The Oceans are Warming Faster than Previously Thought; Rate of Heat Build-up Accelerating

So we keep hearing this phrase in the sciences — faster than we thought. In the context of global warming, it’s not a phrase we want to hear. And when the world’s largest heat sink — the oceans — are warming up faster than we thought, that’s kind of a big deal.

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According to new research published today in Science Advances, the world’s oceans are warming up at an overall rate that is 13% faster than previously thought. Study authors used a new methodology to gain a more refined picture of overall ocean warming. And the results were unfortunately stark. For in addition to the oceans having gained more heat, the study also found that the rate of ocean warming is accelerating.

(Total ocean heat gain in the top 2000 meters as found in Improved estimates of ocean heat content from 1960 to 2015.)

This increased rate of warming is rather concerning — especially when you consider the fact that about 90 percent of the total extra heat absorbed by carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses produced primarily by fossil fuel burning ends up in the world’s oceans. For this reason, ocean heat gain is probably a better determiner of overall global warming than atmospheric heat gain. And, as a result, what we’re looking at is a world that’s surprising us with the rate at which it is responding to the insults of human fossil fuel emissions.

Serious Systemic Impacts From Ocean Warming

Of course, heat in the oceans produces numerous added impacts to the Earth System. As we’ve seen in Antarctica and Greenland, that heat gain has caused a number of the world’s largest ice shelves and glaciers to start melting from below — increasing concerns about the future rate of global sea level rise. The accelerating heat gain in the world’s oceans is absolutely the primary driver of the ongoing global coral bleaching event that has continued uninterrupted since 2014. More ocean heat means less oxygen — which increases the extent of ocean dead zones. And various sea creatures from starfish to mollusks to walruses to puffins have all seen habitat loss and/or loss of key food sources due to ongoing warming.

Extra ocean heat also both reduces the ability of the ocean to absorb CO2 even as it puts stress on various carbon stores — increasing the risk that a carbon feedback response from the Earth System will emerge to further worsen the rate of global warming.

(This year’s global coral bleaching event is starting to kick into high gear. Famous reefs such as the Great Barrier Reef are now threatened. But coral bleaching is just one of many harmful impacts that result from ocean warming. Image source: Coral Reef Watch.)

Finally, warmer oceans can help to push hydrological events such as instances of heavy rainfall and severe drought to greater extremes. A press release by the study’s authors noted:

…we know the oceans are much warmer now and they contain the memory of climate change. Higher sea surface temperatures are continually reinforced by the extra heat beneath the ocean surface. The oceans are affecting weather and climate through more intense rains. This process is a major reason why 2016 was the hottest year ever recorded at the Earth’s surface, beating out 2015 which was the previous record. Additionally 2015 was a year with record hurricanes, heat waves, droughts, and wild-fires around the world.

Conditions in Context — We Need Rapid Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Now

Ultimately what this accelerating and higher than expected ocean heat gain means is that we have less time. Less time to achieve a necessary reduction of emissions before various harmful and catastrophic effects from climate change get locked in. Less time to continue coddling a harmful fossil fuel industry, as the Trump Administration has determined to do. And less time to plan to help the populations of people that will inevitably be harmed by the warming that these vastly irresponsible political and economic powers have so far blocked us from preventing.

Links:

Improved Estimates of Ocean Heat Content From 1960 to 2015

Earth’s oceans are warming 13% faster than thought

Coral Reef Watch

Hat tip to Jeremy in Wales

Leave a comment

196 Comments

  1. Robert. You amaze me with the amount of well researched and well written articles you produce. That along with the references your followers provide make this the best and most up to date.source of CC news on the web.

    Reply
    • I agree. Robert is the best source of quality info and digests of the situation.

      Congrats Bob. And thanks for all the hard work we know is involved.

      Reply
    • Vaughn Anderson

       /  March 11, 2017

      Bob, here is another VERY reliable source of climate news if you have not seen it yet:

      http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/

      Be sure to look at all the graphs and the Arctic Sea Ice Forum as well which you can link to from this blog.

      Reply
      • If you’re interested in the changes now taking place in the Arctic, Neven’s site is absolutely essential. I would also highly recommend the Arctic Sea Ice graphs page and Arctic sea ice forum. One includes links to all the various essential government agencies like NOAA, JAXA, and NSIDC who are on the cutting edge of the established sciences and whose research and observations are so very essential to our understanding of an Arctic undergoing serious and considerable changes. The other is an open discussion of the latest trends among laymen and experts.

        I also want to say something about NSIDC, NOAA and the scientific reports that people like Neven and myself follow and analyze — they are the real heroes in all this. Neven and I try to help spread the word on global warming based changes. But the source is the science. Without it, we’d all be flying blind into a global warming nightmare.

        This statement has so much more bite today than in the past because the sciences are now under threat from politicians who are directly attacking it. People like Trump and Scott Pruitt and republicans like Inhoffe in the US and various others like Turnbull in Australia or Putin in Russia. There is a very real risk that a huge subset of the federally funded climate sciences will be lost under Trump and we should do everything to both support the essential public services these scientists provide and to defend the work that they so diligently and often thanklessly do.

        I absolutely agree with the kind words about Neven and I really appreciate the kind words about my work here. But I want to say that the main reason we are here is to support the sciences and to advance the public interest. So I will say thank you to Kevin Tenberth and the other researchers who did the work that the above article was based on and to highlight how essential government funded ocean temperature research programs are in the present day. This is hard, real, necessary scientific investigation that is absolutely a requirement for public safety resiliency in the present day. And if the public choice is between a tax cut for the rich and funding for the science, then the moral choice to make is to keep funding the science. The rich will do fine without another house they will never fully occupy or another car that will sit collecting dust in a garage. But the health and well being of all Americans relies on a vital and publically funded scientific program. And this is especially true today with regards to the serious threat represented by global warming.

        Yesterday, Dr Jeff Masters made a similar appeal to defend the sciences against a fallacious and fraudulent attack by Scott Pruitt. Colorado Bob has linked Dr Masters’s statement and provided a phone number for Scott Pruitt’s office below. I urge you to read Dr Master’s statement and to call Mr Pruitt and ask for his resignation as present head of the EPA. EPA, as a protector of public health has a duty to honorably and faithfully represent the sciences. Mr Pruitt’s statement about CO2 this week, made on CNBC, was a lie of vast proportion. One that, when made by a public official, puts both public welfare and the integrity of the sciences at risk. Pruitt not only impugned himself with this statement, he impugned the office of EPA head itself and the public and the sientific community should not let such an obvious and viciously harmful misrepresentation stand.

        Reply
        • Vaughn Anderson

           /  March 11, 2017

          Robert, thank you for the detailed response. You are doing a tremendous service writing all these articles. Neven does equally well. It is writers/bloggers like you and Neven and others plus the scientists who will help get us steered in the right direction. Let us remove the obstacles and move forward.

          *Mother Nature does not take IOUs.

  2. wili

     /  March 10, 2017

    I’m off fb now, but there was a site called something like ‘Faster Than Expected’ that this would fit right into. So many things are happening faster than nearly anyone expected to. One can’t help but wonder what other ‘surprises’ are in store.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 10, 2017

      This is the take-away quote for me: “Extra ocean heat also both reduces the ability of the ocean to absorb CO2 even as it puts stress on various carbon stores — increasing the risk that a carbon feedback response from the Earth System will emerge to further worsen the rate of global warming.”

      So, we are closer than we thought to the day when the oceans stop becoming a carbon sink, and instead become a source. And we are closer than we thought to the day when methane hydrates get destabilized by warming deep ocean waters. (Not to mention melting seabed permafrosts releasing not only their own carbon, but free pools of methane that they had been capping…)

      Reply
      • Erik

         /  March 11, 2017

        It’s likely to take centuries for the oceans to become net emitters of CO2 as they slowly weaken as carbon sinks.

        And there’s little evidence of the hydrates letting go soon, so a more likely immediate concern is drought impacting agriculture as fisheries decline then sea level rise.

        Reply
        • Just another ball to keep an eye on. Net carbon emitter may well be an outlier issue for the 21st. But once the glaciers start to really let go, ocean heat gain takes a big jump and I’m a little worried about some mid-range potentials. Loss of resiliency as a sink in the light of other factors is a problem worth tracking.

        • unnaturalfx

           /  March 11, 2017

          Try this again !
          Eric ,there is actually a lot of evidence pointing toward methane release . Most notably Semiltov Guefstison( really bad spelling there, sorry ) From the Siberian Times : http://siberiantimes.com/ecology/others/news/n0760-arctic-methane-gas-emission-significantly-increased-since-2014-major-new-research/
          Excert :Five years ago the professor has claimed: ‘We found more than 100 fountains, some more than a kilometre across….These are methane fields on a scale not seen before. The emissions went directly into the atmosphere… Earlier we found torch or fountain-like structures like this… Second excert :The area of spread of methane mega-emissions has significantly increased in comparison with the data obtained in the period from 2011 to 2014,’ he said. ‘These observations may indicate that the rate of degradation of underwater permafrost has increased.’
          If you are refering to the work done from the modelers at NASA , Royal Academy of Sciences ,Least we forget : Natalia Shakova,EnvisionNation :http://envisionation.co.uk/index.php/blogs/99-russian-scientists-excluded-from-presenting-important-research-as-nasa-goddard-director-tries-to-discredit-observational-scientific-research. They neglected to include DECADES of ground work data . This article includes her scathing letter.
          Thank you to all scribblers , with this space I am never alone . Live Long and Love Lots
          JBinBC

        • We should be clear that the mainstream science still sees this as a lower probability risk. The subject is highly contraversial and, due to the big unknown gray space of uncertainty it creates, can easily become contentious and distorted. So tread with care here.

      • lesliegraham1

         /  March 11, 2017

        “we are closer than we thought to the day when the oceans stop becoming a carbon sink”

        Whilst technically true I don’t think that was what the author was primarily implying.
        The ‘various carbon stores’ he refers to are, IMO, more likely to be the permafrost regions.
        My understanding is the oceans are unlikely to become a carbon source anytime soon.

        Reply
        • I’d avoid attempting to assert certainty at this time. What we will probabably see is a degradation of the ocean’s ability to uptake carbon as it warms and becomes carbon saturated in the near surface region. So the rate of carbon uptake will tend to fall through this century even disregarding the sticky issue of ocean bottom carbon stores.

          That particular issue has just been given its first brush in the sciences and we don’t have enough confirmational data to make a reliable conclusion about trends. That said, the circumstantial evidence and various accepted study conclusions points to large stores that many have concluded are resistant to significant short to medium term responses.

          Some scientists have challenged that established assertion and been shut down by the consensus science — for now. But my view is that threat represented by ocean carbon stores is something that requires additional investigation.

          Permafrost carbon is more likely to respond this century and it appears that we are seeing the start of that response now. But there is still a good degree of uncertainty RE how large that response will be. 50-100 GT appears to be a decent range at this time for the 21st Century.

          We should be clear that though each issue — ocean carbon sink degradation, ocean carbon store response or lack thereof, and permafrost carbon feedback are separate issues but that they appear to have a synergistic relationship. For example, we have submerged permafrost that will probably release its own carbon into the ocean to some extent or another absent hydrate response. Thawing permafrost will dump carbon into the ocean through rivers and sea level rise. Any ocean carbon store response will lend to the degradation of the ocean as a carbon sink. And ocean carbon sink degradation will tend to keep more heat trapping gases in the atmosphere.

          When you look at the big picture like that, it can make things seem rather stark. But, again, it’s a matter of trying get a picture of the accurate ranges of more likely responses. That’s a tough issue to grapple with. Because it’s a little scary and if we accept even moderate permafrost carbon response, a mild but appreciable to the ledger ocean carbon store response, and a decline in the ocean’s ability ability to draw in net carbon that probably flips to net source after enough of the glaciers go down and overturning circulation is reduced, then the conclusion is that we don’t have time to waste.

          One last point — the methodology here is to be inclusive with regards to reasonable risks and established data sets. Such inclusion by necessity involves a dash of reasoned speculation that must necessarily be governed as observations change. Such an assessment is inherently non heirarchical. However, the net aim is to support the science by advancing a vital and lively discussion among experts and non experts alike, to refine risk assessments, and to invite public participation.

    • Suzanne

       /  March 11, 2017

      Wili…I think this is the blog you are referring to “Faster than expected”.
      http://www.fasterthanexpected.com/

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      Wili, ‘faster than expected’ is in large part the fault of the climate science Establishment, who ‘went along to get along’ with deranged Rightwing regimes, particularly in the corrupted IPCC process, to protect their Government sinecures, to sell out altogether, as a few have done, and out of cowardice at confronting the genocidal Right. Even today, as our destruction looms ever nearer, they are basically silent.

      Reply
  3. Keith Antonysen

     /  March 11, 2017

    In 2015 it appeared as though an El Nino event would happen, it appeared in 2016. Now, BOM is stating that there is a 50/50 chance of experiencing an El Nino in 2017. A further indication of Ocean warming, I would think. That must be some kind of record?

    Reply
  4. louis wachsmuth

     /  March 11, 2017

    I f ind it rather fun to post comments of facts onto the “Cornwall Alliance” site. These people see no environmental problems, but we need to burn more fuels so the third world countries can have electriicity so they can have a better life–it’s our duty, they say. Cornwall tries to answer my comments but soon they ignore me. As a former oyster farmer I suffered environmental damage at least three ways by man-caused actions.

    Reply
  5. Keith Antonysen

     /  March 11, 2017

    Thank you for all the research you do Robert, and keeping us informed.

    Off topic, but this is a pod cast featuring Thomas Frank who gives an insight into his views on American politics.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/conversations/conversations-thomas-frank/8324254

    Thomas Frank commented on how the Republicans shamelessly support big business. He instanced how a Republican Kansas Governor experimented with the concept of reducing the size of Government Agencies; that is, promoting austery. The view being that business would be encouraged, it did not happen. The result being Kansas went backwards, a Democrat Governor was subsequently elected and took the opposite tack to government, and prosperity improved.

    Thomas Frank spoke about how the Democrats in earlier years truely understood the plight of working people; but, the Democrat Party evolved from a Party being led by persons from all socio-economic areas to leaders with high academic qualifications, a Professional class. The result being that the Democrats lost contact with numerous groups within society.

    Reply
  6. Allan Barr

     /  March 11, 2017

    Yeah your output Robert is astonishing, quality and quantity. I suspect once arctic ice free everything is going to move faster yet, thanks for the true service you provide, much appreciated. I kinda doubt there is any writer quite like you anywhere in the world.

    Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    EPA Chief Denies Basic Climate Science
    By: Jeff Masters

    Commentary: Scott Pruitt a destructive choice for head of EPA
    It’s difficult to imagine a more destructive choice for the health of Americans, the avoidance of dangerous climate change, and the health of the American economy than Scott Pruitt as head of EPA. Mr. Pruitt’s denial of the basic science behind climate change makes him as unfit for the office of EPA administrator as an astrologer would be for head of NASA. Decisions based on the best science are critical for the success of any endeavor, as summed up well by Mindy Lubber, president of Ceres, in a March 10 editorial at CNBC: “Businesses thrive when they make smart decisions based on the best available information. The reality is that climate change is happening now and is having wide-ranging ripple effects on businesses. Ignoring risks and long-term trends for short-term benefits is how to drive a company—and the economy—into the ground.”

    Take Action!
    These escalating assaults on our health and on the air we all breathe must be protested, and I urge you to write your Senators and Representatives on this issue:

    Contact your House Representative
    Contact your Senator

    Jeff Masters

    Reply
  8. Erik

     /  March 11, 2017

    Ocean temperature controls ice sheet mass so this is bad news for sea level rise. Parts of Antarctica are minus 50 C, warm it up to minus 45 and who cares.

    But it’s at the melting point at the coast and a rise in temp of 1 degree is an insult to ice shelves anywhere in the planet.

    
Ice shelves constrain about 25m of sea level rise equivalent of ice grounded below sea level where it is bathed in warming oceans. 2m in Greenland, 3.5m in West Antarctica and 19m in East Antarctica.



    A lot is still not known about ice sheet response, but it could be devastating.
It’s been observed at Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland that marine terminating ice cliffs over 100m in height collapse. The Thwaites Glacier in the WAIS can expose ice cliffs higher than El Capitan (1000m) to warming oceans and entrain the collapse of the entire ice sheet. When a calving front opens up at Thwaites Glacier the ocean can follow that front all the way to the Trans Antarctic Mountains, dumping over 3m of sea level rise equivalent of ice in multi decadal times or less.


    Reply
  9. Erik

     /  March 11, 2017

    This report on the rate of ocean warming noted the need for “upward revisions in our estimates of the climate’s sensitivity to greenhouse gases and the associated resultant sea level rise.”

    Sea level rise projections were already getting very worrisome, with indications that if we don’t change our ways we could see several meters of sea level rise within 100 years.

    We’d be down to demolition and rebuilding at that point.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      Erik, it is, I would say, mad to speak of several metres of SLR ‘within 100 years’. That just puts it off to the never-never of the far-off future, and, in any case, it is highly likely to occur in a few decades, not ten. And, in 100 years, ‘we’ will not be around to do any ‘..demolition and rebuilding’. That is Panglossian aversion to looking reality in the face.

      Reply
  10. Wow,Robert, you are a writing machine these days, for thst I thank you very very much.
    Sheri

    Reply
  11. redskylite

     /  March 11, 2017

    And R.S it’s thanks from me for highlighting and well illustrating these latest and important findings from a research team. More and more evidence piling in. This article appeared in the Houston Chronicle (10th March) so at least the urgency is being noticed, even in the center state for oil and the workplace of Katherine Hayhoe. Is there still room for optimism ? Close call but diminishing fast.

    “Trump and his advisers may have lost the audience. Throughout the conference known as CERAWeek by IHS Markit, energy ministers, CEOs and other top executives showed that the industry is running ahead of policymakers on climate change, no longer treating it as an inconvenient theory, but rather as a hard reality to which it must adapt and change.”

    http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/For-big-oil-climate-change-looms-large-even-in-10993607.php

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      The only meaningful way in which the fossil fuel industry can ‘adapt’, is by committing auto-euthanasia, and taking its precious money and investing it somewhere where they are not exterminating Life on Earth.

      Reply
  12. redskylite

     /  March 11, 2017

    And at least Smithsonian is trying to keep optimistic.

    On Earth Day weekend, the Smithsonian will convene the first Earth Optimism Summit, a three-day event featuring more than 150 scientists, thought leaders, philanthropists, conservationists and civic leaders, which will highlight what is working in conservation and how to scale up and replicate it. The summit speaker sessions will be based at the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., April 21–23.

    The summit is organized by the Smithsonian Conservation Commons, a team of conservation experts from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. The Conservation Commons brings researchers together to tackle complex conservation problems on a global scale.

    http://insider.si.edu/2017/03/smithsonian-convene-earth-optimism-summit-april-21-23/

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      I imagine the Optimism Conference will be thoroughly infiltrated by the likes of Lomborg and his clones. I hope that I’m wrong, but I rather doubt it. I suppose techno-fixes, ‘clean coal’, ‘carbon capture and storage’, gas as a ‘transition fuel’, etc, and ‘market mechanisms’ like emissions trading will feature strongly. I seem to recall that the Kochs are generous patrons of the Smithsonian.

      Reply
  13. Suzanne

     /  March 11, 2017

    What the past tells us about the Future of Climate Change with TR Kidder: TedX
    Kidder uses the demise of the Han Dynasty 2,000 years ago, due to the catastrophic Yellow River flooding, and how that tragedy can be applied to what we are facing today with CC:

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  March 11, 2017

      At 6:30 into the talk.

      The Yellow River is water poor, and sediment rich .

      The Mississippi carries around 4 to 6 lbs. per cubic meter .
      The Amazon carries around 20 to 40 lbs. per cubic meter.
      The Yellow River at flood carries around 800 lbs.

      Reply
  14. climatehawk1

     /  March 11, 2017

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  15. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s phones have been ringing off the hook — literally — since he questioned the link between human activity and climate change.

    The calls to Pruitt’s main line, 202-564-4700, reached such a high volume by Friday that agency officials created an impromptu call center, according to three agency employees. The officials asked for anonymity out of fear of retaliation.

    Scott Pruitt’s office deluged with angry callers after he questions the science of global warming

    Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    A new study , out Friday in the journal Science Advances, suggests that since 1960, a staggering 337 zetajoules of energy – that’s 337 followed by 21 zeros – have been added to the ocean in the form of heat. And most of it has occurred since 1980.

    “The ocean is the memory of all of the past climate change,” said study co-author Kevin Trenberth , a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

    Link

    Reply
  17. Hi there,
    I just discovered your blog, having wondered across from And Then There’s Physics. Lots of good stuff here, so thanks. I will be dropping back regularly.
    Cheers.

    Reply
  18. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    In The Face Of A Trump Environmental Rollback, California Stands In Defiance ready to play a key role.

    Given that utilities are traditionally subject to state, not federal laws, all states should be able to pursue their own energy plans, despite Trump.

    That will include many red states that are developing clean energy industries:

    “Everyone talks about red states and blue states,” said Hal Harvey, CEO of Energy Innovation, a policy research group. “We really have to start talking about green states and brown states.”

    Link

    Reply
  19. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    Endangerment and Cause or Contribute Findings for Greenhouse Gases under the Section 202(a) of the Clean Air Act

    Action
    On December 7, 2009, the Administrator signed two distinct findings regarding greenhouse gases under section 202(a) of the Clean Air Act:
    Endangerment Finding: The Administrator finds that the current and projected concentrations of the six key well-mixed greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)—in the atmosphere threaten the public health and welfare of current and future generations.
    Cause or Contribute Finding: The Administrator finds that the combined emissions of these well-mixed greenhouse gases from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle engines contribute to the greenhouse gas pollution which threatens public health and welfare.

    EPA

    Reply
  20. Robert E Prue

     /  March 11, 2017

    I’m sure some of you all have read The Vanishing Face of Gaia by James Lovelock. He suggests that the Arctic ocean will be almost Ice free in about 15 years. His book was published 2009. Once ice free summer’s start,he suggests a “serious increase of the Earth’s heat load”. I’m thinking he hit the nail on the head.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  March 11, 2017

      James instinctively knew in the 90’s due to inertia it was probably to late. A bit like Einstein instinctively knew there had to be black holes, just lacked the tools to prove it. Well just like a black hole CC has an event horizon. We can look in but there is no going back. We have ventured to close and now it looks as if the gravity wave has taken control away from us.

      Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  March 14, 2017

        Einstein knew that black holes exist because the mathematics say so. Ditto with climate destabilisation. We passed the event horizon about 2009 (if not earlier), when Copenhagen was sabotaged by the rich, Western, states. I believe that, for the Aymara of the Andes, the past and the future are viewed in a radically different way from that experienced by Europeans. The past and future are, in a way, transposed, and what is ‘past’ in our understanding is yet to come in theirs. It made me think, when I heard it relayed on the radio, second-hand, by the author, Alberto Manguel, of Marquez’s novel ‘Chronicle of a Death Foretold’. Our civilization’s death has long been foretold for millennia in myth and religious belief, and by science for at least forty years, but with deeper roots than that.

        Reply
  21. wili

     /  March 11, 2017

    It is becoming ever clearer that we have irreparably smashed the earth, like a fine vase dropped from a considerable height. The only question now is whether we are going to proceed further o grind it into an unrecognizable powder. All indications so far are that this is exactly where we are heading.

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      In the excellent documentary, ‘Patience (After Sebald)’, the author is quoted, in his ‘The Rings of Saturn’, after he experiences a dust-storm in, of all places, East Anglia, as observing that ‘..although it now grew lighter once more, the sun, which was at its zenith, remained hidden behind the banners of pollen-fine dust that hung for a long time in the air. This, I thought, will be what is left after the earth had ground itself down’. Or been ground down by the psychotic apes, of course.

      Reply
  22. wili

     /  March 11, 2017

    (to, not o)

    Reply
  23. Shawn Redmond

     /  March 11, 2017

    Robert, you comparing notes with Joe Romm or what. Seems you guys post similar articles often.
    ahttps://thinkprogress.org/trumps-policies-will-wreck-coastal-property-values-before-sea-level-rise-does-b3ac326ebfb6#.nx8u59c33
    Both the Arctic and Antarctic keep smashing records for ice loss, providing more evidence we are headed for the worst-case scenario of sea level rise. At the same time, President Trump plans to block climate action while slashing funding for coastal adaptation and monitoring.

    Reply
  24. Shawn Redmond

     /  March 11, 2017

    OT but an interesting read on movements and their workings. Below a small bit from the post.
    https://systemicdisorder.wordpress.com
    Nothing of human creation lasts forever. Capitalism, despite the frantic scribblings of apologists for inequality, is no more immune from this than previous forms of economic and social relations. What will replace it is up to all of us. Given that infinite growth is impossible on a finite planet, that hard-won reforms are temporary in a system of massive and pervasive power imbalances, that no permanent solutions are available in a system that is dependent on its most powerful institutions (large corporations) being able to offload all responsibility for pollution and other social problems on society, and that inequality, endless growth, global warming and pollution are necessary byproducts for the system to function at all, limits will be reached.

    If this is the last century of capitalism, what will replace it? It could be something worse — some combination of high-tech fascism imposed on feudal arrangements in which a minuscule minority uses extreme force to hoard the world’s dwindling resources for itself is not only not out of the question, but the likely response of a capitalist elite that will stop at nothing to maintain itself. In the continued absence of organized resistance across borders, that may well be the future. Or a better world can be created, through organized struggle, that is based on fulfilling human need within environmentally sustainable practices in which everybody has a say in how their enterprise functions and in larger political and social decisions.

    Reply
    • Improbable Otherness

       /  March 11, 2017

      Thanks for the link to Systemic Disorder, Shawn. I read a couple of the more recent essays and the ensuing comments which I found impressive, especially in “Wall Street bigger and badder…”. Thanks, again.

      Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      Shawn, genocidal neo-feudalism is already here. It is not a dark, dystopian future-it is here and now.

      Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    Watch: Incredible videos of floods in Coromandel and Northland pour into 1 NEWS

    A huge storm swept through the North Island overnight, sending some communities in the Far North underwater, and for the second time this week submerging roads and bringing down slips across the Coromandel Peninsula.

    Link

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  March 11, 2017

      Reply
      • lesliegraham1

         /  March 12, 2017

        That’s where I live. We got cut off by flood waters a couple of days ago.
        The rain is very welcome though – 2015 was the dryest year since records began and 2016 was the hottest.
        Pity we got it all on one day though. It’s still chucking it down as I write. Not nearly so intense though.

        Reply
        • lesliegraham1

           /  March 12, 2017

          I spoke too soon. Can hardly hear myself think with the torrential rain hammering off the roof again for the last half hour. We are probably cut off once more but I’m not going out there to find out.

  26. Shawn Redmond

     /  March 11, 2017

    Check out these SSTA’s off Greenland. 5.8c above normal in the green circle. With a lot of ocean 1-3c above average down the east coast around southern Greenland and over to Labrador.
    earth / a global map of wind, weather, and ocean conditions
    https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/ocean/primary/waves/overlay=sea_surface_temp_anomaly/orthographic=-50.07,69.52,1415/loc=-29.995,66.188

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  March 11, 2017

      Waves are 6 to 8 metres along the southeast coast as well. A warm water wash for the ice that the 70 to 80kms winds push into this.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  March 11, 2017

        There are strong southerlies pushing all down the west side as well. Cate looks like you’re getting a bit of a pounding in eastern Nfld. today also. A bullet that just missed us here in N.S. overnight.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  March 11, 2017

          Shawn, yep, snowing hard and blowing a hoolie on the Rock today! Typical March storm. This will certainly stir up the pack out on the front, with nor’easterlies today and sou’westerlies tomorrow. Another storm is due mid-week, we hear—that’ll be the one we call Paddy’s Batch. After that we’ll have Sheila’s Brush, and there will be at least one other rip-roarer right around the end of the month. Yep, we get so many of these big howlers in March, we’ve got perennial names for them. 😀

        • Cate

           /  March 11, 2017

          Damage reports starting to trickle in from all around eastern Newfoundland now—chimneys down, windows blown in, power flickering in and out. Hurricane force winds, the likes of which long-term residents have, you guessed it, “never seen before.”

        • Thanks for this report, Cate. Hope you and yours are safe. –R

        • Cate

           /  March 11, 2017

          Thanks, RS. All well here, hunkered down for the duration in the central boreal. East of us, the St John’s area is getting hammered—-incredible wind damage but so far no major injuries, thank goodness.

        • Cate

           /  March 11, 2017

          Following the tiwitterfeed at #nlwx—-here’s a good thing: people are wondering why we don’t have any windpower in this windiest of provinces. The penny dropping.

    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      I think it is about time to declare that ‘It’, ie Nemesis, has landed.

      Reply
  27. Cate

     /  March 11, 2017

    Snowed in with a nice fire and a cuppa—now something good to read…..

    So—here’s the Dark Mountain Project.

    Perhaps you all know about this, but if not, it might be worth exploring, especially if you, like me, have found the going heavy of late. No matter how dark the prospects, there are ways through this. One involves crafting new responses in the stories we tell ourselves, reimagining—reimaging—our identity and our place in the cosmos.

    I’ve just read the Manifesto (from 2009) and looking forward to dipping into the Blog.

    http://dark-mountain.net/about/manifesto/

    Hope this helps. xo

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 11, 2017

      Thanks for reminding me of these guys. When it was first announced, wow, almost a decade ago now, I know there was some controversy about the perception that these guys were giving up. I never saw it that way. For me, the biggest challenge our predicaments pose is what they mean about how we need to change ourselves culturally. This work is as important as rs’s or other important scientific and activist work, in my book at least. But I’m always open to hear others’ perspectives.

      Reply
      • In the age of climate change, doom is the heroin of the masses.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  March 12, 2017

          There is certainly an either-or quality to human thinking so far in this crisis: either we’re doomed (from which assumption follow all sorts of arguments and conclusions) or we’re not (ditto). It’s almost as if our species has set up two camps, and you have to pick which side you belong to. Well, I’m not happy with either at the moment. I guess I’m looking for thinking in between, for a way to reimagine our response to this predicament beyond the either-or, a way that can encompass them both into the future.

          Whether we end up with the either, the or, or what is more likely, some agonising mixture of both, I think we are looking at transformation as a key to survival here, and by that I mean human transformation: changing how we see ourselves, how we act towards each other and the planet, etc. I happen to think that writers—like RS, artists, and other creative types who are thinking about this might be able to find ways to express this need for transformation and what it might look like, better than say, life coaches, pastors, philosophers, or psychologists can. There is a lot of heat and noise out there. This is a big deal: the greatest crisis we have ever faced. We need room for some light and quiet to consider it.

          I find some of that light and quiet right here.

          Just rambling off the top of my head, hoping not to go over the brink. 😀

        • So there are two old forms of thinking that need to be set aside if we’re to achieve transformation. The one is the business as usual thinking — which seems to elevate both the wealthy and the market above all things. The other is this view, which is partly helpful, that ancient humans were more in balance with the Earth and that their way of life should be idealized when compared to the mechanized monstrosities of the present day. One view is greedy, materialistic, and ultimately unimaginative; the other view leads to a reactionary response to jettison all technology and simply live in the natural world. Both ideals are impossible fantasies. Both are incapable of rationally confronting the problems presented by climate change and collapse pressure. One emerges from the hoard/freeze reaction the other emerges from the flee reaction. Neither produces outcomes that are positive enough to produce a path to survival for either human beings or the natural world.

          Transformation involves working with what we have in a moral way. To take the lessons learned from the ancients to transform human understanding and technology in a way that results in caring for the natural world. It involves responsibly using human innovation in a way that is benevolent and it incorporates the wisdom passed down to us through the ages. And it involves jettisoning harmful technology and confronting bad actors. The word we use for this process in practice is sustainability. And it is the honest confrontation reaction.

          In other words, wallowing in the past without accepting that the human animal is just one rather powerful species that will alter the Earth for good or ill is failing to live in the present day and to confront present problems. The philosophy ends in misanthropy and nialism because it lacks the will or energy or imagination to envision a positive path forward. The business as usual mentality seeks to hang on to what we’ve got for as long as we can, but it often fails in a similar fashion in which its proponents elevate the individual above society, seek self and other destructive competition, and follow a dominating path that leads to an inability to connect with others or the natural world. The business as usual mentality is the weaponized engine of the present destruction.

          Sustainability is transformation. It is the middle road and of course it would reject the precepts of misanthropy and nialism that are the perversion of the flee/back to nature impulse.

        • It appears to me that the present day Native Americans understand these truths pretty intuitively. Consider this recent prayer:

          Great Spirit:
          Give us hearts to understand
          Never to take from creation’s beauty more than we give,
          Never to destroy wantonly for the furtherance of greed,
          Never to deny to give our hands to the building of Earth’s beauty,
          Never to take from her what we cannot use.

          Give us hearts to understand:
          That to destroy Earth’s music is to create confusion,
          That to wreck her appearance is to blind us to beauty,
          That to callously pollute her fragrance is to make a house of stench,
          That as we care for her, she will care for us,

          We have forgotten who we are,
          We have sought simply for our own security,
          We have exploited simply for our own ends,
          We have distorted our knowledge,
          We have abused our power.

          Great Spirit: whose dry lands thirst,
          Help us find the way to refresh our lands.

          Great Spirit: whose waters are choked with debris and pollution,
          Help us find the way to cleanse the waters.

          Great Spirit: whose beautiful Earth grows ugly with misuse,
          Help us find the way to restore the beauty of your handiwork.

          Great Spirit: whose creatures are being destroyed,
          Help us find the way to replenish them.

          Great Spirit: whose gifts to us are being lost,
          In selfishness and corruption,
          Help us to find a way to restore our Humanity.

          A prayer for the sustainability and restoration of nature and the establishment of a benevolent humanity.

        • Cate

           /  March 12, 2017

          RS, thanks for articulating those issues around transformation—spot on. There is also something beneath all the surface change that must happen, something at the core—in the heart: what we are facing is nothing less than an evolutionary challenge. As a species, we have to figure out how to take the next big step in self-transformation—a bit like the first fish who struggled ashore. We have to become something new, something different, and greater than we have ever been in order to meet this challenge. We have to change our own nature—human nature– in order to become fit for purpose, fit for sustainable life on a planet whose resources are limitless only if we learn how to limit ourselves.

          And yes, native spirituality has much—I would say everything—to teach us about living sustainably and in harmony with the planet.

          By coincidence I found a post on the ASIF from AbruptSLR on finding third ways between “growth” and “non-growth.” So—the third way, the way between and beyond the opposing camps….an idea in the air, perhaps.

          http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1102.msg106150.html#msg106150

        • Hilary

           /  March 13, 2017

          Heard this excellent interview on the radio today, she explains how she remains positive & thinks improving communication is a way forward, she & this photographer group achieves it with images & publicity:
          “Using her camera to change the world”
          Kathryn Ryan talks to leading conservation photographer Cristina Mittermeier. She is the co founder and Executive Director of SeaLegacy, a non-profit organization with a mission to use the power of photography and story-telling on behalf on marine conservation.

          http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/201836390/using-her-camera-to-change-the-world

      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  March 14, 2017

        Any project for human survival must, in my opinion, make its first priority the necessity of ensuring that Life-destroying dead souls NEVER come to dominate humanity again.

        Reply
    • miles h

       /  March 11, 2017

      i used to look at dark mountain, but it was pretty dead…. not much got posted. maybe things have changed recently?

      Reply
  28. Greg

     /  March 11, 2017

    This is how it gets done:
    http://insideevs.com/elon-musk-accepts-challenge-to-install-100-mwh-tesla-powerpack-system-in-100-days-or-its-free/

    100MW storage in 100 days Down Under or free. 250$/KW. Elon knows how to motivate a team and deliver and scale.

    Reply
  29. June

     /  March 11, 2017

    The following is just a draft statement, so it may change some, but it is really discouraging.

    G-20 Poised to Signal Retreat From Climate-Change Funding Pledge

    Citing “scarce public resources,” the ministers said they would encourage multilateral development banks to raise private funds to accomplish goals set under the 2015 Paris climate accord, according to a preliminary statement drafted for a meeting that will be held in Germany next week…

    The statement, obtained by Bloomberg News, is a significant departure from a communique issued in July, when finance ministers urged governments to quickly implement the Paris Agreement, including a call for wealthy nations to make good on commitments to mobilize $100 billion annually to cut greenhouse gases around the globe.

    “The takeaway is it clearly puts less emphasis on climate finance as a priority than last year’s did,” Alden Meyer, director of policy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said in an interview. “It doesn’t talk about government action. That is a significant step back from what countries agreed to in Paris.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-03-09/g-20-document-shows-governments-retreating-from-climate-funding

    Reply
    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      Everyone knew that that 100 billion was pure bull-dust, just for PR purposes.

      Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    Reply
    • Nice, succinct, and, sadly accurate.

      OT … But based on the comment chatter, it appears that the next line of distorted wedge issue attacks aimed at dividing environmentalists will be on the term — sustainability. The subversive assaults on us are endless. I’ve got zero tolerance for it anymore.

      Will say that if any part of the natural world is to survive alongside human civilization, then the drive for sustainability (and related jettisoning of fossil fuel industry) is an absolute necessity.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  March 11, 2017

        Hi Robert, looks like there is a comment stuck in “awaiting moderation”. It’s OT on Fukushima. Not sure if the link is a problem or not. If it is cut it. As you know I’m not looking to rock any boats.

        Reply
        • Looks like misinformation to me. Crazy predictions, no corroborating credible source. I’ve removed it.

        • Shawn –
          The famous anti-nuclear advocate Dr. Helen Caldicott is more like a “nuclear denialist”, and a large part of the reason we don’t have more good, modern nuclear power today. More 3G+ or 4G nuclear would be a great help, but the kind of irrational fear generated by Caldicott & co has prevented this.

          Was Not strong on Nuclear myself for some time, until began exploring it. Main problems – 1) dealing with the “waste”. 2) All those high-pressure systems required for cooling operations. Newer nuclear could solve both those problems – and clean up the waste lying around from existing reactors at the same time.

          Not likely to get it though, because of irrational paranoia spread by such as Caldicott.

        • lesliegraham1

           /  March 12, 2017

          Not likely to get it though, because we don’t need it, can’t afford it, we would need 14,000 ‘new’ nuclear reactors and we don’t have time anyway.
          Other than that it’s a great idea – for the people who build them at taxpayers expense.

        • Eric Thurston

           /  March 12, 2017

          I tend to agree with lesliegraham1 on the nuclear issue. IMO the issues more likely to derail future building of nuclear power plants are cost and a level of complexity that humans are simply unable to manage, especially at a large scale. These, rather than the paranoia fostered by Caldicott et. al will do the job of preventing developing a large-scale move to nuclear power. Also, I tend to get very suspicious of glib claims that ‘new generation’ of — not even on the drawing board– reactors can solve the waste and safety issues. I’m also suspicious of claims that only 30 people died as a result of Chernobyl, and the complete dismissal of the Russian studies that paint a very different picture, and zero fatalities as a result of Fukushima. I have yet to run into a nuclear proponent who is honest about these issues.

          This piece on thorium reactors adds to the mix:
          http://www.ccnr.org/Thorium_Reactors.html

        • lesliegraham1

           /  March 12, 2017

          “..glib claims that ‘new generation’ of — not even on the drawing board”'”

          Indeed. The nuclear industry is cynically trying to hijack the climate change problem to rehabilitate their global white elephant project. They have no morals whatsoever.
          In light of what we can confidently expect to be the situation in 30 years time we should be immediately start attempting to decommission the existing nuclear reactors while we still have the global infrastructure, civil order and enough people with the expertise to do so before it’s too late.
          I really can’t imagine that we will be in any position to do so in a peaceful and orderly fashion in the midst of a collapsing global civilisation with the billions of climate change refugees and resource wars that are inevitably on the way.
          Sorry if that sounds a tad apocalyptic but I don’t see any grounds for optimism given the last 30 years of denial and the current political trends which, if anything, are worsening.
          This ain’t no disco and we have to be pragmatic.
          Knowing what we know building yet more of these time bombs now is simply insane.

        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  March 16, 2017

          In fact nuclear is a stalking-horse for fossil fuels. Money wasted on nuclear energy is money not spent on real renewables, like wind and solar, and therefore advantages fossil fuels. Nukes just keep getting more expensive, longer to construct, and harder to maintain, and the waste and accident disasters have not yet been solved. Don’t forget that the same capitalist caste, often the same financial interests and hyper-rich individual parasites, control both fossil fuels and nukes.

      • coloradobob

         /  March 11, 2017

        Right-Wing Media Latch On To “Shadow Government” Conspiracy To Absolve Trump From Russia Controversy
        https://mediamatters.org/research/2017/03/03/right-wing-media-latch-deep-state-shadow-government-conspiracy-absolve-trump-russia-controversy/215555

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  March 11, 2017

          Thanks Robert good to know.

        • I don’t think many people would describe me as a big nuclear proponent. I think it’s costly, takes a long time to build, relies on overly optimistic claims about new tech, has had a negative learning curve for decades, and produces big disasters that generate a high degree of public backlash when things go wrong. It is helpful for reducing GHG, but renewables are far more likely to succeed on a larger scale due to far more favorable cost curves, easy scalability, modularity and no risk of catastrophic failure that pollutes large regions with environmental toxins.

          That said, Caldicot goes way too far in demonizing nuclear and appears to simply make up data:

          https://www.theguardian.com/environment/georgemonbiot/2011/apr/13/anti-nuclear-lobby-interrogate-beliefs

  31. Barbara Burnett

     /  March 11, 2017

    Just letting everyone know, links to The Washington Post won’t go through for me. I get a message saying that I’ve read by quota of free articles for the month and that I have to buy a subscription to read any more. I got this message on 3/1–when I hadn’t read any articles yet in March. I would appreciate it if those who link to WP articles could include a longer synopsis. Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  March 11, 2017

      Clear your cookies, see if that helps , will do that synopsis thing though.

      Reply
    • Greg

       /  March 11, 2017

      Also, if you hit the stop button before it fully loads you can read. The Post could use your subscription, though, as they are helping to hold the line these days. Real journalism is vital. RS falls in that category too 🙂

      Reply
    • Find your browser settings control for cookies.
      Delete all cookies about “WashingtonPost” or WaPo”
      Close settings
      reload desired WaPo page

      (Remember giving this advice to DT a couple of years ago)

      Reply
  32. coloradobob

     /  March 11, 2017

    EPA phones ring off the hook after Pruitt’s remarks on climate change: report

    The agency got so many calls that by Saturday morning, callers were left with a notification that the system’s voice mailbox was full and could not accept anymore messages, according to The Post.

    Link

    Reply
  33. Vic

     /  March 11, 2017

    A preliminary aerial survey has revealed a 300km section of the Great Barrier Reef has been severely bleached, with a more extensive survey next week expected to bring more bad news as sea temperatures in the region continue to rise.

    On a brighter note, Western Australia’s state election yesterday saw the incumbent conservative government suffer a massive defeat, and very importantly, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation party (Australia’s version of Brexit/Trump) failed to collect even 5% of the primary vote.


    The endangered Carnaby’s Cockatoo – one of the beneficiaries of yesterday’s election result.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  March 11, 2017

      Vic , thanks for the “Bitters and Tonic”.

      Reply
    • Vaughn Anderson

       /  March 12, 2017

      Vic, very sad about the coral. I keep reading about the coral bleaching in other areas too…not good.

      Good news about the political scene As I said above, “Let us remove the obstacles and move forward.” This is a good start. We are working on it in the US too, it just doesn’t look very promising in the short term though. The backlash will not be pleasant for some of those currently “in power” or who, more likely, have a fantasy that they are “in power.”

      *Mother Nature does not take IOUs.

      Reply
    • That’s excellent news, thanks for the update.

      Reply
    • How bad a defeat is this for Turnbull? It’s nice to see some hopeful movement in Australia.

      Reply
      • Vic

         /  March 13, 2017

        The other sharks in his tank will have their hackles up over this. One or two more states switching back to Labor and they’ll likely knife him before the next federal election two or so years away. He’s consistently polling badly and getting worse. I suspect Scott Morrison (he of lump of coal fame) wants in, but I’m not hearing Rupert’s regime change war drums yet.

        Reply
      • mulga mumblebrain

         /  March 14, 2017

        It does look like the proles are waking up to Trumble’s one-sided class war and hatred, his total surrender to the climate denialist thugs in his Party, his lies surrounding renewable energy and his general unlovely combination of political opportunism and gutless surrender of positions he once supposedly firmly held. Unfortunately the first thing the new WA Premier said after his victory was that he was ‘pro-business’, and we know EXACTLY what that means.

        Reply
  34. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    The deniers have a new image –

    Reply
  35. Erik

     /  March 12, 2017

    The scale of coral destruction is hard to wrap one’s head around: here’s Jeremy Jackson.

    “To try and give you a sense of this, imagine you go camping in July somewhere in Europe or in North America, and you wake up the next morning, and you look around you, and you see that 80 percent of the trees, as far as you can see, have dropped their leaves and are standing there naked. And you come home, and you discover that 80 percent of all the trees in North America and in Europe have dropped their leaves. And then you read in the paper a few weeks later, “Oh, by the way, a quarter of those died.” Well, that’s what happened in the Indian Ocean during the 1998 El Nino, an area vastly greater than the size of North America and Europe, when 80 percent of all the corals bleached and a quarter of them died.”

    Reply
    • What’s happening now is rather worse. We had a more extreme event than 1998 globally in 2016 and 2017 may be nearly as bad.

      Reply
  36. Tigertown

     /  March 12, 2017

    I inadvertently posted this in the wrong place. I think this is important, so I am copying to here, and the warmer ocean temps. are probably to blame.

    You all really need to see this. I will try to post the image or gif, but will post the link also, in case it does not work . The thickest ice in the Arctic just had something happen to it in just a matter of days. Fluke? Maybe, but I don’t think so. From Reply #160 in the Melting Season thread of the ASIF.
    http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1834.msg106111/topicseen.html#msg106111

    http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1834.0;attach=42754

    Reply
    • That looks really bad. But I’d wait for second source confirmation before we go nuts. That whole region did get a big shove toward the Fram during the recent warm wind invasion, though.

      Reply
      • lesliegraham1

         /  March 12, 2017

        It’s probably just meltwater on top of the ice.

        First rule in first year university science course: “If you think you have discovered or observed something that has never been seen before – your equipment is dodgy.”

        Reply
        • Tigertown

           /  March 12, 2017

          I think the equipment failed from the start, when it portrayed thick MYI to be in the area, when it was really just “rotten” ice with no durability. You can’t really blame the model or the equipment when there is no better ice anywhere to calibrate with.

        • Good point. Also possible that with the present ice state the model has difficulty portraying the thickness and thinning of a compressed/decompressed ice pack — tending to over-emphasize the swings. Movement toward the Fram probably caused the ice to spool out a bit in this zone.

    • DJ

       /  March 12, 2017

      That image, which, BTW is consistent with what’s been seen the whole season, is a great illustration of the true state of the arctic sea ice. Extent may more-or-less match last year, but the lack of ice over 2 meters thick suggests this is going to be an ‘exciting’ melt season to say the least.

      Not sure how Myron Ebell and Scott Pruitt will spin an ice-free arctic into their ‘humans have no impact on the climate’ narrative.

      Reply
  37. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    \Erik / March 12, 2017
    The scale of coral destruction is hard to wrap one’s head around…………………

    There is small army of us who understand . Yet we are fleas on a dog.

    Nothing we say , nothing we do . Moves the needle.

    We have to do better. How I have no idea, But we have to do better.

    Reply
    • Actually, the needle is moving around like crazy. Trump is the ultimate reaction of the dying fossil fuel age. What looks like a last gasp on a bankrupt power base and ideology.

      Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    Or there’s this, … you people . I don’t a rats fuzzy butt what rains down on any of you.

    A much easier choice.

    But that would make me a laying fool.

    And I have been many things, but I was always a fool.

    It’s one thing when one is called a fool, it’s an other to thinks you are a fool.

    Reply
  39. Vic

     /  March 12, 2017

    After witnessing his party’s complete and utter decimation in the Western Australian election yesterday, Australia’s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull reportedly spent an hour on the phone today to Elon Musk in an “in-depth discussion about the value of storage and the future of the electricity system,”.

    Musk has also been in recent talks with South Australian Labor Premier Jay Weatherill, who has been signalling for weeks his government will shortly unveil a range of policy measures designed to boost energy security after the recent blackouts.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/mar/12/elon-musk-plan-to-fix-south-australia-energy-crisis-exciting-but-needs-work-says-labor

    There’s a fascinating interview here with Elon Musk at the World Government Summit held in Dubai a few weeks ago, where the Trump word seemed almost conspicuous by its absence.

    Reply
    • Finally some good news on the political front. It’s about time. Thanks so much for this update, Vic.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  March 12, 2017

      Further info on the subject, very much doubt Elon will get the chance there are actually quite a number of Players in Australia who can do similar and cheaper and just as quick. They were picking up a good head before the Conservative fruitcakes won power
      http://www.smh.com.au/business/malcolm-turnbull-teslas-elon-musk-pick-each-others-brains-over-sa-storage-offer-20170312-guw979.html

      Mr Turnbull, who has vowed to take an agnostic approach to energy policy, is understood to be bemused that more work hasn’t been put into looking at energy storage solutions.

      South Australia’s Premier, Mr Weatherill, has also spoken with Tesla’s Mr Musk and the pair are expected to speak again in the coming days. Separately, Mr Weatherill said that a number of local and offshore groups have come forward with proposals in recent weeks.

      One is the privately owned Lyon Solar, for example, which is finalising plans for a 200-250 megawatt project across four sites in regional South Australia, with land and financing already in place for two of the sites, a spokesman for the company said.

      “Just today major global battery suppliers have told me they could deliver a 100 megawatt (MW) on-grid battery in SA for less than the $330 million quoted by Mr Musk,” John Grimes the head of the Energy Storage Council said.

      “There are over 50 brands active in Australia who could individually or in consortiums, deliver 100MW or more in 100 days of signing a contract.”

      Lyon Solar is working with AES Storage, for example, to use its systems at the back end of a series of solar farms in South Australia with the potential to be up and running by year’s end.

      “South Australia is the global epicentre for the imminent take-off of large-scale battery-based energy storage, which can solve power challenges like SA’s in months, not years,” said Lyon Partner David Green.

      “Multiple companies are sure to join the market, but Lyon is the only company close to being ready to build and be operational before next summer.”

      AES supplied large battery systems to California last year when gas supply constraints posed a threat to its electricity supplies, as did Tesla, for example.

      Note Turnbull always was about solutions to global warming, why he was dumped initially as leader of the opposition because of his support for an ETS, As PM he is constrained by the rabid right wing who control the LNP

      Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    Creepy?

    Hell yes . Death ? He moved in last week

    Death in my case is not a floating angel. He’s this floating a man in a corner. Waiting.

    He does not change , he does blink,
    I am long past pleading .

    I will not whine or sink. Whatever is coming it is mine to drink.
    And if ghosts are involved. You have a friend when really one.

    I’ll be on your ear when your over run with fears.

    Get up stand up.

    Reply
  41. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    Nothing on this Earth compares to being a great mind. It may have not been great but it was all mine, all the the time. I ate acid over 200 times , I ate peyote over 20 times .

    I was after escape I was after wisdom. I was 20 years old. And I have it. I feel like Ms Crow.

    Reply
  42. coloradobob

     /  March 12, 2017

    Bottom , I am old blind fool. never forget that.

    Reply
  43. Shawn Redmond

     /  March 12, 2017

    Call it morbid curiosity if you will but seeing as how it’s -16.6c out side this morning I thought it might be fun to look back at Robert’s old posts. You know, see how the views of the situation we’re in have changed, if at all. I thought that looking back at all the March’s posts and comments may prove to be an enlightening project. Not many comments in the early posts however the first post that caught my eye was this one from March 26 2013 :
    “Most Missing Heat Found, Look to Ice Sheets for Remainder
    This new research finds most of the missing heat scientists have been looking for around the globe. And that heat, as previously suspected, ended up in the world’s oceans and, to great extent, in the deep oceans. That said, a much smaller measure of heat is still unaccounted for. It might not be a bad idea to look in the world’s ice sheets — which appear to be decaying at a much faster rate than expected. One speculates that the hearts of the great glaciers are more watery than anticipated and contain much of the remaining heat from human caused global warming not currently located.”
    March 25, 2013:
    Solar Starting to Take Down Coal In Key Markets; Trend Needs to Expand to China, India, US to Dent Global Warming
    This one from March 7, 2013 seemed uncanny:
    Total Meltdown Warning: High Risk Arctic Summer Sea Ice Will Completely Collapse by 2013-2017
    March 21, 2014:
    Far Worse than Being Beaten with a Hockey Stick: Michael Mann, Our Terrifying Greenhouse Gas Overburden and Heating the Earth by + 2 C by 2036
    Ha the good old days March 14, 2014:
    CO2, Earth’s Global Thermostat, Dials Up to Record 401.6 ppm Daily Value on March 12
    March 19, 2015:
    Angry Waters: The Human Hothouse vs the Imperative to Preserve Lifehttps://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/unitarian-church-norfolk.jpg

    It’s proving to be an educational exercise. The early years don’t have many comments as I’m sure it took awhile for Robert to build a following. As you move up in the years the comment strings can get quite lengthy. Seeing the level of concern rising and in some cases shock is a good measure of the “faster than expected” line of thinking. If you have the time I highly recommend picking a month and perusing that month starting back in time and moving forward,( not you Robert, we need you focused on the here and now). The older posts and comment strings can add some interesting perspectives to the present conditions. If this post would have been running in the 90’s I don’t think we would have the changing conditions in a five year run that are plainly obvious over the past five. Excellent work and documentation Robert. May you live long and prosper.

    Reply
  44. Shawn Redmond

     /  March 12, 2017

    Cate, how are you this morning? Some blow yesterday what? I see wind gusts of 160kms/h at the St. Johns airport. Lots of damage on the news this morning. For our American cousins 160kms/h = 100 ms/h. Even here on the east coast of Canada that’s a good blow. We’re used to 80 to 100 kms/h (50-60 ms/h). It always amuses me to see the weather forecasters in Toronto say strong winds with gust up to 70/80 kms/h. That’s just a stiff breeze here abouts.

    Reply
    • Cate

       /  March 12, 2017

      Shawn, all well here, but yeah, got bit blustery yesterday. Gusts of 178 kmh recorded at Argentia—at the DOCK, so God knows what it was out in the bay. Blizzard conditions all day here, but farther east it was mostly just wind. Lots of damage, some of it major (second storey torn off a house under construction), 60,000 without power overnight in -20 windchills in St John’s and parts of the Avalon, where they depend on the aging infrastructure that limps along at the poor old Holyrood oil-fired plant = the reason for Muskrat Falls.

      On Twitter yesterday, everyone kept asking why we don’t have any wind-power in this province. Aye, right.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  March 12, 2017

        Good to hear from you Cate. The twitter feeds and online are full of pics of the mess. Wind turbines aren’t that fond of those wind speeds. Yes it’s a bit cool too. Almost -17 here this morning not counting wind chill. Coldest morning this winter so far, at my house anyway. Special weather statement up for us on Tuesday. We’ll see if that turns into anything. Forecasts for the next 12 hours are iffy at times. Stuck out here in the North Atlantic as we are, 48 hours out is just a crap shoot. Any good bergs nearby yet? I’m thinking of taking my better half to Gros Morne around mothers day to count moose. Had my parents over bask in the early 2000’s, counted 165 moose in three days.Dad couldn’t believe his eyes. If time allowed we might get over east to look for bergs or up to St Anthony’s.

        Reply
        • Cate

           /  March 13, 2017

          Shawn, as you well know, May-June is an excellent season for moose-spotting, as the mothers drive away last year’s calves in favour of the newborns. Please drive carefully, though, as they can be all over the road anytime of day. May-June typically has the highest moose-vehicle collision stats of the year.

          Check the Canadian Ice Service charts for bergs. There are also a couple of FB groups for iceberg sightings. May can be a bit early, but hey, things are changing so fast. In 2016 the first full-fledged berg showed up in January. St Anthony would be a better bet that early in the season.

      • Suzanne

         /  March 12, 2017

        Glad to hear all is well for you Cate. My daughter lives in Durham, N.C. and just said it is snowing on her daffodils..and everything else that has been budding there.

        Reply
  45. Suzanne

     /  March 12, 2017

    Just came across this on social media. Bringing back the Grizzles to the Northern Cascades. The person behind this is asking for comments..he needs 50,000 on the Department of the Interior …and quickly. If interested:
    http://theoatmeal.com/blog/grizzlies_north_cascades

    Reply
  46. Suzanne

     /  March 12, 2017

    Another source reporting on Elon Musk throwing down the gauntlet to Australia..at Clean Technica… (Just loving this challenge by Musk)
    https://cleantechnica.com/2017/03/10/musk-says-can-solve-australia-grid-storage-problem-100-days-less/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

    Reply
  47. wharf rat

     /  March 12, 2017

    “Weirdly Warm” 2017. Could we Set another record?

    Both Zeke Hausfather, above, and Robert Rohde, below, have been members of the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperatures group, formed by climate skeptic physicist Richard Muller – significantly, with funding from the Koch Brothers – that closely examined surface temperature records to finally settle, (at least in Muller’s mind), what every major scientific group has known for 40 years.

    Yesterday, both of them tweeted observations about how global temperatures are playing out.

    https://climatecrocks.com/

    Reply
  48. redskylite

     /  March 12, 2017

    “This is not a crime against humanity. This is a crime by humanity. We have sentenced to death the largest living structure on the planet: the Great Barrier Reef. The sentence is being carried out slowly and painfully before our eyes.

    Yes, the catastrophic bleaching of the 2015-16 summer got some media attention and got a bit of playing down, too. But in some ways, the 2016-17 summer was worse for the reef. Not in what happened but in what didn’t happen.”

    http://www.theage.com.au/comment/i-saw-the-great-barrier-reef-die-last-weekend-and-i-wept-20170308-guu0r0.html

    Reply
  49. wili

     /  March 12, 2017

    It’s such a strange that we are living in…
    It’s such a strange time that we are passing through…
    What will they do in two thousand years…
    Roll away the stone…

    http://en.musicplayon.com/Leon-Russell-Roll-Away-The-Stone-905546.html

    Reply
  50. redskylite

     /  March 13, 2017

    Isn’t life strange
    A turn of the page
    Can read like before
    Can we ask for more?
    Each day passes by
    How hard man will try?
    The sea will not wait

    You know it makes me want to cry, cry, cry

    Reply
  51. redskylite

     /  March 13, 2017

    CLAIM: “… more than 100 per cent of the warming over the past century is due to human actions. How can it be more than 100 per cent? Because without us the planet would likely have cooled very slightly thanks to natural factors such as volcanic emissions and orbital changes.”

    Andrew King, Research fellow, University of Melbourne:
    While I wouldn’t go quite as far as saying more than 100% of warming is due to human activities (because there are uncertainties on these numbers and it may be just under 100%) the point the writer is trying to make is essentially correct.

    http://climatefeedback.org/claimreview/claim-new-scientist-humans-responsible-100-warming-mostly-correct/

    Reply
  52. Vic

     /  March 13, 2017

    More than 87% of Queensland is officially in drought – the highest level ever recorded.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-13/drought-declared-in-more-southern-queensland-regions/8349056

    Reply
  53. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    Creationism love it!

    Reply
  54. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    When ice free summer’s start to happen, where will the energy that went to melting sea ice go to? Could it be Greenland? I’d advise those who own ocean front property to sell it out , soon. Goodbye, southern half of Florida. This huge increase in but since the 1960s when compared to ice core samples dating back 800,000 years tells a story.

    Reply
    • So I think one of the upshots is that the Arctic gets a lot stormier. More water vapor coming off of the sea surface from evaporation. In addition, more ocean heat uptake in this region. We’re already in that trend now with sea ice so much reduced from the middle and late 20th Century. But periods of ice free states would tend to exasperate and worsen the present trend.

      A lot more heat would tend to hit Greenland as the atmospheric circulation changes as the sea ice insulation is reduced more and more and as ocean waters contacting glaciers warm.

      But the highest net heat gain will, as usual, be transferred into the oceans.

      Reply
  55. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    Just saying, when Arctic sea is ice free in summer, abrupt climate change is probable. Ya all know.

    Reply
  56. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    The feedback that scares me most is the forest bark beetle thing. As the climate gets warmer and dryer, those bugs kill off the trees. An amplified feedback from hell

    Reply
  57. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    Don’t be alarmed by my fields and my forests.

    Reply
  58. lesliegraham1

     /  March 13, 2017

    Just a little update on the weather in my neck of the woods.

    “Deluge brings massive flood to Auckland, swamping homes, cars, shops as North Island reels from autumn storm”

    If anyone is interested this is probably the most informative of the media’s efforts at coverage.
    https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/happened-deluge-brings-massive-flood-auckland-swamping-homes-cars-shops-north-island-reels-autumn-storm

    I’m not sure if this is in any way related to climate change or just a natural freakish event but it has been the talk of the wash house here today. Worst rain for at least a decade and up to 60mm in one hour is west Auckland at one point.

    Great news in my opinion. The soil moisture deficit out on the Waikato plains has been very worrying – especially for a third world country (technical definition) like NZ whose economy depends – bizarrely – on the export price of milk powder.

    Reply
    • So climate change tends to generation more extreme droughts and more extreme floods as the hydrological cycle gets ramped up. The dice are loaded in the sense that there’s a higher likelihood of more extreme events pretty much anywhere on Earth now. The climate regime in NZ is also likely starting to change a bit as well. So old weather patterns would tend to come with a bit of a twist.

      Reply
  59. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    Milk powder?

    Reply
    • lesliegraham1

       /  March 13, 2017

      I know – I was surprised too.
      NZ produces about 40% of world traded dairy output.
      Milk powder is our number one export along with butter and cheese.
      Milk powder is used in a myriad of products and is easily transported and preserved.
      One corporation – Fontera – effectively decides the price of milk powder for the year.
      The milk volume production figures and thus mild powder production correlates exactly with the growth of pasture which in turn correlates exactly with the level of rainfall.
      Ergo the New Zealand economy is directly dependent on the rainfall levels.
      We are very vulnerable to climate change here – at least in financial terms.
      I moved here from the UK about 15 years ago when it became obvious which way the wind was blowing and it turns out I was right to do so – but NZ has it’s own set of problems.

      Reply
  60. Robert E Prue

     /  March 13, 2017

    Salute! To our children’s, children’s, children.

    Reply
  61. Ailsa

     /  March 13, 2017

    Bad understanding of unusual events, which will be happening more and more often, is going to add to the troubles:

    “Oroville dam: multiple riverbank failures on the Feather River after the flow was abruptly stopped

    When state water officials scaled back their mass dumping of water from the damaged Oroville Dam this week, they knew the riverbed below would dry up enough to allow the removal of vast piles of debris from the fractured main spillway. But they apparently did not anticipate a side effect of their decision to stop feeding the gushing Feather River — a rapid drop in river level that, according to downstream landowners, caused miles of embankment to come crashing down. With high water no longer propping up the shores, the still-wet soil crashed under its own weight, sometimes dragging in trees, rural roads and farmland, they said.

    “The damage is catastrophic,” said Brad Foster, who has waterfront property in Marysville (Yuba County), about 25 miles south of Lake Oroville.

    The farmer not only saw 25-foot bluffs collapse, but also lost irrigation lines to his almonds. “When the bank pulled in,” he said, “it pulled the pumps in with it. It busted the steel pipes.”

    http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2017/03/07/feather-river-1/

    Reply
  62. lesliegraham1

     /  March 13, 2017

    Interesting article in the Guardian today.

    “The fossil fuel industry’s invisible colonization of academia”

    It’s about the fossil fuel lobby’s latest piece of transparent propaganda aimed at slowing the transition to low carbon energy.

    This will come as no surprise to anyone here but to quote the article:

    “…The event’s sponsor was Shell Oil Company. The producer of the film series was Shell. The film’s director is Vice President of a family-owned oil and gas company, and has taken approximately $300,000 from Shell. The host, Harvard Kennedy School, has received at least $3.75 million from Shell. And the event’s panel included a Shell Executive Vice President.

    The film “The Great Transition” says natural gas is “clean” (in terms of carbon emissions, it is not) and that low-carbon, renewable energy is a “very long time off” (which is a political judgment, not a fact). Amy Myers Jaffe, identified in the film as the Executive Director of Energy and Sustainability at the University of California, Davis, says, “We need to be realistic that we’re gonna use fossil fuels now, because in the end, we are.” We are not told that she is a member of the US National Petroleum Council….”

    Utterly shameless. I live in hope that I will live just long enough to witness these repulsive biocidal sociopaths rot in jail.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2017/mar/13/the-fossil-fuel-industrys-invisible-colonization-of-academia

    Reply
    • Low cost renewable energy is here now and appears to be eating coal and natural gas’s lunch…

      Reply
    • The only route for fossil fuels to hang on is through political dominance and forcing policies that remove or delay renewables. However, the resiliency of renewable energy casts doubt on the ability of political efforts aimed at entrenching and defending the fossil fuel industry to remain successful.

      Reply
      • Jeremy in Wales

         /  March 13, 2017

        I do not think that we should underestimate how disruptive these new technologies will be to vested interests, or individuals – the combination of fracked natural gas and renewables in the US has undermined coal and marginal price is the main reason – however this has knock on effects to corporation and individuals who see there assets crash in value.
        The same will happen with electric vehicles which have far cheaper fuel costs – better efficiency – less maintenance – cheaper build – when an electric vehicle hits an equivalent price point for a class of vehicle the argument for the petrol/diesel equivalent evaporates – but the disruptive affect is massive – repair garages, petrol (gas) stations, fuel transport, refining – all become increasingly redundant even the manufacturing assets in large part lose value as can be seen by all the tech businesses entering the market.
        Then when they become self-driving – millions more jobs are at risk.
        There are obvious benefits to the atmosphere, health and workers/owners of the new assets but a lot can lose and so the political backlash might gain traction without some redistribution.

        Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  March 13, 2017

          Shouldn’t be an issue. The economists will tell you the jobs just change . Everybody can just move to China and work for five bucks a day. This economic model doesn’t work for anyone except the very rich. Something wicked this way comes.

    • mulga mumblebrain

       /  March 14, 2017

      ‘Rot in gaol…’??? Waste of precious resources.

      Reply
      • Spike

         /  March 14, 2017

        Mulga my wife always says the UK Tories will bring back the workhouse next, and I always remind her they would not want to pay for the gruel.

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  March 16, 2017

          Spike, me old Dad always predicted a return of slavery. He was correct (he usually was, just by being a curmudgeon, an occupational hazard as a journalist). Australian workers put in more UNPAID over-time than any other OECD country. Unpaid ‘internships’ are widespread. and now the parasites are starting to try to get ‘interns’ to pay for the privilege. Penalty rates are being reduced, piece by piece. Wage growth is virtually zero, contingent, precarious, casualised work is burgeoning, and fraudulent ‘contractors’, without workplace protections, proliferate. One-sided class war by the rich and their political stooges is on the march, as in the USA, UK and elsewhere. Parasite greed is INSATIABLE, as Aristotle noted over 2000 years ago.

  63. Spike

     /  March 13, 2017

    Interesting explanation of Indian Ocean dipole and impact on E Africa here. “Things will not improve any time soon. As with El Niño, global warming means the Indian Ocean Dipole has become more extreme in recent years. In East Africa, these severe droughts will become the norm.”

    http://theconversation.com/dipole-the-indian-nino-that-has-brought-devastating-drought-to-east-africa-74011

    Reply
  64. BJ

     /  March 13, 2017

    “Here we present clear evidence for microbial methanogenesis in the continental shelf sediments fuelling the ETNP OMZ methane plume”

    http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ismej20176a.html

    Reply
    • wili

       /  March 13, 2017

      For those, like myself, who are acronym challenged: ETNP OMZ = Eastern Tropical North Pacific [Ocean]…Oxygen Minimum Zones

      Reply
      • BJ

         /  March 13, 2017

        Thanks wili. I should have included the article title itself…

        “Origin and fate of methane in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific oxygen minimum zone”

        Reply
  65. Greg

     /  March 13, 2017

    Antarctic Bottom Water fills in the abyss of most of the world ocean’s basins, so understanding how it traps and releases heat is vital to determine how global climate will change. Boaty-Mcboatface, set to launch and will be ‘flying’ through a deep current in the Southern Ocean that originates in Antarctica, as part of the DynOPO project. Boaty will collect data on the speed of the Antarctic Bottom Water flow, as well as the level of turbulence within the submarine waterfalls and rapids it travels through. These data will be sent onto scientists via radio-link in order to help them understand the influence these features have on mixing between different layers of the Southern Ocean, which will shed light on how the ocean is responding to global warming.
    http://noc.ac.uk/education/educational-resources/boaty-mcboatface

    Reply
  66. Tigertown

     /  March 13, 2017

    Monitoring heat intrusion into the Arctic through the water under the ice. Starting December 1st 2016 til March 12th 2017. Used the Temperature band on Worldview.

    Reply
    • Tigertown

       /  March 13, 2017

      Note; everything showing up as warm on here is not warm water under the ice. Use discernment.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  March 13, 2017

        Interesting stuff TT. There warmth in the ocean may seem small but it’s making itself felt. The ice in front of the Shirase is still collapsing nicely as well. Looking at air temps as well as sea surface temps you wouldn’t think it should come apart so much. Upwelling of warm water seems the likely source. Opinion only of course. Lots of new leads showing up this week.
        ahttps://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?p=antarctic&l=MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Coastlines&t=2017-03-13&z=3&v=1211647.4761087557,1648543.6919117896,1743615.4761087557,1991583.6919117896

        Reply
        • Tigertown

           /  March 13, 2017

          With the increase in ghg’s including water vapor, a little heat goes a long ways. As the heat tries to escape via long wave radiation, less and less makes it into space. More is being turned back as down-welling longwave radiation.

  67. Jeremy in Wales

     /  March 13, 2017

    The rate of accumulation of heat in the oceans and to such depth is really scary – but fear not Boaty McBoatface is coming to the rescue, well to give us a bit more data
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/13/boaty-mcboatface-to-go-on-first-antarctic-mission
    (never let the public vote on a name!)

    Reply
  68. coloradobob

     /  March 13, 2017

    On Monday, the American Meteorological Society, a key scientific organization whose members have considerable expertise in studying the climate and weather, wrote a letter to Pruitt strongly critiquing the remarks.

    “The world’s 7 billion people are causing climate to change and our emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are the primary cause,” wrote the group’s executive director, Keith Seitter. “This is a conclusion based on the comprehensive assessment of scientific evidence. It is based on multiple independent lines of evidence that have been affirmed by thousands of independent scientists and numerous scientific institutions around the world. We are not familiar with any scientific institution with relevant subject matter expertise that has reached a different conclusion.”

    The Environmental Protection Agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the American Meteorological Society’s letter.

    Not long afterward, a group of 30 U.S. scientists who share an expertise in climate change also wrote to Pruitt, with a similar message. As they put it:

    … human beings are changing the Earth’s climate. This key conclusion follows from the basic laws of physics. Just as there is no escaping gravity when one steps off a cliff, there is no escaping the warming that follows when we add extra carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

    Link

    Reply
  69. coloradobob

     /  March 13, 2017

    Drought, Deforestation Set to Propel Vicious Amazon Die Off

    Thirty-eight percent of the Amazon Basin is at risk due to a self-amplifying process of drought and forest die off — which is made worse by industrial-scale agricultural production.

    Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty
    Reduced rainfall across the Amazon basin is causing large areas of forests to die, which could be amplifying drought conditions across the region.

    Researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research believe that this process, known as self-amplifying forest loss, could cause a vicious circle of drought and further forest loss across the Amazon region, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

    Link

    Reply
  70. wili

     /  March 14, 2017

    It is impossible and absurd to be
    anyone

    Reply
  1. The Oceans are Warming Faster than Previously Thought; Rate of Heat Build-up Accelerating | robertscribbler | GarryRogers Nature Conservation
  2. Evolution of Thought – Flooded Planet
  3. “Climate Change in Your Face” — Great Barrier Reef Suffers Second Consecutive Mass Bleaching as Potential for Record Warm 2017 Looms | robertscribbler
  4. Warmer Oceans – Mr. Nychka's Webpage

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