April of 2017 was the Second Hottest in 137 Year Climate Record

According to measurements by NASA’s GISS global temperature monitoring service, April of 2017 was warmer than all past Aprils in the climate record with the single exception of 2016.

The month came in at 0.88 degrees Celsius above NASA’s 20th Century baseline and fully 1.1 degrees Celsius above 1880s averages. This measure was just 0.01 C warmer than now third warmest 2010 and 0.18 C shy of last year’s record. All of the top ten hottest Aprils on record have occurred since 1998 and six of the top ten hottest Aprils have occurred since 2010.

(During April of 2017, and with only a few moderate exceptions, most of the world experienced above normal to considerably above normal surface temperatures. Image source: NASA GISS.)

The first four months of 2017 now average around 1.21 degrees Celsius warmer than 1880s ranges. This number is about tied with 2016’s overall record warmth which was spurred by a combined strong El Nino and the incredible buildup of greenhouse gasses in the Earth’s atmosphere that we have seen for over more than a century. It is also a warming that is now strong enough to start bringing on serious geophysical changes to the Earth System. The longer readings remain so warm or continue to increase, the more likely it is that instances of global harm in the form of glacial melt, sea level rise, ocean health decline, severe storms and other extreme weather will worsen or emerge.

This year, ENSO neutral conditions trending toward the cooler side of average during the first quarter should have helped to moderate global temperatures somewhat. As is, though a slight cooling vs the first quarter of 2016 is somewhat evident, the broader, more general counter-trend cooling that we would expect following a strong El Nino is practically non-apparent.

(A mildly warm Kelvin Wave forming in the Equatorial Pacific brings with it the chance of a weak El Nino by summer of 2017. This warming of such a broad region of surface waters may combine with atmospheric CO2 and CO2e in the range of 405 and 493 ppm respectively to keep global temperatures near record highs of around 1.2 C above 1880s averages during 2017. Image source: NOAA EL Nino.)

Very strong Northern Hemisphere polar warming during the winter months appears to be a primary driver pushing overall global temperatures higher during recent months. Meanwhile, southern hemisphere polar amplification is becoming more and more apparent over time.

In April, the trend of Northern Hemisphere polar amplification/warming was readily apparent in the NASA measure despite a seasonal relative cooling. Under global warming related heat forcing, we would expect to see the highest temperature departures during late fall through winter. And as 2016 transitioned into 2017, this kind of warming was amazingly evident.

(Only the very far north and the very far south saw below average temperatures in NASA’s zonal measure. Meanwhile, temperatures in the lower Arctic were particularly warm. Image source: NASA GISS.)

Anomalies during April in the higher latitudes did cool somewhat to 2 to 2.6 C above average in the key 65 to 75 N Latitude zone. Highest departures continued to be very considerable for April — ranging from 4 C to as much as 7.5 C above average over Northeastern Siberian, the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, the Bering Sea and parts of Northwest Alaska. Meanwhile, temperatures over the Central Arctic dipped to slightly below average as polar amplification in the southern hemisphere appeared to take a break before warming again in March.

Globally, according to GFS model reanalysis data, temperatures appeared to cool through the end of April. However, by early May another warm-up was underway and, if the GFS measure is any guide, it appears that May will likely be about as warm as April overall. This track would tend to make May of 2017 the 1rst to 4th warmest on record if the trends analysis bears out.

Links:

NASA GISS

NOAA EL Nino

Global and Regional Climate Anomalies

 

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160 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  May 17, 2017

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  2. And, suddenly it’s summer here in East Central Vermont. Today’s high 90F, tying record for date set in 1977 and 21F above normal high. Forecast is for tomorrow to be warmer still, then back to normal for several days.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  May 17, 2017

      Officially hit 94 here in Connecticut, a new record for the day! Likely set a new record for tomorrow too.

      Reply
    • Spring was nice, though, wasn’t it? All 5 hours of it…

      Reply
      • Yes, indeed. Spent 11 years in DC and that’s the one thing I really miss about it–a seemingly endless spring, with warm days as early as late Feb and sometimes not too hot until July.

        Anyway, yesterday’s official high was actually 91, breaking the old record. Today’s record of 94, however, survived.

        Reply
    • wili

       /  May 18, 2017

      Things are pretty wacky right across the country, from what I hear…record late snowfalls in the Rockies, more killer Tornadoes probable across the Plains, as well as this summer-like heatwave down the East Coast. “Stuck” patterns?

      Reply
  3. Erik Frederiksen

     /  May 17, 2017

    Thanks for another excellent article. I wonder if we are seeing a step change in the roughly linear rise of temperatures over the last four decades.

    Time will tell.

    Reply
    • Tigertown

       /  May 17, 2017

      Some think we are in the curve of the exponential trend line, the part that is followed by steeper increases. Time will tell, but for now the forecast seems to support just that.

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  May 18, 2017

      There has been a lot of investigation of how much carbon and heat the oceans can absorb as that task becomes tougher as equilibrium calcs fall into play. The higher those components rise, the higher the atmospheric components have to rise to “push” heat & carbon into the soup.

      I see that tying into the “step changes” as you’ve aptly referred to it.

      Reply
  4. Erik Frederiksen

     /  May 17, 2017

    In a recent presentation Richard Alley said that if we don’t change our ways that by the time his students are old large parts of the planet would see average summers hotter than anything yet experienced by us.

    And that by the end of the century we’d start to see places where temperatures on hot days were lethal and that in the next century these areas would spread.

    Reply
  5. Jeremy in Wales

     /  May 17, 2017

    I want to remain optimistic that we can still do something to remedy this situation and the reducing cost of wind power is a major part of this story. 8mw turbines are now in place in the Irish Sea which I spotted on a recent coastal walk, the largest in the world so far. This Guardian article puts the scale of the technology in context (nice diagrammatic) and this technology was in large part a direct transfer from developments in the North Sea oilfields. The Burbo Bank wind farm extension in itself is 258MW and the Irish Sea now has a total installed capacity of 2,275MW (2.3GW), up from 60MW in 2003.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/17/mersey-wind-turbines-liverpool-uk-wind-technology

    Reply
    • Mblanc

       /  May 18, 2017

      Wow, they are absolutely massive. I know the article says there are going to be technical limits to this gigantism, but it doesn’t look like they are going to hit that point very soon.

      Keep hope alive (whilst being realistic, obvs).

      Reply
      • Jeremy in Wales

         /  May 18, 2017

        The desperation shows itself when, in work, I take newspapers, cans or plastic bottles out of the general waste bins to put them in the recycling bins. But on the plus side saw another two electric cars this week.

        Reply
  6. Sheri

     /  May 17, 2017

    Thank you, , Robert..

    Reply
  7. Open source article: A volcanic trigger for the Late Ordovician mass extinction?
    Mercury data from south China and Laurentia http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/2017/05/01/G38940.1.full.pdf+html
    More evidence of the effect of LIPs. Interesting discussion of the preceding and concomitant ice age and sea levels associated with the extinction.

    Reply
  8. India is blazing. Kolkata and Bhubaneswar at at late 30s but feels like factor late 40s centigrade. Several other parts well in the 40s C.

    Reply
  9. “six of the top ten hottest Aprils have occurred since 2010”

    Of course that could just be a coincidence…

    Sarcasm aside, the suicide bomber president that the cynically stupid Republican Party clutched to its breast may end up removing the last major influential group of AGW deniers from political power. Sure, there will be mopping up actions to deal with British Conservatives and Australian Coalition members, but their time is running out. And hopefully not too late.

    Reply
    • Mark in OZ

       /  May 19, 2017

      Great point Magma!
      ‘Time’ is the constant that has been taken for granted. As the ‘distance’ to some event (climactic) shortens, and the velocity (of change) increases, the ‘amount’ of time available to act/ re-act decreases.

      Many are now ‘feeling’ this and it’s more palpable than any graph or forecast.

      “Time is the most important commodity; to avoid catastrophic outcomes requires emergency action to force the pace of change. Australia, along with the Asian regions to our north, is now considered to be “disaster alley”; we are already experiencing the most extreme impacts globally.”

      http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/this-is-not-rhetoric-approving-the-adani-coal-mine-will-kill-people-20170518-gw7nv9.html

      Reply
  10. Vox has an article that’s been out a week but doesn’t seem to have been linked to from here: A new book ranks the top 100 solutions to climate change. The results are surprising.

    Seems to take a long-view, but could be an interesting read to habitues here.

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  May 19, 2017

      Nice article – the dietary impacts (waste/meat) are huge.

      Reply
  11. Abel Adamski

     /  May 18, 2017

    OP maybe.
    But explains much.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/07/the-great-british-brexit-robbery-hijacked-democracy

    Be frightened, it is a pervasive brutal fascist repressive evil empire in the making and Bannon, Mercer and the Trump presidency are at the centre

    Reply
    • Mblanc

       /  May 19, 2017

      I think you have to add Russian influence on the vote, if the article doesn’t throw that in as well. Brexit is very clearly in Vlad’s interest, and I have been surprised how little the possibility has been picked in the UK media.

      It was such a tight vote that I think it will be seen as very dodgy, when the history books are finally written.

      Both Trump and Brexit were fraudulent results, imho.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  May 20, 2017

        Actually I read a couple of comments on WaPo
        https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/politics/mercer-bannon/

        Yup. And we know there is some connection to Robylevyev, the Fertilizer king oligarch, who’s jet seems to end up at the same place Trump is. His yacht was spotted near the Mercers yacht. What’s that all about.

        Coincidence? Or not…..just saying.

        “After disavowing any contact with President Donald Trump last week, Russian oligarch Dmitry Rybolovlev’s state-of-the-art yacht Anna sat anchored in the British Virgin Islands on Friday night when another equally resplendent luxury liner, the Sea Owl, sidled up, according to a website that tracks the movement of yachts.
        The owner of the dark-hulled yacht? President Donald Trump’s biggest financial supporter and Breitbart News moneyman, Robert Mercer.”

        The comments were based on an article in NT Daily News
        “Meet Dmitry Rybolovlev, the Russian oligarch believed to have ties to President Trump ‘

        Reply
  12. wili

     /  May 18, 2017

    Guardian just had a major article on Antarctica, and now NYT has started a series on it as well…I think that’s what’s called ‘trending’!

    Reply
  13. wili

     /  May 18, 2017

    CO2 atmospheric levels used to peak reliably in May. Now they are doing so in April, suggesting that on average spring in the Northern Hemisphere is starting weeks earlier than it used to. We are already deep into ‘consequences,’ with fundamental shifts in such once-reliable cycles as when spring and fall start. And much more to come.

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  May 19, 2017

      That is a good point – I’ve looked over the years for any research that has documented trends in the timing of the peak over time, but have never seen any. Intuitively it makes sense.

      Reply
    • Spike

       /  May 20, 2017

      Tamino did look at it in 2012:

      “What’s the bottom line about the annual cycle of CO2? At the south pole, I don’t see significant change. But at Mauna Loa and Barrow, the timing of the cycle is earlier. This seems to be primarily due to earlier spring decrease, i.e., that spring — in the sense of plant growth — is coming earlier, by 4 or 5 days. Finally, at Barrow the annual cycle has gotten bigger. My guess is that this is a direct effect of warming in the Arctic, so there’s simply more plant growth (and decay) happening each year.”

      https://tamino.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/annual-cycle-of-co2/

      Reply
  14. coloradobob

     /  May 18, 2017

    What a great group you are . It’s a grim mine you work But mining has never been a walk in the park.

    Reply
  15. Greg

     /  May 19, 2017

    The kind of storm you usually see summertime in the middle of the continent. Washington D.C. area a short while ago:

    Reply
  16. Andy_in_SD

     /  May 19, 2017

    In the farthest reaches of Antarctica, a nightmare scenario of crumbling ice – and rapidly rising seas – could spell disaster for a warming planet.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/the-doomsday-glacier-w481260

    Reply
  17. Spike

     /  May 19, 2017

    I had commented on here how dry the UK had been with early wildfires in Scotland and Ireland of all places, although recent days have brought welcome rain. Well it turns out we have had a new record period of dryness.The last 10 months were the driest July to April for southern England in records stretching back more than 100 years.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2131308-driest-ten-months-in-100-years-recorded-in-southern-england/

    Reply
  18. Suzanne

     /  May 19, 2017

    Dark Snow project on the use of wind and solar now being used in their expeditions:

    Reply
  19. June

     /  May 19, 2017

    Good article by Joe Romm.

    Offshore wind is now competitive with nuclear power, and gas is ‘in sight’

    As prices plummet, offshore wind wins German power auction — with no subsidy

    https://thinkprogress.org/offshore-wind-is-competitive-with-nuclear-c4218113f6fe

    Reply
  20. Mblanc

     /  May 19, 2017

    I’m loath to link to the Torygraph at this difficult time, but as your fearless self-appointed automotive correspondent, I nearly fell of my chair when I saw this.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/05/19/electric-vehicles-cost-conventional-cars-2018/

    ‘The cost of owning an electric car will fall to the same level as petrol-powered vehicles next year, according to bold new analysis from UBS which will send shockwaves through the automobile industry.

    Experts from the investment bank’s “evidence lab” made the prediction after tearing apart one of the current generation of electric cars to examine the economics of electric vehicles (EVs).

    They found that costs of producing EVs were far lower than previously thought but there is still great potential to make further savings, driving down the price of electric cars…’

    That is the first time anyone has said this, AFAIK. If we had pushed this technology 20 years ago, I’d have been much happier, but late is so much better than not at all.

    Reply
  21. Andy_in_SD

     /  May 20, 2017

    The Arctic seed vault had to deal with melting permafrost last winter
    No seeds lost, but the entrance is being waterproofed after surprise flooding.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/05/the-arctic-seed-vault-had-to-deal-with-melting-permafrost-last-winter/

    Reply
  22. wili

     /  May 20, 2017

    Reply
  23. wili

     /  May 20, 2017

    thnx to tigertown at neven’s blog for this:

    Flooding persists globally.

    Caribbean – Homes and Infrastructure Damaged After Floods in Jamaica, Haiti and Dominican Republic

    Deadly Flash Floods Set to Worsen Poverty and Hunger in Kenya, Experts Say

    Indonesia – Homes Destroyed, 7 Dead After Floods and Landslides in Sulawesi, Borneo and Sumatra

    China – Floods Affect 6 Provinces Leaving 4 Dead and 1,600 Displaced

    Thailand – Evacuations After Floods in Northern Provinces

    http://floodlist.com

    Reply
    • wili

       /  May 20, 2017

      …just give me one thing

      that I can hold on to…

      Reply
      • Mark in OZ

         /  May 20, 2017

        thanks wili
        We’re riding shotgun down the avalanche

        Reply
        • Raul M.

           /  May 22, 2017

          Looking at raw food experiences on YouTube and net. It seems grains are tasty when sprouted and raw. Some smart fellow says that proteins are gained through the digestion of raw foods differently than that gained through the same foods when cooked. Interesting that some say foods eaten raw are enough so that meat and dairy aren’t wanted or needed.

        • Whu.u.u. boy. I have tried the raw veggie bit and I am here (barely) to tell you it ain’t so. Gorillas, yes, humans, no.

  24. Spike

     /  May 20, 2017

    I must say the recent comments threads have been outstanding – great work by all who have to drink this bitter draught.

    Reply
  25. Suzanne

     /  May 20, 2017
    Reply
  26. Mblanc

     /  May 20, 2017

    Some more follow up on the story, it isn’t quite as bad as it could be…

    http://gizmodo.com/the-doomsday-vault-isnt-flooded-but-were-all-still-goin-1795400407

    Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  May 20, 2017

    Thanks to global warming, Antarctica is beginning to turn green

    Note it’s the small things making the first “jump” . Moss, lichens, algae. and they are marching South down the peninsula . Given that there is zero “soil” there , bushes and wildflowers are a ways off . But Moss, lichens, and algae kickstart the making of soil.

    Here’s an amazing story about all this in Alaska at Glacier Bay , and wonderful story about how science works. One person goes out and works, and works, and works. Then over 100 years later, one person comes along and picks up that baton . A truly great story here.

    Century-Long Glacier Study May Help Us Crack Climate Change

    A scientist restarts longest glacier study with sketched maps and bear mace. See how the landscape has changed in that time.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/05/glacier-bay-plant-succession-study-william-skinner-cooper-buma/?google_editors_picks=true

    Note to the reader :
    When News Corp. swallowed up the National Geographic we all wore ashes and sackcloth, well their climate reporting is as good as ever. And this whole article is about one scientist funded with a grant made by them. As a tree hugger , read this one you’ll love it.

    Reply
  28. coloradobob

     /  May 20, 2017

    Our president is a whining titty baby .

    Reply
  29. meljay14

     /  May 21, 2017

    Coloradobob, here is a great article on why comparing Trump to children and babies is unfair to children and babies. (Although I think we’ve all done it…)

    Reply
  30. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 21, 2017

    Where it is normally warm it is really warm!
    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/heat-wave-claims-17-lives-in-48-hours/article18498643.ece
    Weather to be extremely hot and humid for at least another two days

    The prevailing heat wave condition in coastal Andhra Pradesh has become a cause of concern for the government, as many people are dying under its impact. At least 17 persons are reported to have died due to sunstroke in the last 48 hours, and the A.P. State Disaster Management Authority (AP-SDMA) has predicted that the weather could be extremely hot and humid for at least another two days.

    Twelve persons died in Nellore district followed by three in Guntur and two in West Godavari.

    Unconfirmed reports

    The government is gathering daily reports from the districts and putting out the larger picture. There are unconfirmed reports that more than 50 people died in the last 48 hours.

    Reply
  31. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 21, 2017

    Lots of heat, enough for all to get a share.
    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/05/heatwave-grips-northern-china-170519071621931.html
    A 2015 study of heatwaves in China revealed that the number of deaths due to excess heat had increased by a factor of 20 between the last decade of the 20th century and the first decade of this one.

    Reply
  32. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 21, 2017

    Okay I’m off in search of some optimism, I may be a while.
    http://www.dailyclimate.org/tdc-newsroom/2017/may/climate-change-could-cut-into-major-crop
    Climate change, and its impacts on extreme weather and temperature swings, is projected to reduce global production of corn, wheat, rice and soybeans by 23 percent in the 2050s, according to a new analysis.

    The study, which examined price and production of those four major crops from 1961 to 2013, also warns that by the 2030s output could be cut by 9 percent.

    The findings come as researchers and world leaders continue to warn that food security will become an increasingly difficult problem to tackle in the face of rising temperatures and weather extremes, combining with increasing populations, and volatile food prices.

    The negative impacts of climate change to farming were pretty much across the board in the new analysis. There were small production gains projected for Russia, Turkey and Ukraine in the 2030s, but by the 2050s, the models “are negative and more pronounced for all countries,” the researchers wrote in the study published this month in the journal Economics of Disasters and Climate Change.

    Reply
  33. Abel Adamski

     /  May 21, 2017

    Meanwhile
    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/tibets-permafrost-playing-surprise-role-climate-change-1620559

    Tibet’s permafrost is playing a surprise role in climate change
    Carbon has accumulated in the upper layers of the soil in the Tibetan Plateau in the space of a decade.

    In the Tibetan Plateau, climate change is increasing the carbon concentrations within the upper layers of permafrost soils, a study has shown. This represents a negative feedback to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and could potentially slow the pace of climate change.

    Permafrost soils are known to store large amounts of carbon. As temperature rise and permafrost thaws, some of this carbon is released into the atmosphere. However, the upper layers of the permafrost soils can also trap a certain amount of carbon.

    Reply
  34. Abel Adamski

     /  May 21, 2017

    Also in China
    http://www.thedailystar.net/science/china-hails-breakthrough-tapping-gas-ice-1408090

    China hails breakthrough in tapping gas from ‘ice’

    Methane hydrate is an enormous untapped energy source formed under high pressure and low temperatures in permafrost or under the sea. It is considered a clean energy option with high energy density and releases less than half the amount of carbon dioxide as oil and coal when burned, said ministry officials.

    Methane hydrate is formed in such abundance that the United States Department of Energy has estimated the total amount could exceed the combined energy content of all other fossil fuels, reported the South China Morning Post (SCMP).

    Reply
    • wili

       /  May 21, 2017

      What could possibly go wrong? : |

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  May 22, 2017

        Precisely
        As the article points out it is something being actively investigated by many countries, especially the US, the underwater ones are particularly scary

        Reply
  35. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 21, 2017

    Optimism is getting harder to find. So there’s this, that shows continuing to follow the economic model that doesn’t even work on paper unless all the negatives (externalities) are left out. “The new normal in a few decades” has to qualify as optimism.
    http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2017/05/19/sea-grant-king-tides/
    The highest water levels of the summer are expected around the upcoming peak astronomic tides of the year, known as “king tides,” occurring over a few days around May 26, June 23 and July 21 in Hawaiʻi. These may produce flooding events similar to what occurred in late April, and University of Hawaiʻi researchers say summer will provide a glimpse of what will eventually become routine with continued global warming and sea-level rise.
    ……………………..
    and it goes on to say……
    Chip Fletcher, associate dean of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, adds “Water levels may reach more than 1 foot above typical high tide and produce unusual flooding in low-lying regions. Within a few decades this will be the new normal. Hawaiʻi should consider this a practice run, and reevaluate policies and development practices accordingly.”

    Reply
  36. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 21, 2017

    How long before our aging infrastructure starts this?
    http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-lights-are-going-out-in-the-middle-east

    Over the past eight months, I’ve been struck by people talking less about the prospects of peace, the dangers of isis, or President Trump’s intentions in the Middle East than their own exhaustion from the trials of daily life. Families recounted groggily getting up in the middle of the night when power abruptly comes on in order to do laundry, carry out business transactions on computers, charge phones, or just bathe and flush toilets, until electricity, just as unpredictably, goes off again. Some families have stopped taking elevators; their terrified children have been stuck too often between floors. Students complained of freezing classrooms in winter, trying to study or write papers without computers, and reading at night by candlelight. The challenges will soon increase with the demands for power—and air-conditioning—surge, as summer temperatures reach a hundred and twenty-five degrees.

    The reasons for these outages vary. With the exception of the Gulf states, infrastructure is old or inadequate in many of the twenty-three Arab countries. The region’s disparate wars, past and present, have damaged or destroyed electrical grids. Some governments, even in Iraq, can’t afford the cost of fuelling plants around the clock. Epic corruption has compounded physical challenges. Politicians have delayed or prevented solutions if their cronies don’t get contracts to fuel, maintain, or build power plants.

    Reply
  37. Full length talk that covers the facts of climate change, the urgency with which it needs to be addressed and actions we can take to stop it. Delivered by Dr Aaron Thierry at the University of Sheffield, hosted by the Carbon Neutral University Network.

    Reply
  38. Sheri

     /  May 21, 2017

    What websites organizations and others are tryring to save climate data that is being eliminated by the orange headed enemies?
    I know this site is doing what it can. Yes, I am talking giving money to some one or someplace online. Enemies of knowledge are my enemy.

    Reply
  39. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    Not a problem with the technology or the actual plan, rather the incompetent companies, French pressure to mine uranium in Kakadu National park and general organisational incompetence
    http://www.smh.com.au/business/fastmoving-clouds-how-cs-energys-kogan-creek-solar-boost-project-failed-20170516-gw5p2u.html

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  May 22, 2017

      The technology is very successful in other countries

      Reply
  40. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    One for DT
    http://www.energymatters.com.au/renewable-news/butterfly-wings-solar-cell-technology-em6048/

    Technology leaps in solar cell and light technology, courtesy of the humble butterfly genus

    Reply
  41. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/22/new-coalmines-will-worsen-poverty-and-escalate-climate-change-report-finds

    New coalmines will worsen poverty and escalate climate change, report finds

    Oxfam attacks Australia’s ‘climate policy paralysis’ and urges it to promise no new coalmines and end public subsidies
    New coalmines will leave more people in poverty, Oxfam has said in a new report, calling on Australia to commit to no new coalmines and to end public subsidies for coalmining.

    Reply
  42. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    http://techau.com.au/csiros-20-million-climate-change-research-center-opens-in-tasmania/

    Today the Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research (CSHOR) opens in Tasmania. The project is designed to learn more about the changes in climate by monitoring the southern oceans, so it makes sense its located in the southern most place in Australia.

    The project is a collaboration between CSIRO, China’s Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology (QNLM), with support from the University of Tasmania and the University of New South Wales. The project will cost $20 million dollars over the next 5 years.

    The Chinese involvement comes as they, like Australia, are exposed to risks from the changing climate, including future sea level rise. CSHOR will also look at the impact that melting Antarctic ice shelves will have on global sea level rise.

    Reply
  43. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 22, 2017

    Okay something positive.
    https://thinkprogress.org/watch-almost-everything-you-know-about-clean-energy-is-outdated-594cd2bfccdd
    Renewables and efficiency have already won the battle for the future of electricity.
    At least, that was the message at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Summit in New York City last week. In his must-see keynote talk, BNEF founder and chair Michael Liebreich explained that if you blinked, you missed the clean energy revolution: “This is a different world from three years ago.”…………………

    Last April, the cheapest contract for unsubsidized solar was 3.6 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh), Liebreich said. A year later, it has fallen 25 percent to just 2.7 cents/kWh. Last year, unsubsidized offshore wind was going for 5.3 cents/kWh. Now it is 4.9 cents/kWh. For context, the average residential price for electricity in the United States is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour.

    Reply
  44. Andy_in_SD

     /  May 22, 2017

    I’m not sure if this is just the channel clearing, or a chunk of Petermann broke off.
    This is today & 2 days ago.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8-8/2017-05-20;2017-05-18/9-N80.95756-W62.50157

    Reply
  45. wili

     /  May 22, 2017

    Hi robert. I wonder if you could help me out. When you say: “…CO2 and CO2e in the range of 405 and 493 ppm respectively…” do you have a link for the latter number?

    It would help me in discussions on other fora to have an ‘official’ source rather than just a (wonderful) blog that (unfortunately) most people still have never heard of.

    As I understand it, at 500ppm CO2e, we have only 2/3 chance of exceeding 2C and a 50-50 chance of exceeding 3C (though I’m not clear whether these are short term, mid term or long term calculations). Does that sound about right?

    And of course others are more than welcome to pitch in with any insights or links they may have available.
    Thanks,
    wili

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  May 22, 2017

      Here is what the EPA has to say about calculating co2e for now. I’m guessing that this protocol is on death row.
      http://info.era-environmental.com/blog/bid/58087/GHG-Emissions-Demystifying-Carbon-Dioxide-Equivalent-CO2e
      and this from IPCC’s second assessment report is the table of math problems that will be your home work for the foreseeable future.
      http://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg1/en/ch2s2-10-2.html#table-2-14

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  May 22, 2017

        This is a cheat sheet for doing your own calc’s, if your so inclined. It is based on the IPCC’s work. I have it in my reading list but didn’t keep the link where I found it. You just pick the tonnage and multiply by the number under the named gas and presto co2 equivalent based on 100 year lifetime, if I remember correctly.
        Carbon dioxide (CO2)
        1
        Methane (CH4)
        25
        Nitrous oxide(N2O)
        298
        Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
        124 – 14,800
        Perfluorocarbons (PFCs)
        7,390 – 12,200
        Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
        22,800
        Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3)2
        17,200

        Reply
        • bostonblorp

           /  May 22, 2017

          IIRC, at least for CH4, that number is based on a 100-year amortization given methane’s rapid decay in the atmosphere. The real-time value, however, is closer to 100. And since CH4 concentrations are increasing, not declining, the decay rate is irrelevant.

        • Shawn Redmond

           /  May 23, 2017

          I completely agree BB. However if you want to explain the totals to the unaware you have to know how the IPCC and others arrive at these totals. The IPCC are using the 100 year timeline for the rosier outlook I suspect. The truth is abstract.

        • Brian

           /  May 23, 2017

          I think the bigger question here is what is the time lag that it takes to normalize the climate to the changing CO2? Like, are we experiencing the climate of a static 405ppm, or maybe a static 375ppm or even 350ppm and there’s so much lag in the system that it just hasn’t caught up yet.

          The reason why I ask is that once (if) we are able to stabilize on CO2 and other emissions, then the earth will continue to heat until it too has stabilized at its new ‘normal’. Is this lag period just a few years, or will it be measured in decades?

          Even if a magic solution stabilized CO2 ppm emissions today, temperatures will continue to rise until the system catches up.

    • Vaughn Anderson

       /  May 24, 2017

      Brian, please try this link and then further explore this website: https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/aggi.html

      Reply
  46. Ryan in New England

     /  May 22, 2017

    The world seed bank tucked away safely in the frozen Arctic was flooded after unusually warm weather caused permafrost melting. So this should be a very clear example that nowhere is safe from the effects of a changing climate.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/19/arctic-stronghold-of-worlds-seeds-flooded-after-permafrost-melts

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  May 22, 2017

      Least of all the polar regions!

      Reply
    • lesliegraham1

       /  May 22, 2017

      The main problem with that story is that it’s not true.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  May 23, 2017

        The story is correct. The headline is click bait and gives a very false impression. The entrance to the vault was flooded by overland water. I wonder if they have flood insurance?

        Reply
        • lesliegraham1

           /  May 23, 2017

          It wasn’t ‘flooded’.
          Some moisture got in – same as last year.
          The way the entrance tunnel is designed makes it impossible for water to reach the seed store. NO water reached the seed store.
          Nothing to do with the ‘permafrost melting’ either.
          These alarmist clickbait headlines and ‘stories’ are just fuel for the deniers.

        • lesliegraham1

           /  May 23, 2017

          Hege Njaa Aschim—communications director of the Norwegian Government-led organization Statsbygg, confirmed that the leaks happened last fall, during a time of high temperatures and unusual rainfall in the Svalbard area.
          “This fall—October 2016—we had extreme weather in Svalbard with high temperatures and a lot of rain—very unusual. This caused water intrusion into the tunnel leading to the seed vault. The seeds and the vault was never at risk. This was no flooding…”

          Cary Fowler, who helped create the seed vault. “In my experience, there’s been water intrusion at the front of the tunnel every single year.”
          “The tunnel was never meant to be water tight at the front, because we didn’t think we would need that,” Fowler says. “What happens is, in the summer the permafrost melts, and some water comes in, and when it comes in, it freezes. It doesn’t typically go very far.”

          http://www.popsci.com/seed-vault-flooding

  47. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 22, 2017

    The following site gives real time air pollution numbers. Pick a reporting site near you check it out.
    http://aqicn.org/map/world/#@g/0.8608/8.0859/1z

    Reply
  48. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    Some good news

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-22/baby-dugongs-return-shows-seagrass-recovering-from-cyclone/8548052

    Baby dugongs’ return to Great Barrier Reef suggests vital seagrass recovering from Cyclone Yasi

    An increase in the number of baby dugongs on the Great Barrier Reef suggests seagrass ecosystems are recovering well after recent flood and cyclone events.

    A James Cook University report on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and turtles on the southern Great Barrier Reef, between Hinchinbrook Island and southern Queensland, showed the number of dugong calves had gone from zero per cent after Cyclone Yasi in 2011 to ten per cent of the visible population in late 2016.

    The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s (GBRMPA) Roger Beeden said the fact that dugongs are reproducing suggests their ecosystem is in better health.

    “Because they have obviously found enough seagrass to sustain them and not only to sustain their growth but also to be able to reproduce,” Dr Beeden said.

    “They are actually an indicator of the health of those systems as a whole, so it is really encouraging news.”

    Reply
  49. Abel Adamski

     /  May 22, 2017

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-22/new-cshor-venture-sees-csiro-link-up-with-china-for-climate-res/8547516

    The move continues a significant change in direction from early last year when the CSIRO’s climate science capacity was to set to be stripped back.
    Dr Steve Rintoul climate scientist CSIRO
    Photo: CSHOR is a world-first in looking at the role of southern oceans in global weather, Dr Steve Rintoul says. (ABC News: Tony King)

    When announcing 275 jobs cuts to the agency, chief executive Dr Larry Marshall declared the CSIRO was moving away from understanding how climate change worked to trying to find solutions to the problem.

    That position changed after incoming Science Minister Greg Hunt intervened.

    Under Mr Hunt’s encouragement, the CSIRO reaffirmed its commitment to strong climate change research, announcing a new Hobart Climate Science Centre, but not before the knowledge bank of esteemed climate scientists like Dr John Church was lost.

    Professor Lixin Wu, director of the Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science (QLM), said it made sense for China to study the Southern Ocean because it impacted directly on the Asian monsoon.

    “It you’re talking about global warming, the Southern Ocean is the major sink of carbon dioxide and heat,” he said.

    “It’s the biggest driver of climate for the eastern area of Asia.

    “Ice melting in the Antarctic region can also impact the rainfall in China.”

    He said QLM was planning to build five research centres worldwide: Hobart, two in the US and one each in Russia and Germany.

    He said international collaboration was vital in tackling the challenges of global climate.

    Reply
  50. Climate change could slash staple crops: Study

    Climate change, and its impacts on extreme weather and temperature swings, is projected to reduce global production of corn, wheat, rice and soybeans by 23 percent in the 2050s, according to a new analysis.

    Haile’s study is one of two major studies this month reporting big impacts to major crops in the future. Just this week UC Davis researchers released a study in the Environmental Research Letters journal reporting that by the end of the century climate change is likely to cause France’s winter wheat yields to decrease 21 percent, winter barley yields to decrease by 17 percent and spring barley to decrease by about to 33 percent.

    http://www.dailyclimate.org/tdc-newsroom/2017/may/climate-change-could-cut-into-major-crop

    Reply
  51. wharf rat

     /  May 22, 2017

    India Launches Massive Push for Clean Power, Lighting, and Cars
    While President Trump wants to revive America’s coal industry, India is embracing renewables, LED lighting, electric cars, and more.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/05/india-solar-wind-renewable-power-electric-cars-leds/?google_editors_picks=true

    Reply
  52. Half the global population could face ‘unknown’ climates by mid-century

    https://www.carbonbrief.org/half-global-population-could-face-unknown-climates-by-mid-century

    Reply
  53. wharf rat

     /  May 22, 2017

    Calif. snowpack 206% of average on 5/19.

    Reply
    • Devon Macintosh

       /  May 22, 2017

      Here’s an interesting tidbit: 1905 in CA had record snowfall, then 1906 had the big earthquake possibly due to weight change on crust. Winter of 2016 was dramatic as compared to previous years of drought. Could that portend a 2017 CA earthquake on the San Andreas? It’s overdue.

      Reply
  54. coloradobob

     /  May 22, 2017

    Shawn Redmond / May 21, 2017
    THE LIGHTS ARE GOING OUT IN THE MIDDLE EAST
    http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-lights-are-going-out-in-the-middle-east

    A really timely article Shawn has found .
    Makes me wish I was young solar panel salesman over there. Talk about demand.

    Powerlines in Iraq

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  May 23, 2017

      It’s an interesting comparison to our infrastructure CB. It can be argued that it is a war zone and as such the grid is a military target. So how can that resemble grids elsewhere? Well, the weather extremes that most now experience could be described as offensive military action. The wide spread destruction caused by the “active weather” to infrastructure is most likely envied by generals. Perhaps it should be viewed as acts of “terra-ism” and we would get a more appropriate response from the powers that be.

      Reply
  55. coloradobob

     /  May 22, 2017

    President Donald Trump urged two senior intelligence officials in March to publicly deny there was any evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, the Washington Post reported on Monday, citing current and former officials.

    Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers refused to comply with Trump’s requests because they believed them inappropriate, according to two current and two former officials, the Post said.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-russia-intelligence-idUSKBN18I2QH

    Reply
  56. coloradobob

     /  May 23, 2017

    What is “Make America Great Again” ?
    Well, apparently lots of us get to go back to the Life Expectancy of 1900 . When you died at the age of 47 years. ……………….

    Trump budget seeks huge cuts to disease prevention and medical research departments
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/05/22/trump-budget-seeks-huge-cuts-to-disease-prevention-and-medical-research-departments/?utm_term=.c68678fea435

    And we thought the war on science was about the war climate science. This brings up an interesting nexus . We have seen the microbes from the tropics march North, and we know the microbes at poles are being unlocked. And our course of action is more of the same ole’ same ole’ . The rich need relief, and corporations are struggling . But above all more weapons So screw those hungry kids in the barrios .

    This is madness , pure and simple. And it’s a pure 19th century frame of mind . ” Let’s send those little kids to the coal tipple to pick over the ” clinkers” coming of of the mine. ”
    He got one thing right , this is a battle of good and evil .
    But it’s also a battle between right , and wrong. And above all a battle between wisdom , and ignorance.

    Hell of a time to be alive. I grew up thinking that ignorance and fear were in retreat.
    I had a polio shot , I wasn’t going to end up in an iron lung. I had a smallpox shot . The world’s greatest killer wasn’t going to get me.
    Those shiny silver suits of Mercury 7 blinded me. I had out grown my little red wagon , when they were launching. But I hauled our ” portable TV ” to school in it . We watched very shot . American schools didn’t have TV’s back then.

    This is not the march of fools , or folly . This is the march of greed.

    Reply
  57. coloradobob

     /  May 23, 2017

    Your Account Is Temporarily Locked
    We’ve locked your account because someone recently tried to log in from an unfamiliar location. Please help us confirm that it was you who tried to log in.

    Facebook

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  May 23, 2017

      The cookie monster strikes again.
      Have you cleaned your caches and your cookies etc, or new security program doing its job cleaning out all those little tags hidden away.
      I cop the same thing every time CCCleaner has a run ,

      Reply
  58. Shawn Redmond

     /  May 23, 2017

    So what happens when the power goes down? The residents that have to pump water up hill from their properties will suddenly be the proud owners of a lovely pond. The power almost never goes out during storm surges right?

    When several pumps were either turned off or out for repairs during a thunderstorm in October, one restaurant a few feet below street level flooded, fueling the worries of homeowners in the larger project area. The owner’s insurance company denied full flood coverage, prompting the owner and city to dispute the claim.

    Joey Flechas: 305-376-3602, @joeflech

    Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/miami-beach/article129284119.html#storylink=cpy

    Reply
  59. Abel Adamski

     /  May 24, 2017

    https://www.wired.com/2017/05/us-isnt-great-meteorology-trump-may-get-worse/

    The United States bests most nations when it comes to exploring outer space, curing disease, and designing lighter, thinner smartphones. But when it comes to weather prediction, America lags behind a European prediction model that does a better job at telling us how warm or cold it will be three to 10 days out.

    A lack of computing power, scrimpy research budgets, and an overworked National Weather Service are the prime reasons for this forecast gap. And as the White House considers new leadership for the agency that manages the weather service—and slashing its budget—many scientists, weather experts, and meteorologists worry that this gap might widen.

    Nothing has been made public, but Barry Myers, the CEO of private weather firm AccuWeather, is leading the pack of potential nominees to lead NOAA, according to the Washington Post. Myers might be more likely to streamline the weather service and privatize some functions, but he might not be the best person to defend the science mission of both the NWS and NOAA, says Cliff Mass, a meteorologist at the University of Washington who has been a frequent critic of the weather service.

    Myers has a background in a science-facing business, but he’s not a scientist. “He doesn’t know much about climate or oceans,” Mass says. “That is going to be a problem. He doesn’t have scientific credibility.” Mass and others argue that cutting basic research into the oceans, atmosphere, and climate—the taxpayer-funded research done by NOAA and NWS—will lead to less reliable weather modeling by private firms like AccuWeather as well as federal models like the Global Forecast System.

    Reply
  60. Greg

     /  May 24, 2017

    $1.4 Billion: With more than 150,000 car insurance claims and 50,000 homeowners insurance claims estimated to be filed—the monster hailstorm that pounded Colorado’s Front Range on May 8th is on pace to be Colorado’s most expensive insured catastrophe.
    http://www.rmiia.org/news_room/catastrophe_news/2017_05_23_Insurance_News_Colorado_Hail_Storm_Breaks_Records.dwt

    Reply
  61. Suzanne

     /  May 24, 2017

    At NOAA…”Low Sea Ice in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska”
    https://www.climate.gov/news-features/featured-images/low-sea-ice-chukchi-sea-alaska

    Sea ice this spring in the Chukchi Sea, off northwest Alaska, is breaking up and melting earlier and much more extensively than is typical for May. While small areas of open water in this region during mid-May are normal, it appears to be unprecedented in the satellite era to have this much open water north of 68°N latitude (Point Hope) at this time of year.

    Reply
  62. Suzanne

     /  May 24, 2017

    NY Times has been doing a great series on melting ice due to CC.

    Reply
  63. wharf rat

     /  May 24, 2017

    Pope Francis politely shades Trump’s climate ignorance with a parting gift

    Pope Francis and President Donald Trump had their much anticipated first in-person meeting on Wednesday, a 30-minute conversation in which the pope reportedly “did not smile” as he asked the president to work to bring about peace in the world. Despite concern that the two leaders — who hold diametrically opposite views on several issues — might spar during the summit, the exchange appeared to be relatively free of fireworks.
    But according to the National Catholic Reporter, Francis did offer Trump a none-too-subtle parting gift as he left: copies of the pontiff’s published works on progressive economics, climate change, and nonviolence.

    https://thinkprogress.org/francis-trump-meet-c9c5a61617e8

    Reply
  64. Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures. May 23, 2017.
    University of Washington
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523082009.htm

    “The authors suggest that another mechanism controlling the rate of weathering may be how much land is exposed above sea level and the steepness of Earth’s surface. When the Tibetan Plateau was formed some 50 million year ago, the steeper surfaces may have increased the global rate of chemical weathering, drawing down more CO2 and bringing the climate down to today’s more moderate temperatures.

    Their calculations also indicate a stronger relationship between atmospheric CO2 and temperature, known as climate sensitivity. Doubling CO2 in the atmosphere eventually triggered an increase of 5 or 6 degrees Celsius in global temperatures, which is about twice the typical projections for temperature change over centuries for a similar doubling of CO2 due to human emissions.

    Though not the final word, researchers said, these numbers are bad news for today’s climate shifts.
    “What all this means is that in the very long term, our distant descendants can expect more warming for far longer if carbon dioxide levels and temperatures continue to rise,” Catling said.”

    Reply
  65. coloradobob

     /  May 24, 2017

    $1.4 Billion: With more than 150,000 car insurance claims and 50,000 homeowners insurance claims estimated to be filed—the monster hailstorm that pounded Colorado’s Front Range on May 8th is on pace to be Colorado’s most expensive insured catastrophe.
    ……………………………..
    Hail damage is the # 1 insurance payout in the US . And has been for years.
    When the deniers claim cutting carbon is too expensive , remember this number is going to go up big time , because we are changing to a world where the heat engine is going to the top of the troposphere to expel it’s load of BTU’s .
    And that means more baseball, softball, and grapefruit sized hail.

    Reply
  66. coloradobob

     /  May 24, 2017

    Scientists just published a study calling out the head of the EPA by name

    “In my opinion, when incorrect science is elevated to the level of formal congressional testimony and makes its way into the official congressional record, climate scientists have some responsibility to test specific claims that were made, determine whether those claims are correct or not, and publish their results,” Santer told the Washington Post.
    The study found — again — that “tropospheric warming trends over recent 20-year periods are always significantly larger (at the 10 percent level or better) than model estimates of 20-year trends arising from natural internal variability.” In other words, the lowest portion of the atmosphere, where we live, is warming and is doing so in a way that does not look normal. Wednesday’s paper comes on the heels of new, additional research that refuted earlier claims, popular among climate deniers, that there was a “hiatus” in global warming.

    https://thinkprogress.org/pruitt-scientifically-wrong-a114a6492ed7

    Reply
  67. coloradobob

     /  May 24, 2017

    The Anthropocene Morornia –
    We are just destroying our only home , we getting stupider as do it.

    Reply
  68. coloradobob

     /  May 24, 2017

    Bill Maher Teams With ATTN: To Deliver His “F*ck Mars!” Message In Animation

    http://deadline.com/2017/05/bill-maher-animated-fuck-mars-donald-trump-epa-global-warming-video-1202100456/

    Reply
  69. coloradobob

     /  May 24, 2017

    50 years ago –

    Trouble Every Day – Mothers of Invention

    Reply
  70. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    The O’Jays – For The Love of Money (Audio)

    Reply
  71. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    The Pope gave Trump something to read , let us all all hope it was written in crayola.

    Reply
  72. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    I’ve been watching PBS . A series called American Epic . Tracing our music .

    HOWLIN WOLF – LONDON SESSIONS (FULL ALBUM)

    Reply
    • wili

       /  May 25, 2017

      I’ve been hearing great things about that series. I’ll have to check it out.

      Reply
  73. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    Spirit – Twelve Dreams Of Dr. Sardonicus+ 1970[Full Hd 1080]

    Reply
  74. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    Our leaders go dark . We wander in the barrens . Our opponents grind sausage everyday.

    They never stop .

    Ever.

    Reply
  75. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    If one is going to be a voice, Speak-up,

    Reply
  76. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    I am so broken , so beat down , so lost. My comments here mean zip.

    I am so lost . At the end of my rope. I have to cut my lawn , It takes 3 days.

    I can’t walk over 150 feet.

    Reply
  77. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    I am so broken , so beat down , so lost.

    Reply
  78. coloradobob

     /  May 25, 2017

    When we need RS, He stays dark , Then he blooms. I am so hungry for a bloom.

    Reply
  79. Greg

     /  May 25, 2017

    The world’s largest floating solar power plant just went online in China.The 40-megawatt facility was created by PV inverter manufacturer Sungrow Power Supply Co. Ironically, the floating grid itself was constructed over a flooded former coal-mining region.
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/china-floating-solar-power-plant/amp/

    Reply
  80. Abel Adamski

     /  May 25, 2017

    Here we go round the Mulberry bush

    https://www.sciencealert.com/the-dakota-access-pipeline-has-sprung-two-leaks-and-it-hasn-t-even-started-operating-yet?perpetual=yes&limitstart=1

    The Dakota Access Pipeline Has Sprung Two Leaks – And It Hasn’t Even Started Operating Yet

    It didn’t take long for detractors of the Dakota Access Pipeline to have their fears met, with reports surfacing that the facility sprung two leaks in March, leaking more than 100 gallons (378 litres) of oil before it was contained.

    While both leaks were relatively small, and were cleaned up before affecting nearby waterways and wildlife, the concern here is that the pipeline has now sustained three leaks in 2017 alone, and it still hasn’t even begun operations.

    As the Associated Press reports, two barrels of oil totalling 84 gallons (320 litres) spilled on March 3 due to a mechanical fault at a pipeline terminal in Watford City, North Dakota.

    A second, above-ground spill occurred on March 5 in Mercer County, North Dakota – a leak of half a barrel, or 20 gallons (75 litres), due to a manufacturing defect. The contaminated soil was reportedly cleaned up before doing any damage to the surrounding environment.

    A third, known leak occurred on April 4 in South Dakota, where two barrels (84 gallons) spilled at a pump station.

    The North Dakota Environmental Health Chief, Dave Glatt, told the Associated Press that all spills are listed on their online database, but they don’t usually notify the public unless the leaks involve at least 150 barrels (6,300 gallons or 23,848 litres), or the oil has made its way into the waterways.

    To be clear, these leaks are tiny compared to what we’ve been seeing elsewhere in the state of North Dakota, which has experienced 700 oil spills in the past 12 months alone.

    Between 2006 and 2014, there have been more than 1,300 pipeline spills in the state, according to The New York Times.

    Reply
  81. Abel Adamski

     /  May 25, 2017

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-25/how-did-whales-become-enormous-in-just-3-million-years/8558144

    Man-made climate change ‘could make being big bad’

    The link between whale size and the present state of the climate has not been lost on researchers either.

    They warned that as oceans warmed from man-made climate change, the seas would be more like they were when the whales were smaller.

    Professor Slater said that meant the giants of the deep would increasingly face a tougher task of survival.

    “They’re highly adapted to current ocean climates,” he said.

    Reply
  82. Abel Adamski

     /  May 25, 2017

    http://www.thefifthestate.com.au/columns/spinifex/weve-failed-the-great-barrier-reef/91928

    imon Black, Greenpeace | 24 May 2017

    At a Senate Estimates hearing this week, it was revealed that as much as 50 per cent of the Great Barrier Reef has died following back-to-back bleaching events. Simon Black reflects upon the tragedy.

    As much as half of the Great Barrier Reef is now dead.

    The largest living structure on Earth, formerly 2300 kilometres long and visible even from space. Home to countless species of marine life and economic support to more than 60,000 people.

    Burned away by bleaching brought on by climate change, and by the continued inaction of our governments to do anything meaningful to protect it.

    Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority chairman Russell Reichelt this week delivered the sombre news to a Senate Estimates hearing declaring that it is believed about 30 per cent of coral died last year, mostly in the Reef’s northern section, while initial observations suggest a further 20 per cent was destroyed in this year’s event.

    Reply
    • Ryan in New England

       /  May 25, 2017

      This is heartbreaking. If things like this don’t move people to change, nothing is ever going to.

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  May 25, 2017

        Read the article, and the “Conservative” politicians laughed and joked about it to Russels face

        Reply
  83. Genomik

     /  May 25, 2017

    Colbert last night did a bittersweet sing along w Paul Simon singing “Feeling Groovy” with some more timely lyrics for today! The Arctic is Melting, the seas are boiling! You can sing along! 1.30secs

    Reply
  84. wili

     /  May 25, 2017

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2017/may/25/global-climate-projections-help-civil-engineers-plan

    “Global climate projections help civil engineers plan ”

    They should add, “…if policy makers let them…”

    “…we expect the Earth to warm by about 4°C more (7°F) over the present temperature by the year 2100. This is near the upper end of the last IPCC reports…”

    Probably still conservative, but better than taking the least dramatic predictions of the IPCC.

    Reply

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