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Harvey’s Mammoth Deluge Potential: Some Models Are Showing Storm Could Produce Five Feet of Rain

Media, Texas, and Gulf Coast residents take note: the thing to be most concerned about with regards to Harvey is not its admittedly life-threatening storm surge and strong winds, but what is shaping up to be a potentially historic rainfall event.

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The latest update from the National Hurricane Center shows that Harvey continues to strengthen and is now a category 4 storm. Packing 130 mph winds and a 941 mb minimum central pressure, the storm is certainly now very powerful. This new intensity is above the NHC’s previously expected peak strength for the storm just prior to landfall late tonight. The situation is thus becoming ever more dangerous.

But with Harvey, the serious concern we are facing is not just the usual and notably very dangerous high winds and storm surge flooding that go along with a category 4 storm. We are also looking at very severe and long lasting flooding rains that will have the potential to cause damage and disruption for not just months but for years to come.

A Devastating Rainfall Potential

(Southeast Texas has never seen 60 inches of rainfall from a tropical system. But that potential exists with Harvey.)

Consensus models now predict that peak rainfall totals will be around 35 inches in association with Harvey. This is due to the dual facts that Harvey is currently a very moisture-rich storm and that the storm is expected to stall for between 5 and 10 days following landfall. The storm is predicted to hover along the coastline, drawing in an unusually intense flow of moisture from a much warmer than normal Gulf, and to generate severe thunderstorms hour after hour, day after day. And this kind of rain event, if it emerges, could produce a disaster of historic proportions for Texas.

It’s worth noting that rainfall totals could also exceed the consensus forecast. Some models are now predicting upwards of 50 or 60 inches of rainfall by the time Harvey leaves the Texas area later next week (see top image above). The highest rainfall amounts ever produced by a tropical cyclone, in our records, for Texas is 48 inches. But there’s at least some possibility, with the perfect rainstorm that appears to be shaping up in Harvey, that these ultimate rainfall totals will be exceeded and a disaster of unprecedented proportions could emerge. But even if this worst-case doesn’t emerge, a 35 inch rainfall event would wreck untold destruction upon Texas’s southeastern cities.

Harvey strengthening as it moves toward shore

( Harvey rapidly strengthening to CAT 4 as it nears landfall. Image source: National Hurricane Center.)

Normally soft-spoken forecasters like Bob Henson and Eric Holthaus are not mincing words over the potential severity of the present situation. Last night, Bob Henson on twitter asked people: “Please don’t fixate on whether Harvey arrives as a Cat 2, 3, or 4. It’s the mammoth rainfall amounts (up to 35″) that will affect millions.” Meanwhile, Eric Holthaus warned: “This is scary. I have never seen a rainfall forecast like this in my entire career. Texas will be recovering from for years.”

Of course, we could dodge a bullet and rainfall totals could be lower for Harvey. It’s just that this event is currently trending toward a near worst case or worst case deluge-type storm that produces very heavy rains over the same region over nearly a week-long period.

Conditions in Context — This is Not Your Father’s Atmosphere

(The number of record rainfall events has increased dramatically during recent years. An observation attributed to human-forced climate change. Image source: Increased Record-Breaking Precipitation Events Under Global Warming.)

During recent years, a warmer than normal atmosphere has been producing more and more intense rain storms. The number of record daily rainfall instances around the world has been rising precipitously (see image above). This increasing severity is, in large part, due to the fact that human-forced warming amps up the hydrological cycle — producing more intense rain storms and more intense droughts. In other words, the climate dice are loaded for extreme rainfall and droughts in the present atmosphere. And it is in this atmosphere that Harvey has emerged. So we shouldn’t at all discount the fact that Harvey’s potential worst impacts from rainfall are now higher than they would have been even just a few decades ago. And this is one of the major reasons why we are seeing such a historic potential out of Harvey.

UPDATED (4)

UPDATE (5): As of 800 PM CDT the eye of Harvey crossed the coastline somewhere between Corpus Christi and Port O’Connor. Unfortunately, this storm is just getting started as a very severe one week long rain event is about to follow.

UPDATE (6): As of 1000 PM CDT and just following landfall, Harvey’s minimum central pressure had fallen to 938 mb. An indication that the storm was still strengthening as it began to cross the coastline. According to these reports (here and here), this is the 4th lowest barometric pressure recorded for a hurricane at landfall on the Texas coast since 1900. Maximum sustained winds remained at 130 mph with gusts to 160 mph.

Links:

National Hurricane Center

National Weather Service

Increased Record-Breaking Precipitation Events Under Global Warming

Greg Carbin

Eric Holthaus

Bob Henson

Hat tip to Greg

Hat tip to Titania

Hat tip to Wili

Hat tip to Andy in San Diego

Hat tip to Wharf Rat

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179 Comments

  1. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    ‘Lummi Nation declares state of emergency after salmon spill’
    August 24, 2017

    The Lummi Nation declared a state of emergency Thursday after a weekend spill of Atlantic salmon from a fish farm in San Juan waters.

    “The tribe has not received confirmation that the Atlantic salmon spill has been contained, so we have to assume that the invasive fish continues to spill into these waters, putting the spawning grounds for native salmon species at risk,” Timothy Ballew II, chairman of the Lummi Indian Business Council, said in a statement.

    Lummi Nation officials said that the state reported over 300,000 Atlantic salmon escaped at Cooke Aquaculture Pacific’s farm off Cypress Island.

    The pens held 305,000 fish.

    The company initially blamed high tides from Monday’s approaching eclipse as a reason why the net pens failed. But that theory has been debunked by scientists. Environmentalists also claim this is not the first time the Cooke facility has had problems with its net pens.

    The Washington state Department of Fish and Wildlife has encouraged the public to come catch as many of the fish as they want.

    “Tribal fishermen are currently fishing within Bellingham Bay and at the mouth of the Nooksack River to protect and help prevent native fish of the area from being eaten or exposed to disease. The Atlantic salmon spill must be addressed immediately by all levels of government,” Ballew said.

    Reply
    • Sea level rise and salmon spills…

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 25, 2017

        ‘Environmental Nightmare’ After Thousands Of Atlantic Salmon Escape Fish Farm’
        August 24, 2017

        http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/24/545619525/environmental-nightmare-after-thousands-of-atlantic-salmon-escape-fish-farm

        “Every month of 2017 had brought stronger currents to Cypress Island, according to DeepZoom. Winds in nearby Anacortes never exceeded 6 miles per hour on Saturday, according to the National Weather Service.

        Warren said his main concern is that Atlantic salmon could out-compete native Chinook salmon and steelhead for food and spawning grounds.

        “The Atlantic salmon bring with them pollution, virus and parasite amplification, and all that harms Pacific salmon and our waters of Washington,” Beardslee said.

        Beardslee said this event should be of concern — especially because the same company, Cooke Aquaculture, is proposing a larger Atlantic salmon net pen in the Strait of San Juan de Fuca.

        “The majority of our salmon migrate through the straits when they’re leaving as juveniles. You start having a viral or parasitic outbreak there, when our juvenile fish are moving through — it could be a disaster,” Beardslee said….

        Penalties for the fish farm are still being evaluated. Phone calls to Cooke Aquaculture were not returned.”

        Reply
    • Stunning imagery from Eric Fisher

      Reply
    • Forward motion is slowing down. Now moving at just 8 mph.

      Reply
  2. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 25, 2017

    Yikes,

    I hope people heed warnings and head to higher ground. That much rain will back up fast and deep. Hopefully those without transportation had options (bus / rail) to get clear of this.

    Reply
  3. Nancy

     /  August 25, 2017

    I just cannot imagine that much rain. We had almost 5″ of rain one day a few years ago and it washed our road away. How much damage can 3 FEET of rain do?

    Harvey will be another billion dollar storm, and it might be the storm that finally wakes up this country to the effects of climate change.

    Reply
    • I can’t imagine it either. Been through some rough storms. But nothing even approaching the 20 to 60 inches forecast for Harvey.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 25, 2017

      “…it might be the storm that finally wakes up this country to the effects of climate change.”

      Unfortunately, not likely. Too many current distractions ala the Orange Menace, Patriot Preyers, brawling boxers, etc. It will wake up a lot of people locally, in the areas affected.

      Reply
      • Cumulative net effect.

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          Another one or two storms like or near-like this one by mid-October and the net closes in.
          Wide-spread wake up is inevitable.

      • Spike

         /  August 26, 2017

        The US, as Churchill said, will end up doing the right thing – after exhausting all the alternatives. I say this as a Brit who recognises the same fault in my own backyard 😉

        Reply
  4. Leland Palmer

     /  August 25, 2017

    I guess the climatologists say roughly 7 percent more water in the atmosphere per degree C of warming. So, this year, maybe 10 percent more moisture in the atmosphere than in the past.

    Since water heat of condensation drives storms, a lot of the solar energy that evaporated that water vapor will be driving storms like this.

    Scary stuff.

    Reply
    • And the distribution of moisture isn’t even. The net effect is that a disproportionate amount of that added ten percent is wrung out in the more severe rain events.

      Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  August 25, 2017

        Yes, like you say. I am surprised at how severe the worst events are getting, so quickly. Uneven distribution, with a vengeance, if the forecasts are even approximately correct.

        Reply
      • Spike

         /  August 26, 2017

        And I guess if a storm is larger and more powerful it sucks in moisture from a larger area. Then if we get stalling over an area you get the humongous quantities we now see again and again.

        Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  August 25, 2017

      I was in a severe flood on the Russian river a few years ago. We sat high and dry 30 feet above the maximum rise of the river, watching stuff float by.

      We were fine, it was the people close to the river who suffered.

      So, some people will be OK. Others will likely lose everything. But the probabilities will be scewed, compared to the past.

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  August 25, 2017

      Add in the sea surface temp rise, reducing the effort required to pull up more moisture by the storm. I suspect this may cause a compounding effect going on where the atmospheric loading may be higher than a standard 7% per 1C.

      Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  August 25, 2017

        You know, maybe that’s what is going on. Sea surface temperature compounding.

        Reply
      • Added moisture, warm atmosphere, more lift coming off land and water, warmer SSTs — it all adds to CAPE.

        Reply
      • wili

         /  August 25, 2017

        And it’s not just the temp at the very surface. With gw, not only is the surface temp higher, the deeper water is also still hot. So after evaporation from the front part of the storm starts to cool surface water, deeper still hot water is drawn up to further intensify the rest of the storm. That’s my (limited) understanding, anyway. Others please correct or amend with more/better info.

        Reply
        • Andy_in_SD

           /  August 25, 2017

          That makes a lot of sense to me too wili, thanks for pondering that puzzle piece up onto the table. Once the top hot layer is scraped away….there’s now another hot layer.

  5. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    “Up to 14,000 tons of sunscreen enter the world’s reefs annually, according to a 2015 paper published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. Most of it — including products by Aveeno, Banana Boat, Coppertone, Hawaiian Tropic and Neutrogena — contains a chemical called oxybenzone to deflect UV rays.

    Even in minute doses, the researchers found, oxybenzone rapidly bleaches coral and slows new growth: A single drop in 4.3 million gallons of water — about six and a half Olympic-size swimming pools — is enough to be deadly. In a 2008 study published in Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers applied the recommended amount of sunscreen to volunteers’ hands, then immersed them into plastic bags containing water and coral samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, as well as the Red Sea; the samples were completely bleached within 96 hours….”

    Reply
    • Banning oxybenzone in sunscreens is helpful. But if you don’t stop burning fossil fuels, the combined ocean warming and acidification take down 90 percent of the world’s coral reefs before 2050 without it. In any case, we need to be very clear that the global coral bleaching event of 2014 through 2017 was caused by ocean surface warming. And we’re looking at the potential for a 2018 global event as well. SSTs are in that range now where it’s not hard to tip the scales at all. The primary cause is not oxybenzone which has a deleterious local effect in certain regions, but not a global effect.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      ‘Chasing Coral | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix’

      “Beneath the waves, coral reefs are dying on a massive scale. These scientists and filmmakers are fighting to stop it. Chasing Coral is now streaming on Netflix.”

      Reply
  6. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    ‘Hawaii considers banning certain sunscreens to protect coral reefs’
    Aug. 17, 2017

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hawaii-considers-sunscreen-oxybenzone-ban-to-help-save-coral-reefs/

    “… Biologist Dr. Robert Richmond and his team study the effects of oxybenzone.
    “You’re talking about a shot glass in a swimming pool. These are the kinds of levels where things began to have action,” Richmond said.

    His research shows even a trace amount of oxybenzone is toxic to coral.
    “First thing they give up are things like reproduction and growth, and then it will eventually die,” Richmond said….

    The strong scientific evidence is what encouraged Hawaii lawmakers to propose a statewide ban on the sale of all sunscreens that contain oxybenzone. State Sen. Will Espero says people will have to learn to use sunblocks that contain titanium and zinc instead.

    Espero said if Hawaii approves the ban, it would be the first state to do so.
    “I’d like to see Hawaii take the lead and make certain that we can do all we can to protect our ocean environment,” Espero said.

    But sunscreen makers are fighting back. A group representing about 90 percent of the cosmetic and personal care products industry said: “There is no conclusive, scientific evidence that sunscreen ingredients negatively impact coral reefs at levels that have been detected in tourist areas.”

    Richmond disagrees.
    “The levels that we’re finding in the water are the levels at which it’s having that biological impact,” Richmond said.”

    Reply
  7. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    Anthony Farnell‏ @AnthonyFarnell 2h2 hours ago

    “The Euro model has Harvey leaving the state of Texas on Saturday. That’s Saturday September 2nd, as in 8 days from now.”

    Reply
  8. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    ‘NOAA plane enters the ‘eye’ of Hurricane Harvey’

    Published on Aug 25, 2017
    Video footage released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows conditions in the air as the storm passed over the Gulf of Mexico on August 24.

    Reply
  9. eleggua

     /  August 25, 2017

    ‘Top GOP senator (Chuck Grassley) warns Trump:
    Don’t make the mistake George W. Bush did with Katrina’
    Aug. 25, 2017

    http://www.businessinsider.com/gop-chuck-grassley-hurricane-harvey-katrina-bush-2017-8

    Reply
    • Bush was far more responsible than Trump ever was. It will be tough for Trump not to flub this. But, yeah, maybe Congress and the generals can herd him into doing something decent for a change.

      Reply
      • wili

         /  August 25, 2017

        I think people forget that it took Bush eight years to start the wars he got us into AND to bring the world to within a millimeter of a total global financial collapse. Trump is just getting started!

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 26, 2017

        ‘Media, please stop asking Michael Brown about storm preparedness: Opinion’
        Aug. 25, 2017
        By Jarvis DeBerry, columnist
        NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

        http://www.nola.com/opinions/index.ssf/2017/08/michael_brown_fema_1.html

        “”Before I would call up former FEMA director Michael Brown to ask him about hurricane preparedness, I’d seek place-kicking advice from Charlie Brown. Before I called up ole “Heckuva job Brownie,” I’d dial up Wile E. Coyote and say, “Hey, Wile E., this roadrunner I just cooked sure is gamey. Tell me, how do you cook yours?” Before I asked Mr. “Anything Specific I Need to Do or Tweak?” his thoughts on what a coastal city should do as a big storm approaches, I would ask the Atlanta Falcons how to stay ahead in a Super Bowl.

        But, for some reason, news outlets keep calling up Brown as hurricanes approach. And, for some reason, Brown keeps taking their calls. He appeared on CNBC Friday to complain that people aren’t taking Hurricane Harvey as seriously as they should. “It’s been 12 years since we’ve had a major storm hit the Gulf Coast, so people aren’t aware that it’s not necessarily the winds,” but the water that can be the biggest problem, he said.

        CNBC couldn’t find anybody else on Earth to make that point? They had to get the guy with, like, zero credibility? …

        Brown should have hung his head in shame after Hurricane Katrina. But instead he’s stayed in the public eye as much as he possibly can, offering unsolicited advice about what cities should do to get prepared and telling bald-faced lies about what happened in New Orleans when he was the head of FEMA.

        In June 2015, in response to a news story about a mayor ordering an evacuation, Brown tweeted, “Damn, wish I’d had that mayor back in 2005. #JustSaying.”…”

        Reply
        • I think Brown is a little odd, but you’re right, the really strange thing is calling him up for comment. So I guess he is not so odd in comparison after all. Old saying, “There’s nowt so queer as folk,” meaning all of us collectively.

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

      • Trump’s First Natural Disaster.

        Reply
        • We’ll see how that goes. He appeared to be bound and determined to do everything possible to distract from it.

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          “He appeared to be bound and determined to do everything possible to distract from it. ”

          And use it for a “news dump”.

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/08/25/president-trumps-flagrant-friday-night-news-dump/?tid=pm_politics_pop

          ‘President Trump’s flagrant Friday night news dump’

          “It’s Friday night. A Category 4 hurricane is about to slam the Texas coastline, and President Trump just directed the Pentagon to ban transgender people from joining the military and pardoned a politically radioactive convicted former sheriff. News also broke that one of his more controversial advisers, Sebastian Gorka, is leaving the White House.

          This isn’t your average sleepy Friday news dump — a trick newsmakers use to bury unpopular news by releasing it when most people aren’t reading news. This is a flagrant attempt to hide a series of politically fraught (but base-pleasing) moves under the cover of an August Friday night hurricane.

          In other words, it’s transparent Trump is doing controversial things he knows are controversial, and he and the White House would prefer the public and the media not focus on it……….”

  10. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    Harvey aftermath: Areas “uninhabitable for weeks or months.”

    Zero mincing of words in @NWSCorpus #Harvey local statement. “Locations may be uninhabitable for an extended period.”

    Reply
  11. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    Even though I had just read your headline, I was still gobsmacked when I came across the specific prediction here:

    “ECMWF model output pushing 60-inches of rainfall over next 8 days as #Harvey meanders thru SE Texas. Time to abandon ship. ”

    https://mobile.twitter.com/RyanMaue/status/901155459872292865

    Reply
  12. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    “The storm models that scientists have created show that Houston’s perfect storm would push water up the Ship Channel, topping out at a height of more than 30 feet above sea level. ” (Higher than any storm surge in US history, I believe)

    https://projects.propublica.org/houston/
    (Thanks to vox at POForums for this)

    Reply
  13. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    The greatest immediate concern is lives and homes, but it is important to remember some other consequences that will ripple through the national and probably world economy:

    With a six-foot rise in water, all six of Corpus Christi’s refineries would flood.
    Hurricane Harvey could bring twice that.

    “Hurricane Harvey aims for the Texas fracking boom’s favorite port

    … Part of that concern is driven by where the storm is expected to make landfall. Corpus Christi, a critical port for the Texas oil and gas industry, is also one of the most vulnerable places in America when it comes to coastal flooding. An analysis earlier this year by the South Texas Economic Development Center predicted that 92 square miles of the Corpus Christi metro area would flood with a six-foot rise in water, including all six of the city’s refineries.

    Harvey could bring up to twice that, with as much as 12 feet of storm surge potentially swamping refinery infrastructure, including huge tanks of crude oil, with saltwater.

    As Emily Atkin writes in the New Republic, the pollution consequences of the storm could be immense. Harvey’s floodwaters could seep into massive underground gasoline storage facilities, potentially dislodging and floating the tanks.

    Above ground, the port also has the capacity to store up to 3.2 million barrels of crude oil, infrastructure which could buckle and leak during the storm. Bloomberg reported that several refineries are filling their tanks with as much oil as possible before the storm hits to try to help weigh them down.”

    The irony of a GW juiced storm taking out some of the most important GW-producing FF infrastructure is…well…I’m at a loss for the right word…

    http://grist.org/article/hurricane-harvey-aims-for-the-texas-fracking-booms-favorite-port/

    Reply
  14. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 25, 2017

    First tanker crosses northern sea route without ice breaker

    A commercial LNG tanker has sailed across the colder, northern route from Europe to Asia without the protection of an ice-breaker for the first time.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-41037071

    Reply
  15. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 25, 2017

    For those that decide to stay, I hope they keep an axe or chainsaw in their attic. Otherwise, that is where oftentimes the deceased are discovered, drowned.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/09/09/katrina.survivors/

      ‘3 days of death, despair and survival
      ‘We’re gonna die, why don’t we just end it quicker?”
      September 9, 2005

      “BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (CNN) — Trapped inside the darkened, stifling hot attic of her flooded home in New Orleans with her two teenage daughters, Debbie Este watched her own mother die as they waited for help she thought would never come.

      For three days they waited, sweating and stripped nearly naked because of the 110 degree heat, with no food and running out of water. The rising water reached the attic and threatened the survival of anyone inside the yellow-sided, single-story house.

      During half the time they were trapped, the body of Debbie’s mom, Melissa Harold, 68, who didn’t make it through the ordeal, lay lifeless on the attic floor.

      Debbie and her girls — Tiffany, 16, and Amanda, 13 — could hear the churn of helicopters overhead, evacuating neighbors near their house on Arts Street. The sound only reminded them that nobody had come to their rescue…….”

      Reply
  16. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    I have seen some who accept gw but dismiss slr as a great threat. It sounds so gradual and steady and incremental, surely people will just make rational decisions about where to live and work as they see the oceans gradually encroach.

    But this storm (if Katrina, Sandy and others haven’t already) should show that it’s not just slr.

    It’s slr plus super-juiced storms that push unprecedented strom surges from the ‘raised platform’ of higher sea level while at the same time dropping unprecedented deluges of rain from the sky. These along with shattering winds will deeply damage or destroy city after city and region after region.

    Of course, inane policies like that mentioned up thread by robert, and crazy insurance ‘plans’ that essentially trap people in the most dangerous areas, and the sheer idiocy of states that don’t allow their employees to even use words like global warming when planning for the future…those and other marches of folly will guarantee that pain, suffering, death and loss will be much much higher and sooner than it needed to be.

    It used to be that some people trying to avoid talking about reducing our contribution to gw would emphasize mitigation. Now even mitigation seems to be off their radar screens.

    Reply
  17. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    More on meteorologists’ unminced words:

    “‘Prolonged misery’: Meteorologists break out the thesaurus for Hurricane Harvey.

    Over the past two days, the storm — anticipated to hit Texas later Friday — has rapidly strengthened into a Category 3 major hurricane, packing 120 mph winds and a threatening a multi-day rainfall so heavy you’ll need a yardstick to measure it. The storm’s impact could be among the worst in U.S. weather history, rivaling even Hurricane Katrina.

    The implications are hard to put into words, so I asked my meteorologist colleagues to describe them using one or two:

    “Epic, unprecedented” — Brian McNoldy, hurricane specialist at University of Miami

    “Unprecedented danger” — Marshall Shepherd, meteorology professor at University of Georgia

    “In a word: life-changing. The question is where, how expansive, and how many people’s lives it will change. If nothing else this should be a big wake-up call to many.” — Anthony Fracasso, forecaster at the NOAA Weather Prediction Center

    “Dangerous, scary” — Adam Sobel, hurricane expert, Columbia University

    “Epic deluge” — Ryan Maue, hurricane expert, WeatherBELL analytics

    “One word, given the storm’s longevity: torturous” — Jim Cantore, the Weather Channel

    “Simply: overwhelming” — Taylor Trogdon, National Hurricane Center

    “Prolonged misery” — Rick Smith, NWS meteorologist in Norman, Oklahoma

    “Two answers, not playing by the rules with both. 1.) Forecast challenge of a career. 2.) Enormously challenging.” — Matt Lanza, energy industry meteorologist based in Houston”

    http://grist.org/briefly/prolonged-misery-meteorologists-break-out-the-thesaurus-for-hurricane-harvey/amp/

    Reply
  18. Shawn Redmond

     /  August 25, 2017

    New entry at cat-6
    https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/major-hurricane-harvey-bears-down-texas-catastrophic-flooding-likely

    And just so the east coast doesn’t feel left out there is this:

    “Tropical disturbance 92L was located along the southwest coast of Florida on Friday afternoon. Satellite images showed that 92L had little heavy thunderstorm activity and very little organization, and high wind shear of 20 – 30 knots was hindering development. The system is expected to move to the northeast over Florida this weekend, spreading heavy rains of 3 – 5”, and may have better chances of development early next week, when it will begin accelerating to the northeast, parallel to the U.S. East Coast. The best chances for development may come on Tuesday, when wind shear is expected to drop to the moderate range, according to the 18Z Friday run of the SHIPS model. At that time, 92L is expected to be several hundred miles east of the coast of North Carolina. In its tropical weather outlook issued at 2 pm EDT Friday, the National Hurricane Center gave 92L 2-day and 5-day odds of development of 30% and 50%, respectively.

    Jeff Masters co-wrote this post.”

    Reply
  19. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 25, 2017

    125 mph with 155 gusts. 6 to 12 ft surges. In the news they’re driving through single story older houses where folks are hunkered down to ride this out. Car is in the driveway (the car that could have driven them to higher ground). I just don’t see how that is a wise decision.

    Reply
  20. wili

     /  August 25, 2017

    Thanks to sig at asif for this and many other links and text:

    “The rarest of warnings now issued for Corpus Christi area: Extreme Wind Warning. Only used for wind events >115 mph. #Harvey”

    “Extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation!… Widespread winds of 115 to 145 mph…. Treat these as though a tornado was approaching….”

    Wow

    Reply
  21. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 25, 2017

    Fear of deportation could keep Texans from evacuating for Harvey — and Trump is making it worse

    I guess if you drown ’em, it’s a form of deportation. Legal or illegal, foreigners are afraid of the Fed now, and may be riding this thing out rather than getting scooped up in a giant net.

    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/8/25/16205040/hurricane-harvey-checkpoints-immigration-border

    Reply
    • cushngtree

       /  August 25, 2017

      From CBS live update, at time 5:06;

      “Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a joint statement Friday saying they won’t question the immigration status of families arriving to hurricane shelters in Texas and Louisiana.

      The agencies said their “highest priorities are to promote life-saving and life-sustaining activities, the safe evacuation of people who are leaving the impacted area, the maintenance of public order, the prevention of the loss of property to the extent possible, and the speedy recovery of the region.”

      The joint statement said that routine “non-criminal immigration enforcement operations” would not be conducted at evacuation sites or assistance centers such as shelters or food banks.

      It also warned that immigration laws would not be suspended, and the agencies would “be vigilant against any effort by criminals to exploit disruptions caused by the storm.”

      https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hurricane-harvey-texas-live-updates/

      Reply
      • Better late than never. But I wonder how many will get this news at this late hour?

        Reply
        • cushngtree

           /  August 26, 2017

          Too true; the ones most affected won’t have as much news access. I wonder if cellphones are already overloading towers there

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          ‘AT&T preparing for Hurricane Harvey, offering discounted backup cellphone batteries in Austin stores’
          Aug. 24, 2017

          http://www.statesman.com/news/local/preparing-for-hurricane-harvey-offering-discounted-backup-cellphone-batteries-austin-stores/dupD8adh7rCqdtsJcNqcXP/

          “AT&T is preparing for Hurricane Harvey by putting personnel on standby and gathering an arsenal of disaster response equipment, the network’s officials said Thursday.

          AT&T is discounting cellphone charging batteries 20 percent at stores in affected areas, and that includes Austin.

          Preparation includes topping off fuel generators, testing high-capacity back-up batteries at cell sites and protecting physical facilities against flooding, AT&T officials said. Its national center will be monitoring outages.

          Crews have moved certain electronics above expected flood levels, and it has installed more generators at critical cell towers.”

  22. coloradobob

     /  August 25, 2017

    Thinking about Dr. Francis tonight , and her whole theory of the larger system becoming slower, and getting stuck .

    Reply
    • Good point and observation, Bob. Huge slow trough over the eastern U.S. Harvey is predicted to get stuck in one of the dead zones.

      Reply
  23. climatehawk1

     /  August 25, 2017

    Tweet scheduled.

    Reply
  24. coloradobob

     /  August 25, 2017

    The Cat 6 site is a fire hose of information , here’s Harvey just off shore .

    Reply
    • We got it in the update 🙂

      Reply
      • wili

         /  August 26, 2017

        Shoulda known you’d be right on top of this. Silly me just looked over the recent comments and didn’t see i mentioned.

        I’m not much of a religious guy, but I’m praying for those poor Texans now.

        Reply
        • No worries. A couple of folks beat me to it. Might as well try, right?

          As for prayer, at a certain point, that’s all you’ve got left.

        • coloradobob

           /  August 26, 2017

          Prayer –

          When you are trapped in your attic , and you don’t have an axe.

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          “In nearby Aransas Pass, 66-year-old Mike Taylor said he was resigned to riding out the storm in his one-story house just a few blocks from the water. As part of routine hurricane preparations, the town maintains a list of residents who need help in leaving. Taylor, who does not own a car and lives with his disabled 40-year-old son, said he thought he was on the list.

          No one came for him.

          “Now, I am just out trying to find some groceries,” said Taylor, who was trudging along Route 35 in a yellow raincoat, even though all the grocery and convenience stores appeared closed. “I lost my driver’s license because I am nearly blind.””

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          Friday morning, residents Phyllis Sweeney and Gary Balding told their story of fleeing the wrath of tropical storms. They live on a 41-foot sailboat, having moved to Corpus Christi from Key West. Two weeks ago, they tried to sail to the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico but were battered by Hurricane Franklin.

          “We got within 20 miles, and couldn’t get there because the winds and currents were blowing in the wrong direction,” said Balding, 68. “We thought, “Okay, we’ll go to Corpus Christi and everything will be cool.”

          Now they’re in the path of Harvey. They fled the boat early Friday and checked into the Holiday Inn downtown. The hotel has become a refuge for stranded tourists, boaters, storm chasers and journalists. But Sweeney, 70, is worried that the hotel, which is surrounded by several other skyscrapers, will also suffer significant damage.

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          Santos Rojas, 72, said he isn’t preparing for the hurricane much beyond buying bottled water and pan de campo.

          “I am legally blind, so if I try to board up windows I will just smash my thumb,” he said.

          His son Daniel Rojas, 47, also is disabled and is on dialysis.

          “We didn’t even think of leaving,” he said. “We never leave for hurricanes. We don’t have anywhere to go. I hope I can still get my dialysis tomorrow, but I don’t know if they will be open.”

        • eleggua

           /  August 26, 2017

          ‘Hurricane Harvey Is Here. Time for Christians to Show What We’ve Learned Since Katrina.
          Advice for US churches on Category 4 storm from a disaster researcher who survived 2005.’
          Jamie Aten August 25, 2017

          http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2017/august-web-only/hurricane-harvey-texas-advice-christians-churches-katrina.html

          “A decade ago, maybe your church volunteered, planned a short-term mission trip, gave money, or helped rebuild Gulf Coast communities beaten down by one of America’s most deadly and destructive disaster seasons.

          Harvey, a Category 4 hurricane by Friday evening, offers Christians a chance to be even more helpful—to show God’s grace and mercy to a disaster-filled world. But it means we have to be willing to learn from experiences like Katrina.

          I’ve learned a lot myself, both personally and professionally. Katrina walloped my community six days after I moved to South Mississippi. Within weeks, I was on the ground researching how faith helps peoples’ resilience and how the church can best respond. Today, I run the Humanitarian Disaster Institute at Wheaton College, the nation’s first social science research center devoted to the study of faith and disasters….

          …You may have never thought about your church’s role in preparing for a disaster in your own community. Even if you have, you still may not know how to prepare as you watch this unexpected hurricane rapidly approaching. Taking these small actions now can go a long way toward preventing harm and saving lives. Following these tips will better position your congregation to be able to help each other and others in your community after the storm passes….”

      • wili

         /  August 26, 2017

        I see you also note the minimum pressure of 941 mb. That seems awfully low!

        Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  August 26, 2017

    robertscribbler / August 26, 2017
    You in the path of this thing, Bob?
    No, I’m up where ” Lonesome Dove” was set . Blue Duck stole Lorie Darling , and Gus rode in and saved her.

    But we are closing in on the wettest summer ever here. My nephew has budding business in Corpus . He fled to Houston.

    Funny thing about all the plots , one still calls for it come right over us.

    Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  August 26, 2017

    One for the ages –

    Reply
    • Definitely impressive. Look at all the thunderstorms kicking up around it as well. Just so much moisture in the atmosphere in this region now.

      Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  August 26, 2017

    A word about wild life , this one of our most productive areas , this where the Whopping Cranes spent the winter . And countless other creatures depend on for their life cycle.
    You want to pray tonight ?

    Pray for them as well.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  August 26, 2017

      +1 ….Good to see you Bob. Great observations. Tonight and for the next several days…
      we are all Texans..

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      http://www.stltoday.com/news/world/hurricane-s-impact-on-coast-could-injure-wildlife/html_16f20956-b051-58e1-8a8b-c281a2aa90fe.html

      ‘Hurricane’s impact on Coast could injure wildlife ‘

      As Hurricane Harvey moves in, bad weather could potentially hit the Coast, possibility injuring animals or separating wildlife from their homes.

      Rescue workers tell News 25 that whenever big hurricanes hit our surrounding areas, dozens of animals wash up on beaches from the strong winds or heavy rain.

      During Tropical Storm Cindy, a group of baby pelicans were rescued after they were removed from their homes. Volunteers with Wildlife Care and Rescue say if it weren’t for the beachgoers that called their center, the pelicans could have all died. Wildlife Care and Rescue Center Director Alison Sharp said, “We always end up with quite a number of different animals whether they’re babies or even adults, they get very, very weather beaten. So, we want people to realize that we are out there. We are ready to go pick these animals up. It is very important that they get that help.”

      If you do come across injured wildlife as a result of the anticipated weather conditions, please call the rescue hotline number at 228-669-2737.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      Wildlife and domesticated life, too.

      http://kfdm.com/weather/hurricane-stories/jefferson-county-sheriffs-office-advises-how-to-prepare-livestock-before-hurricane-harvey

      ‘Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office advises how to prepare livestock before Hurricane Harvey’

      “When you know there is a storm coming, it’s best to prepare everything you possibly can to reduce the chance of injury to your livestock or pets. Here are some storm safety tips you can follow to prepare for a thunderstorm, tropical storm or other severe weather.”

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      http://www.newsweek.com/hurricane-harvey-texas-alligator-floods-655125

      ‘Beware of Alligators on the Move During Hurricane Harvey’

      “…The Fort Bend Country Sheriff’s Office, just outside Houston, shared advice this week from the Texas Gator Squad, a nonprofit that does nuisance control in the area. The group wrote on Facebook that people facing Hurricane Harvey should remember that floods can displace alligators, forcing them to look for better shelter or hideaways where they can ride out the storm—like driveways or back porches.

      “Alligators that show up on your property during flooding and heavy rain are not out seeking you for food or trying to be aggressive,” the nonprofit wrote in a Facebook post. “They are [simply] trying to deal with the weather like the rest of us.”…

      After the 2015 floods in the Lone Star State, alligator catchers reported an uptick in business. A similar phenomenon occurred in South Carolina last fall after Hurricane Matthew, and in Florida, a woman took a video of an alligator swimming down a street during Hurricane Hermine.”

      Reply
  28. Ace

     /  August 26, 2017

    Really appreciate your posts. Minor quibble: “storm is expected to inexplicably”. If it is inexplicable, how can it possibly be “expected”.

    On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 1:33 PM, robertscribbler wrote:

    > robertscribbler posted: “Media and Gulf Coast residents take note: the > thing to be most concerned about with regards to Harvey is not its > admittedly life-threatening storm surge and strong winds, but what is > shaping up to be a potentially historic rainfall event. ***** The ” >

    Reply
  29. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    Robert, what happened to “UPDATED (4)” at the bottom of the post ?

    Reply
  30. Suzanne

     /  August 26, 2017

    Here is storm chaser Jeff Piotrowski….LIVE from the storm.
    https://www.pscp.tv/w/1zqKVRbYXWWKB

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  August 26, 2017

      Unbelievable images from Jeff as he is sitting with the eye wall on top of him. He is sitting in his car…in a car wash where the roof is lifting.

      Reply
    • Just crazy all that debris flying around.

      Reply
    • cushngtree

       /  August 26, 2017

      Jeff’s signal just cut out—don’t know if it’s a paywall I don’t know about, or worse. Hope that eyewall gets to him fast.

      Reply
    • Bobinspain

       /  August 26, 2017

      I’m lost for the right words. I’ll be crawling around on the roof this afternoon, checking for leaks and preparing for storms that we get in the autumn months and thinking about all the poor souls affected by these events, not just in Texas, but in the Far East as well. This is our future. The simple logic is that the situation will neither improve nor stabilize and can therefore only deteriorate. Welcome to the Near Future.

      Reply
  31. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Hurricane Harvey Is Scaring Everyone Away But These People
    The worst hurricane to hit Texas in 56 years is here, a category 4 storm that will leave parts of the state uninhabitable.’

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/hurricane-harvey-is-scaring-everyone-away-but-these-people

    “…Wade Walker is heading directly into the eye of the storm.

    As head of Dallas-based search and rescue outfit Texas Task Force II, Walker has some idea what to expect when Harvey makes landfall on the Gulf coast tonight. The last big hurricane he deployed to on the Texas Gulf Coast was Ike, which, after causing massive destruction and hundreds of deaths in Haiti and Cuba, made landfall on the island of Galveston in September, 2008.

    “We’re currently at a staging area in San Antonio,” he told The Daily Beast on Friday afternoon. “Texas Task Force II has 66 people including four canine handlers. We have six boats and enough food and water to sustain us for 72 hours. We’re basically just waiting now to see when the storm comes ashore.”…

    Keith Pierre, a U.S. Coast Guard commander based at Corpus Christi, told The Daily Beast that the storm surge and flooding could present real problems; that they’ll have to wait until the hurricane tracks away from the coast before they can conduct rescue operations. ..

    “We have well over 100 people here, helicopters ready and surface assets like small boats and flood punts that can get into shallow areas,” Pierre said. “Once the storm passes we’ll go to work and try to make sure everyone’s safe.””

    Reply
  32. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘20,000 stuck at sea in cruise ships as Galveston hunkers down for Hurricane Harvey’
    August 25, 2017

    http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/20-000-stuck-at-sea-in-cruise-ships-as-Galveston-11959300.php

    “Four ships that had been set to dock over the weekend — three Carnival cruises and one Royal Caribbean boat — were turned away after the Port of Galveston closed about noon Friday with gale-force winds approaching.

    Peter Simons, interim director for the Port of Galveston, said officials are still trying to determine if it will be safe for ships to call on Galveston Sunday. One official said it could be Tuesday or Wednesday before the ships can dock if Harvey continues on its expected path toward Houston and Galveston….”

    Reply
  33. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘GEOSTORM – OFFICIAL TRAILER 2 [HD]’

    “After an unprecedented series of natural disasters threatened the planet, the world’s leaders came together to create an intricate network of satellites to control the global climate and keep everyone safe. But now, something has gone wrong—the system built to protect the Earth is attacking it, and it’s a race against the clock to uncover the real threat before a worldwide geostorm wipes out everything…and everyone along with it….”

    Reply
  34. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Tropical Storm “Pakhar” (Jolina) hits Philippines, heading toward Hong Kong’
    August 25, 2017

    https://watchers.news/2017/08/25/tropical-storm-pakhar-jolina-hits-philippines-heading-toward-hong-kong/

    “Tropical Storm “Pakhar,” known in the Philippines as Jolina, made landfall in Aurora province on Friday, August 25, 2017. The storm is dumping moderate to heavy rainfall within 300 km (186 miles) from the center. After passing over the Philippines, Pakhar is expected to strengthen and make landfall in China’s Guangdong Province, just south of Hong Kong and Macau, around 18:00 UTC on August 27. This is the same region devastated by Typhoon “Hato” just a few days ago….”

    Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  August 26, 2017

    Being as old as I am, and as sick as I am, This is good place to go.

    Reply
  36. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Stevie Ray Vaughan – Texas Flood’

    Reply
  37. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Trailer – The Great Flood ‘

    “The Mississippi River Flood of 1927 was the most destructive river flood in American history. In the spring of 1927, the river broke out of its banks in 145 places and inundated 27,000 square miles to a depth of up to 30 feet.

    Part of it enduring legacy was the mass exodus of displaced sharecroppers. Musically, the “Great Migration” of rural southern blacks to Northern cities saw the Delta Blues electrified and reinterpreted as the Chicago Blues, Rhythm and Blues, and Rock and Roll.

    Using minimal text and no spoken dialog, filmmaker Bill Morrison and composer / guitarist Bill Frisell have created a powerful portrait of a seminal moment in American history through a collection of silent images matched to a searing original soundtrack.”

    Reply
  38. wharf rat

     /  August 26, 2017

    10:00 PM CDT Fri Aug 25
    Location: 28.0°N 97.0°W
    Moving: NW at 7 mph
    Min pressure: 938 mb
    Max sustained: 130 mp
    gusts to 160

    http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

    Reply
  39. coloradobob

     /  August 26, 2017

    ” Get ready little lady , hell is coming to breakfast’

    Reply
    • Signing off for tonight. Been a long day. Hope everyone stays safe.

      Reply
    • desmodia

       /  August 26, 2017

      Can you please drop the “little lady” when you do that quote? Thanks. Thought that little patronizing usage went out in the 60’s.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 26, 2017

        “Thought that little patronizing usage went out in the 60’s.”

        It didn’t but should have, of course.

        Bob’s not being patronizing.
        You probably don’t know the source and reference. Not the perfect metaphor for an incoming storm/problem that won’t be good, however not intended to patronize.

        Here:

        Reply
  40. Spike

     /  August 26, 2017

    This doesn’t bode well.

    Reply
  41. Shawn Redmond

     /  August 26, 2017

    Late night post,“Harvey simply has no resistance in all directions!”
    https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/harvey-slams-ashore-texas-catastrophic-flood-threat-still-come
    Light upper-level winds gave Harvey room to grow
    Harvey is the first Category 4 hurricane to be tracked with the new GOES-16 satellite, launched in November 2015. Imagery from GOES-16 showed Harvey to be a remarkably well-structured hurricane as it approached land, with outflow evident in all directions. This symmetry was partly the result of a lack of strong upper-level winds close to Harvey that would have distorted the storm’s outflow, according to Greg Tripoli (University of Wisconsin–Madison). Tripoli and colleagues at UW created maps of potential vorticity near the top of the hurricane, where outflow is maximized. On Friday, he said, “There was an annular ring of zero potential vorticity surrounding [Harvey], probably produced by the storm over the last few days but not carried away from the storm by the environment. This suggests that there was little or no environmental resistance to outflow.” Sometimes a strong upper-level jet close to a hurricane can provide an outflow channel, reducing the resistance to outflow in that direction, but this wasn’t necessary today, said Tripoli: “Harvey simply has no resistance in all directions!”

    Reply
  42. Shawn Redmond

     /  August 26, 2017

    I fear that people have no idea how dire our situation is. I remember a study that I read around 1998 that said in order to avoid the worst of global warming that we needed to immediately drop our emissions below the level at the beginning of the industrial revolution. In other words, we needed to stop adding to the carbon load immediately in 1998. That was 19 years ago. We knew prior to 1977 that global warming was a serious issue and that we needed to take immediate remedial action. That was forty years ago. We have done virtually nothing. Instead, we have allowed the oil industry to pay their well paid whore “scientists” to spread the lie that there was questions about the source (or even existence) of global warming, and the corporate media presenting “both sides” of the story even though more than 98% of the scientific community felt there was no doubt. So here we are with the ices caps and glaciers melting, the ocean acidifying and warming, and the permafrost bomb getting ready to explode. Do we hear it yet? Apparently not as both Trump and the Republicans are still tooting the broken “ain’t no problem horn.”
    http://www.uncommonthought.com/mtblog/archives/2017/08/25/only-solution-says-mckibben-100-renewables-as-fast-as-humanly-possible.php#more-24114

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 26, 2017

      “I fear that people have no idea how dire our situation is. ”

      ““Dire Beauty”, coined by astrologer Caroline Casey.
      It describes the times we live in: times of deep grief and even horror –
      yet seeds of beauty can grow from this soil”

      Reply
  43. Shawn Redmond

     /  August 26, 2017

    O/T the truly deep south is looking at a little rain again:

    Reply
    • Shawn Redmond

       /  August 26, 2017

      Damn it the wrong chart again. The five day average starting on the 26th shows rain on the Antarctic peninsula. Trying again :

      Reply
  44. Suzanne

     /  August 26, 2017

    Climate State has a compilation of video from storm chasers as Harvey came ashore…including some of Jeff’s amazing and scary footage…(BTW Jeff is safe)…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=or_xsbUsINo

    Reply
  45. Suzanne

     /  August 26, 2017

    Storm chaser Jeff Gammons twitter with some pictures of the damage in RockPort
    https://twitter.com/StormVisuals?lang=en-gb

    Reply
  46. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017
    Reply
  47. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Tell your your state’s Attorney General: Investigate Exxon’

    “350 dot org will send your comments to state AGs to encourage them to take action against Exxon. ”

    https://act.350.org/letter/ag-exxon-harvard-study/

    “There’s been a breakthrough in the case against ExxonMobil.

    Two Harvard researchers just published a peer-reviewed study showing that Exxon knew about global warming as early as the 1970s but funded an aggressive misinformation campaign and delay climate action.

    The study is a systematic documentation of Exxon’s coverup. It’s time for Attorneys General everywhere to step up to investigate Exxon.”

    Reply
  48. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    David Best used dead trees, stricken by pine bark beetle, to build this year’s ‘Temple’ at Burning Man, removing those trees as a possible source of wildfire. Good job, David!

    http://www.temple2017.org/ecology.html

    “…there is another important message in this year’s temple, the healing of the disruptive balance in our surrounding ecosystems. Throughout Nevada and California there are dramatic changes occurring in our forests. Pines, oaks, and many other kinds of trees are dying in unprecedented numbers from diseases and pests such as Sudden Oak Death and pine bark beetles. Last year scientists reported more than 100 million dead trees in California, and just last month scientists reported over 800 million dead trees in Colorado. Indeed, all of the western US states are experiencing elevated levels of forest decline. Many point to climate change as the cause of this decline. However, a deeper understanding of the forest history and ecology suggests that human activities other than climate change are more likely the primary reasons why our forests are suffering……..

    This is one of the tasks of The Temple of 2017, to utilize the dead pines that have succumb to pine bark beetle to build the temple. The process of securing the wood involves the removal, milling, and drying of dead pines that otherwise could and, likely, would fuel a catastrophic wildfire. The milling and drying process will ensure that no pests are transported to the playa. On a personal note, I live in Big Sur and know what it is like to lose a home and see a community devastated by wildfire and resulting landslides. My involvement in this year’s temple is a way of helping other communities avoid a similar fate. “

    Reply
  49. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘Hiker hit by lightning near Lake Tahoe woke up with blood everywhere’
    August 24, 2017

    http://kron4.com/2017/08/24/video-hiker-hit-by-lightning-near-lake-tahoe-woke-up-with-blood-everywhere/

    An Austrian man hiking 9,000 feet up in the Sierra Nevada was on a peak taking a photo when he was struck by a lightning bolt that blasted away his clothes, burned a hole in one of his shoes and left him with severe burns.

    Mathias Steinhuber, who was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail with his girlfriend and their friend, had an entry wound on his head and an exit wound on his foot….

    Steinhuber said he doesn’t remember being struck. While he could see a thunderstorm far in the distance, he said there was no rain or lightning nearby….

    Steinhuber was thrown away and his shoes and all his clothes, including his underwear, were ripped off from his body. The lightning bolt singed his clothes and burned a gaping hole through one of his tennis shoes…..

    “Somebody told me the odds are higher winning the lottery than getting struck by lightning,” Steinhuber said. “I would’ve rather won the lottery.””

    Reply
  50. eleggua

     /  August 26, 2017

    ‘SF’s Muni was fined $220K by state for blowing off emissions requirements’
    August 25, 2017 by Joe Eskanazi

    https://missionlocal.org/2017/08/sfs-muni-was-fined-220k-by-state-for-blowing-off-emissions-requirements/

    “This week, Mission Local revealed that the agency’s new diesel-electric hybrid buses are operating without a pollution-control program that has been par for the municipal transit course since the 1980s. The buses’ onboard computers are not programmed to shut down the engine after several minutes of idling — and sources say buses are being allowed to idle excessively in the yards, a decades-long Muni malady.

    Muni, it turns out, is on an emissions kick. In September of last year, it quietly agreed to a settlement with the California Air Resources Board: Muni pledged to fork over $220,500, mend its ways and make investments in training and maintenance after the state regulators alleged San Francisco’s transit agency failed, for years, to ensure its vehicles met California emissions standards — and failed to even attempt to do so. …

    …One of the settlement’s stipulations stated that “SFMTA shall instruct all employees who operate diesel-fueled vehicles to comply with the idling requirements” of section 13 in the California Code of Regulation.

    The state, bluntly, is ordering Muni to cease violating the law. And, intriguingly, it was these very laws regarding over-idling buses that Muni workers allege are still being broken when coaches are allowed to rumble on indefinitely at bus yards. These are the buses, again, in which Muni opted to not install automated programs that would curtail excessive idling. …

    When queried about the settlement, Muni officials sent an e-mail claiming the situation had “less to do with the actual emissions of the vehicles than … with paperwork and regulatory policies” — and was exacerbated by the inconsistent advice and faulty equipment of the Air Resources Board.

    Queries to the Air Resources Board seeking its view of Muni’s response — and asking whether Muni could be subject to further fines — have not yet been answered. “

    Reply
  1. Not time to Let Our Guard Down With Harvey; Rainstorm Expected to Last 5-9 More Days | robertscribbler
  2. Not time to Let Our Guard Down With Harvey; Rainstorm Expected to Last 5-9 More Days | RClimate

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