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Scorching 129 Degree (F) Temps Hit Iran; Severe June European Heatwave Attributed to Climate Change; Satellite Data Confirms Rapid Global Warming

In a slew of climate change related news this week, Iran’s city of Ahvaz saw temperatures hit near the highest readings ever recorded on Earth, a new scientific model study has found that climate change made the recent heatwave that hit Europe this June two to ten times more likely, and climate change deniers lost a major cherry-picked talking point as the most recent satellite data now confirms the rapid global temperature rise that ground stations have been reporting all along.

129 F in Iran — Near Record for Globe, But Not a 35 C Wet Bulb Reading

On Thursday, in Ahvaz, Iran, temperatures hit a blazing 53.7 degrees Celsius or 128.66 degrees Fahrenheit. These temperatures were just shy of the 54 C (129.2 F) global records in Mitribah, Kuwait on July 21, 2016 and in California’s Death Valley on July 30, 2013 identified by Chris C Burt of Weather Underground. The reading was also the hottest temperature ever recorded in Asia.

This very severe high temperature came just one day after the thermometer struck 52.9 C (127.2 F) on Wednesday and is the strongest temperature spike of a broader Middle Eastern heatwave that has been baking the near-Persian-Gulf-region for many days. Such severe heat did not, however, tip wet bulb readings above the 35 C human self-cooling threshold despite an extremely hazardous heat index near 142 F. A combined dew point of 72 F, a 129 F temperature, and 995 hPa pressure resulted in wet bulb readings of around 30.2 C for the city — quite dangerous, but not beyond the human limit for temperature self-regulation.

June European Heatwave Attributed to Climate Change

As the Middle East was testing new all-time high temperature records for planet Earth, Europe was also sweltering under combined severe heat and drought. Throughout June, dry weather and high temperatures have plagued Europe. Extreme record heat sweltered the UK, France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Belgium — setting off heat emergencies and forcing some regions to ration water. Belgium as a country saw its highest night-time temperature readings on record. England endured its hottest day since 1976. Meanwhile, the heat and extreme dryness set off wildfires that resulted in the tragic loss of 64 lives in Portugal while 1,500 were forced to evacuate from similar extreme blazes in Spain.

(June heat set off a rash of extreme conditions across Europe. World Weather Attribution has linked this extreme event to climate change. Image source: Climate Central.)

This kind of heat is becoming more typical around the world as global temperatures have increased, on average by around 1.2 C since the 1880s. And a recent climate change model attribution study has confirmed that this particular heat wave was a lot worse than it otherwise would have been without the added kick provided by human-forced warming. For a study by World Weather Attribution found “clear and strong links between June’s record warmth and human-caused climate change.” 

According to the new study:

“These high temperatures are no longer rare in the current climate, occurring roughly every 10 to 30 years depending on the country. The team found that climate change made the intensity and frequency of such extreme heat at least twice as likely in Belgium, at least four times as likely in France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and central England and at least 10 times as likely in Portugal and Spain.”

Satellite Data Confirms Rapid Global Warming

In another climate science related development, remote sensing researchers at the University of California have significantly revised their lower troposphere temperature record. The revision corrected for orbital decay in satellites that caused the world to appear to warm more slowly than actual trends. As a result of these revisions, a significant subset of the satellite data now largely confirms the more accurate land based temperature record showing significant global warming over the past few decades.

(Satellite data revised to correct for orbital decay now basically confirms land-based observations of global temperature increase. Image source: Carbon Brief. Data Scource: RSS and NASA.)

Dr Carl Mears, a co-author of the new findings, in a statement to Carbon Brief noted:

By correctly accounting for the changes in satellite measurement times, the new satellite data are in better agreement with the surface data.

Carbon Brief goes on to add that:

Unlike the satellite temperature record, where only a few satellites are measuring temperatures at any given point of time, there is a large amount of redundancy in surface temperature observations, with multiple independent sets of data producing consistent results. Therefore, it is not too surprising that corrections to problems with satellite data would move them closer to surface records.

Climate change deniers (self-labeled skeptics), have long pointed to satellite data showing the Earth warming at a slower rate than land-based measures. These ‘skeptics’ have then gone on to falsely claim that such data throws the whole issue of human-caused climate change into doubt. But this same group has failed to acknowledge the fact that orbital decay, as pointed out by the very researchers that run the satellite sensors, tends to result in artificially cool readings.

The recent reworking of satellite data to account for orbital decay along with researchers’ direct acknowledgement of the higher accuracy of land-based data removes the rational scientific basis for this line of ‘climate skeptic’ argumentation and renders past assertions in this vein mostly moot.

Links:

Mercury Tips Record 53.7 C in Iran

World Weather Attribution

Europe’s Extreme June Heat Clearly Linked to Climate Change

Chris C Burt

Major Correction to Satellite Data Shows 140 Percent Faster Warming Since 1998

Hat tip to wili

Hat tip to bostonblurp

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158 Comments

  1. climatehawk1

     /  June 30, 2017

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  2. I just wanted to say thanks for your continued excellence in blogging about the state of the earth. I’ve been doing my own investigation over the past three years and have written a number of articles about quantifying and visualizing climate change. Here is a link that tells the story of my work: https://3danim8.wordpress.com/climate-change-quantified/

    Thanks,

    Ken

    Reply
  3. Oh, my, my, my, I can hardly wait to hear the climate deniers have a go at this one. Get your notebooks ready, class.

    Reply
  4. wharf rat

     /  June 30, 2017

    OT.. carryover from Suzanne’s post on the previous thread…

    20 states refusing to provide voter data to Trump election panel
    http://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/340289-19-states-refusing-to-provide-voter-data-to-trump-panel

    Reply
    • He and these republican governors are subjecting their populaces to extreme risk of identity theft while also continuing in their mad campaign to suppress the vote.

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  July 1, 2017

      Xenophobia will rise worldwide as populations begin to migrate.

      Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 1, 2017

      The “snowflakes” that make up the #Resistance sent a blizzard of phone calls and emails to State Capitols all day today…..looks like it may have made an impact. 🙂
      This Kobach Commission is nothing but a “witch hunt”….and fascism in action…IMO.

      Reply
  5. Tigertown

     /  June 30, 2017

    I remember ice spikes coming out of the wet ground in the winter time in Alabama.
    Kind of like this.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwjM4oSftubUAhVCWCYKHScRBKcQjRwIBw&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thoughtco.com%2Fmake-ice-spikes-in-your-freezer-609398&psig=AFQjCNEMtW2_xbLPPKkojNT89DyjszYvmg&ust=1498941445544635

    What I don’t remember is the last time that I did see them here. Maybe the late seventies or early eighties, as I am not sure. It’s been a lifetime. Evidently, it has to get really cold for these to form, and it just doesn’t get that cold here anymore.

    Reply
  6. IMHO, one way to explain people a change in the statistical likelihood in hotter events is to show them NASA’s Gaussian temperature shift animation. (This one ends in 2011.)

    Reply
    • Thanks for this, NS. It’s an excellent tool, IMO.

      Edit: Page not found… Going to look for your link. Added a youtube embed to your post which I think is of the same video.

      Reply
      • Thanks. (You can nuke my 2nd attempt.)

        Reply
        • No worries. For some reason the direct NASA link wasn’t working. I’d prefer that, though, because it freeze frames at the end. Adding the link data here in case folks want to cut and paste.

          svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003900/a003975/bell_final_comp.m4v

      • Hello Robert
        I came across this important info this week about leaks from natural installations and distribution network. It’s all in this short video

        Thanks, and keep fighting (with words eh)

        Jack

        Reply
    • wili

       /  July 1, 2017

      Thanks, RJ. Another good example of how some bio-fuels can wreak environmental disaster. Let’s hope they at least take it slow, as the last paragraph suggests.

      Reply
  7. redskylite

     /  July 1, 2017

    How hot can it get?, how can people live and perform under 129 degrees F, hope they all have a/c.

    I’ve just read this article in ARSTechnica I don’t know whether to laugh or cry, I thought they already had this mechanism called “WUWT” courtesy of Willard Anthony Watts.

    EPA intends to form “red team” to debate climate science
    Agency head reported to desire “back-and-forth critique” of published research.

    US Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and Energy Secretary Rick Perry have been making some headlines for publicly rejecting the conclusions of climate science. But in between wrongly claiming that climate scientists just don’t know how much of a contribution humans make to recent global warming (answer: roughly 100 percent), they have also been parroting a new line—that climate science needs a “red team” to take on the scientific consensus.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/06/epa-intends-to-form-red-team-to-debate-climate-science/

    Reply
  8. kay

     /  July 1, 2017

    Robert, wasn’t the temperature 165 degrees F in Iran in July of 2015? Was this not accurate or am I missing something?
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/07/30/iran-city-hits-suffocating-heat-index-of-154-degrees-near-world-record/?utm_term=.94d0d6c373b9

    Reply
    • Kay –
      The value of 165° F referred to in this article from July 2015 is the heat index, a calculated value based on actual air temperature and the dew point ( humidity).

      As noted in the article:
      …the air felt like a searing 165 degrees (74 Celsius) today factoring in the humidity.

      To achieve today’s astronomical heat index level of 165, Bandar Mahshahr’s actual air temperature registered 115 degrees (46 Celsius) with an astonishing dew point temperature of 90 (32 Celsius).

      ( Emphasis added by me)

      Reply
    • wili

       /  July 1, 2017

      I think the difference is ‘heat index’ rather than just raw temperature. But I may be missing something.

      Reply
  9. Suzanne

     /  July 1, 2017

    A National Treasure in the Senate….Senator Sheldon Whitehouse’s weekly CC speech…
    “Time to Wake Up: Climate Change Affects Public Health”…(apropos considering the tax break …er..healthcare bill being considered this week)

    Reply
  10. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    Most here know this, however the trend line shows 1.7c/century in 45 years. As I understand it most of our increase has happened in the last 25 years. Based on this graph( https://robertscribbler.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/warming-since-1880-shows-acceleration-in-recent-years.png?w=1000&h= ) the rise from 1960 till 1980 was about .2c. While the rise from 1980 till 2000 was about .4c. From 2000 till 2016 it looks to be about another .4c already. This would seem to indicate a doubling of the rate of increase in the 20 to 25 year bracket. This increased rate while we still have a floating ice cap up north. I see on other blogs some talk of another El Nino possibly next year! Even with an ice cap it shouldn’t be a problem to make 2c + by 2050. I would expect without our ice cap the doubling time will be substantially reduced. With that thought, how fast of a rise is theoretically possible without any summer ice cap? There is lots of talk about how much energy the Arctic Ocean will absorb during an ice free summer. With the extra forcing from GHG’s there is a tremendous amount of ice free ocean between 45 north and 45 south year round. Excuse my french but man we’re in some deep shit!
    Scientists have devised a new mathematical equation that allows them to determine just how much humans are affecting the climate. According to the researchers, global temperatures have decreased by an average of 0.01 Celsius per century over the last 7,000 years. This figure is what they considered the baseline rate. In the last 45 years however, trends show that it has increased at 1.7 Celsius per century, due to greenhouse gas emissions.
    https://futurism.com/humans-are-changing-the-climate-170x-faster-than-natural-forces/

    Reply
  11. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    Global average temps don’t tell the whole tale. An average rise of one degree celsius globally is going to be substantially more than that in the continental heart lands. Cereal grain territory! Rain fall coming in extreme bursts instead of evened out and longer, hotter longer heat extremes will take a nasty toll on bushels per acre totals.
    http://grist.org/briefly/a-drought-in-the-dakotas-spells-trouble-for-the-u-s-wheat-harvest/
    A drought in the Dakotas spells trouble for the U.S. wheat harvest. Farmers in the Upper Midwest got a big dose of bad news Thursday: The extent of the region’s ongoing “extreme” drought has more than tripled in the past week.
    Temperatures are expected to reach as high as 107 degrees next week in parts of the Dakotas, more than 20 degrees above normal. In large swaths of the Dakotas and eastern Montana, spring rains have been less than half of normal. On Monday, North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum declared a statewide fire and drought emergency.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 1, 2017

      Like plants and animals migrating north…so too is wheat. Apparently though North Dakota is not far enough north. As the article closed with….looks like Canada will be growing wheat next.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  July 1, 2017

        Hi Suzanne, here in Canada we’ve been producing wheat in the area of 20 to 30 million tonnes per year since the 1980’s (world production 700 million tonnes +/_). The late spring frosts that limit us to one crop per season will still occur despite what looks like earlier good conditions. The flip flop that is evident now in the hard frosts sweeping in from the north due the the exaggerated wavy jet stream will likely ensure that the amount of northward movement of the growing zone will be kept in check, unless the falls see a longer wait for the first frost. However the days get shorter fast at what is “now” the end of the growing season, this would have an impact on the bushel per acre numbers as the grains won’t swell as much during the shorter days. Even if the first fall frosts hold off.

        Reply
        • Suzanne

           /  July 1, 2017

          Thanks Shawn for that helpful explanation from the northern latitudes.. 🙂

    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  12. Suzanne

     /  July 1, 2017

    “Climate refugees will search hard for homes” at Climate News Network…
    http://climatenewsnetwork.net/22574-2/

    By 2060, around 1.4 bn people could be climate refugees, driven from low-lying coastal cities by sea level rise. By 2100, as the global population may have reached 11bn, there could be 2bn climate refugees.

    To feed those 9 to 11 bn people expected in the second half of the century, farmers will have to grow as much food in 40 years as they have grown in the last 8,000 or so.

    And in a world of accelerating sea level rise and climate change, in which farmland is being degraded and turned to desert, in which ever more land is set aside for carbon storage in the form of forest, and in which the strains of survival increase social divisions and social conflict, there is a new challenge: where will the 2bn climate refugees find new homes?

    Reply
    • Erik Frederiksen

       /  July 1, 2017

      The inland areas don’t have the infrastructure for those displaced from the coasts.

      Reply
  13. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    The following link is a review of The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, by Elizabeth Kolbert from 2014. It’s interesting in retrospect. It’s a book I’ve yet to read and not sure if I want to.
    https://harpers.org/archive/2014/05/consume-screw-kill/

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 1, 2017

      Shawn…a must read. I keep it out, as a reminder of our reality, and for me, why it is important to keep on fighting.

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  July 1, 2017

      It is a very good book, I’ve read it as well. I highly recommend it.

      Reply
    • I’ve listened to it on audio and it’s excellent. A print copy is sitting in my reading stack. Highly recommended–lots of interesting history to go along with the admitted direness of the present.

      Reply
  14. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    Okay I’m reading this article and seeing the general agreement between what is happening and the outlook for the future and the I hit this paragraph :”In fact, states in New England and the Pacific Northwest, where temperatures are generally cooler, could even benefit from warmer temperatures and longer growing seasons. Some counties here could see economic gains of as much as 10 percent or more of their gross county product. But all over the US, the situation is more dire: each 1 degree Celsius increase in temperatures could cause yields in agriculture to drop by about 9 percent. And heatwaves could cause more people to die, the study says: each 1 degree Celsius increase would increase mortality rates by 5.4 deaths per 100,000 people.”
    “could even benefit from warmer temperatures and longer growing seasons” pie in the sky optimism if ever there was any. The earlier start time for the growing season isn’t much help for the perennials that push out buds and blossoms one month early only to have them freeze dried by extreme frost at what would constitute a “normal frost” for the time of year.

    https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/29/15892910/climate-change-south-midwest-economic-loss

    Reply
    • Spike

       /  July 1, 2017

      Personally I have always found the argument that there would be gains from warming highly dubious, even for cold areas becoming warmer, which superficially sounds plausible. The impact of other climatic or environmental effects such as extreme weather/weather whiplash, SLR, or ecosystem damage may nullify benefits of the warmer temperatures it seemed to me.

      Someone finally did what I had long wanted to see and looked at the impact on severe weather of the warming that has already occurred and found half a degree had considerable impacts in the real world:

      “Comparing two 20-year periods—1960-79 and 1991-2010—between which average global temperatures jumped 0.5 C (0.9 F), scientists found that several kinds of extreme weather gained in duration and intensity.
      The hottest summer temperatures increased by more than 1 C (1.8 F) across a quarter of Earth’s land areas, while the coldest winter temperatures warmed by more then 2.5 C (4.5 F).
      The intensity of extreme precipitation grew nearly 10 percent across a quarter of all land masses, and the duration of hot spells—which can fuel devastating forest fires—lengthened by a week in half of land areas.”

      Add to that the beautiful complexity of ecosystems that evolved specifically to thrive in the relatively stable conditions of the last 7000 years and the likelihood of damage to life on Earth always seemed high.

      Reply
        • Shawn Redmond

           /  July 1, 2017

          I agree Spike. The averages don’t show the damage that the extremes cause, especially the hotter ones that are absolutely required to achieve the higher year end average. The surface temperatures on a world that is 70% water have to increase dramatically over the 30% of land to see a 1c rise on average. This is going to be catastrophic for agriculture as we have come to practice it. This risk seems to either be underplayed or overlooked. The chatter always seems to be around the better growing conditions that the warmer atmosphere will bring with it and the nasty stuff will be localized i.e. more land available up north to farm. Well it doesn’t seem to be working out that way so far, just more land up north to burn. Individually there are very few village idiots, but collectively we seem to be as dumb as posts.

        • Yes, couldn’t agree more. Look at the damage the bark beetle infestation caused and continues to cause, with only a degree C or less of warming. Ecological effects are very sensitive, as you all point out.

          Russia still seems to think they will benefit from global warming, even as huge wildfires devastate large areas of the country, and infrastructure built on permafrost collapses.

          In general, there won’t be any climate change winners, only losers, I think. Disaster capitalism might benefit…for a while.

        • Yep. Recent analysis suggests Vermont will be a beneficiary (that multicolored county map that appeared in the NYT and elsewhere). But, we just got 2.5 inches of rain here yesterday (that’s about half as much here as Tropical Storm Irene dropped) and have lots of road repairs ahead–hard to know just how much of that is factored into the estimates.

        • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

    • entropicman

       /  July 1, 2017

      The optimum average temperature for economic productivity is 13C.

      https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/oct/21/perfect-temperature-for-economic-success-is-13c-climate-change

      It can now be revealed. The tar sands are a Canadian plot to move the 13C temperature contour Northwards.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  July 1, 2017

        Oh oh you’re on to us. Just when the plan was starting to take shape. We were going to use the increase in temperate to turn the tar sands into rice paddies and simultaneously soak the oil out of the sands and produce a healthy crop of GMO rice modified to grow well in the oily water. BP and Bayer have the intellectual patents and are chomping at the bit to get it going. All thats holding it up is the XL pipeline.

        Reply
    • Dave Person

       /  July 2, 2017

      Hi,
      Moreover, as you move north, you run into thinner soils with less defined horizons, and glacial till, hence all those lovely stone walls in New England.

      dave

      Reply
      • Hatrack

         /  July 2, 2017

        Typically missing from the charming delusion that “We’ll just grow our food in Canada” (Marketplace Magic! Human Ingenuity!) is the fact that the Laurentian Shield is in many locations close to the surface, and not terribly hospitable to agriculture since it’s made out of metamorphic rock.

        Oh, and the fact that many plant species don’t do all that well at high latitudes, setting aside questions of soil quality. If Canadian farmers could grow wheat, oats or barley farther north, they’d likely have already done so.

        Reply
  15. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    This shot of the Jakobshavn Isbrae is stunningly gorgeous due unfortunately to the melting
    http://apps.sentinel-hub.com/sentinel-playground/?lat=69.13273879476066&lng=-49.19609069824219&zoom=10&preset=CUSTOM&layers=B8A,B03,B02&maxcc=100&gain=0.4&gamma=1.0&time=2015-01-01|2017-06-28&cloudCorrection=none&atmFilter=&showDates=true&evalscript=

    Reply
  16. Spike

     /  July 1, 2017

    “Climate change deniers (self-labeled skeptics), have long pointed to satellite data showing the Earth warming at a slower rate than land-based measures. These ‘skeptics’ have then gone on to falsely claim that such data throws the whole issue of human-caused climate change into doubt.”

    I always thought this was one of their wackier arguments, even by their standards. If we were trying to determine surface temperatures of a distant planet would we trust thousands of probes dropped on the surface over most of the planet or a few satellites measuring outgoing radiation? The likelihood always was a technical problem with the satellite data. And so it came to pass.

    Reply
  17. Lisa

     /  July 1, 2017

    I saw the damage in Portugal done by the fires. It was 43 celsius that day. I drove along the ‘road of death’ where 64 mortals unfortunately met their end. As far as the eye could see in all directions were vast swathes of burnt forest and charcoalled rocks. Imagine a oval of radius some 40k x 20k in dimensions. Every tree and green plant in that area was destroyed beyond comprehension. The whole side of one mountain range top to bottom has been burned. Recovery time 25-30 years for that kind of damage.

    Reply
  18. wili

     /  July 1, 2017

    Hey! I got another hat tip!! ‘-)

    Where is it that I go again to trade them in for big big prizes? And how many box tops do I need to go with them for the best prizes? 🙂 🙂 🙂

    But really, I’m glad you picked up on this Robert. It really struck me as significant…one of the kinds of milestones we want to keep watch on and note when new records like this are set or exceeded. Of course, the important thing is the larger trends…but you of course cover those well true.

    Keep up the excellent work, bro! But take some breaks when you need ’em, too..we hate it when you’re away, but we’ll survive.

    Reply
  19. Jacque

     /  July 1, 2017


    No comment necessary!

    Reply
  20. wili

     /  July 1, 2017

    Note that the European heat wave is hitting Italy and the Balkans now as well:

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/07/heat-plagues-southeastern-europe-170701083153369.html

    “Heat plagues southeastern Europe

    Extreme temperatures shift east, bringing a brutal heatwave to the Balkans.”

    And in Turkey: “In Turkey, the cities of Antalya and Akhisar recorded highs of 45C on Friday. “

    Reply
  21. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    This is interesting in a roll your eyes kinda way. Not that I ever thought gasifying coal was a good idea. Just wondering how much renewables could have been put in play with 7.5 billion?
    The filing comes on the heels of a historic vote by Mississippi’s state regulators that rejected asking the 187,000 customers who may get electricity from Kemper to pay for the long-delayed and far over-budget “clean coal” experiment. The 582-megawatt plant, initially projected to cost $1.8 billion, has so far run up a bill of more than $7.5 billion in construction and engineering expenses. In comparison, a typical 700-megawatt natural gas plant would have cost roughly $700 million to build, according to the Wall Street Journal.
    https://www.ecowatch.com/clean-coal-project-fail-2450386749.html?utm_campaign=RebelMouse&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=EcoWatch

    Reply
  22. Allan Barr

     /  July 1, 2017

    Appears to be only a matter of time before a regional wet bulb event hits, in exactly the areas where uptake of air conditioning is low.

    Reply
  23. wili

     /  July 1, 2017

    Sorry if this is a repeat, but here on the states’ side, we have a spreading and deepening drought situation in the uppermost midwest…especially the Dakotas and Montana, prime wheat growing locations: http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

    And this prompts of course the obligatory Montana song from the King of Absurd Lyrics:

    Reply
  24. PlazaRed

     /  July 1, 2017

    Having looked at the land temps and the anomalies I think that the SST anomalies are more than something to be concerned about. Particularly above the north coasts of Canada and Russia/Siberia:-
    Link.
    https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane?mr=1

    Of an added major concern are the record SST temps also in the Mediterranean, which might be pleasing the tens of millions of tourists but are in no way good news for the sea based life?

    Cool here in Spain on the land over the last few days with temps at only about average, +35/C in the south but temps are set to go back on the rise after Sunday.
    Massive thunder storms in the north east around the Barcelona area, widely speaking for reference but with 2 inches of rain and most of it in the form of hail in half an hour, the flooding and damage was to say the least “bad.”
    Raging fire destroyed about 8,000 hectares of the massive national park at Donada, (in the province of Huelva at the mouth of the Guadalquiver river, about a 100 miles, or 160 klms north of the Gibraltar area) that’s about 20,000 Acres, could take a few decades to recover but by that time it might be under water anyway from rising seas as its only inches above high water sea levels right now.

    Dams are at low levels and a lot of hot winds this year. If it wasn’t for the trees it would look like a desert around here. I think hot winds are going to be the hidden reason for a lot of demise with this climate change, they strip away every trace of moisture and leave just dead husks as memories of the once green pasts!

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  July 1, 2017

      “If it wasn’t for the trees it would look like a desert around here. I think hot winds are going to be the hidden reason for a lot of demise with this climate change, they strip away every trace of moisture and leave just dead husks as memories of the once green pasts!”
      It would seem so PR. The winds around here in Nova Scotia seem to strip the moisture out faster than ever before. Nothing scientific about it, just observation. Spending most of my life outdoors, the better part of six decades, play as a child and then blue collar trades that had me out of doors more often then not, the changes in the local climate are undeniable. The averages don’t elude to it however, which is problematic because most people don’t spend more than a few weekends out of doors a year. Certainly not enough time to notice the small differences that are the major problems. It all gets lost in the back ground noise that a few weekends can’t possibly show. It takes decades of living to notice these changes and you have to spend much of that outside to even sense it. Not to disparage the scientific community, but the smoothing that is required to produce the charts and graphs that are so telling, miss the heart ache that is “living” through the extremes that make up the averages.

      Reply
      • PlazaRed

         /  July 2, 2017

        Shawn, I spend most of my time in the outdoors as I live in a village with panoramic views in all directions and its nearly always warm enough to go outside even in mid winter without putting on massive amounts of clothes.
        An example of what hot winds can do is easily explained from something that we do here in Spain.
        Take a normal bed double mattress, probably weighs about 50 to 80 pounds, (25 to 35 kilos)
        Stand it up against a wall, scrub it and hose it down with water a bit like doing the washing on a grand scale. On a still day with temps at about 35/C 95F, it will take about a 24 hour day to dry out. On a windy day its dry in 2 hours, that’s to say back to its weight before it was washed.
        I have watched green fields of crops go from green to brown in a day, in the hot dry winds. So even is there is rainfall and the vegetation is soaked, a day later it returns to being a fire hazard.
        My main point is that its going to be the increase in hot winds that spells a lot of doom, as they not only dry things out very fast they also spread wild fires very quickly making it harder to stop them even if there is water available. So wind watch is one of the things needed to predict increased threats from climate change.
        These last few years there has been a noticeable increase in the hot summer winds, which even as I write this are howling round my house at 11am with 30/c temps and rising again.

        Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  July 2, 2017

        +1 and I know Ryan who works outdoors, in the N.E, has also commented on how high winds have kept him and his co-workers from being able to do their roofing jobs..

        Reply
  25. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    Some interesting reading, at least for me I like what Richard has to say most of the time. His take on the planet is fossil fuel based but from a crash perspective I believe. In other words get off it the sooner the better.
    http://richardheinberg.com/museletter-301-coal-dinosaur-growth-economy
    In a recent paper, Justin Ritchie, a Ph.D. candidate in resources and the environment at the University of British Columbia, and his co-author, UBC professor Hadi Dowlatabadi, pointed out that global estimates of the amounts of coal that are economically and technologically recoverable have fallen by two-thirds since the 1990s. This observation also formed the substance of my 2009 book, Blackout: Coal, Climate and the Last Energy Crisis, so it’s nice to see the point taken up by others. However, Ritchie and Dowlatabadi go a step further and think through the implications of the ongoing coal reserves downgrades for climate modeling.

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has for years produced computer-generated models of several possible trajectories for future greenhouse gas emissions through the remainder of the century. These “representative concentration pathways,” or RCPs, include an extreme high emissions case, RCP 8.5, that is commonly referred to as “business as usual.” In this scenario, “coal use in particular increases almost 10 fold by 2100” according to IPCC authors.
    ………….The article goes on to say:
    Again, unrealistic assumptions about fossil fuel reserves, and therefore emissions, lead to unrealistic (i.e., implausibly expensive and risky) methods for keeping those emissions down. The only realistic solution to our climate crisis is not to put so much carbon in the atmosphere in the first place. But that path runs counter to expectations about economic growth—which requires energy. And that is almost surely at the root of the IPCC’s assumptions about future fossil fuel consumption (regardless of whether those fossil fuels are actually available to be consumed).

    Reply
  26. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 1, 2017

    Not sure if this works but here goes, new Arcade Fire Creature Comforts lots of relevant stuff to the times in which we live.

    Reply
  27. Paul

     /  July 2, 2017

    Here’s a good read from Truthout, “The Planet Is in Our Hands: Countering Trump’s Climate Crimes” http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/41126-the-planet-is-in-our-hands-countering-trump-s-climate-crimes

    Before I even read the article today I was mulling over how future generations (not only in the U.S. but around the world) would come to view the Trump presidency. If the projected climate disasters come to pass, they will not view his administration well. By his actions described in the article, he is in grave danger of being viewed by future generations around the world and throughout coming ages as the worst U.S. President in history, on par with some of the worst world leaders in history.

    Reply
  28. Andy_in_SD

     /  July 2, 2017

    “Ask nearly anyone in the Miami area about flooding and they’ll have an anecdote to share. Many will also tell you that it’s happening more and more frequently. The data backs them up.”

    A really good piece on what Miami is facing on BBC News website.

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170403-miamis-fight-against-sea-level-rise

    Reply
  29. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 2, 2017

    ROME, Jun 27 2017 (IPS) – It is no secret that the biggest responsible for climate change is greed. The greed of the world’s largest private corporations, which blindly seek unlimited high financial benefits. And the greed of those politicians who are also blindly keen about holding their temporary power at any cost, thus not daring to challenge big business. Ordinary people can meanwhile help slow down such a hellish race.
    http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/anyway-help-slow-climate-change-individually-yes-can/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=anyway-help-slow-climate-change-individually-yes-can

    Reply
  30. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 2, 2017

    ROME, Jun 7 2017 (IPS) – By 2025 –that’s in less than 8 years from today– 1.8 billion people will experience absolute water scarcity, and two thirds of the world will be living under water-stressed conditions. Now it is feared that advancing drought and deserts, growing water scarcity and decreasing food security may provoke a huge ‘tsunami” of climate refugees and migrants.

    No wonder then that a major United Nations Convention calls drought ‘one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse.’ See what the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) says in this regard.
    http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/the-relentless-march-of-drought-that-horseman-of-the-apocalypse/

    Reply
  31. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 2, 2017

    “The extinction of species and the loss of microbial diversity undermines our rights to life and health by destroying potential sources for new medicines and weakening human immunity. Reduced variety, yield and security of fisheries and agriculture endangers our right to food. Nature’s weakened ability to filter, regulate and store water threatens the right of access to clean and safe water.”
    The UN independent expert strongly emphasised that biodiversity and human rights are “interlinked and interdependent,” and States have obligations to protect both.
    http://www.ipsnews.net/2017/06/re-connect-with-nature-now-before-it-is-too-late/

    Reply
  32. Abel Adamski

     /  July 2, 2017

    Not Good

    Counseled by Industry, Not Staff, E.P.A. Chief Is Off to a Blazing Start

    With the Trump shenanigans, the media are not paying attention to what is actually happening

    Reply
  33. Abel Adamski

     /  July 2, 2017

    Even Worse

    As Beijing Joins Climate Fight, Chinese Companies Build Coal Plants

    When China halted plans for more than 100 new coal-fired power plants this year, even as President Trump vowed to “bring back coal” in America, the contrast seemed to confirm Beijing’s new role as a leader in the fight against climate change.

    But new data on the world’s biggest developers of coal-fired power plants paints a very different picture: China’s energy companies will make up nearly half of the new coal generation expected to go online in the next decade.

    These Chinese corporations are building or planning to build more than 700 new coal plants at home and around the world, some in countries that today burn little or no coal, according to tallies compiled by Urgewald, an environmental group based in Berlin. Many of the plants are in China, but by capacity, roughly a fifth of these new coal power stations are in other countries.

    Over all, 1,600 coal plants are planned or under construction in 62 countries, according to Urgewald’s tally, which uses data from the Global Coal Plant Tracker portal. The new plants would expand the world’s coal-fired power capacity by 43 percent.

    The fleet of new coal plants would make it virtually impossible to meet the goals set in the Paris climate accord, which aims to keep the increase in global temperatures from preindustrial levels below 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 2, 2017

      Getting harder and harder to stay optimistic when you read an article like this one.

      Reply
  34. Suzanne

     /  July 2, 2017

    I use to really enjoy Sunday mornings leisurely reading the Sunday papers. But on days like today…I just want to go back to bed and pull the covers over my head:

    ‘New Florida law lets any resident challenge what’s taught in Science classes”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/07/01/new-florida-law-lets-any-resident-challenge-whats-taught-in-science-classes/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_sos-fla-science-450am%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

    EPA Chief pushing government wide effort to question Climate Change Science”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/07/01/epa-chief-pushing-governmentwide-effort-to-question-climate-change-science/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_epa-835pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

    Reply
    • Wow. And now Alex Jones has revealed that the terrible scientists at NASA are running a child slave colony on Mars! Our President loves Alex Jones, and certainly loves the votes he commands.

      http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2017/06/30/alex_jones_trump_endorsed_infowars_site_exposes_nasa_s_martian_slave_colony.html

      Incredible!

      Truly, deeply horribly incredible!

      Those dastardly scientists!

      I wonder sometimes if Alex Jones is just crazy, or is paid off ( who would pay for such tripe?) or is just making a buck by acting bat shit nuts, or what.

      One way to hide a signal…bury it in noise. It becomes harder and harder to deal with real problems, when a good portion of the population is distracted by such nonsense. Maybe he is being paid off – to increase the political noise.

      Info wars, indeed.

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  July 2, 2017

        He is just another right wing nut entertainer…who masquerades as a journalist. Unfortunately, he has 3 million regular listeners…and Trump is one of them…who has now given Jones “credibility”.
        These days, I shake my head in shame seeing what my country has become. We have gone from a nation formed by men of the “Age of Enlightenment”….to now, men of the “Dark Ages”.

        Reply
        • I fear it could be the start of something more sinister…an anti-scientific pogrom. The recent Scientists March may have ruffled some right wing feathers, maybe.

          For low information Alex Jones voters, the take away message might be “scientists are bad, and NASA scientists are REALLY BAD”.

          If Alex Jones listeners (and voters) had any sense, would they have believed in chemtrails?

          Or, maybe this will be too much for even such low information listeners to swallow. I doubt it, though.

      • Abel Adamski

         /  July 3, 2017

        http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-super-pacs-idUSKBN19J2GI

        Pro-Trump groups take no prisoners in rush to help an embattled president

        Flush with cash, political groups outside the White House are aggressively coming to President Donald Trump’s aid as he battles low public approval numbers, questions about his election campaign’s ties to Russia and a stalled legislative agenda.

        Through television attack ads and online campaigns normally seen only during the tumult of an election, the groups are helping Trump to strike back against his perceived enemies and boost his agenda, adding to the firepower of his Twitter account and the bully pulpit of the White House.

        On Tuesday, one of the groups, America First Policies, launched an attack ad against a senator from Trump’s own Republican Party who had balked at a Senate plan to overhaul healthcare that would leave millions more Americans uninsured. The attack angered Senate leader Mitch McConnell, who is struggling to rustle up the votes for the plan.

        It is the first time that a U.S. president has had Super PACs – political action committees that can raise unlimited amounts of money and typically operate during elections – or political non-profits, which do not have to disclose their donors or where they spend their money, actively working to support him after the dust of campaigning has cleared.

        The pro-Trump groups are prohibited from coordinating with the White House, which declined to comment for this story. The New York Times reported that McConnell had complained to White House chief of staff Reince Priebus about America First Policies’ ad. The group later pulled the ad.

        America First Policies and the other pro-Trump groups were set up to promote Trump and his legislative agenda – healthcare reform, building a wall along the Mexican border, and pushing for lower taxation and deregulation. They are not allied to the Republican Party, which can pose a problem for Republican leaders as Tuesday’s attack ad showed.

        Reply
    • entropicman

       /  July 2, 2017

      Challenge how? Is incredulity and belief enough, or do they have to make a rational evidence based case?

      Reply
  35. Suzanne

     /  July 2, 2017

    And today from the Siberian Times….
    “Big Band and pillar of fire…as latest of two new craters form this week in the Arctic”
    http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/big-bang-and-pillar-of-fire-as-latest-of-two-new-craters-forms-this-week-in-arctic/

    Scientists have located two fresh craters formed on Yamal peninsula this year, with the latest exploding on 28 June with the eruption picked up by new seismic sensors specifically designed to monitor such events, The Siberian Times can disclose.

    First pictures of the large craters – or funnels as experts call them – are shown here, and add to four other big holes found in recent years and examined by experts, plus dozens of tiny ones spotted by satellite.

    The formation of both craters involved an explosion followed by fire, evidently signs of the eruption of methane gas pockets under the Yamal surface.

    People in Seyakha village heard a ‘loud explosion-like bang’ then saw a fire and clouds of black smoke, according to reports.

    Reply
    • The real concern with these craters seems to be that they might be a symptom of a regional layer of ice sheet relic methane hydrate left over from glaciations about 90,000 years ago. How much methane? How rapidly will this methane be released? This methane hydrate could be metastable (meta-stable)- outside the current gas hydrate stability zone, and so very sensitive to any amount of warming.

      https://www.researchgate.net/profile/M_Arzhanov/publication/305310131_Impact_of_regional_climatic_change_on_the_stability_of_relic_gas_hydrates/links/57b4225e08aeac317785f04f/Impact-of-regional-climatic-change-on-the-stability-of-relic-gas-hydrates.pdf

      Impact of regional climatic change on the stability of relic gas hydrates Arzhanov et al.

      “Taking into account the permafrost thawing velocity in the crater walls and snow accumulation peculiarities, the characteristic period of complete flooding of the crater is about two years”

      “In particular, small lakes ranging in size from a few meters to more than 200 meters make up about 97% of the total number of lakes in the Central Yamal Region, according to the interpretation results of ultrahigh resolution satellite images ”

      “Based on the calculation results, the upper boundary of the GH stability zone could have reached the surface in the Yamal Region under climatic conditions corresponding to the glacial maximum about 90 ka, an ice shield thickness of over 250 m, and a temperature of the ice at bottom of below –1°C.”

      The topography of the region has hundreds of thousands of small circular lakes, and also larger lakes that could consist of masses of smaller ones consolidated together. The size distribution of such lakes clusters in the range from a few meters to a few hundred meters in diameter – consistent with methane blowouts allowing for enlargement due to ice rich permafrost melting and subsiding on the edges of the craters/lakes. I have believed for a couple of years now that these lakes are likely remnants of a massive number of methane blowouts probably clustering around the Holocene Climactic Optimum 6,000 years ago. This small circular lake topography covers maybe a million square kilometers of Siberia, and appears to me to have shallow stream erosion features cut through it consistent with a few thousand years of stream erosion since crater formation.

      I think these craters are going to be popping like popcorn, over maybe a million square kilometers of Siberia.

      Reply
      • Vladimir Romanovsky, Geophysicist and permafrost expert at the University of Alaska, also thinks that these hundreds of thousands of small lakes in Siberia might be methane blowout craters. He was recently quoted in the Washington Post saying that the 7,000 number they were using for methane filled pingos is low, and the real number is likely around 100,000.

        This is from a talk he gave talking to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute scientists. The longer video of his entire talk is also available on Youtube.

        One of the new methane blowout craters is right in a small river bed. Rivers have unfrozen areas underneath them called taliks, that might weaken the permafrost layer and increase the probability of a blowout directly under the river. The heat from the river itself might also increase the probability of a relic methane hydrate blowout.

        Reply
    • Scheduling tweet on this, thanks.

      Reply
  36. Suzanne

     /  July 2, 2017

    And now, to try to “lighten the mood”…..Try to remember…”enjoy yourself” today my fellow Scribblers..

    Reply
    • wili

       /  July 3, 2017

      Nice, but I rather prefer the ska version! ‘-)

      Reply
      • Suzanne

         /  July 3, 2017

        Thanks..hadn’t come across this one…. The point, in any musical rendition, cannot be lost…we must find ways to “enjoy ourselves”…so we don’t go completely mad… 🙂

        Reply
        • wili

           /  July 3, 2017

          Just took a couple hours to sit out in a beautiful park and have a small picnic with my favorite cheese (Pont l’Eveque, stinky but tasty) and good French bread and a beverage 🙂 and a good book (for my odd tastes) and had quite a pleasant time, thank you.

        • Suzanne

           /  July 4, 2017

          Wili….sounds lovely. +1

  37. Robert,
    One more mention because I suspect it is important and I promise to shut up (post as you will.)
    It is about the cross equator flow branching off the jet stream again. You seem to be the only one paying any attention. All I can find written is that yeah, it happens, ‘not uncommon’, but nothing quantitative. We need figures. It seems to me to be more and more and is certainly enough someone could measure. Too much of this looks to me (what do I know?) to be a strong earth temperature equilibrating mechanism.
    For example, today on Earth Nullschool there are five – plus or minus depending on your measuring technique – spanning maybe 20 -25 degrees of longitude at about 50 km/hr. (Others have been considerably faster). The Pacific Ocean appears to be the preferred location but they can be anywhere. There is also a short 128 km/hr jet at the equator in the Indian Ocean. Those are figures.
    Most things that are so measurable are measured. I can’t find anyone doing so but I will keep a look out. What am I missing here? Out.

    Reply
  38. Tigertown

     /  July 3, 2017

    PIOMAS has been informally updated on the forum. Not official yet.
    Wipneus,
    “The gridded thickness files where updated. The official volume numbers not yet, what follows are my calculated volume data calculated from the thickness.
    Volume on day 181 is about 12.163 [1000km3], that is 0.18 [1000km3] below 2012’s volume. IOW the volume gap (barely) survived.

    Here is the monthly animation”.

    http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=119.0;attach=47648;image

    Reply
  39. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 3, 2017

    As lakes run dry in Chennai, residents are desperate for a few buckets of water.
    Desperate search for water
    Even before the onset of summer, it was anticipated that there would be great difficulty in maintaining regular water supply to Chennai. When water levels in the four lakes fall, MetroWater usually taps into the Veeranam lake in Cuddalore district to make up for the shortfall. But this large lake has also run dry. This prompted MetroWater officials to extract water from the Wallajah lake, also in Cuddalore. But the use of these rural lakes to meet urban needs has infuriated farmers in the district, who say they are being deprived of their water resources.

    “We have lived by this lake for decades,” M Anbazhagan, a farmer, told Scroll.in on May 1. “We were not even consulted or informed about our water being directed to Chennai.”
    https://scroll.in/article/841914/as-lakes-run-dry-in-chennai-residents-are-desperate-for-a-few-buckets-of-water

    Reply
  40. Abel Adamski

     /  July 3, 2017

    Hawking says Trump’s climate stance could damage Earth

    Stephen Hawking says that US President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement could lead to irreversible climate change.

    Prof Hawking said the action could put Earth onto a path that turns it into a hothouse planet like Venus.

    He also feared aggression was “inbuilt” in humans and that our best hope of survival was to live on other planets.

    I don’t know if that is a good idea for other intelligent life in the universe

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  July 3, 2017
      Reply
    • entropicman

       /  July 3, 2017

      I wish he would not exaggerate.

      Global warming will not produce Venus style surface temperatures (400C) in the near future, no matter how much fossil fuel we burn.

      Venus conditions on Earth would require a warmer Sun, photodissociation of all the water and an end to plate tectonics. It will come, but a billion years hence.

      Reply
      • John McCormick

         /  July 3, 2017

        Agreed. And, he has to drop that crazy idea about living on other planets.

        Reply
        • Planetary colonies on Mars seem beyond our current technological capacity, for any significant number of people.

          Orbital space colonies, supplied with lunar materials, like those proposed by Gerard K. O’Neill seem like a better bet. But could we get enough people into space colonies soon enough? Probably not.

          But with lunar and asteroid materials, and solar energy, space colonies could thrive, I think, eventually.

          Much better to not destroy the only self-regulating biosphere that we know exists. Then space colonies will happen, likely, I think.

        • Solar energy in space can have huge lightweight collectors that don’t have to track the motion of the sun across the sky. That makes solar energy in space a huge, constant, dependable energy source. Space colonies could use cheap lunar materials, at just the energy cost to catapult them into space. It is also possible to catapult raw materials into orbit from the surface of the earth, for volatile elements like nitrogen. With solar energy, lunar materials, and volatile elements from earth, the economic basis for growth of space colonies seems to exist.

          Long term, it is just more efficient to contain atmospheres in enclosed habitats than it is to use the mass of an entire planet to attract them by gravity. With solar energy in space, lunar materials, and volatile elements from earth, the solar system could support trillions of people, I think.

      • Actually sort of reassuring–his comments on colonizing other planets seem uninformed (by biological reality) to me, so it’s good to know he’s not spot on with everything else. 🙂 He is obviously a super smart guy, and I’m sure he means well, but, perils of venturing outside one’s area of expertise.

        Reply
      • I’m not so sure that we can’t go all the way to Venus-like conditions.

        Most of those calculations don’t take into account a true worst case scenario, IMO. Suppose we have 100 trillion tons of methane hydrate in our global methane hydrate inventory, as Klauda and Sandler calculated? Suppose hydrogen sulfide chemocline breakthrough occurs and we end up with hydroxyl radical concentrations a factor of a million times less than today, with methane lifetimes of hundreds of years before oxidation?

        http://www3.geosc.psu.edu/~jlm80/Geosc497/Kump2005burp.pdf

        Massive release of hydrogen sulfide to the surface ocean and atmosphere during intervals of oceanic anoxia – Kump et al.

        Suppose other atmospheric changes occur along the way, creating strong atmospheric chemistry positive feedback to global warming, as modeled by Isaksen et al?

        At some point, the oceans will start to move into the atmosphere. Water vapor is the strongest greenhouse gas, with an amazingly complex infrared spectrum that could rise like a curtain, Whether we go all the way to Venus-like conditions at that point is anyone’s guess, I think.

        Reply
        • I have to admit that plate tectonics would probably bring us back to earth-like conditions, after a few hundred thousand years. Probably.

        • Assuming that we can have a rock weathering cycle driven by plate tectonics with the oceans in the atmosphere, Assuming the carbonates don’t start to calcine, releasing yet more CO2.

        • Clarification – Klauda and Sandler calculated about 75 trillion tons of carbon in the global methane hydrate inventory, equal to about 100 trillion tons of methane. The total amount of methane hydrate would be roughly 10 times that, roughly a quadrillion tons.

        • We have to remember the faint young sun paradox, I think. Something unknown, likely a greenhouse gas, was keeping the earth warmer than it should have been a couple of billion years ago, considering the sun was 25% fainter (less luminous) than it is now.

          Under such changed conditions that unknown greenhouse gas or whatever it was might come back. Suggestions have included methane, ammonia, and carbonyl sulfide, as solutions to the faint young sun paradox. If we’re really unlucky, it would be a greenhouse gas that absorbs in the holes in the water spectrum around 4 and around 10 microns (um). Plugging up these holes in the water spectrum would make it easier for the earth to reach Venus like conditions, say some scientists.

          Don’t try this experiment at home.

    • Suzanne

       /  July 3, 2017

      Here is the same story at The Hill.
      http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/340476-stephen-hawking-trump-pulling-out-of-paris-agreement-could-push

      I agree…I am tired of hearing him talk about us escaping to another planet. I am all for space exploration, but since he has such a loud megaphone…he needs to use it for promoting “solutions” to human induced CC. Focus on solutions, not escapism. Tell folks over and over we need a global project to solve CC….that takes priority over just about anything else.

      Reply
      • Mblanc

         /  July 4, 2017

        I don’t think he was saying we are definitely going Venusian in the near future, and hasn’t Hansen used the comparison at various points.

        We often seem to criticise scientists for being to conservative, so I would rather have ‘names’ like Hawking trying to add to the chorus of warnings, even if their reported statements aren’t quite as ‘on message’ as we might like.

        The Mars thing seems very flavour of the month, do you think the super-rich folk might bail out on us? I quite fancy a super-yacht…

        Reply
        • Hansen’s later models found that Earth is probably not capable of hitting a Venus type runaway warming over any reasonable timescale. But it can end up with a wet stratosphere type runaway, which basically renders the world a lifeless place. And there are many, many steps along that path that are extraordinarily damaging and harmful.

  41. Otis Redding – A change is gonna come.

    Let’s make it a good one.

    Reply
  42. wharf rat

     /  July 3, 2017

    DC appeals court orders EPA to move ahead with methane rule
    Originally published July 3, 2017 at 1:12 pm

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court in Washington ruled Monday that the head of the Environmental Protection Agency overstepped his authority in trying to delay implementation of a new rule requiring oil and gas companies to monitor and reduce methane leaks.

    In a split decision, the three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ordered the EPA to move forward with the Obama-era requirement that aims to reduce planet-warming emissions from oil and gas operations.

    http://www.seattletimes.com/business/dc-appeals-court-orders-epa-to-move-ahead-with-methane-rul

    Reply
  43. Abel Adamski

     /  July 3, 2017

    http://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/most-mass-extinctions-are-due-global-warming-180963910/

    Most Mass Extinctions Have Been Due to Global Warming
    Might the next one be caused by humans rather than volcanoes?
    .
    .
    Volcanoes, of course, indicate that we live on a dynamic, active planet. As long as Earth remains habitable, it will be volcanically active, and some of the eruptions will be very energetic. Now imagine one of these large-scale magmatic outpourings, with lots of gas venting, should occur at the same time human-made global warming is taking place. The result might be the largest mass extinction Earth has ever seen.

    Reply
  44. Abel Adamski

     /  July 4, 2017
    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 4, 2017

      From the last paragraph:
      The long and short of it: unless we take immediate action against climate change, we will lose our beloved Great Barrier Reef forever. Andrew King, a climate scientist from the University of Melbourne, explained that the results found in Dr Hugh’s research point to the inevitability of more bleaching and limited, if no recovery.

      I DON’T THINK PEOPLE ARE AWARE JUST HOW BAD IT IS.
      ————————————————-
      And that last sentence, my friends is the problem in a nutshell. People are just so oblivious to what is actually happening in the natural world and with how science works, it astounds me.

      Thanks again Abel…for all the great links.

      Reply
  45. Abel Adamski

     /  July 4, 2017

    https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2017/07/these-screen-printed-batteries-could-be-the-future-of-australian-manufacturing/

    Printed Energy’s solid state batteries are a thin, flexible format – printed in a roll-to-roll process like a newspaper – that can be adapted to almost any shape. It has potential applications in powering everything from disposable medical devices, smart cards and wearable electronics to large-scale solar panels and energy storage.

    “The highly innovative and unique nature of this technology makes it ideal for powering sensors, devices for the Internet or Things, disposable healthcare devices and eventually, even for large-scale application to help manage the intermittent nature of electricity generated by solar panels,” said Rodger Whitby, CEO of Printed Energy and of the St Baker Energy Innovation Fund.

    Reply
  46. Abel Adamski

     /  July 4, 2017

    A slight digression yet most relevant if you may humour me, from a speech by Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel.
    You think you know your history, the Lady with the Lamp and nursing etc. That is a manipulated and trashed version of the facts.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/alan-finkel-ao/florence-nightingale-saved-far-more-people-with-her-grasp-of-num_a_23014858/?ncid=edlinkauhpmg00000003?benref=smh

    Florence Nightingale Saved Far More People With Her Grasp Of Numbers Than Of Nursing

    This is an edited version of a speech delivered by Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel on July 2 to the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (MERGA) conference marking the 40th anniversary of the group.

    The relevance

    Evidence can give decision-makers in all these communities the impetus and confidence to act. But it can only do so if we present it in an actionable form. It cannot be just a statement of problems. It cannot be just a statement of demands. It has to be written, and read, as a statement of opportunities.

    In all my dealings with politicians, the education sector, industry and parents, I sense an enormous will to change. Your research can be the springboard they need. But the springboard has to be fabricated from evidence and solutions. And it has to be fabricated to minimise the side effects that might cause it to break.

    Reply
  47. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 4, 2017

    So I’m reading this Guardian article on the Paris Agreement that most here probably know inside out by now. The following are a couple of paragraphs out of the middle which are well discussed here and elsewhere, but then I hit the paragraph further down and It just mystifies me. How these people can come up with this tripe is unbelievable. 4c = 5% of global GDP? Just look at the lost performance with 1.2c to 1.5c depending on where you start from. Not to mention the physical damage to infrastructure and agriculture already. To be fair the damage caused is a plus the way GDP is calculated, but so are increases in the sick being hospitalized or otherwise using the heath care system and a rise in the numbers of incarcerated people. The only reason to listen to these talking heads is so we can best guess the most likely path the politicians are likely to take. Fore warned is fore armed. Agriculture as we practice it will not work to the level it now does in a 2c warmer world. It in all likelihood it will be challenged at a solid 1.7/8c. Just look at the disruptions in the food supply happening already. Allowing this sort of tripe to be our guiding principle is surely going to kill most of us. The economists know less about the living world than what a meteorologist can tell you about the weather in your exact location four hours and fourteen years from right now. So long as we allow these soothsayers to plot our future, we have none! All this leads to RCP8.5 being the best case.
    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/jul/03/paris-climate-deal-wont-work-our-future-depends-degrowth
    Here’s the backstory. The Paris agreement relies on data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Over the past couple of decades, the IPCC has been busy devising hundreds of different scenarios, or “pathways”, for how much we need to cut our emissions if we want a decent chance of averting catastrophic climate change. But as they were running the numbers, they stumbled upon a rather inconvenient fact. The necessary emissions reductions turn out to be so steep that getting there requires that we slow down and gradually reverse the pace of economic growth.
    This conclusion did not go down well with politicians and industry bosses, and everyone knew it would be a tough sell in international negotiations. So the IPCC fudged it and began devising pathways that relied on the assumption that sometime in the near future – by around 2020 – we will have “negative emissions technologies” up and running, which will pull carbon out of the atmosphere.

    We face a stark choice: either we act now, right-sizing our economy and managing the transition in a careful and controlled way, or climate change will do it for us. If we wait for the latter option it will be unimaginably destructive and chaotic. According to Nicholas Stern of the London School of Economics, 4C of global warming will cost us at least 5% of global GDP per year indefinitely, and possibly as much as 20% – economic crisis on a scale never seen before.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  July 4, 2017

      Thanks Shawn…A must read IMO.

      Reply
    • The Integrated Assessment Models, especially their damage functions, show dangerously misleading views of the costs of climate change. If you ask a climate scientist whether modern society will survive 4C, 5C or 6C they will say probably not. The three main IAMs used by the US government will tell you “8.5% of GDP for 6 degrees”.

      This is another recent paper that uses the same type of methodology. I wonder if you asked the climate scientists involved directly whether they would agree with the output of their own work. They estimate that a 6C rise in global temperatures would cost the US 6% of GDP!

      Estimating economic damage from climate change in the United States

      “The combined value of market and nonmarket damage across analyzed sectors—agriculture, crime, coastal storms, energy, human mortality, and labor—increases quadratically in global mean temperature, costing roughly 1.2% of gross domestic product per +1°C on average”

      https://phys.org/news/2017-06-climate-economy-inequality.html
      http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6345/1362.full

      Reply
    • OK…

      So there need to be a few clairifications here.

      1. The various economic growth arguments with regards to emissions cuts were based on a fossil-fuel centric economic model. This view is fallacious. Economic growth can occur when cutting emissions, increasing efficiency, and transitioning to new energy. It’s just a form of economic growth that involves less material consumption and instead relies on innovation. A decoupled form of economic growth. The critics of this model basically lack imagination in that they do not believe healthy economies can exist while simultaneously reducing harmful consumption and switching energy sources.
      2. Pretty much all the impact models are too conservative — not just the ones used by the Paris summit. So I wouldn’t read this as ‘conspiracy theory.’ more just as a sign that we are basically unprepared and unaware of the risks at the policy level.
      3. Scientists, for the most part, are pretty aware. 6 C probably does completely wreck the global economy and a 3 C world long term is a radically altered one in which considerable infrastructure is lost.
      4. For those arguing that draconian cuts to consumption are needed sans an energy transition (basically in the form of economic damage), you should be aware that this is an austerity argument. Such cuts would tend to damage the very economic system that would enable an energy transition and increased efficiency — forcing a return to reliance on older, more polluting energy sources. Such a path is doomed to failure from jump — the response to such economic pain would result in considerable resistance to responses to climate change. In fact, this perception already has done just that — and is one of the primary reasons why climate change denial abounds.
      5. In other words, if you believe that it’s impossible to innovate climate change mitigations via an energy transition that enables the growth of efficiencies and the adoption of more helpful practices in an organic manner, then you’ve basically painted yourself into a mental and ideological corner.
      6. Paris absolutely was a good first step. Paris absolutely needs to be built on and improved. Attacks on it at this time are completely not helpful.

      Reply
  48. Abel Adamski

     /  July 4, 2017

    http://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/most-mass-extinctions-are-due-global-warming-180963910/

    Most Mass Extinctions Have Been Due to Global Warming
    Might the next one be caused by humans rather than volcanoes?

    Nearly 20 extinction events in Earth’s natural history have been analyzed in a new study by David Bond from the University of Hull in the U.K. and Stephen Grasby from the University of Calgary in Canada. They found that most of the events seen in the geologic record, starting about 500 million years ago and extending until today, can be linked to periods of massive volcanic activity, which caused global warming of the atmosphere together with acidification and oxygen depletion in Earth’s oceans. Other associated kill mechanisms were acid rain, damage to the ozone layer, enhanced ultraviolet radiation, and toxic metal poisoning.

    Sound familiar? All these kill mechanisms are also side effects of the human-induced climate change we’re seeing today. For a future geologist looking back at Earth’s natural record a few million years from now, things may look pretty much the same: a well-defined mass extinction event starting in the current human-dominated (or Anthropocene) era, as measured by a drop in biodiversity and indications of massive die-offs in the rock record.

    Reply
  49. Suzanne

     /  July 4, 2017

    “It’s Raining in Antarctica while Trump slashes Climate Science funding” by Dahr Jamail at Truth-Out.
    http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/41136-it-s-raining-in-antarctica-while-trump-slashes-climate-science-funding

    Anthropogenic climate disruption has created stunning major developments in the lives of the Earth’s plants and animals over recent weeks.

    A recently published paper in the journal Scientific Reports shows how ACD is disrupting the timing of dozens of songbird species. Timing is critical for migratory birds, because if they arrive too late they only get the tail end of the spring’s insect supply and have trouble finding nesting spots and mates. On the other hand, if they arrive too early, they will arrive in temperatures colder than they are prepared to deal with. Yet, ACD is causing spring to arrive earlier in eastern US states and later in the west, disrupting the timing of dozens of bird species.

    This is threatening the survival of many species that are currently popular in many people’s backyards. “The long-term concern is that this growing mismatch can lead to population declines,” Stephen Mayor, the study’s primary researcher said in an interview.

    Reply
  50. Suzanne

     /  July 4, 2017

    I don’t think this has been posted yet…apologies if I missed it on an earlier thread..

    “Antarctica is Melting, and Giant Ice Cracks are just the start”..at National Geographic..
    http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/antarctica-sea-level-rise-climate-change/

    Seen from above, the Pine Island Ice Shelf is a slow-motion train wreck. Its buckled surface is scarred by thousands of large crevasses. Its edges are shredded by rifts a quarter mile across. In 2015 and 2016 a 225-square-mile chunk of it broke off the end and drifted away on the Amundsen Sea. The water there has warmed by more than a degree Fahrenheit over the past few decades, and the rate at which ice is melting and calving has quadrupled.

    On the Antarctic Peninsula, the warming has been far greater—nearly five degrees on average. That’s why a Delaware-size iceberg is poised to break off the Larsen C Ice Shelf and why smaller ice shelves on the peninsula have long since disintegrated entirely into the waters of the Weddell Sea. But around the Amundsen Sea, a thousand miles to the southwest on the Pacific coast of Antarctica, the glaciers are far larger and the stakes far higher. They affect the entire planet.

    Reply
  51. Off topic ,but Happy Revolution on the 4th of July from the USA’s greatest Historian ,the late Great Howard Zinn..Jim Lobe | “Decent Respect” Might Help Image Woes Abroad [

    Patriotism and the Fourth of July
    By Howard Zinn
    AlterNet

    Tuesday 04 July 2006

    The Declaration of Independence gives us the true meaning of a patriot, someone who supports a country’s ideals, not necessarily its government.

    In celebration of the Fourth of July there will be many speeches about the young people who “died for their country.” But those who gave their lives did not, as they were led to believe, die for their country; they died for their government. The distinction between country and government is at the heart of the Declaration of Independence, which will be referred to again and again on July 4, but without attention to its meaning.

    The Declaration of Independence is the fundamental document of democracy. It says governments are artificial creations, established by the people, “deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,” and charged by the people to ensure the equal right of all to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Furthermore, as the Declaration says, “whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it.” It is the country that is primary-the people, the ideals of the sanctity of human life and the promotion of liberty.

    When a government recklessly expends the lives of its young for crass motives of profit and power, while claiming that its motives are pure and moral, (“Operation Just Cause” was the invasion of Panama and “Operation Iraqi Freedom” in the present instance), it is violating its promise to the country. War is almost always a breaking of that promise. It does not enable the pursuit of happiness but brings despair and grief.

    Mark Twain, having been called a “traitor” for criticizing the U.S. invasion of the Philippines, derided what he called “monarchical patriotism.” He said: “The gospel of the monarchical patriotism is: ‘The King can do no wrong.’ We have adopted it with all its servility, with an unimportant change in the wording: ‘Our country, right or wrong!’ We have thrown away the most valuable asset we had – the individual’s right to oppose both flag and country when he believed them to be in the wrong. We have thrown it away; and with it, all that was really respectable about that grotesque and laughable word, Patriotism.”

    If patriotism in the best sense (not in the monarchical sense) is loyalty to the principles of democracy, then who was the true patriot? Theodore Roosevelt, who applauded a massacre by American soldiers of 600 Filipino men, women and children on a remote Philippine island, or Mark Twain, who denounced it? Today, U.S. soldiers who are dying in Iraq and Afghanistan are not dying for their country; they are dying for Bush and Cheney and Rumsfeld. They are dying for the greed of the oil cartels, for the expansion of the American empire, for the political ambitions of the president. They are dying to cover up the theft of the nation’s wealth to pay for the machines of death. As of July 4, 2006, more than 2,500 U.S. soldiers have been killed in Iraq, more than 8,500 maimed or injured. With the war in Iraq long declared a “Mission Accomplished,” shall we revel in American military power and insist that the American empire will be beneficent?

    Our own history is enough to make one wary. Empire begins with what was called, in our high school history classes, “westward expansion,”a euphemism for the annihilation or expulsion of the Indian tribes inhabiting the continent, in the name of “progress” and “civilization.” It continues with the expansion of American power into the Caribbean at the turn of the 20th century, then into the Philippines, and then repeated Marine invasions of Central America and long military occupations of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. After World War II, Henry Luce, owner of Time, LIFE, and Fortune, spoke of “the American Century,” in which this country would organize the world “as we see fit.” Indeed, the expansion of American power continued, too often supporting military dictatorships in Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, because they were friendly to American corporations and the American government. The record does not justify confidence in Bush’s boast that the United States will bring democracy to Iraq.

    Reply
  52. Paul Brady 1977 – The Lakes of Ponchartrain

    Apropo of nothing…just pretty.

    Reply
  53. Suzanne

     /  July 4, 2017

    No words necessary….

    Reply
    • Sea level rise and subsidence are compounding factors for some regions. It’s tough to see this. But it’s still the early, easy stuff.

      Reply
  54. Suzanne

     /  July 4, 2017

    4 Climate Scientists & Their Fears for the Future (July 2017) (from ABC News Australia)…Also, share the places they might move to….

    Reply
  55. Suzanne

     /  July 4, 2017

    At Neven’s Arctic Sea Ice Blog…”PIOMAS July 2017″
    http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/
    Last month we finally received some good news from PIOMAS, and the good news continues this month. With 2017 losing a below average amount of sea ice volume during June (compared to the average of the last 10 years), while a couple of years losing a great deal of volume, such as 2010, 2011 and of course, record smasher 2012, the gap has effectively been closed. At the end of May the difference between 2012 and 2017 was 1481 km3 (a month earlier it was 2412 km3 even), and now it’s just 131 km3.

    Reply
    • Yes. The somewhat cool May has helped to bring PIOMAS back to the 2012 line. July is a crap shoot. But it’s looking like the summer isn’t setting up to be anywhere near as bad as the Fall/Winter.

      Worth noting that, generally, winters in the Arctic Ocean will tend to see more warming than summers under human forced climate change due to all the various factors involved.

      Reply
  56. wili

     /  July 4, 2017

    A bit off topic, but nice to see these nurses stand up for what is actually needed:

    Reply
  57. coloradobob

     /  July 5, 2017

    The Siberian Times always has lots of graphics in it’s articles. , And these two are no different .
    What they reveal is truly frightening , these latest blowouts are hurling huge blocks of permafrost out of the holes. The first ones we saw were more a rock and mud type of ejecta. As if the surface cap had thawed first , and the gas pressure could over come the overburden. These are different , house sized blocks of ice are being ejected.

    ‘Big bang’ and ‘pillar of fire’ as latest of two new craters forms this week in the Arctic
    By The Siberian Times reporter
    02 July 2017
    Local reindeer herder witnessed the tundra explosion that led to birth of new hole in river.

    http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/big-bang-and-pillar-of-fire-as-latest-of-two-new-craters-forms-this-week-in-arctic/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  July 5, 2017

      Warnings of new Arctic explosions at some 700-plus sites in Yamal due to thawing permafrost
      By The Siberian Times reporter
      04 July 2017
      Scientists rush to site of latest tundra eruption – which formed a crater 50 metres deep – amid fears for homes and key industrial sites.
      http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/warnings-of-new-arctic-explosions-at-some-700-plus-sites-in-yamal-due-to-thawing-permafrost/

      Reply
      • utoutback

         /  July 5, 2017

        CB –
        Nice to see you back posting.
        You have been missed.

        Reply
      • John McCormick

         /  July 6, 2017

        The first extinction began with the lava outflow beneath the Siberian traps. Now, methane flowing up from the tundra and permafrost could trigger the sixth extinction in less than a century.

        Reply
      • Hi Bob-
        Great to see you back. 🙂

        About Siberia – those hundreds of thousands or millions of small circular lakes up there might be remnants of past methane blowouts, almost all of them.

        If there is a layer of relic methane hydrate under Siberia, left over from glaciations 90,000 years ago, how much methane is in it?

        Reply
  58. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 5, 2017

    And here we go again, this is so disconnected from the reality of what is actually happening on the ground it’s mind numbing.
    If emissions growth is not slowed, then the resulting 6-10°F (3-5°C) of warming above 19th century levels projected for the last two decades of this century will have costs on par with the Great Recession — except they will not go away afterwards and damages for poor regions will be many times larger.

    Further down it goes on to say the following:
    The study is the first of its kind to price warming using data and evidence accumulated by the research community over decades. From this data, the team estimates that for each one degree Fahrenheit (0.55°C) increase in global temperatures, the U.S. economy loses about 0.7 percent of Gross Domestic Product, with each degree of warming costing more than the last. This metric can help the country manage climate change as it does other systematic economic risks — for example, the way the Federal Reserve uses interest rates to manage the risk of recession.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170629142958.htm
    What seems to be lost on them is that 3-5c global averages means the interiors of the continents will be TOO hot to farm much of anything. With water scarcity already becoming a problem with todays small amount of warming, it will be even scarcer.

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  July 5, 2017

      Just a point that speaks to the above concerns I point to:
      http://sfist.com/2017/07/03/cows_tipping_like_mad_in_record-bre.php
      For San Franciscans, the relative heatwave of this summer simply means “shorts weather” for big holidays like July 4, some interesting heat-related tweets, and perhaps a flex alert or a Spare the Air Day. For ranchers in California’s Central Valley, though the AP reports that the heat is killing off cows by the hundreds, wreaking havoc on dairy production, and that a facility that processes livestock carcasses can’t take any more incoming — so farmers have to bury and compost their own dead animals onsite.
      ______________ further down: _______________
      This is just what happens to cows in significant heat waves, but this year’s is the most lethal for San Joaquin Valley cows in about a decade. In 2006, valley farmers reported around $300 million in losses because of the heat, “In the dairy business, you just have to take what Mother Nature gives you,” Van Exel told CBS 13. “That’s just farming.”
      ______and only 1.3c so far!

      Reply
    • So I think the costs of 3-5 C warming are a bit underestimated here. What’s the cost of eventually losing 90 percent or more of your coastal cities? I think it’s tough to quantify in monetary terms that compare to the transient vicissitudes of global market movements. Economies recover from recession. Cities don’t recover from inundation. They’re just lost.

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  July 5, 2017

        “vicissitudes” okay you had in the dictionary for that one. 🙂

        Reply
  59. Shawn Redmond

     /  July 5, 2017

    I personally am not vegetarian the following may give one some more reason to look a little harder at it:
    http://www.animals24-7.org/2017/07/01/hunting-controlled-burns-brain-rot/

    Reply
  60. bostonblorp

     /  July 5, 2017

    Something positive.. Volvo to manufacture only hybrids or electric as of 2019.

    Reply
  61. utoutback

     /  July 5, 2017

    Unfortunately, China’s push into electric car manufacture will not help with greenhouse gas emissions. The most important thing they can do is close down fossil fuel based electrical energy generation:
    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-07-04/china-s-electric-cars-are-actually-pretty-dirty

    Reply
    • Actually, since EVs are far more efficient than ICE vehicles and since China is also planning to add hundreds of gigawatts of renewables over the next decade, it is likely to help. That said, if China wants to do its best, it needs to also continue to rapidly shut down coal plants. Backsliding on coal while adding EVs would certainly be bailing from one end of the boat while adding water to the other. Cutting coal first and fast is the wise move here. Delaying on coal emissions cuts is a very bad choice overall.

      Reply
  62. Abel Adamski

     /  July 5, 2017


    Buzz Aldrin nailed it

    Reply
  63. utoutback

     /  July 5, 2017

    Climate hypocrisy on display as C20 nations Public financing of Fossil Fuels is 4X that for renewables:
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/05/g20-public-finance-for-fossil-fuels-is-four-times-more-than-renewables

    Reply
  64. david

     /  July 10, 2017

    Change , increasingly accelerating, brings about pressure and while we need stability the movement may be sudden, may be large and unpredictable. Energy and its source and supply for civilisation needs the powers involved to remain stable so energy transition can be safe in its implementation. But pressure can bring about sudden, tectonic shifts. Are we facing rapid and monumental , unpredictable change as a tipping point in the power struggle approaches?
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=11888377

    Reply
  65. Allan Barr

     /  July 10, 2017

    Interesting article that is currently getting a whole lot of attention.

    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/07/climate-change-earth-too-hot-for-humans.html

    Reply
  1. U. S. Hot During First Half of 2017 | GarryRogers Nature Conservation
  2. June of 2017 Was Third Hottest on Record for Globe | robertscribbler
  3. June of 2017 Was Third Hottest on Record for Globe | RClimate

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