U.S. Electrical Vehicle Sales Growth Continues Ahead of Model 3 Tsunami

During August of 2017, U.S. electrical vehicle sales continued to increase at a respectable pace year-on-year.

According to Inside EVs, total sales for electric-powered cars in the U.S. totaled 16,624 during August. This represents another record — growing by 2,032 or 12.2 percent above 2016’s previous record August total of 14,592.

The Tesla Model S and Chevy Bolt EV held the first and second rank among individual model sales by sending 2150 and 2107 vehicles out to new owners respectively. The 238 mile range Bolt priced at $36,000 before incentives continued to show strong sales growth as Chevy accelerated expanding offerings to new states across the U.S. Model S sales, while holding top position, were down year-on-year — likely in part due to anticipation of the Model 3 ramp-up.

(Elon Musk recently reassured investors that the Model 3 will achieve its 10,000 per week production target in 2018. Image source: EV Network.)

Inside EVs estimates that 75 of the game-changing Model 3 — with best in class features, a 220 to 310 mile range, and a 126 MPGe fuel efficiency rating — were produced and sent to customers during August. If this number is correct, it would signify a somewhat slower ramp than the expected 100 sales for the month. However, this report is preliminary and may be subject to revision. And there have been more than one or two hints circulating around the web that Tesla is actually ahead of its production goals — hitting 200 vehicles by end August (see tweet below).

Presently ranked 30th on the EV sales chart for all of 2017, the Model 3 (with its approximate half-million reservations) is likely to climb into the top 20 by end September. At that point, Tesla expects about 1,500 Model 3s to be produced monthly. By October, monthly sales of the Model 3 may eclipse all other U.S. EVs as production exceeds 5,000.

At this point, the Model 3 will likely start having a noticeable influence on overall U.S. EV sales — with that impact further dilating during November and December. And if Tesla meets its December sales goal of 20,000 units for the Model 3, then the U.S. overall may see December 2017 total EV sales from all models nearly double December 2016 numbers (of nearly 25,000 units).  Meanwhile, through 2018, the Model 3 could help to drive total U.S. EV sales to around half a million or more.

In other words, the U.S. EV market is about to be hit by a tidal wave of very high quality and relatively low cost Model 3s — with profound and long-lasting results. This is good news for renewable energy and climate change response advocates. For such a large wave of electrical vehicles coming to market provides considerable opportunity for reduced carbon emissions from both vehicle based fossil fuel burning and from the ancillary electrical power market where batteries used for EVs can also replace base load coal and gas fired power stations with energy storage linked to wind and solar.

Links:

Monthly Plug-in Sales Scorecard

Plug In Electric Car Sales for August

Tesla Model 3 Production

Tesla Model 3 Information

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21 Comments

  1. Does anyone have a comment on how well EV compare to ICE vehicles when driving through deep water in an extreme precipitation event? There seem to be so many places in the world every day where 1-3 feet of water are running through cities. Yes I know one shouldn’t be driving flood water at all, but there are plenty of videos on extreme weather showing people doing that quite frequently.

    Reply
    • EV requires no oxygen. It doesn’t shut down as easily when flooded.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  September 5, 2017

      ‘The Bremach T. Rex is like a Unimog, only electric’
      4/08/11

      http://jalopnik.com/5790291/the-bremach-t-rex-is-like-a-unimog-only-electric/

      “…The Italian company’s been building traditional Unimog competitors for decades. Now it’s putting out an electric-powered version of its T. Rex model with similar all-terrain capability as its gasoline-fueled counterparts. The EV uses a low-voltage VLV motor-generator (114V DC) with peak power of 200 kilowatts (268 hp) and 150 kilowatts of continuous output (201 hp) and 265 lb-ft of torque. Alternatively, the T. Rex be had with a six-liter Chevrolet V8 (optionally powered by natural gas), producing 323 hp and 373 lb-ft of torque, over a GM four-speed 4L85E automatic, and a series hybrid version pairs a two-liter gasoline engine with an electric motor and 40kWh battery pack.

      So how much? Expect to pay about $120,000 for a fully equipped EV version of the T. Rex. Because electric truck.”

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  September 5, 2017

        “Have you ever seen a truck advertisement that doesn’t mention torque? We didn’t think so. That’s because torque is one of the most important metrics used to measure a truck’s ability. It provides the “get up and go” that comes in handy when towing a heavy payload, or pulling a stump (roots and all) from the soil, or anything you’ve seen a rugged pickup do in one of those “like a rock” ads. If you’re a fan of the show, you may have heard us mention torque a few times as well. That’s because nothing provides more of it off the line than a good ol’ electric motor. That’s where the Bremach T-Rex comes in; a workhorse ATV that also happens to be 100% electric…and 100% badass.”

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  September 5, 2017

        ‘Bremach T-Rex 4×4 crossing a river.’

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  September 5, 2017

          More like a stream than a river; none the less, you get the idea. It can handle water.

          ‘Mercedes-Benz Unimog U 5023 or Bremach T-Rex’

          https://gearpatrol.com/2014/02/24/want-get-mercedes-benz-unimog-u-5023-bremach-t-rex/

          …The T-Rex can also conquer a 45 degree slope and ford nearly three feet of water, so escaping any pursuer is just about guaranteed (unless it’s a helicopter). And though it won’t boast the payload of the big Merc, it will most assuredly get you to places you wouldn’t dare go if your sane personality had any vote in the matter.”

      • wili

         /  September 5, 2017

        See above link for a tesla going through 3 feet of water.

        If you are worried about batteries, remember that ICE cars have batteries too.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  September 5, 2017

        Maybe the same vid below; WaPo one won’t load here.

        Reply
        • wpNSAlito

           /  September 6, 2017

          If the problem with not seeing the lane markings is the glare from sheeting water (rather than occlusion from deep dark water), it would help if the cameras had polarized glass.

      • eleggua

         /  September 5, 2017

        Wow.

        Reply
        • Tesla Model S and X are very popular here in Norway because they are also very good winter cars. A lot of people with cabins in the mountains use them for their trips there.

  2. Spike

     /  September 5, 2017

    Reply
  3. wili

     /  September 5, 2017

    Channeling COBob here: Hell is coming to breakfast…and her name is Irma!

    Reply
  4. Lots of great replies to my question! I was more worried about the water shorting stuff out though than cutoff of oxygen. All food for thought!

    Reply
  5. Would it be OK if I cross-posted this article to WriterBeat.com? There is no fee, I’m simply trying to add more content diversity for our comm5unity and I liked what you wrote. I’ll be sure to give you complete credit as the author. If “OK” please let me know via email.

    Autumn
    AutumnCote@WriterBeat.com

    Reply

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