Reply
  75. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    Beetle Increase Kills Thousands of Acres

    We’re looking at a bald Rocky Mountains , Uinta Mountains, Sierra Mountains, and Cascade Mountains, thanks to insects getting the upper wing on our brave new world. There are tens of millions of acres in these forests of “standing dead trees ” that were alive , just 10 years ago.

    This is the wooden water tower of our country, and the beetles and worms are eating holes in it.

    Dead trees don’t shade the snow pack. Living trees do . They act as a break on the spring runoff by sheltering the snow from direct sun light. All of this is done deal. And as the Keeper says it’s just getting Faster and Faster. .

    Reply
  76. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    ( I urge those interested in proxy data to read this one , it’s a pretty big deal -)

    Fossilized tree and ice cores help date huge volcanic eruption 1,000 years ago to within three months

    Writing in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews the team describes how new analysis of the partly fossilised remains of a tree killed by the eruption, and ice cores drilled in Greenland, lead them to conclude the eruption occurred in the final months of 946 AD.

    We got lucky thanks to the burst of cosmic radiation that bathed the Earth in the year 775. It was only recently recognised that this left a worldwide signature in trees alive at the time.

    Reply
  77. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    And there is crowd funding. , If Trump kills the money, They will have more than they ever dreamed of.

    It’s called give me a dollar. There millions of people who can give one dollar to help one person to do one great thing.

    Reply
  78. coloradobob

     /  January 29, 2017

    Reply
  79. coloradobob

     /  January 30, 2017

    We are not sheep.

    Reply
  80. No surprise to readers here, but some new data. Interesting details on the Milankovitch cycles filled in.

    Earth’s orbital variations, sea ice synch glacial periods. Jan 26, 2017. Brown University.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170126130856.htm

    Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  January 31, 2017

      That does explain why the eccentricity cycle now dominates as well as the switch from the 41,000 year obliquity cycle about a million years ago. Although it is obvious that that switch occurred, it has never been obvious why.

      Reply
  81. Dave McGinnis

     /  January 30, 2017

    The key phrase in the quoted article occurs farther down in the abstract of the Mega-Drought link: “Such effect is mostly dynamic, due to the decrease in the westerly winds impinging central Chile.” Yeah, westerlies are onshore and bring rain, the place is analogous to B.C. or Alaska which coincidentally are wet lately. But note in the satellite photo, the smoke goes out to sea on east winds. These are downsloping, warm and dry, again analogous to Santa Anna winds which stand for fire season in Cali. Bad news.

    I lived in Chile for a while in the 80s doing cloud seeding but up in La Tercera region, Coquimbo/La Serena much farther north where fire danger is pretty much always low.

    Reply
  82. utoutback

     /  January 30, 2017

    Elon Musk may just save the world.
    This is very impressive:
    “Tesla moved particularly, completing in just 3 months a project that in the past would have taken years.”
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-30/tesla-s-battery-revolution-just-reached-critical-mass

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  January 31, 2017

      “There were teams working out there 24 hours a day, living in construction trailers and doing the commissioning work at two in the morning,” Straubel said. “It feels like the kind of pace that we need to change the world.”

      Reply
  83. Suzanne

     /  January 30, 2017

    More disturbing news….at Reuters:
    U.S. will change course on Climate Policy http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-epa-idUSKBN15E1MM

    The United States will switch course on climate change and pull out of a global pact to cut emissions, said Myron Ebell, who headed U.S. President Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) transition team until his inauguration.

    “(Trump) could do it by executive order tomorrow or he could do it as part of a larger package,” Ebell told a conference in London on Monday. “I have no idea of the timing.”

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  January 31, 2017

      Suzanne, ghastly, Evil and moronic as Trump and his minions are, they are at least the most perfect and honest expression of what the Right really stand for. They stand, as ever, for Greed before everything else, including Life on Earth. They are the enemies of Life and always have been. Just as the tobacco industry (and its advertisers) had and continue to have NO qualms over knowingly killing tens of millions in pursuit of profit, and as the junk-food peddlers (and their advertisers, who even deliberately target children)have NO qualms over killing perhaps an even great number in pursuit of profit, so the fossil fuel peddlers, representing the great concentration of wealth ever accumulated, have NO moral compunction in knowingly causing human destruction.
      We have, now, the very best exhibition of precisely what capitalism and the Rightwing, libertarian pathopsychology truly represent. This is a threat to humanity vastly greater than Nazism, and one which will wipe us all off the face of the Earth if it can. If we don’t finally wake up, now, and fight to be rid of these incubi who have afflicted humanity and Life on Earth for millennia, then we will be history, and the final expression of humanity will be the Kochs, Ebells, Bannons and Trumps.

      Reply
  84. Shawn Redmond

     /  January 30, 2017

    I wasn’t going to post this link out of respect to a lot of the democrats that read these threads. However after watching this evenings news, hearing Trump’s press secretary say that what happened last evening in Quebec was a good reason for banning muslims from certain countries made sense. well to say I was/am pissed is an under statement. It wasn’t muslims doing the shooting asshole! It was muslims being shot!! So apologies to those of you who think Obama was great because to a lot of people on the planet outside your borders he was the worst so far. All though I’m sure that Trump is going to give him a run for his money both inside your borders as well as outside. All that said I beg your mercy for I know it is customary to kill the messenger as that is in it’s self a message.

    Imagine that Trump had said during his campaign that he wanted to greatly expand America’s drone program and bomb twice as many countries as his predecessor. What would the public outcry have been? If Trump had pledged during his campaign to reverse America’s trend toward nuclear disarmament and commit more than one trillion dollar to developing the U.S. nuclear arsenal, what would the public outcry have been? When Obama did so, no Democrat said a word. Exactly the same goes for Obama’s wars (see here). During the election, the issue of foreign wars was forbidden domain. Is that progressive politics? If Trump had promised during his campaign to greatly expand the Patriot Act, install an Orwellian surveillance program and prosecute more whistleblowers than any previous administration, what would the public outcry have been?

    http://www.flassbeck-economics.com/the-liberals-president-eight-years-of-obama/

    Reply
    • Matt

       /  January 31, 2017

      Shawn,
      Mercy truly provided 🙂

      On this article…… Well as I am on lunch break I cannot go into as much detail as I would like, but would just like to make a few observations.
      1. The constant “I wont go into his achievements” why? to avoid presenting balance perhaps?
      2. It amazes me that these far right articles always fail to mention who had control over the last eight years. Obama was a courageous president who unfortunately was a lame duck for his entire presidency. My god the good the world would have seen if he had the majority Trump enjoys at present.
      3. The author of this diatribe fails to ever mention the restrictions faced by the former President, and the compromises he had to make in order to make any progress on his agenda. As an example, all of Obama’s work on reducing GHG emissions had to be achieved via the EPA instead of through the parliament due to republican vested interests blocking tactics.
      I’m not saying for one minute that Obama was perfect, but to bring up “statistics” and “facts” during a term in office controlled by republicans is misleading and abhorrent.

      Reply
      • Matt

         /  January 31, 2017

        Or as a summary…..It is the Republicans who own the vast majority of the points presented in that article, not Obama.

        Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  January 31, 2017

      ” However after watching this evenings news, hearing Trump’s press secretary say that what happened last evening in Quebec was a good reason for banning muslims from certain countries made sense”

      If we don’t let Muslims in, Trumpistas can’t attack them while they worship?

      Quebec City Mosque Shooting Suspect Criticized Refugees and Supported President Trump Online
      http://time.com/4654434/alexandre-bissonnette-quebec-mosque-shooting-donald-trump-marie-le-pen/

      Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  January 31, 2017

      It’s not about Obama! It’s about the six plus decades of foreign policy that concerns the other 191 countries on the globe.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  January 31, 2017

        Your foreign policy is about to become domestic policy. Okay now you can kill the messenger.

        Reply
  85. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    This January was the hottest calendar month ever recorded in Sydney

    http://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/01/31/11/21/sydney-just-endured-its-hottest-month

    Reply
    • Matt

       /  January 31, 2017

      What is more amazing than that Bob, it that channel nine here even reported it at all! surprised they even mentioned it. I note the article doesn’t even mention CC, but hey, better than nothing.

      Reply
  86. Abel Adamski

     /  January 31, 2017

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/donald-trump-to-withdraw-from-paris-agreement-change-course-on-climate-change-says-adviser-20170130-gu1t58.html

    Donald Trump to withdraw from Paris agreement, ‘change course’ on climate change, says adviser

    London: The man who wrote the Trump administration’s environment action plan says the environmental movement is “the greatest threat to freedom and prosperity in the modern world” and said the United States was about to change course on climate policy, including withdrawal from the Paris agreement.

    Myron Ebell, who led the Environmental Protection Agency transition for the new administration, said he gave the president three pathways for withdrawing from the 2015 Paris agreement on greenhouse gas emissions, at least one of which could be done “right now”.

    He also said the president had been clear he wanted to abolish the EPA – though it might survive as a channel for pollution clean-up grants to states.

    And he hinted at an end to emission standards for US vehicles, through abolishing the EPA’s ‘endangerment finding’, which had given it powers to protect the public from the health threat posed by greenhouse gases.

    Reply
  87. Abel Adamski

     /  January 31, 2017

    https://climatecrocks.com/2017/01/29/this-freak-has-nuclear-weapons/

    Twitter has been lighting up all day with this video clip of Steve Bannon, who has now displaced the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, and the Director of National Intelligence, on the National Security Council. #StopPresidentBannon is trending.

    Only Donald Trump’s tissue thin skin, snakelike predatory mind, and brutish, wounded ego stands between this man and you.

    The president signed an executive action on Saturday that adds White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon to the NSC and removes the director of national intelligence and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stating they “shall attend where issues pertaining to their responsibilities and expertise are to be discussed.”
    Rice shared a tweet that said: “Trump loves and trusts the military so much he just kicked them out of the National Security Council and put in a Nazi in their place.”

    Reply
  88. Greg

     /  January 31, 2017

    The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) normally collects $4 million or so online in a year. This weekend it collected $24 million and counting. That’s the kind of outpouring of support we need right now for the resistance in response to this administration. If Don the Con pulls us out of the Paris accords I’ll give my right nut.

    ACLU racks up $24.1 million in donations over weekend
    http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/30/news/aclu-online-donations/index.html

    Reply
  89. wharf rat

     /  January 31, 2017

    AltNASA Retweeted
    Chelsea Thompson ‏@ArcticAirDoctor 3h3 hours ago
    More
    Flew low over the #Arctic Ocean near Barrow on #NASA_ATom yesterday. Almost no #seaice, in winter! Scary. #climate
    https://twitter.com/alt_nasa

    Reply
  90. Abel Adamski

     /  January 31, 2017

    One for CB and DT
    Whilst about industrial farming practices, also applicable to environmental Global Warming damage

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/28/frances-wild-hamsters-being-turned-into-crazed-cannibals-by-diet-of-corn

    Makes me wary of too much corn in the diet

    Reply
    • This is awful. Some plant biochemist is going to have to figure out a way modify corn that does not need nixtamalization. It doesn’t take much to imagine accumulating disaster without that.

      Reply
  91. Spike

     /  January 31, 2017

    The Met Office of the UK isn’t forecasting much of a stepdown in global temperature if any over the next few years. “During the five-year period 2017-2021, global average temperature is expected to remain high and is likely to be between 0.42°C and 0.89°C above the long-term (1981-2010) average. This compares with an anomaly of +0.46 ± 0.1 °C observed in 2016 (provisional), which makes 2016 one of the warmest two years on record.”

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/climate/seasonal-to-decadal/long-range/decadal-fc

    Reply
  92. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Trump has appointed a leading denier of climate change, Kenneth Haapala of the Heartland Institute, to serve on the administration team handling appointments for the U.S. Department of Commerce, the federal agency that oversees NOAA. Haapala will be in a position to help choose top administrators at NOAA, an agency that conducts atmospheric research and, among other duties, also oversees the National Weather Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

    Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/white-house/article129716229.html#storylink=cpy

    Reply
  93. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Chile – Forest Fires UPDATE (DG ECHO, ONEMI, CONAF, Meteo Chile, Local Media) (ECHO Daily Flash of 31 January 2017)

    Over the next 24 hours, extreme high temperatures (up to 34°C in Metropolitana on 31 January) and strong winds are forecast for the already affected regions. As of 31 January at 7.00 UTC, ONEMI has issued a Red Alert for forest fires in the regions of Valparaiso, Metropolitana, O’Higgings, Maule, Biobio.
    http://reliefweb.int/report/chile/chile-forest-fires-update-dg-echo-onemi-conaf-meteo-chile-local-media-echo-daily-flash

    Reply
  94. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Record heat and drought seen in Amazon during 2015-16 El Niño
    30 January 2017 / Claire Salisbury
    The 2015-16 El Niño saw record-breaking negative impacts on the Amazon rainforest, with new extremes of heat and drought; that’s bad news for curbing climate change.

    https://news.mongabay.com/2017/01/record-heat-and-drought-seen-in-amazon-during-2015-16-el-nino/

    Reply
  95. June

     /  January 31, 2017

    Soon Trump won’t have to worry about those pesky federal judges stopping his rollback of environmental regulations. Back to the good old days before Rachel Carson, and good bye to a livable climate. I have felt sick to my stomach since the inauguration, and his deliberate strategy to push these radical changes through all at once to overwhelm opposition is a smart, if evil, one. All avenues of effective protest are quickly disappearing, and Myron Ebell is calling environmentalists the greatest threat to freedom. How do we fight on so many different fronts at the same time…climate, immmigration, civil rights, wars and on and on…

    Record Judge Vacancies Could See Trump Recast Courts

    Trump is a foe of environmental regulations who is working quickly to undo rules, programs and agreements backed by President Obama to slow global warming. By appointing federal judges with similar views, Trump could make it harder for future administrations to secure courtroom approvals for new climate rules for decades to come.

    http://www.climatecentral.org/news/record-judge-vacancies-trump-recast-courts-21124

    Reply
  96. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Climate change drove population decline in New World before Europeans arrived

    What caused the rapid disappearance of a vibrant Native American agrarian culture that lived in urban settlements from the Ohio River Valley to the Mississippi River Valley in the two centuries preceding the European settlement of North America? In a new study, researchers from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis reconstructed and analyzed 2,100 years of temperature and precipitation data—and point the finger at climate change.

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-climate-drove-population-decline-world.html#jCp

    Reply
  97. Greg

     /  January 31, 2017

    Ver big new operational 8-9 MW offshore Wind turbine demonstrates where the technology is going. 24 hrs of this thing spinning would power a home for more than 20 years.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/denmark-wind-turbine-breaks-records/#ixzz4XJsgQJXC

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 31, 2017

      A small factoid about Vestus , the maker of this turbine. They were a small tractor maker in Denmark , when they bought the rights to this design , and set standard for the world. Where did they get the rights ?
      The good ole’ USA.
      Good catch Greg.

      Reply
  98. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    A Secret Army Base Buried Deep In Arctic Ice Could Rise Again

    The Camp Century site contains 53,000 gallons of diesel fuel and 6.3 million gallons of sewage and other wastewater and “nontrivial” quantities of PCBs and low-level radioactive waste from the mobile nuclear reactor that powered the base.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericmack/2017/01/31/a-secret-army-base-buried-deep-in-arctic-ice-could-rise-again/#1900a1736c63

    Reply
  99. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Louisiana Tries New Defense Against Floods — Move People To Higher Ground

    Louisiana has announced a big policy shift. Rather than buying people out after a natural disaster, the state wants to move them out of harm’s way ahead of one.

    http://www.npr.org/2017/01/29/512271883/louisiana-tries-new-defense-against-floods-move-people-to-higher-ground

    Reply
  100. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    The Meaning of Life –

    Life is a series of seemingly random events , some of which are designed to knock you on your ass. The meaning of life is getting back up.

    Reply
  101. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    I bring this up because the flush lever on my toilet broke this morning . I tried to fix it with super glue. Which melted the entire joint , and I nearly glued my right index finger to my thumb.
    The whole episode nearly brought me to tears. I really hate being an old man in this day and age. Better to have been a Comanche, they never had a toilet lever , and when they couldn’t walk around their “Home Depot”, the wolf came along and recycled them .

    I relate all this because we all are aware of this new dark age we entering. But there is getting back up, the ACLU story is one item that warmed my heart . They used to raise 4 million a year online, Cheetoe Boy signs his name and they raise 6 times that in 2.5 days.

    That’s getting back up.

    Reply
  102. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 31, 2017

      I’ve been swimming in a sea of anarchy
      I’ve been livin’ on coffee and nicotine
      I’ve been wondering if all the things I’ve seen
      Were ever real were ever really happening

      Reply
  103. A tie-in to the article “Antarctic bottom waters freshening at unexpected rate”. Jan 25, 2017.
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution).

    Scientists unravel the process of meltwater in ocean depths. Jan 30, 2017. U. of Southampton. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170130110924.htm

    An international team of researchers has discovered why fresh water, melted from Antarctic ice sheets, is often detected below the surface of the ocean, rather than rising to the top above denser seawater.

    The researchers made their discovery during an expedition in the Southern Ocean, led by Professor Karen Heywood of UEA, on British Antarctic Survey’s Royal Research Ship James Clark Ross. The trip was undertaken in 2014 as part of the NERC-funded iSTAR programme4. The team measured turbulence experienced by meltwater as it flowed out of a cave beneath the Pine Island Glacier — one of the fastest melting glaciers in Antarctica. They used a VMP23 (Vertical Microstructure Profiler) to detect subtle fluctuations in the water.

    The scientists discovered the meltwater ends up settling hundreds of metres down, because as it tries to rise above the surrounding denser seawater, it is affected by Earth’s rotation. This makes it spin very quickly around its vertical axis, resulting in the ejection of meltwater filaments in a sideways motion into the surrounding sea — preventing the water from rising to the surface.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 31, 2017

      I read this , I have been really interested in the ACC for sometime now. Several years back a denier was pointing to under sea volcanoes melting ice, his volcano was a thousand miles away from Antarctica, but I found this :

      All that water spinning around Antarctica has to pass through this straw , the Drake Passage , it’s over 13,000 feet deep . This feature is key to what happens .

      Reply
  104. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Reply
  105. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  January 31, 2017

      A Hell of a lot water has to pile up on the West side on this , this explains that red ball map we saw here a few days back.

      Reply
  106. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    It’s like fuel injector

    Reply
  107. redskylite

     /  January 31, 2017

    Robert thanks for the beautifully illustrated and the richly narrated posting on the situation in Chile, what a great old fashioned coffee table book you could release using your collection and how educational and inspirational it would be for youngster’s with interests in Earth Science. So many media outlets sweep it all under the carpet sadly.

    NASA feature a lot in this post and comments, I hope (and pray) that they can weather the coming storm and remain in the same useful mode,

    I admire their news release provided today with a beautifully clear chart up front and spelling out, clearly with no unnecessary frills, the serious situation we are now in on the atmospheric CO2, I just hope it can reach the minds of the masses, at least the clear open minded folk.

    Pray for NASA
    Nam myoho renge kyo…
    Peace to all beings.

    News | January 31, 2017

    Satellite data confirm annual carbon dioxide minimum above 400 ppm

    “Seeing global concentrations above the 400 ppm threshold at a time of year when atmospheric CO2 is typically at its lowest level is a critical turning point.”

    http://climate.nasa.gov/news/2535/satellite-data-confirm-annual-carbon-dioxide-minimum-above-400-ppm/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  February 1, 2017

      The Co2 sinks are under attack. The world want’s more giant 4X4 pickups. With a brush guard.
      They get more Mad Max by the day.

      Reply
  108. coloradobob

     /  January 31, 2017

    The mosque at Victoria, Texas was burnt to the ground this weekend. They have raised a million dollars to rebuild.

    Reply
  109. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    The environment roll out comes next .

    All the other insults mean nothing , if we lose this.

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  February 1, 2017

      Tony Abbott rolled out a blitzkrieg of far right insults. The only ones that really survived the inevitable pushback were his cuts to environmental and climate action.

      Reply
  110. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    We all share the world, to wreck it for mere money means we all lose. And that is what we’re about. Nothing short of Jesus coming back , is going to help us.

    That is wrong, there are millions who don’t need Jesus coming back .

    We can bend world, Martin Luther walked up to the doors of the church , and tacked his 95 complains. He changed the world. But the printing press made it possible. If he was 20 years earlier. ZIp.

    Reply
  111. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    What ever your issue , it pales on a Earth that driving life to extinction.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  February 1, 2017

      What ever your issue , it pales on a Earth that is driving life to extinction.

      Reply
  112. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    The moon and mars tonight , don’t look good . If I was a witch doctor.

    Reply
  113. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    If I was a witch doctor.

    But I am not, but I am believer in karma. And Nature is about vote in our karma.

    Get ready little lady.

    Reply
  114. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    Jessica Ryan Aldridge what’s a scribber?

    Reply
  115. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    The worst cyclone in the history of cyclones is coming to Palm Beach.

    Reply
  116. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    What is a scribber?

    Reply
  117. Spike

     /  February 1, 2017

    Rising CO2 induced “greening” in grasslands declines when climate gets wetter, drier or hotter.

    http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v7/n2/full/nclimate3191.html

    Reply
  118. Shawn Redmond

     /  February 1, 2017

    Battery prices have continued their stunning decline, with game-changing implications for electric vehicles (EVs), the electric grid, and the cage fight between renewables and natural gas.
    Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) reports that lithium-ion battery prices have fallen “by almost half just since 2014” and “electric cars are largely responsible.” Last year, BNEF called this “the miracle of Musk,” referring to Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla, which jump-started the stagnant EV business and whose gigafactory will keep putting downward pressure on battery costs.
    In 2013, the International Energy Agency estimated EVs would achieve cost parity with gasoline vehicles when battery costs hit $300 per kiloWatt-hour of storage capacity, which the IEA said would happen by 2020. That price point was in fact crossed last year, which is why both GM and Tesla announced they could deliver affordable (well below $40,000), long-range (200-plus miles) EVs.
    https://thinkprogress.org/chart-of-the-month-driven-by-tesla-battery-prices-cut-in-half-since-2014-718752a30a42#.mh5drbfku

    Reply
  119. wharf rat

     /  February 1, 2017

    Arctic is melting again today. it’s grim, peeples.

    ‘Beyond the extreme’: Scientists marvel at ‘increasingly non-natural’ Arctic warmth

    By Jason Samenow February 1 at 12:26 PM

    The Arctic is so warm and has been this warm for so long that scientists are struggling to explain it and are in disbelief. The climate of the Arctic is known to oscillate wildly, but scientists say this warmth is so extreme, humans surely have their hands in it and may well be changing how it operates.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/02/01/beyond-the-extreme-scientists-marvel-at-increasingly-non-natural-arctic-warmth/?postshare=2591485973112848&tid=ss_tw&utm_term=.223589263549

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  February 1, 2017

      Good article Wharf Rat and to my amazement I read the comments section which I don’t usually for reasons of which we’re all aware. However they seemed sensible. WTF!

      Reply
  120. A few articles ago I commented on a mialgia epidemics in Salvador Bahia. Seems that the culprit is a parechovirus. The epidemics seems to have been contained, wiith no cases in the last two weeks.
    https://alagoasreal.blogspot.com/2017/01/virus-causador-da-doenca-misteriosa-parechovirus.html

    Reply
  121. coloradobob

     /  February 1, 2017

    Yesterday
    The worst forest fires in Chile’s history have now destroyed more than a million acres of land
    http://www.businessinsider.com/chiles-worst-forest-fires-history-wildfire-acre-land-hectares-2017-1

    Reply
  122. Ailsa

     /  February 2, 2017

    Surely coming to the end of thread, RS will put a new one up soon… we all hope! But, a bit of music here inspired me. The ever enigmatic Kate Bush – this (old) video makes me think of the clash of science with political force… hmm..

    Reply
  123. Matt

     /  February 2, 2017

    Major jellyfish stranding here in OZ
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-02/wallpaper-of-jellyfish-wash-up-on-queensland-beach/8234454
    Marine biologist Dr Lisa-Ann Gershwin, who specialises in jellyfish, said “……..We see jellyfish bloom, but not like this, this is jaw dropping……” and “….I’ve never seen them that close together”
    But of course no mention of CC at all, no mention of the predictions of a warming more acidic ocean being the perfect conditions for jellyfish to thrive.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  February 2, 2017

      Yes, Matt-mention of anthropogenic climate destabilisation is verboten here in Australia, too. You can have reports on the Chilean fires, or the hottest ever January in Sydney, maximum and minimums, and ACD is nowhere. When you speak to people, like gardeners in the Botanic Gardens, they tell you knowingly that the older gardeners say summer here has never been wetter, in up to forty years experience, and it’s all caused by El Nino. When you mention climate change, you get puzzled, slightly suspicious looks.
      The popular mass is dull, brainwashed either in total denial (the Murdoch MSM still leading the way)or happy ignorance, as if nothing at all is happening, or could happen to disturb the idyll of their mindless consumption. And the regime is mounting a steadily rising campaign against renewable energy (urged on by Murdoch’s minions of course)yesterday promising new ‘CLEAN’, coal-power stations instead of more hated renewables. With the insane mad-man in the White House, our local maniacs are on a roll. To call it a nightmare risks epic under-statement.

      Reply
  124. Shawn Redmond

     /  February 2, 2017

    Way O/T and a fairly long read but it shows one should take a look into the history of the ones on whose shoulders you stand. In the human world, as in the natural world, everything goes round and round. Everything has a turn at being predator and at some point prey. This is history and because it often plays out over more than one lifetime it isn’t very well understood or even well known, if known at all in a lot of circles. we all know a little something about the great events that shaped our past, i.e. WW1,the depression,WW2,Korea, Vietnam. But we don’t seem to widely understand the day to day moves that deliver us out from one disaster only to pave the way into the next. Some of the trouble, I think, is in the fact that the cure for one does not necessarily look as if it will lead to the next. To far removed hence, everything has an effect on everything else.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/10/how-democrats-killed-their-populist-soul/504710/
    New Deal fears of bigness and private concentrations of power were given further ideological ammunition later in the 1930s by fascists abroad. As Roosevelt put it to Congress when announcing a far-reaching assault on monopolies in 1938: “The liberty of a democracy is not safe if the people tolerate the growth of private power to a point where it becomes stronger than their democratic state itself. That, in its essence, is fascism.” In 1947, Patman even commissioned experts to publish a book titled Fascism in Action, noting that fascism as a political system was the combination of extreme nationalism and monopoly power, a “dictatorship of big business.”….

    On the Democratic Party’s left, a series of thinkers agreed with key elements of the arguments made by Jensen, Stigler, and Bork. The prominent left-wing economist John Kenneth Galbraith argued that big business—or “the planning system” as he called it—could in fact be a form of virtuous socialism. Their view of political economics was exactly the opposite of Patman’s and the other populists. Rather than distribute power, they actively sought to concentrate it. Galbraith for instance cited the A&P chain store, which, rather than the political threat Patman had decried, Galbraith declared should be recognized as a vehicle for consumer rights and lower prices. His theory was called “countervailing power.” Big business was balanced by those subject to it: big government and big labor. Inserting democracy into the commercial arena itself through competitive markets was “a charade” and “the last eruption of the exhausted mind.” Anti-monopoly measures had never worked; they were a “cul-de-sac” for reformist energy, leading away from the real solution of public ownership of industry.

    Reply
  125. Vic

     /  February 2, 2017

    At the height of summer, Queensland’s southern interior region is expected to reach temperatures 5-10C above average over the coming week or longer, reaching record breaking temps up to 48C.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-02/queensland-weather-january-hotter-average-february-hotter-bom/8235472

    Reply
  126. Shawn Redmond

     /  February 2, 2017

    Is a March for Science a ‘terrible idea,’ or is the New York Times blaming the victims?
    Science is under assault, and it’s long since time scientists fought back.

    Joe Romm doesn’t think so….

    https://thinkprogress.org/is-a-march-for-science-a-terrible-idea-or-is-the-new-york-times-blaming-the-victims-c84b3c77e538#.4isq9uaea

    Reply
    • SR
      Appreciate your postings. It’s terrible when the best way to find relevant USA news is from outside the country.

      Reply
      • Witchee

         /  February 2, 2017

        Been that way forever at least as a balance- grew up watching the same stories on US and Canadian news programs. It was quite instructive. I have also lived outside the US, and that is something that is always in my view. Alas, my reading knowledge of languages other than English has faded and I rely on mostly English language news sources from outside the US, but I do consistently rely on them for perspective, and for the stories we do not, or barely, see.

        Reply
  127. Shawn Redmond

     /  February 2, 2017

    To think that if Pence takes control this will likely worsen.

    In North Dakota, for instance, Republicans introduced a bill last week that would allow motorists to run over and kill any protester obstructing a highway as long as a driver does so accidentally. In Minnesota, a bill introduced by Republicans last week seeks to dramatically stiffen fines for freeway protests and would allow prosecutors to seek a full year of jail time for protesters blocking a highway. Republicans in Washington state have proposed a plan to reclassify as a felony civil disobedience protests that are deemed “economic terrorism” … And in Iowa a Republican lawmaker has pledged to introduce legislation to crack down on highway protests.
    Though Democrats in state legislatures may be able to block at least some of these bills, the flood of legislative proposals stemming from anti-protester sentiment is worrisome for civil liberties advocates. Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union, told ThinkProgress she finds it “troubling” that states would prioritize anti-free speech legislation at the beginning of their legislative sessions.
    “This is a marked uptick in bills that would criminalize or penalize protected speech and protest, and every person should be alarmed at that trend,” she said, calling the bills unconstitutional. “We should also be alarmed by the attitude they betray, which is that when Americans get out into the streets and make their voices heard — recently, in record numbers — their elected representatives’ response is not to listen to those concerns but to attempt to silence and criminalize them.”
    “That goes against the very fabric of our constitutional democracy, and legislators introducing these bills should be ashamed,” she added. “To try to silence those who are speaking up right now is a betrayal of American values.”

    https://thinkprogress.org/anti-protest-legislation-2afe0d59360a#.3cqmjuybu

    Reply
  128. Shawn Redmond

     /  February 2, 2017

    Man just two weeks in and the entire system seems as though its passing through a meat grinder. Granted my knowledge of how your political system works is a bit less than optimal. It seemingly runs like the rest of western democracies,( by the wealthy for the wealthy). Looks like you folks are getting screwed from both ends at this point.

    https://thinkprogress.org/republican-bill-to-privatize-public-lands-is-yanked-after-outcry-d77bc0041c85#.8pq7x7vdl

    But selling off public lands isn’t Chaffetz’ only plan to transition public lands into individuals’ hands.
    In an apparent nod to the one-year anniversary of the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and the occupiers’ demands to dispose of public lands and undermine public officials, Chaffetz introduced a second bill that would eliminate federal law enforcement on public lands.
    This bill would abolish the law enforcement capacity of Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service officials and hand over all law enforcement powers on U.S. public lands to local sheriffs. The change was one of the demands of the Bundy family and their followers who led last year’s occupation and refuse to recognize that the federal government exists. Local governments do not have the resources to monitor or enforce on public lands.

    Reply
  129. coloradobob

     /  February 2, 2017

    President Trump, Military Split on Climate Change

    NORFOLK, VA —
    A nondescript metal box at the end of an unremarkable pier in Norfolk, Va. is one key to why the U.S. Navy is concerned about climate change.

    For nine decades, the Sewells Point tide gauge or its ancestors have been recording the sea level off Pier 6 at Naval Station Norfolk.

    The story it tells is clear. Between naturally sinking land and global warming driven sea level rise, the water is a half-meter higher than it was at the beginning of the last century.

    That’s creating problems at the world’s largest naval base.

    http://www.voanews.com/a/president-trump-military-split-on-climate-change/3702979.html

    Reply
    • DJ

       /  February 2, 2017

      Tillerson says it’s ‘just an engineering problem’. I’m so relieved…

      Reply
      • No way you can engineer your way out of the coming impacts. You’re talking about forced migration of millions away from the coastline in the best case at this time over the next 1-4 decades. Number could easily climb to the tens of millions by mid century and hundreds of millions not far after.

        Can’t engineer your way out of moving precipitation patterns, loss of predictable growing seasons, and expanding drought and too hot to be habitable zones. Sure, you can build indoor farms and habitats, but the loss of land and productivity and nature wealth and life will be a blow that will hurt human civilization and the earth environment for decades and centuries. And what about the people who don’t have access to said engineering? Add them to the mass migration pool and the growing risk of expanding poverty.

        Rex T has been selling the sickness for years and years now. What we need is a cure. Engineering isn’t even a treatment…

        Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      – Wonder how long Voice of America will be allowed to deviate from the official Trump line.

      – I see the liars at Climate Depot already have an article out rebutting this one. Seems as though their turnaround time has gotten really fast.

      Reply
  130. Robert in New Orleans

     /  February 2, 2017

    If Mr. Fanney was to throw up his hands in despair and walk away from this blog right now, I would be disappointed, but I would understand why.
    Thelma and Louise had a better chance of survival then our democracy does now.

    Reply
    • Not a chance. But, yeah, it doesn’t look too great. Trump’s assault on democracy, the one we predicted, has come in full force. I guess we could hope that some of the republicans who talk-talk a lot about small government might get cold feet. B/c this guy is a true authoritarian. No small government guy here.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  February 3, 2017

        Bannon wants their heads on poles as well for all his glib talk and spin

        Reply

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