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Harvey Intensifies Slightly Just Prior to Second Landfall

Tropical Storm Harvey, which has dumped more than 51 inches of rain over parts of Texas and flooded hundreds of thousands of homes, intensified this afternoon over the Gulf of Mexico as it continued to move to the North-Northeast.

(Visible satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Harvey late afternoon on August 29th shows the storm slightly re-intensifying before a second landfall with strong rain bands again threatening Houston. Image source: The National Hurricane Center.)

As of the 4 PM CDT advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Harvey’s minimum central pressure had dropped to 994 mb even as its maximum sustained winds increased to 50 mph. This made Harvey a still rather weak tropical storm is it continued to lash sections of Eastern Texas and Louisiana with winds and rains.

Now a 5-day long event since threatening the Texas Coast as a category 4 storm on Thursday, Harvey has produced the worst flooding in Texas state history. In Houston, dams designed to contain a 1,000 year flood are overflowing — increasing already catastrophic flooding throughout the beleaguered city.

(After a brief respite, Houston’s eastern suburbs are again seeing heavy rain from Harvey. Image source: National Weather Service.)

Very heavy rains have fallen over Houston since Saturday. But during the early afternoon hours rains had lightened over the city as the heaviest squalls shifted further east over Beaumont. Recent weather radar imagery from the National Weather Service, however, has shown more intense rain bands again back-filling over Eastern Houston in coordination with Harvey’s recent re-intensification.

Tonight, Harvey is expected to track inland before being pulled northward by a trough and finally leaving Southeastern Texas behind. But not before giving the region one last lashing over the next 12-24 hours or so while dumping another 6-12 inches of rain.

RELATED STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION:

Links:

The National Hurricane Center

National Weather Service

Worst Tropical Rainfall Event in Texas History

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83 Comments

  1. Max rainfall total is now more than 51 inches… U.S. record about to fall…

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      Record 49.20, which you’d posted earlier.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      Now up to 51.88 as of 3.40pm CDT.
      Noted on that image: “The gauge may have stopped reporting as of 3pm CDT.”

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      “The record for a cyclone in what is now the entire United States was set in 1950, when Hurricane Hiki dropped 52 inches of rain on Hawaii, a spokeswoman for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. Hawaii was a U.S. territory then and became a state in 1959. “

      Reply
  2. Record-breaking high temperatures in California today, and big fires further north as well. The hits just keep on coming!

    Reply
  3. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Is it forming a new eye?

    Reply
    • Not an enclosed one. The center is still away from strongest convection.

      However, there is a worrying jog to the east in recent frames. If that keeps happening, watch out Louisiana.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 29, 2017

        Thanks.

        Potential article here? “If that keeps happening, watch out Louisiana.”

        Reply
        • Not yet. Will see. Right now, the models bring it on shore near the Louisiana border. Not too much change. The jog has a SE component. And it’s over some very warm waters. So if this does keep up, it’s something we’ll need an update on.

        • eleggua

           /  August 29, 2017

          ‘Harvey Doubling Back After Houston Deluge, Louisiana in Crosshairs ‘
          Aug 29 2017, 6:56 pm ET

          https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/hurricane-harvey/harvey-doubling-back-after-houston-deluge-louisiana-crosshairs-n797221

          “Harvey was taking aim at Texas again Tuesday, forecast to make landfall later somewhere along the border with Louisiana after swamping the Houston area with record rainfall and deadly flooding.

          The storm literally became historic on Tuesday, when the record for rainfall from a tropical cyclone in the continental United States was smashed at 51.88 inches in Mont Belvieu, 35 miles east of Houston, the National Weather Service reported….

          Harvey, now a tropical storm with maximum winds of about 50 mph, was about 30 miles east-southeast of Galveston, Texas, at 5 p.m. ET Tuesday and was moving northeast at about 6 mph. It is expected to remain offshore in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall again in southeast Texas, on Wednesday.

          Bands of heavy rain are expected to persist over the next several days, with parts of Texas and Louisiana facing record rainfall through at least the Labor Day weekend, forecasters say….

          As it makes landfall again, Harvey was expected to pack winds up to 45 mph and drench the upper Texas coast and southwestern Louisiana with 6 to 12 inches of rain before heading deeper inland, the National Weather Service warned. Forecasters said final localized rain totals up to 50 inches were possible in Texas by later this week.

          “The whole problem with Harvey the entire time is that it has basically been stationary, and it continues to be fed by moisture coming off the ocean,” said Danielle Banks, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel.

          Parts of southwest Louisiana have already recorded more than a foot of rain from Harvey’s outer bands, and 5 inches or more are possible through Thursday, said the National Weather Service, which projected tides up to 2 feet above normal along the coast west of the Mississippi River. A coastal flood advisory is in effect.

          The system is expected to sweep southwest to northeast across the state, passing through major cities like New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Flash flood watches spanned the entire state except for the far northeast corner.

          Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards warned that there could be power outages and that hundreds of trees could topple because the ground is already saturated.

          “It is not going to turn back into a hurricane or anything of the sort, but the winds are picking up a bit,” Edwards said at a news conference. “We do anticipate over the next 24 hours that southwest Louisiana will see an additional 10 to 24 inches of rain.”

          About 500 people were evacuated from the Gulf Coast near the Texas-Louisiana border, where Harvey is expected to make landfall around midday Wednesday, Edwards said.

          More than 250 were already bunking in Louisiana shelters, more than a dozen government offices were closed, and 671 members of the Louisiana National Guard were “working on Harvey operations,” he said.

          “This storm is going to play out over the next 48 to 72 hours,” Edwards said. “It has tremendous potential to continue to drop heavy amounts of water and to prevent people from going about their normal business in a safe manner.”

          In New Orleans, Mayor Mitch Landrieu marked the 12th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated his city — and sparked an exodus to residents to new lives in Houston.

          “We lost 1,800 fellow Americans, and the devastation we experienced was great,” Landrieu said. “No city welcomed more New Orleanians following Katrina than Houston, and our hearts break for them as Hurricane Harvey displaces so many of their citizens.”

          “We believe we can handle this,” Landrieu said. “We are prepared for whatever comes our way.”

          But he warned New Orleans residents to remain vigilant. “Things can change on a dime,” he said….”

        • eleggua

           /  August 29, 2017

          Got it. Thanks for that assessment.

  4. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    From 350 dot org

    “Friends,

    Today Donald Trump visited Texas. He had no words of comfort for people forced from their homes, or for those who lost family members — instead he bragged about his crowd size.

    The overheated waters of the Gulf of Mexico following the hottest month ever measured on earth made Harvey into a monster storm. Trump is refusing to tell the truth and name climate change as a key culprit in creating this disaster.

    If we want to prevent more disasters like this one, we need to call it what it is. Every leader who wants to defend vulnerable communities threatened by stronger storms, and who understands climate science should condemn Trump’s climate silence.

    Can you send a message to your Members of Congress asking them to connect the dots between Harvey and climate change and condemn Trump’s climate denial?

    Click here to send a message to your Members of Congress about standing up for the truth and condemning Trump’s climate denial.

    http://act.350.org/letter/harvey-congress/

    This is exactly the moment to be talking about climate change.

    The historic destruction Harvey has brought to the Gulf is the product of higher sea levels and warmer waters caused by climate change. If our politicians can’t call this what it is and get serious about climate action, they are not prepared to protect people from the next storm.

    The people who will pay the highest price from inaction are often poor, people of color, or from other vulnerable communities. People living next to toxic refineries and chemical plants in Houston are at elevated risk of contamination from spills and other disasters as you read this.

    Trump is only making the problem worse. Just last week he disbanded his climate advisory group and revoked requirements that new federal infrastructure take sea level rise into account. That’s on top of exiting the Paris Agreement, approving the Dakota Access Pipeline, and appointing climate deniers throughout his administration.

    This is no time for Trump’s egomania and climate denial. Tell your members of Congress to condemn him, and speak out for the truth.

    Thank you for speaking out. We will continue to push, together.

    Jamie Henn”

    Reply
  5. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    All of Donald Trump’s billions.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      “He grabbed a Texas flag and shouted back to the crowd, seeming to forget, for the moment, that he was at the scene of a disaster and not one of his rallies. “What a crowd!” he said. “What a turnout!”” – NYT

      “It was also a chance for them to sell their merchandise and play blue-collar dress-up. The president showed up in a white “USA” baseball cap, embroidered with his own last name, that he sells on his website for $40. Melania opted for a satiny olive bomber, tailored black trousers, aviator glasses, and a pair of teetering snakeskin stilettos. Her shoes attracted the most criticism from internet observers, prompting a White House spokeswoman to assure the Washington Examiner that Melania was planning on changing her shoes on the plane. Vogue, a known champion of garments that serve the gods of fashion over the false idols of function, said the heels were “better suited to a shopping afternoon on Madison Avenue or a girls’ luncheon at La Grenouille” than a trip to the site of an ongoing natural disaster.” – Slate

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      “…yes it really does matter that Melania Trump headed out to a disaster zone in five-inch stiletto heels. Even if she is famous for wearing them nearly all the time, and even if she was planning to change on the plane even before her footwear became the latest internet meme. We live in a world of visual communication, and this is especially true of Melania Trump who has not been very vocal about much of anything during her time as a candidate’s wife and then first lady.

      Yes, these are serious times, especially in Texas, and no, no one should be obsessing about what the first lady has on her feet. That’s precisely the point. By taking the time to carefully put together not one but two made-for-papparazzi looks, the first reminiscent of Top Gun, the second of preppies everywhere, Melania Trump pulled the focus of the visit away from where it belonged. Many commenters claimed the shoes were proof that the president and first lady were merely seeking a photo op and not a chance to be helpful. I don’t know if that’s true, but her clothing choices sure made it look that way.” – Inc.

      “But what kind of message does a fly-in visit from a First Lady in sky-high stilettos send to those suffering the enormous hardship, the devastation of this natural disaster?
      And why, oh why, can’t this administration get anything, even a pair of shoes, right?” – Vogue Magazine

      Reply
  6. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Highways around downtown Houston are empty as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey overflow from the bayous around the city, Aug. 29, 2017.

    Reply
  7. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Water from the Addicks Reservoir flows into neighborhoods.

    Reply
  8. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Homes are flooded, even children’s playgrounds are in deep water.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 29, 2017

      “children’s playgrounds are in deep water”

      ^Metaphor for the earth and all inhabitants.

      Reply
  9. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Water from the Addicks Reservoir flows into neighborhoods.

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  August 29, 2017

      Looks like some flooded deltas in Africa. Wow. Basically an area the size of the state of New Jersey.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 29, 2017

        A lot of these areas will be abandoned ala parts of New Orleans.

        Today is the 12th anniversary of the breaking of the levees.

        Reply
        • DJ LX

           /  August 30, 2017

          Honestly, many of these areas should be abandoned. It would be insane to remain at a location where events of this sort will continue to occur with increasing frequency. it’s the sad reality in which we find ourselves.

      • eleggua

         /  August 29, 2017

        And Bangladesh.

        Reply
        • 41 million in South Asia now impacted by floods…

        • eleggua

           /  August 30, 2017

          “41 million in South Asia now impacted by floods…”

          “More than 1,000 people have died in floods across South Asia this summer, and as sheets of incessant rain pummeled the vast region on Tuesday, worries grew that the death toll would rise along with the floodwaters.

          According to the United Nations, at least 41 million people in Bangladesh, India and Nepal have been directly affected by flooding and landslides resulting from the monsoon rains, which usually begin in June and last until September.

          And while flooding in the Houston area has grabbed more attention, aid officials say a catastrophe is unfolding in South Asia.

          In Nepal, thousands of homes have been destroyed and dozens of people swept away. Elephants were pressed into service, wading through swirling waters to rescue people, and aid workers have built rafts from bamboo and banana leaves.

          But many people are still missing, and some families have held last rites without their loved ones’ bodies being found.

          “This is the severest flooding in a number of years,” Francis Markus, a spokesman for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, said by phone from Kathmandu, Nepal’s capital.

          …And the rain keeps coming….”

        • eleggua

           /  August 30, 2017

          Floods covered the streets last week in Agartala, the capital of Tripura State in India. Credit

        • eleggua

           /  August 30, 2017

          Villagers in Assam State, India, resorted to traveling on makeshift rafts last week.

  10. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    10 Minute Oil Change $21.99

    Reply
  11. Greg

     /  August 29, 2017

    Thank you Robert for your continuing coverage of this. I noted that temperatures there have been 20 degrees Fahrenheit lower than normal this time of year which is a relief to those on the ground but is a piece of the puzzle linking to climate change as it indicates changes in the jet stream. Can you explain to followers why that might be the case along with the issue of stalled fronts? I know that might be a.complete post but an outline for now would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • I’ve been waiting for this storm to end before doing a full run-down. I’m thinking I should probably just write it all up tonight. B/C this thing may well be trying to hold out on me 😉

      For a brief explanation, if you look at the work of Dr Jennifer Francis, you’ll find that warming in the Arctic results in more large ridges and troughs in the Jet Stream. This also causes more fixed and persistent weather patterns. In such cases, things tend to linger for longer. Storms and droughts tend to stall over the same areas for longer periods. This year, a large trough in the East and two related blocking highs — one in the west and one in the East — associated with high amplitude Jet Stream waves created a pocket in which Harvey could stall for a longer time than usual.

      This was just one of the climate change based factors related to Harvey. More on this later.

      Reply
      • Greg

         /  August 29, 2017

        🙂
        Gracias

        Reply
      • CD

         /  August 30, 2017

        What do yo think of this:

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  August 30, 2017

          Good stuff ^there. Interview with Trenberth.

          Trend in U.S. mainstream media is changing, though.

        • CD

           /  August 31, 2017

          @eleggua
          I was wondering about what RS would say about Trenberth’s critique of the meteorologist’s implication of stuck weather patterns, but I believe RS answered the question in his Aug. 30 post (i.e., that a climate change induced stuck weather pattern did play a role in the severity).

        • My opinion is yes, absolutely. The Harvey stall was an attribute of the various blocking patterns at play. These blocking patterns, in turn, were contributed to by polar warming’s influence on the Jet Stream. There is no consensus right now on this issue. My opinion and observations support that line of evidence, though. I will probably be attacked and/or taken out of context because of this view. I don’t really care. I’ve got to call it as I see it.

  12. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    Reposting this comment.

    Jeff Boutilier / August 29, 2017

    As the rain falls in the U S, the trees continue to burn in B C . Destroying the record books with dozens of out of control fires still raging …
    http://globalnews.ca/news/3585284/b-c-wildfires-map-2017-current-location-of-wildfires-around-the-province/
    Vancouver B C 17 degrees and clear skies . Rain in B C has been so scarce , Best thoughts to all species affected by these events that will become more and more frequent .

    Reply
    • Its been hard to watch this …..we have smoke in the Alberni Valley again . Vancouver Isl.
      Thanks Eleggua , For all your efforts on your posts.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 30, 2017

        You’re welcome. Thank you for what you’re doing!

        It’s painful to observe; spent a lot of time up there and love it dearly.

        Reply
  13. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    ‘Looters will face more time for crimes committed in disaster area’

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      ‘Curfew imposed in Houston as deluge from Tropical Storm Harvey continues, breaking rainfall record’
      August 29, 2017

      http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-texas-harvey-20170829-story.html

      “Authorities announced the curfew — midnight to 5 a.m. — after police arrested a crew of armed robbers who were hijacking vehicles, and officials warned residents of people impersonating Homeland Security investigators. There also were fears of looting as thousands of houses lay partially submerged and abandoned.”

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 30, 2017

        “…subject to being stopped, questioned and arrested…”

        Live updates.

        Reply
  14. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    ‘The Dutch Understand Flooding. Why Can’t America Manage It? ‘
    Jed Horne Aug 28, 2017

    https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/flood-prevention-katrina-new-orleans-houston-harvey/538185/

    “….For Texas, the measure of dysfunction was a failure to coordinate evacuation orders. A climate-change denier, Governor Greg Abbott nevertheless urged everyone to get out of harm’s way. But Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, remembering the catastrophic, sometimes lethal, traffic jams associated with past evacuation efforts, said not so fast. Rockport Mayor Pro Tem Patrick Rios told constituents who failed to leave town to write their names on their bodies with Sharpie pens so coroners would be able to identify their corpses.

    Notwithstanding this version of the Texas two-step, the state seems to be faring better than Louisiana did during the Katrina/Rita double whammy of 2005, though there are some depressing similarities: splintered buildings, biblical floods, and images of residents trapped on rooftops. The Astrodome, haunted as it is by eerie memories for the New Orleanians who fled to it for shelter from Katrina, saw service again, this time for local residents. Yes, Rockport was battered and the high school lost its roof. But Harvey had taken fewer than a half-dozen lives as of Monday morning—compared with Katrina’s death toll of about 1,800….”

    (long, worthwhile article; clipped most of it; read the rest at the link above)

    “As the Dutch made clear to Times reporter Michael Kimmelman, their revolution in water management isn’t just a burden shouldered grudgingly by a low-lying nation. It’s an exciting challenge, a source of pride—and a source of money. Exportable water management ideas are to the Netherlands as cheese and wine are to the French, Kimmelman quipped.

    The Netherlands is pioneering—and, where possible, marketing—insights, attitudes, and technologies in demand around the world as weather worsens and seas rise. There’s an irony here. A hundred years ago, when the New Orleans pumping system was considered an engineering marvel, it was the Dutch who came to us in search of guidance. Their version of Katrina was the horrific 1953 inundation that made water management a national purpose of existential urgency. They turned disaster into a much more trenchant learning experience than we have.

    We could be part of that engineering and commercial juggernaut. In a sense we are—but so far, our role is that of the coal-mine canary. We are a city that should be augmenting public safety by implementing the new water-management paradigm. The Dutch build purposely leaky levees and marvelous parks alongside massive flood gates attuned to the rhythm of the clouds and seas.

    We chirp and flutter in our cage.”

    Reply
  15. eleggua

     /  August 29, 2017

    “Hurricane Rita struck Texas and Louisiana in September 2005. Years later, American cities still struggle with successful flood infrastructure.”

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  August 29, 2017

      Above link: Mumbai, city of 18 million, ‘brought to its knees’ today by epic flooding–10x usual monsoon rain

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 30, 2017

        To anyone that’s encountered the normal monsoon deluge, that figure is mindblowing.

        Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  August 29, 2017

    How climate change could turn US real estate prices upside down
    One such number-crunching company, the San Francisco-based Climate Corporation, which collates and analyses National Weather Service data mostly for clients in agriculture, has previously warned that it would take only “a few climatic events in a row” for a collapse in property values “that will make the housing crisis [of 2008] look small”.

    Its assessment is backed by Albert Slap, president and co-founder of Coastal Risk Consulting, a Florida firm that provides flood risk analysis reports. Slap said Harvey was only the latest natural disaster to expose flaws in the national flood insurance programme allowing property owners in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s so-called Zone X – areas at risk of a once-in-500-years flood event – not to carry coverage or fully disclose their flood risk when they sell.

    “With storm surge and heavy rainfall increasing and climate and sea level rise, the system is just not working,” he said.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/aug/29/hurricane-harvey-climate-change-real-estate-florida

    Reply
  17. Greg

     /  August 30, 2017

    For a few minutes in Houston rain rates were nearly 12 inches/hr.

    Reply
  18. Robert McLachlan

     /  August 30, 2017

    Nice piece at the Guardian. Michael Mann, Stefan Rahmstorf, “a general slowdown of atmospheric summer circulation in the mid-latitudes as a result of strong warming in the Arctic”, “simulations have indicated that similarly rapid increases in storm speeds will be 10 to 20 times more likely to occur by 2100” – just like reading the Scribbler!
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/aug/29/how-did-climate-change-worsen-hurricane-harvey

    Reply
  19. eleggua

     /  August 30, 2017

    Not just the Gulf and South Asia currently getting drenched and flooded.

    ‘Attention is on Harvey. But flooding has killed thousands this month in other countries, too.’
    August 29 at 12:54 PM

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/08/29/attention-is-on-harvey-but-flooding-has-killed-thousands-this-month-in-other-countries-too/

    “e should also spare a thought for the floods that have each taken more than a thousand lives in Sierra Leone and South Asia.

    Local officials in Sierra Leone’s capital, Freetown, said this week that the death toll from floods and mudslides triggered by intense overnight rainfall on Aug. 14 had passed 1,000. The combined death toll from floods amid ongoing and unusually severe monsoon rains in Nepal, India and Bangladesh has surpassed 1,200. The United Nations said that 41 million people in those three countries were affected in one way or another by the floods. (On the flip side, relentless drought in Somalia and neighboring Ethiopia has left hundreds of thousands dependent on food aid to avert a famine.)

    These calamities elsewhere have been exacerbated by a lack of prevention infrastructure, like levees, as well as widespread deforestation, which promotes soil erosion. Many of the affected are also among their country’s poorest and live in areas particularly susceptible to mudslides (on densely packed urban hillsides) and torrential rain (on the floodplains of rivers that seasonally overflow). As in Texas and Louisiana, extensive property damage, indefinite displacement and the spread of disease are all compounding the heavy toll….”

    Reply
  20. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 30, 2017

    This what is called “Duff’s ditch”. It is a serious lesson in planning ahead. When the waters recede, one can hope such things are discussed.

    It is a 47 km (29 mi) long channel which, during flood periods, takes part of the Red River’s flow around the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba to the east and discharges it back into the Red River below the dam at Lockport. It can carry floodwater at a rate of up to 140,000 cubic feet per second (4,000 m3/s), expanded in the 2000s from its original channel capacity of 90,000 cubic feet per second (2,500 m3/s).[1][2] It was built partly in response to the disastrous 1950 Red River flood.

    The Floodway was pejoratively nicknamed “Duff’s Ditch” by opponents of its construction, after Premier Duff Roblin, whose Progressive Conservative government initiated the project. It was completed in time and under budget. Subsequent events have vindicated the plan. Since its completion in 1968, the Floodway has prevented over $40 billion (CAD) in cumulative flood damage.

    Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  August 30, 2017

      And in order to save that 40 billion dollars what did it cost?

      The total cost at the time was $63 million (CAD), equivalent to approximately $505 million today.

      Reply
  21. eleggua

     /  August 30, 2017

    Infrared image of Hurricane Harvey just prior to making landfall along the Texas coast.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      In his seminal 1982 work The Fractal Geometry of Nature, Mandelbrot argued that seemingly random patterns could in fact be the same infinitely repeated shape.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      Spiral galaxy NGC 1232

      Reply
  22. utoutback

     /  August 30, 2017

    Sent to my mail list:
    Climate change is here.
    I’ve avoided sending along the barrage of climate related articles I read on – high temperature records (particularly in the Arctic), Greenland and Antarctic ice melt, sea level rise, declining ocean health, disrupted jet stream flows, floods, forest fires (& in Greenland a peat fire where the tundra has defrosted and dried) and of course human fatalities and refugees.
    Americans tend not to worry about the disasters happening on other parts of the globe. But, now we have our very own catastrophe.
    Here in Oregon and up in British Columbia the air is thick with smoke and dangerous air quality. And you all know about TX.

    But, this is happening beyond our borders:

    I’m not being alarmist – really more of a realist. This is just the beginning. The amount of CO2 now in the atmosphere (not counting the amounts we continue pumping out daily) will cause the global temperature to continue rising beyond 1.5C and beyond 2.0C within the next 10 to 50 years. What a world we are leaving for the coming generations. What will they have to say about us and the lack of leadership our governments and corporations have shown?

    Billions in disaster relief, but no hint of ceasing our dependence on fossil fuels.
    This is not a rant.
    “It is what it is.”
    Peace,

    Reply
    • It is what it is , instead of being a radical and getting to the root of the problem, literally 100s of Billions will be spent on relief and rebuilding ,as certain people will make huge profits off this . Ienstiens definition of insanity on a massive scale . Ive known co2 to be a greenhouse gas since 1986 ish , and watched the Canadian gov, give grant after grant to these corporate giants , this makes them guilty of intergovernmental crimes against nature and the future of so much , so many .

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 30, 2017

        Exactly!

        Radical = “of the root”. That’s the etymology of the word radical.
        It’s not “wild and crazy”.
        It deeply grounded.

        Radical solutions for radical problems: that’s the near future. Radicals will be looked to for solutions, not demonized for “extremism” and other nonsense.

        “extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice”
        “moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!”

        Reply
  23. Andy_in_SD

     /  August 30, 2017

    Italy drought: Rome forced to cut water pressure at night

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-41081066

    Reply
  24. redskylite

     /  August 30, 2017

    CBC News reports on Giant Craters in Canada – seems not too dissimilar to the news from Siberia earlier.

    VIDEO
    Giant craters in Canada’s melting permafrost impacting climate change: researchers
    Melting permafrost releasing carbon dioxide to atmosphere, contributing to greenhouse effect.

    Scientists are looking to collect samples from the craters to gain more information about the problem, which they call a “sleeping giant.”

    “There is this uncertainty associated with what this sleeping giant is going to look like,”

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/canada-permafrost-melting-carbon-dioxide-climate-change-researchers-1.4267433

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      ^^^^^ image: cumulative precipitation…the last five daze….the next five daze ^^^^^

      Reply
  25. eleggua

     /  August 30, 2017

    Opinion piece by the managing editor of the Houston Chronicle.

    ‘Harvey should be the turning point in fighting climate change’
    By Vernon Loeb August 29 at 8:46 PM

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/harvey-should-be-the-turning-point-in-fighting-climate-change/2017/08/29/21c53244-8cd2-11e7-84c0-02cc069f2c37_story.html

    “I’ve covered the news in Houston for 3½ years and have already seen two devastating floods and now what is being described as a one-in-800-years flood brought on by Hurricane Harvey.

    That suggests to me that something is happening here that’s way bigger than the largely made-up tiff between Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner (D) about whether Houston should have been evacuated before Harvey dumped trillions of gallons of rain on the nation’s fourth-largest city.

    There’s no denying Texas is politically polarized, with all its major cities liberal and Democratic, and the rest of the state, and all its statewide elected officials, conservative and Republican. So there’s no end of discord and rancor if one wants to find reasons for blame and finger-pointing.

    Houston, meanwhile, can be its own worst enemy when it comes to flood control. A big part of its freewheeling, entrepreneurial identity is its lack of zoning, which has produced more than 600 square miles of subdivisions, strip malls and concrete prairie. It’s not hard to wonder whether this vast expanse of what was once coastal plain was really the best place to build a major city.

    But anyone who has lived through four straight days of torrential rain that may surpass 50 inches knows perfectly well that no zoning code, infrastructure improvements or flood control regulations could have done anything to deal with this much water inundating a major metropolitan area this quickly.

    And it is an unbelievable amount of water. Not wanting to risk my car on Sunday morning, I started toward our newsroom on foot and found myself waist-deep two blocks from my home.

    On Monday I ventured a mile north to Buffalo Bayou, a bucolic urban park remade thanks to $25 million from a leading local philanthropist who once worked for Enron. The park was gone, its meandering bayou now a roiling, fast-moving river that had engulfed parkways on both sides, flooded a television station and badly damaged much of the city’s theater district.

    On a stretch of Kirby Drive in River Oaks, Houston’s toniest neighborhood, the water was chest-deep, lapping up onto mansion lawns.

    Sometimes, even in our political and governmental bureaucracies, people say exactly what they mean. Not known for hyperbole, the National Weather Service tweeted after the first devastating day of rainfall, during which some parts of Houston got more than 25 inches: “All impacts are unknown & beyond anything experienced.”

    “It’s catastrophic, unprecedented, epic,” said Patrick Blood, a National Weather Service meteorologist. “Whatever adjective you want to use.”

    Brock Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, went even further: “This is a storm the United States has not seen yet.”

    What they’re talking about, whether they know it or not, or care to acknowledge it or not, is global warming. The planet is getting warmer, ocean temperatures are rising, the polar ice caps are melting, and all of the incontrovertible science of climate change is that more extreme-weather events are an inevitable consequence.

    Tom Friedman in his new book calls climate change a “black elephant” — a combination of the unforeseen “black swan” event with enormous consequences and the “elephant in the room” no one can see.

    There’s really no other way to make sense of what’s happening in Houston. The black elephant is here in America, just as it’s in Africa and the Middle East and Antarctica, whether we want to see it or not.

    Just acknowledging that will help Houston recover once the rain finally stops, making the political blame game even more futile than it has already become in American politics.

    For now, Abbott and Turner are working tirelessly and cooperatively to help the thousands and thousands of people trapped by the worst floods in Houston’s history.

    And whenever it’s over, Houston should use Harvey to jump-start its transition from the country’s epicenter for oil and gas to a world capital of alternative energies. If the city can turn this devastating tragedy into an existential moment of reinvention after the storm, then a decade from now we may argue that it was worth it.

    As for the nation, Americans need to understand what leading scientists have concluded even if many of our political leaders pretend it’s not true — we’ve just about blown through the Holocene epoch, when Earth emerged from the last ice age and became more comfortable for human life. Some climatologists have started to call our current age the Anthropocene, in which conditions on the planet have been dramatically altered by man. We have to take responsibility for what we’ve done, and take charge of our future.

    It’s clearly too late to stop the Category 4 hurricane that led to the millennial flooding in Houston. But it may not be too late to save the planet if we heed Harvey’s hard lesson here in Texas, a proud state that doesn’t like to be messed with. It could be the perfect place to start.”

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  August 30, 2017

      And this:
      http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/29/opinions/hurricane-harvey-abbott-needs-to-resign-sachs/index.html

      Excerpts from Jeffrey Sachs opinion piece:
      Here is what has not happened: There has been little or no effort at zoning protection to keep development clear of floodplains; little or no offshore and onshore infrastructure for flood protection; no discernible heed paid to the scientific evidence and indeed the growing practical experience of catastrophic flood risks; and of course, relentless, pervasive climate change denial, the mother’s milk of Texas politics.
      So, here’s the deal. Those of us elsewhere in the US also suffering from flooding and other disasters from warming temperatures, rising sea levels, and more intense storms (such as New Yorkers who are still rebuilding from 2012 Hurricane Sandy) want truth from Texas politicians and the oil industry.
      We are bearing the costs of your lies. We are tired of it. More importantly, we are in pain and solidarity with the good people of Houston who are losing lives, homes, and livelihoods because of your lies.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  August 30, 2017

        “We are bearing the costs of your lies. We are tired of it. ”

        Yay! Tell it like it is and don’t stop ’til they get enough to figure out truth is the only way to go.

        Reply
  26. Suzanne

     /  August 30, 2017

    And now…93L is something we all might want to pay attention to…

    Tropical Weather Outlook
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
    800 AM EDT Wed Aug 30 2017

    For the North Atlantic…Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

    The National Hurricane Center is issuing advisories on Tropical
    Storm Harvey, located over southwestern Louisiana.

    Satellite images indicate that the low pressure area a couple
    hundred miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands has become better
    organized overnight, and advisories will likely be initiated at 11
    AM EDT on a tropical cyclone. The system is forecast to gradually
    intensify and move west-northwestward to westward at about 15 mph
    over the tropical Atlantic during the next several days.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours…high…near 100 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days…high…near 100 percent.

    Reply
    • Suzanne

       /  August 30, 2017

      Looking like we will have a named storm at 11…Say hello to “Irma”.

      Reply
  27. Vic

     /  August 30, 2017

    Kevin Trenberth on Harvey’s climate change aspects…

    Reply
  28. Suzanne

     /  August 30, 2017

    Understanding Climate Change…with updated video of the effects from Harvey…He also gives us video from around the world of extreme weather events..including the devastating impact of the 2 year drought that continues in Somalia..
    WARNING: The last two minutes shows a flash flood event that caught several people unawares..and the deadly consequences.

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  August 30, 2017

      “WARNING: The last two minutes shows a flash flood event that caught several people unawares..and the deadly consequences.”

      Normal for that location, that time of year. Not exactly climate change-induced flash flooding.

      Three members of a family were drowned as flash flood caused a sudden flow of water in the famous Patalpani waterfall near Indore. Patalpani waterfall is a famous picnic spot near Indore, and the Rathi family members, who had gone there to enjoy a quiet Sunday, had no inkling of a disaster awaiting them. The water current caught all the five people & three of them Chhavi, Chandrashekhar & Mudita downed dead, while local people rescued Mudita’s brother and another youth. The video was taken by a local tourist Gaurav Patidar.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patalpani_waterfall

      “During monsoon season (July-September), the area is prone to flash floods. On 17 July 2011, heavy rains occurred in the catchment area of the upstream. Over 50 visitors, many of them on a picnic, were sitting near the waterfall at that time. The local villagers warned them about the risk, and asked them to move away from water. Most of the visitors managed to get to safety, but five people did not move away in time. When the water flow started rising, they started to move. However, as they were crossing the stream, they were washed away in a sudden gush of water.
      Only two of them survived. The bodies of the victims were found over the next week: Chavi Dhoot of 22 years (18 July), Chandrashekhar Rathi of 55 years (19 July) and His daughter Mudita Rathi of 22 years (20 July).
      A video of the accident went viral. Subsequently, the local administration constructed a bridge and a staircase to avoid similar mishaps.”

      Reply
  29. Kassy

     /  August 30, 2017

    It turns out that the Caspian Sea will become a victim of climate change too:
    http://www.sciencealert.com/the-caspian-sea-is-literally-evaporating-in-response-to-rising-temperatures

    Reply

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