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Sudden Severe Flood Leaves 14 Dead in Athens, Forecasts Show Up to 15+ Additional Inches on the Way for Greece

Extreme drought. Extreme floods.

Unfortunately, with human-caused climate change, these kinds of devastating events have become far more frequent. With the Earth warming by around 1.1 to 1.2 C above pre-industrial averages, there are now four times as many instances of extreme weather than there were as recently as the 1970s.

What this means is that anywhere around the world now, the hammer of severe weather and related damages is four times more likely to fall than in the past. That the tempo of such events is now greatly increased. All thanks to continued fossil fuel burning, atmospheric CO2 levels that will average around 407 ppm over the coming months, the heat that these greenhouse gasses are continuing to add to the Earth’s climate system, and a failure to transition swiftly enough to more sustainable practices and zero carbon energy sources to prevent ramping damages.

Major Rain Event Strikes Athens — With More Severe Weather in the Forecast

Today, the major blow appears to have fallen on Greece. To the west of this country, over the Mediterranean, a cut off low is creating instability throughout the region. An intense, thick, moist warm air flow is moving in from the south. This warm and very water dense air is then colliding with a colder air mass to the north. Upper level instability is feeding powerful convection erupting in the atmosphere above Greece. And this convection is producing some mountainous thunderheads.

Last night, torrential downpours dropped 2-15 inches of rain over the outskirts of Athens. A biblical flood of water ripped through the region — rocketing vehicles down roads, prompting more than 600 calls for water rescues, killing 14 people, and leaving streets flooded or buried in mud while depositing cars into trees or on the tops of dwellings.

The rains stretched over a broad area from Greece to the Turkish coast — spurring declarations of emergency throughout the area. As with many of the increasingly fierce new disasters, it will take weeks or more to get a final tally of the total damages. But this event is probably not over.

Unfortunately, the cut-off low is expected to continue to circulate near this already flooded region for the next 3-4 days. Forecasts call for additional rainfall totals of up to 15 inches as the low churns and continues to generate outsized convection over an already hard-hit area.

RELATED STATEMENTS AND INFORMATION:

 

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156 Comments

  1. coloradobob

     /  November 15, 2017

    According to this article it might have been 80-100 millimeters per hour (horrible), but I don’t know how many hours it did rain at those places.
    http://www.ert.gr/frontpage/pou-apodidete-o-kataklysmos-prognosi-tou-kerou-video/

    Reply
  2. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    Another story you may want to comment on . “The Gas Chamber in New Deli “

    Reply
  3. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 16, 2017

    It is not going to let up. Here are the top five headlines at http://floodlist.com all in the last six days. I check it almost daily and there are new severe flooding events and associated land slips somewhere on the globe practically daily. This has been going very nearly solid for the past couple of years. 2100 in a pigs eye, the future is now! better get used to it. Can’t seem to get the genie back in the damn bottle, elusive little beggar.
    Greece – Deadly Floods in Attica Region
    Greece – Floods in North West Leave 1 Dead
    Sri Lanka – Over 1,700 Displaced by Floods in Northern Province
    Indonesia – 9 Dead as Heavy Rain Causes Floods and Landslides
    Colombia – 4 Dead, 18 Missing After Floods and Mudslide in Cauca Department

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 16, 2017

      I was this same flood watch 10 years ago That was a precursor of to today.

      Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 16, 2017

      This is exactly like heat deaths, no one can say exactly that one death was due to snog, or heat , but we can say it is mowing down vast numbers every year,

      Reply
  4. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    It’s a Beautiful Day-Time Is

    Reply
  5. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    Reply
  6. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    Sorry U tube is posting the whole album . A wonderful mistake. This is one of the master works of our lives.

    Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    Another giant topic old friend.
    Climate Change and Water Woes Drove ISIS Recruiting in Iraq
    Battered by shifting resources, desperate farmers were driven into terror recruiters’ clutches. Can it happen again?

    https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/11/climate-change-drought-drove-isis-terrorist-recruiting-iraq/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 16, 2017

      1 / 3
      Picture of oven burning near a Marsh Arab family’s reed hut
      Picture of Kut deser
      An oven burns near a family’s reed hut in Chibaish, Iraq. The family moved to this area in search of water, but much of the former marshes remain desolate after years of draining and neglect.
      PHOTOGRAPH BY CAROLYN DRAKE, MAGNUM
      An Iraqi shepherd leads his camels in search of water in the Kut Desert, about 180 kilometers south of Baghdad. The country has seen years of drought, which ISIS recruiters exploited to attract followers.
      PHOTOGRAPH BY ALI AL-SAADI, AFP, GETTY IMAGES
      Turkey has built more than 600 large dams, in some cases flooding ancient cities like Hasankeyf, above. The dams has decreased the amount of water flowing across borders into Iraq and other countries.
      PHOTOGRAPH BY CAROLYN DRAKE, MAGNUM
      By Peter Schwartzstein
      PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 14, 2017
      Catch The Long Road Home on Tuesdays at 9/8c on National Geographic.
      SAMARRA, IRAQIt was a few weeks after the rains failed in the winter of 2009 that residents of Shirqat first noticed the strange bearded men.

      Circling like vultures among the stalls of the town’s fertilizer market in Iraq’s northern Salahaddin governorate, they’d arrow in on the most shabbily dressed farmers, and tempt them with promises of easy riches. “Join us, and you’ll never have to worry about feeding your family,” Saleh Mohammed Al-Jabouri, a local tribal sheikh, remembers one recruiter saying.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 16, 2017

        With every flood or bout of extreme heat or cold, the jihadists would reappear, often supplementing their sales pitches with gifts. When a particularly vicious drought struck in 2010, the fifth in seven years, they doled out food baskets. When fierce winds eviscerated hundreds of eggplant fields near Kirkuk in the spring of 2012, they distributed cash. As farming communities limped from one debilitating crisis to another, the recruiters—all members of what soon became the Islamic State—began to see a return on their investment.

        Reply
        • coloradobob

           /  November 16, 2017

          Now this is from the Nat Geo. So think about it, if we do nothing about climate change , the jihadists win.

  8. Here in Twinsburg we just had a three day windstorm caused blackout.
    Coincidentally, I came down with pneumonia during it.

    Reply
  9. coloradobob

     /  November 16, 2017

    oloradobob1 • 24 minutes ago
    One last thing tonight , be glad you ain’t Roy Moore ……………..

    Three new accusers have come forward against Alabama GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore, adding to mounting allegations of sexual misconduct against teen girls when Moore was in his 30s.
    https://www.npr.org/2017/11/15/564398024/moore-campaign-tries-to-cast-doubt-on-accuser-as-new-allegation-reported

    A man who worked at the mall in the early 1980s told CNN that Moore had been banned from the mall because “he was bothering girls in the mall.”

    Reply
  10. Andy_in_SD

     /  November 16, 2017

    One Bitcoin transaction takes more energy than a household uses in a week

    Roughly 300,000 Bitcoin transactions occur each day – and each one uses 215 kilowatt-hours (KWh) of energy – enough to power an American household for a week.

    https://inhabitat.com/one-bitcoin-transaction-takes-more-energy-than-a-household-uses-in-a-week/

    Reply
    • Brian

       /  November 16, 2017

      Yeah, the more I learn about BitCoin and related BlockChain currencies, the more disgusted I am.

      Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  November 16, 2017

      Yes, bitcoin appears to be an environmental disaster. I work in tech and “miners” are buying up huge quantities of graphics cards to do their work. A graphics card can easily use more power than the rest of the system combined. And that’s before you factor in all the additional datacenter costs like climate control.

      The mining costs are bad enough but the energy required for a simple transaction is just insane.

      Reply
    • PlazaRed

       /  November 17, 2017

      Interesting that the American household use average 215 KWH per week,
      My Electricity consumption for a 4 story, 4 bedroom house is running at 14 KWH per week. 2 KWH per day, Needless to say I have over 15 years of the bills to prove it.
      All down to turning things off and using low wattage appliances.
      Possibly living at 36 degrees north helps a bit as well, about 2000 feet though above (the present,) sea level.
      I can’t understand why people in north America have lights and appliances turned on when they are not using them? Maybe its to do with unlimited apparent wealth and shear idleness? Lights even left on all day while there is nobody in the house’s. Dishwashers washing a few plates, washing machines with a single shirt in them, every light in the house left on, including outside lights all night, (possibly so as to help the bears can find the garbage cans!) Driving 5 miles to the shop for a single bottle of milk for the coffee.
      Being in north America is like living an environmentalists horror movie.

      Apologies to all the energy conservers in the USA and Canada but the masses there are really out to lunch on energy use. I would go into a state of deep shock if I received an electric bill that indicated I had used 215 KWH in a week, that’s about 15 times more than I use in a week.

      Reply
      • Jim

         /  November 18, 2017

        Hi PlazaRed,

        I’m curious where you home is located. I live in Phoenix, so I won’t shock you with my electricity usage – although I’ve cut it to about 1/3 of what it use to be through a combination of self generation PV, energy conservation, and sealing air conditioning leaks (a big problem) here.

        You’re correct that most American’s readily waste energy in any form, and building codes and regulations actually encourage it, except for a few progressive states. Unfortunately Arizona is not one of them.

        ~Jim

        Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  November 17, 2017

      If it takes that much power to execute a transaction, what must be the power consumption to conjure up a bitcoin and “create it’ including adding it the block chain? it must be obscene.

      Reply
      • Brian

         /  November 17, 2017

        My understanding is that there a no more being created; this is all just dividing a finite sum into a larger quantity of smaller numbers… IE… it’s not even being useful for anything on the side (like, say, the SETI @ Home project).

        Worse, there are now thousands of sites / apps that hijack your computing power on desktops, laptops, phones etc to do this mining!!

        And the latest scam is that there are sites where they advertise they will do this to you so that… *gasp*… you don’t have to *PAY*. (Of course, you pay for it in your electricity bill, but they don’t tell you THAT.)

        The world just keeps getting more _______________ (insert your favorite word here).

        Reply
  11. DrTskoul

     /  November 16, 2017

    Devastating rains but also burning your forests. Without those trees the floors are even more devastating….muddy flood from denuded mountains….

    Reply
  12. DrTskoul

     /  November 16, 2017

    The particular flood is not due to weather. It is the result of a chaotic building without an over dry streams without any flood-control measure, etc. West Attica has been flooding regularly with records going back to the 19th century….

    I grew up there…

    Reply
  13. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 16, 2017

    Behind every tragedy there is a story. This story is non-fiction and begins in the 1980’s. It involves the Rockefeller funded Villach conferences, the entrance of the neoclassical economists, propaganda, and most importantly the disappearance of the 1ºC temperature threshold cited as the safe limit in 1990 by the United Nations Advisory Group on Greenhouse Gases.

    Like so many stories there was a villain. In this story, the villain’s name was ‘Insatiable Greed’ – like the Agent Smith virus, uploaded into ‘the Matrix’, Insatiable Greed was a terminating virus capable of multiplying.

    Insatiable Greed was warned by the United Nations working group that “ beyond 1ºC there might be “rapid, unpredictable and non-linear responses that could lead to extensive ecosystem damage.” He was also warned that a 2ºC increase was “viewed as an upper limit beyond which the risks of grave damage to ecosystems, and of non-linear responses, are expected to increase rapidly.” Non-linear in this case means runway climate change.

    Earth and her inhabitants would clearly be threatened if the 1ºC threshold was to be exceeded. However, Insatiable Greed, did not listen. Insatiable Greed dismissed the wise advice – only interested in knowing how much further destruction could be continued before the Earth would reach her maximum limit where catastrophe would be unavoidable. Being the virus he was, Insatiable Greed used the tools available to successfully infect and multiply – effectively burying the initial warning of 1ºC, thus ensuring the Earth’s inhabitants would believe the extremely dangerous threshold of 2ºC would be safe. This is the story.
    https://thebiggestlieevertold.wordpress.com/2010/12/10/part-1-expose-the-2º-death-dance-–-the-1º-cover-up/

    Reply
    • Jim

       /  November 18, 2017

      Thanks, it’s a great article. Maybe a bit long, but it certainly drives the point home. I wonder if we’ll see a second phase of this – let’s keep temperature rise below 3C…What do you think?

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  November 18, 2017

        Your welcome Jim, yes it’s quite long but it is a very complicated tale, as are most political economic adventures. She (Cory Morningstar) spent a decade researching this tale of woe so this is probably the cole’s notes version. As for the second phase I think we may be too busy sand bagging and/or lashing everything down sooner than expected to take much notice of the talking heads.

        Reply
  14. 12volt dan

     /  November 16, 2017

    Are the Koch brothers buying into time magazine?

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      “Time alone – oh, time will tell:
      Think you’re in heaven, but ya living in hell;
      Think you’re in heaven, but ya living in hell;
      Think you’re in heaven, but ya living in hell.
      Time alone – oh, time will tell:
      Ya think you’re in heaven, but ya living in hell.

      Back them up; oh, not the brothers,
      But the ones who sets ’em up.”

      – Bob Marley

      Reply
  15. Suzanne

     /  November 16, 2017

    Understanding Climate Change….Greece starts at the 7 min mark..
    Climate & Extreme Weather News #80 (November 7th-15th 2017)
    00:12 Colombia: Corinto flood and mudslide & Santa Marta flood
    07:00 Greece: Igoumenitsa flash flood; Symi flash flood; Mandra & Nea Peramos floods
    28:50 Malta, Italy & Slovenia storms & flash floods
    33:26 Turkey: Kumluca storm & tornado
    36:10 Panama: Colon flood
    39:19 Indonesia: Banjarnegara storm & sea level rise report
    44:31 November temperature anomalies

    Reply
  16. Paul

     /  November 16, 2017

    OT, but I just read this article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about a new study of how ethanol produced from corn adds to carbon emissions:

    http://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2017/11/16/uw-study-finds-carbon-emissions-increase-fromland-converted-into-crops-ethanol-boost-carbon-emission/864416001/

    I’m not sure what to make of this new study. If this is a problem, the corn lobby will fight efforts to make reductions in the current ethanol requirements.

    Reply
  17. wili

     /  November 16, 2017

    Always on the lookout for happy articles, found this one: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/16/political-watershed-as-19-countries-pledge-to-phase-out-coal

    “‘Political watershed’ as 19 countries pledge to phase out coal

    New alliance launched at Bonn climate talks hopes to signal the end of the dirtiest fossil fuel that kills 800,000 people a year with air pollution”

    Reply
  18. eleggua

     /  November 16, 2017

    Robert, if you haven’t seen this one, good info within.

    Reply
  19. eleggua

     /  November 16, 2017

    Positive change of direction.

    “….Wyoming and West Virginia, two very different states whose economies lean heavily on fuel extraction. With energy prices falling or stagnant, both have lost population and had middling economic growth in recent years. In national rankings of economic vitality, you can find them near the bottom of the pile.

    Their fortunes have declined as coal has fallen from providing more than half of the nation’s electricity in 2000 to about one-third last year. Thousands of workers have lost their jobs and moved on — leaving idled mines, abandoned homes and shuttered stores downtown.

    Now, though, new businesses are emerging. They are as varied as the layers of rock that surround a coal seam, but in a twist, a considerable number involve renewable energy. And past jobs in fossil fuels are proving to make for good training….”

    Reply
  20. Vic

     /  November 16, 2017

    Mexico’s Department of Energy has received a bid for solar power coming in at 1.77¢/kWh, a new world record.

    “When the bids of 2.42¢/kWh hit last summer in 2016, much of the world suggested this was a bottom that was unique and couldn’t be passed without financial loss by the owners. When Saudi Arabia hit 1.79¢/kWh just a few weeks back – the narrative was that these prices were impossible elsewhere in the world because nowhere else in the world has Saudi Arabian oil money, sunlight, and control of all levels of government.”

    https://electrek.co/2017/11/16/cheapest-electricity-on-the-planet-mexican-solar-power/

    Reply
  21. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    Update on Laura and Jorge Posada’s Puerto Rico relief effort. Broadcast in Spanish, but you don’t understand Spanish you’ll get what they’ve been doing: the images speak for themselves.

    “Official video of Telemundo Un Nuevo Día. The baseball player, Jorge, and his wife, Laura Posada, have already made more than 10 trips with humanitarian aid to Puerto Rico after the passage of Hurricane Maria.”

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      Laura and Jorge’s YouCaring page. Donation drive is active.

      https://www.youcaring.com/familiesandkidsdevastatedbyhurricanemaria-956568

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      ‘Puerto Rico Utility Head Resigns After Slow Hurricane Maria Response ‘
      Nov. 17, 2017

      https://www.usnews.com/news/us/articles/2017-11-17/puerto-rico-utility-head-resigns-after-slow-hurricane-maria-response

      “…Ricardo Ramos, who was named head of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) in 2016, was also criticized over controversial contracts. His resignation was effective Friday, Governor Ricardo Rossello said in a statement….

      Ramos was criticized for signing a $300 million contract with a little-known Montana company, Whitefish Energy Holdings, to restore power, and because he did not request aid from U.S. utilities that is a normal procedure following storms.

      A week after the storm, the Federal Emergency Management Agency put the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in charge of restoring power, which is usually the responsibility of the local utility. The Corps has been working with several utilities, including PREPA.

      On Oct. 31, the governor said early efforts had fallen short and finally turned to U.S. utilities for assistance, asking for hundreds of crews and vast fleets of trucks to repair the grid….

      PREPA has been hampered by years of underinvestment and frequent turnover in management, and inefficient collections that forced it to go deeply into debt. The utility had incurred about $9 billion in debt before declaring bankruptcy in July.

      Regulators, including U.S. Congressional committees and the island’s energy commission, are investigating PREPA’s response and the contracts it awarded to Whitefish, along with a $200 million deal with Cobra Acquisitions, a subsidiary of Mammoth Energy Services Inc.

      “There are qualified people at PREPA to serve as director, if they take the political component out of it,” said Ángel Figueroa Jaramillo, president of UTIER, the union representing PREPA’s workers. Complexities of Puerto Rico’s grid make it difficult for an outsider to take on the role, but anything is possible, he said…..”

      Reply
  22. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    Good news re: the horses of the island of Vieques, PR. Last news report posted here over a month ago claimed that not many of them survived the hurricane. That report was in error.

    ‘Helping the hurricane horses: Puerto Rico’s special Vieques horses are survivors’
    October 6, 2017

    https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2017/10/06/hurricane-horses-puerto-rico-vieques-survivors/

    “…Some 280 mares from the island’s 2000 horses had been injected with PZP late last year in an effort to stem growing numbers of the horses on the small island. The island is known for one of the world’s most remarkable bioluminescent bays, and for its beautiful, free-roaming paso fino horses. But water is scarce on the island and in recent years drought has claimed several lives.

    The HSUS team bringing aid to the island had confirmed that some horses lost their lives, killed by storm surges or injury from debris, and a fair number of animals required medical attention. But they also said that the vast majority of the horses appear to have survived the storm.

    “We are providing them with supplemental food because the trees have been stripped bare and forage and fresh water are scarce, and we’ll provide as much medical care as possible,” said HSUS CEO Wayne Pacelle…..”

    Reply
  23. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    “…a battery-powered, nearly self-driving semi truck that the company said would prove more efficient and less costly to operate than the diesel trucks that now haul goods across the country. And of course, it will emit no exhaust.

    In a surprise, Mr. Musk also showed he was not letting up on the car side of the business, unveiling a new Tesla Roadster that he said would be able to reach 60 miles per hour in 1.9 seconds and travel 620 miles before needing to recharge. He claimed it would be the first production car ever with a zero-to-60 time under two seconds.

    It has a top speed of at least 250 miles per hour, said Mr. Musk, dressed in a green canvas jacket and jeans.

    “The point of doing this is to give a hard-core smackdown to gasoline cars,” he said to a cheering crowd of more than 2,000 people. “You’ll be able to drive from Los Angeles to San Francisco and back.”…”

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      Approved by R.Crumb.

      Reply
    • Greg

       /  November 17, 2017

      Watch out trucking industry, within hours of the trucks’ unveiling, Wal-Mart – the world’s largest retailer with a fleet of about 6,000 trucks – announced plans to test the new vehicle.

      Wal-Mart says it’s preordered 15 of Tesla’s new electric tractor trailers

      The pilot is planned for the U.S. and Canada.
      J.B. Hunt Transport Services announced earlier on Friday it has reserved “multiple” new electric semis just unveiled by Elon Musk.

      https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/17/wal-mart-says-its-planning-to-test-teslas-new-electric-trucks.html

      Reply
    • Jim

       /  November 18, 2017

      “The point of doing this is to give a hard-core smackdown to gasoline cars”

      I love it. Given the trash Musk has taken from the incumbent auto industry, it’s followers and enablers, he deserves the right to deliver a great big *-you back by way of an awesome product.

      Reply
      • Jim

         /  November 19, 2017

        And it’s not just Tesla, a number of other companies are working on alternative fuel vehicles.

        Nikola Corporation has a battery/hydrogen fuel cell Class 8 semi under test. Bosch recently partnered with them. The freight company, US Xpress is their launch customer, and field trials begin in 2018.

        Wrightspeed was founded by an early founder of Tesla. They take existing trucks and electrify the drive train.

        https://nikolamotor.com/one

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  November 20, 2017

          “Wrightspeed was founded by an early founder of Tesla. They take existing trucks and electrify the drive train.”

          Here’s a bit about Wrightspeed.

          “The ideal propulsion for start-stop applications, Wrightspeed discusses the technologies for fleet applications. Range extending turbine generators are discussed along with their benefits. “

        • eleggua

           /  November 20, 2017

          Wrightspeed roadster.

          “Wrightspeed X1 electric car beats Ferrari 360 Spider and a Porsche Carrera GT and costs half as much.”

    • Jim

       /  November 19, 2017

      And it’s not just Tesla, a number of other companies are working on alternative fuel vehicles.

      Nikola Corporation has a battery/hydrogen fuel cell Class 8 semi under test. Bosch recently partnered with them. The freight company, US Xpress is their launch customer, and field trials begin in 2018.

      Wrightspeed was founded by an early founder of Tesla. They take existing trucks and electrify the drive train.

      https://nikolamotor.com/one
      https://www.wrightspeed.com/
      https://arstechnica.com/cars/2017/08/ahead-of-tesla-semis-cummins-shows-off-all-electric-powertrain-concept/

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 20, 2017

      Reposting the tease vid from 2016.

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 20, 2017

      Keep in mind, Tesla wasn’t the first manufacturer to announce an all-electric semi.
      Cummins scoooped ’em by a few months with this rig, which has a traditional semi design versus the sleek nose-less Tesla. (The thing in that tease vid from 2016 doesn’t look much like what Tesla revealed last week.)

      ‘U.S. manufacturer beats Tesla to stage with electric semi-truck ‘
      August 30, 2017

      http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/08/30/u-s-manufacturer-beats-tesla-to-stage-with-electric-semi-truck/

      “…Cummins, the Indiana-based maker of diesel and natural gas engines, revealed an all-electric demonstration truck on Tuesday powered by lithium-ion batteries. The company announced it would manufacture and begin selling the 140 kilowatt hour battery packs to bus operators and commercial truck fleets in 2019.

      The concept Urban Hauler Tractor — known as Aeos, after a mythological Greek horse — carries a range of 100 miles on a single charge, with optional batteries extending range to 300 miles. The battery pack charges in an hour. The hauler is designed for short local routes, with a maximum payload of 44,000 pounds, the company said…..”

      Reply
  24. Vic

     /  November 17, 2017

    That road transport could become cheaper than rail certainly blows my mind clear out of my skull and into an alternate dimension. Elon the Disruptor strikes again!

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  November 17, 2017

      Oops. No need to watch it twice.

      I meant to post this one instead.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  November 18, 2017

        Mercy sakes alive, looks like we got us a convoy…except there’s no good buddy behind the wheel of the any of the rigs of ev’ry size. Bye bye, floating kidneys.

        ‘Truck drivers like me will soon be replaced by automation. You’re next’
        Finn Murphy – Friday 17 November 2017
        Finn Murphy is an American long-haul trucker and the author of The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road

        https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/17/truck-drivers-automation-tesla-elon-musk

        “I’ve been driving big trucks since shortly after my 21st birthday in 1980 and I always figured I’d be able to stay on the road until retirement. Now I’m not so sure. Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, Daimler, Tesla, Uber, Ford and Toyota are all investing billions of dollars in driverless vehicles.

        I’m sure about one thing, though: driverless trucks will be here before driverless cars because that’s where the early money is going to be made. With some of the world’s most aggressive and best capitalized companies racing to be first with a viable driverless vehicle, I don’t give myself very good odds on choosing when to hang up my keys.

        The only humans left in a modern supply chain are truck drivers. Today’s cutting-edge warehouses buzz with automated forklifts and robots that load and unload trucks while drivers stand around sipping coffee – and getting paychecks and health insurance. That’s the kind of thing that drives corporate finance types crazy. The best option is to eliminate drivers.

        I understand that global industry is constantly being reinvented to reduce inefficiencies. New technologies will not be stopped, because if we don’t do it here, they’ll do it everywhere from Singapore to Shanghai or Dusseldorf and we’ll be left behind.

        I also understand that human error is responsible for almost all vehicle accidents. About 1.25 million people worldwide are killed on roadways every year, including 40,000 in the US. I’ve no doubt that when the technology is perfected and critical mass is achieved, those millions of deaths will be reduced to a trickle.

        But what’s the endgame with all this technological innovation?

        In the early 19th century, weavers went on strike to protest the power loom in British textile factories. They were called Luddites. A cave artist in Chauvet might have emerged after a day of drawing 35,000 years ago to see someone scratching on sheepskin with charcoal. “This new technology,” our artist would surely have groused, “is going to ruin our culture.” This question of where we’re going with technology has been steamrolled by the pace of innovation. It’s long past time we figured this out.

        For drivers like me, driverless trucks are the power loom and the sheepskin. There are about 3 million of us in the US alone (plus 600,000 in Britain), and we will soon be extraneous – roadkill, so to speak, except we won’t be dead. That makes us, as one driver said, “disposable people”. Too bad for us, you might think. We’re on the wrong side of history.

        Maybe so, but guess what? You’re next. When automation starts displacing lawyers, accountants and bankers, then we might see some push-back about the social costs of technology. So long as it’s only truckers and factory workers getting sacked, well, there’s always Walmart, McDonald’s, or food stamps.

        What we want is to work and support our families. We’re citizens. We coach soccer and go to parents’ night at school and pay our taxes. Who is taking responsibility for the human cost runaway technology is causing? Not the companies reaping enormous benefits. Not the fleet owners. Not the software engineers. Not governments.

        I’m not at all confused by the general surge in populism we’re seeing. The tail of technology is wagging the dog of the social contract, leaving millions of citizens in penury. Even the Economist, no foe of innovation, admits that the US, and the west, have fallen far short in addressing the problem of displaced workers. Something needs to change.

        We can start by accepting that both the private and public sectors have a responsibility to manage the human side of technological disruption.”

        Reply
  25. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 17, 2017

    Interesting projections from ancient history(2010).
    https://canadianclimateaction.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/climate-food2.pdf

    Reply
  26. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 17, 2017

    Some of what was fact in 2010. Wow the more I read this and the referenced material just wow!
    http://www.theartofannihilation.com/portfolio/test/

    “350 ppm is a death sentence … The safe level of CO2 for SIDS (Small Island Developing States ) is around 260 parts per million …” CO2 buildup must be reversed, not allowed to increase or even be stabilized at 350 PPM, which would amount to a death sentence for coral reefs, small island developing states, and billions of people living along low lying coastlines.” – AOSIS Briefing 2009
    Despite the “demands” by the hope industry for a “fair, ambitious, binding agreement” which consisted of an inadequate 40% global emission reductions by 2020 – with no disclosed baseline, the G77, AOSIS (Alliance of Small Island States), and the Bolivian government (under the leadership of Indigenous President Evo Morales) aggressively pursued the scientific targets necessary in order for the world to avoid complete ecological collapse and a global genocide of unparalleled proportions. This empty demand of a “fair, ambitious, binding agreement” was the marketing centre of the campaign that grew from that oligarchy’s wet dream, the corporate social engineering creation, TckTckTck.

    Bolivia and the AOSIS called for an agreement to keep the global temperature from exceeding no more than a 1ºC rise and to reduce atmospheric CO2 to 300 ppm. [AOSIS Briefing 2009: “350 ppm is a death sentence … The safe level of CO2 for SIDS (Small Island Developing States ) is around 260 parts per million …” CO2 buildup must be reversed, not allowed to increase or even be stabilized at 350 PPM, which would amount to a death sentence for coral reefs, small island developing states, and billions of people living along low lying coastlines.] [2] In stark contrast, the corporate NGOs “demanded” that temperatures not exceed a +2ºC and further “demanded” that world emissions peak within 8 years (meaning that emissions would continue to increase, business as usual, until, up to a further 8 years at which point we would begin an effort to decrease). TckTckTck includes over 350 international partners (280 in 2009) including Avaaz, 350.org (who signed on in inception-see HAVAS pager/press release), Conservation International, Greenpeace International, World Wildlife Fund (and many more pro-REDD advocates and climate-wealth profiteers) as well as Climate Action Network International [3] who represents (and speaks on behalf of) over 700 NGOs. CAN also lobbies governments for REDD – a false solution that breeds a new form of climate racism. [In 2009 the evolving data from the IPCC revealed that at an increase of temperature just below 2 degrees above pre-industrial level, the poor, the vulnerable and the disenfranchised would not survive, and below 1.5 degrees there would be a chance of survival.]

    Regarding the issue of human rights and climate justice, the hundreds of corporate NGOs – by campaigning to convince the public to accept the global average temperature further rising up to a 2ºC limit – thereby sanctioned/sanctions most all species on this planet to an unprecedented annihilation within decades. [Note: Consider that at under +1ºC, we are already committed to a minimum +2.4ºC not including feedbacks: Ramanathan and Feng 2008 paper. Further, note climate scientist James Hansen’s warning that even 1ºC now looks like an unacceptably high risk.]

    Reply
  27. Mblanc

     /  November 17, 2017

    I’m just delighted with the Tesla truck, the numbers are extraordinary. Just like with the damage done by CC, things are moving faster than expected.

    Whatever you do from here on in, think very carefully before buying anything new with just an ICE. If you cannot avoid using one, consider leasing, or buy a rough one with a few years life left in it.

    Stranded assets are not just a concern for oil companies.

    Reply
  28. Mblanc

     /  November 17, 2017

    Correction: think very carefully before buying anything with just an ICE, or a ‘mild’ hybrid.

    …….

    There are some hybrid’s where ICE’s are used as range extenders, which are reasonable purchases at the moment, although no one will be buying them new in a few short years. I have friends with a BMW i3 range extender (used daily), and they can barely remember the last time the ICE (actually a small 650cc motorbike engine) actually fired up.

    A vehicle like that will still have resale value in 5 years time, whereas mild hybrids/straight ICE’s will be deeply unfashionable, on running costs alone.

    Reply
    • Brian

       /  November 17, 2017

      >A vehicle like that will still have resale value in 5 years time, whereas mild hybrids/straight ICE’s will be deeply unfashionable, on running costs alone.

      I think you might be confusing what *might* happen with what *should* happen. The world won’t change if everyone stands around looking at each other waiting for someone else to make the first move. This is why active participation in the democratic process is so important.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  November 17, 2017

        “The world won’t change if everyone stands around looking at each other waiting for someone else to make the first move. ”

        Rise up, and go about
        The Pole of our salvation,
        As winds the pilgrim route
        By Mecca’s holy station.

        Why art thou slumber bound,
        Like clay the earth caressing?
        In movement shall be found
        The key to every blessing.

        – Rumi

        Reply
  29. Greg

     /  November 17, 2017

    Watched videos of those lucky enough to have taken a test drive in the new Tesla Roadster. People were at a loss for words except this one “ICE vehicles are cooked.” The paradigm has now shifted for trucking as well. Truckers who don’t have to worry about busted brakes, busted windshields, jackknifing or crossing the Rockies at slower than 65mph, and even “fueling” since they can drive most routes and back without charging and can charge, if needed, in under 30 minutes for U.S. 7 cents a KWh. Awaiting Robert’s analysis…

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  November 17, 2017

      Alright, one more geek saying what is on the minds of those watching last night:

      Reply
  30. Thanks Colorado Bob for the It’s a Beautiful Day post. I haven’t listened to it in decades. I loved to listen to it, particularly when I was in an expansive exuberant mood. To hear it again brought tears to my eyes. It never came out on CD as far as I know.

    Reply
  31. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    Extremes.

    ‘For First Time in 20 Years, Minneapolis Might Not Reach 50 Degrees in November’
    11.15.2017

    https://weather.com/news/weather/news/2017-11-16-minneapolis-chilly-november-not-reach-50-degrees

    “…Colder-than-average temperatures have persisted across the northern Plains and Upper Midwest so far this November due to a persistent southward dip in the jet stream.

    As a result, the warmest temperature Minneapolis recorded for the first half of November is 46 degrees, on Nov. 14, and the lowest the mercury dipped this month is 11 degrees.

    The chilly average temperature has been almost six degrees below average through Nov. 15 in the Twin Cities. In fact, temperatures were below average in each of the first 12 days of the month.

    This is a big change from October, when temperatures were generally warmer than average until the last few days of the month as the jet stream shifted. The last time the thermometer reached 50 degrees was just before this pattern change, when temperatures topped out at 58 degrees on Oct. 26….

    Since 1872, this has only happened seven times. Three of those years are among the top-10 coldest Novembers on record in Minneapolis; the city not expecting this type of cold this year…..

    When looking at those seven years without a 50-degree temperature reading in November, there does not appear to be a correlation with snowfall for the season. Most recently, in the 1997-98 season, the winter was colder than average and seasonal snowfall (from July 1997 through June 1998) was above average, with 73.6 inches accumulating, compared to the average of 54.4 inches.

    In addition to the 1997-98 season, the 1991-92 season also saw above-average snowfall, with 84.1 inches. Two seasons experienced near-average snowfall: 1995-96 (55.5 inches) and 1992-93 (47.4 inches). However, the 1943-44 season saw only 26.9 inches of snow and the 1911-12 season was slightly below average, with 42.7 inches. Snowfall data is missing for the 1873-74 season…..”

    Reply
  32. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    ‘The seven megatrends that could beat global warming: ‘There is reason for hope’ ‘
    Damian Carrington, Environment editor
    8 November 2017

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/08/seven-megatrends-that-could-beat-global-warming-climate-change

    “…No one is saying the battle to avert catastrophic climate change – floods, droughts, famine, mass migrations – has been won. But these megatrends show the battle has not yet been lost, and that the tide is turning in the right direction. “The important thing is to reach a healthy balance where we recognise that we are seriously challenged, because we really have only three years left to reach the tipping point,” says Figueres. “But at the same time, the fact is we are already seeing many, many positive trends.”….

    THE TRENDS

    1. Methane: getting to the meat….

    2. Renewable energy: time to shine…..

    3. King coal: dead or dying….

    4. Electric cars: in the fast lane…..

    5. Batteries: lots in store…..

    6. Efficiency: negawatts over megawatts…..

    7. Forests: seeing the wood…..

    …Will these megatrends move fast enough to avoid the worst of climate change? Opinions vary and Anderson is among the most hawkish. He says it remains possible for now, but is pessimistic that the action will be taken. “We’re pointing in the right direction but not moving [there]. We have to not just pursue renewables and electric vehicles and so forth, we have to actively close down the incumbent fossil fuel industry.”….”

    Reply
  33. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    ‘‘Planet at a crossroads’: climate summit makes progress but leaves much to do ‘
    Damian Carrington in Bonn
    Friday 17 November 2017

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/17/planet-at-a-crossroads-climate-summit-makes-progress-but-leaves-much-to-do

    “…Frank Bainimarama, Fiji’s prime minister and president of the summit: “We are not simply negotiating words on a page, but we are representing all our people and the places they call home.” ….

    US president Donald Trump’s decision to pull the US out of the Paris deal has had little impact at the talks, according to negotiators, who say US officials have been neutral and not blocked anything. Gebru Jember Endalew, the Ethiopian chair of the 47-strong Least Developed Countries negotiating bloc, said: “Unlike immigration, you cannot protect your country from climate change by building a wall.” Other big powers, such as China and India, have not used the US move to try to gain extra advantage but remain constructive players, insiders say….

    Laurence Tubiana, France’s climate ambassador during the Paris deal and now at the European Climate Foundation, said: “There is no time to rest on our laurels, we are not on track. If we are serious about tackling climate change, everyone will need to step up and put forward ambitious climate commitments between now and 2020.””

    Reply
  34. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    ‘Climate summit goes slow and steady but King Coal looms ‘
    Damian Carrington in Bonn
    Friday 17 November 2017

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/17/climate-summit-bonn-makes-slow-steady-progress-king-coal-looms

    “….The Trump administration, which wants the US to be the only country in the world not in the Paris deal, was the pantomime villain, but only succeeded in uniting the 195 other nations against it. The sole US event brought an executive from Peabody, the US coal company with a long history of funding climate denial, to argue for “clean coal”. A protest song and walkout from most of the audience followed and for the rest of the summit, the US delegation was irrelevant.

    But the large coalition of US cities and states backing climate action – which as a group represents the third-largest economy in the world – stole the American show, with the California governor, Jerry Brown, popping up everywhere, pumping up the crowds….”

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      “imoci Naulusala, a 12-year-old Fijian boy, gave a passionate yet nerveless account of the destruction of his village by Cyclone Winston in 2016 to the gathered heads of state and ministers. “Climate change is real, not a dream,” he said.”

      ‘Year 7 student, Timoci Naulusala of Naivicula in Wainibuka, Tailevu was lifted by leaders today as he spoke of the impacts of Climate Change on Fijian communities to open the high level segment of COP23.’
      The Fiji Times Online – Published on Nov 15, 2017

      Reply
  35. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    Carbon, a driver of climate change, could become a valuable resource

    ESSEN, Germany — On a dreary November morning, a small party of visitors from around the world boards a boat for an hour-long ride around what was once one of the most polluted waters in the Ruhr valley.

    Lake Baldeney has become a symbol for the efforts Germany is making to revive its western industrial heartland, and the gleaming white vessel is meant to showcase where the journey is heading: toward a cleaner, sustainable future.

    The boat is the first in the world to be fitted with an electric engine powered by a fuel cell containing methanol — a form of alcohol that inevitably prompts “booze cruise” jokes among passengers. What makes the boat really stand out, though, is the fact that the methanol is produced using a chemical process which draws carbon out of the air.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/carbon-the-driver-of-climate-change-could-become-a-valuable-resource/

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 17, 2017

      Among the pioneers that have been getting the most attention is Swiss company call Climeworks, which operates a site near Zurich that draws carbon dioxide from the air and pumps it to a nearby plant nursery. While the saplings would naturally absorb CO2, Climeworks is effectively providing them with fertilizer and speeding up the removal of carbon at the same time. …………….. “If your basement is flooding, your top priority is to turn off the faucets, not reach for the mops and buckets,” said Jones, who is co-director of Climate Interactive, a think tank that uses computer models to simulate solutions to global warming.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 17, 2017

        “Climeworks, which operates a site near Zurich that draws carbon dioxide from the air and pumps it to a nearby plant nursery. While the saplings would naturally absorb CO2, Climeworks is effectively providing them with fertilizer and speeding up the removal of carbon at the same time. …………….. ”

        As an old hippy , years ago I worked on several greenhouses, and studied them . At the time I though of combining an composting digester , with the greenhouse. In a compost pile, oxygen is used by the microbes , and heat, Co2, and ammonia are produced by the pile. All of these waste products would be used by the greenhouse. The greenhouse is making oxygen , it is drawn into the digester, the exhaust gases are run through a water filter. There the ammonia bonds with the water. The Co2 goes back into the greenhouse , and the ammonia water feeds the plants.

        I have wrecked prototype of this sitting in my backyard. Life over took this experiment , but my reasoning is sound.

        Reply
  36. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    “The Keystone Pipeline leaked 210,000 gallons, or 5,000 barrels, of oil Thursday in Marshall County, South Dakota near Amherst. Officials are currently investigating the cause of the leak, CNN reported.
    TransCanada, the company that owns the pipeline, said it detected a drop in pressure around 6 a.m. on Thursday morning and shut down the pipeline.

    The pipeline runs from Hardesty, Alberta to Cushing, Oklahoma and Wood River/Pakota, Illinois.
    The company said in a statement, “the section of pipe along a right-of-way approximately 35 miles (56 km) south of the Ludden pump station in Marshall County,
    South Dakota was completely isolated within 15 minutes and emergency procedures were activated.”
    TransCanada said it received permission from the landowner to investigate the spill and plan cleanup, the Washington Post reported.

    This would be the largest Keystone oil spill to date in South Dakota, said state spokesman for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources Brian Walsh, CNN reported.”

    Reply
  37. Jim

     /  November 17, 2017

    Good report showing how China is driving the move to renewables, with PV solar being the fastest growing. First link it a chart showing rate of growth with a strong inflection point in 2007. Second link is the original full report.

    https://www.globalgreenshift.org/single-post/2017/11/15/Global-green-shift-in-the-electric-power-sector-IEA-data

    Reply
    • Jim

       /  November 17, 2017

      The author differentiates between Renewable Energy source (RE) of wind and sun, and Water, Wind, Solar (WWS). And for those not steeped in electric utility lingo, power is expressed as MW or TW of generating capacity. Since the wind doesn’t always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine, electricity generation, expressed as MWh or TWh, is lower than installed generating capacity. 🙂

      What’s impressive about China’s move is that it is accelerating going forward, and the same trend is now being seem, albeit in it’s early stages, in India.

      ~ Jim

      Reply
  38. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    “Climeworks, which operates a site near Zurich that draws carbon dioxide from the air and pumps it to a nearby plant nursery. While the saplings would naturally absorb CO2, Climeworks is effectively providing them with fertilizer and speeding up the removal of carbon at the same time. …………….. ”

    As an old hippy , years ago I worked on several greenhouses, and studied them . At the time I though of combining an composting digester , with the greenhouse. In a compost pile, oxygen is used by the microbes , and heat, Co2, and ammonia are produced by the pile. All of these waste products would be used by the greenhouse. The greenhouse is making oxygen , it is drawn into the digester, the exhaust gases are run through a water filter. There the ammonia bonds with the water. The Co2 goes back into the greenhouse , and the ammonia water feeds the plants.

    I have wrecked prototype of this sitting in my backyard. Life over took this experiment , but my reasoning is sound.

    550 Seedlings

    Reply
  39. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    Bear in the Rotunda

    Bear in the Rotunda

    Reply
  40. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    Big Salad Bar

    Reply
  41. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    Bear #339 and The Bear-A-Tones on California Prop #23

    Reply
  42. coloradobob

     /  November 17, 2017

    Once upon a time , I was more than a mere fool.

    Reply
  43. Vic

     /  November 17, 2017

    Day one.
    Canadian grocer Loblaw has ordered 25 of Tesla’s all-electric Semis, Walmart dips their toes in ordering 15, while J.B. Hunt has reserved an unspecified number of the trucks for the U.S. West Coast market.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/tesla-electric-truck-walmart-test-1.4407198

    Reply
  44. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    “Scientists can now evaluate how much an individual glacier or ice sheet melting will contribute to rising sea levels in port cities around the world, according to new research.”

    ‘Should coastal planners have concern over where land ice is melting?’
    Eric Larour, Erik R. Ivins and Surendra Adhikari
    Science Advances 15 Nov 2017

    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/11/e1700537

    “Abstract

    There is a general consensus among Earth scientists that melting of land ice greatly contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) and that future warming will exacerbate the risks posed to human civilization. As land ice is lost to the oceans, both the Earth’s gravitational and rotational potentials are perturbed, resulting in strong spatial patterns in SLR, termed sea-level fingerprints.

    We lack robust forecasting models for future ice changes, which diminishes our ability to use these fingerprints to accurately predict local sea-level (LSL) changes. We exploit an advanced mathematical property of adjoint systems and determine the exact gradient of sea-level fingerprints with respect to local variations in the ice thickness of all of the world’s ice drainage systems.

    By exhaustively mapping these fingerprint gradients, we form a new diagnosis tool, henceforth referred to as gradient fingerprint mapping (GFM), that readily allows for improved assessments of future coastal inundation or emergence.

    We demonstrate that for Antarctica and Greenland, changes in the predictions of inundation at major port cities depend on the location of the drainage system.
    For example, in London, GFM shows LSL that is significantly affected by changes on the western part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), whereas in New York, LSL change predictions are greatly sensitive to changes in the northeastern portions of the GrIS.

    We apply GFM to 293 major port cities to allow coastal planners to readily calculate LSL change as more reliable predictions of cryospheric mass changes become available.”

    Reply
  45. eleggua

     /  November 17, 2017

    NASA Goddard
    Published on Nov 13, 2017

    “Life. It’s the one thing that, so far, makes Earth unique among the thousands of other planets we’ve discovered. Since the fall of 1997, NASA satellites have continuously and globally observed all plant life at the surface of the land and ocean.”

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      From space, satellites can see Earth breathe.
      A new NASA visualization shows 20 years of continuous observations of plant life on land and at the ocean’s surface, from September 1997 to September 2017.
      On land, vegetation appears on a scale from brown (low vegetation) to dark green (lots of vegetation); at the ocean surface, phytoplankton are indicated on a scale from purple (low) to yellow (high).

      This visualization was created with data from satellites including SeaWiFS, and instruments including the NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer.
      Credits: NASA

      Reply
    • eleggua

       /  November 17, 2017

      CBS This Morning
      Published on Nov 17, 2017
      A stunning new NASA time-lapse video crams 20 years of Earth into just a few minutes. It is helping scientists learn a lot more about global warming and how the earth is changing. Chip Reid reports.

      Reply
      • It is stunning..phytoplankton breathing, especially

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  November 19, 2017

          Yes. Your mention of the phytoplankton breathing reminds me….

          ‘Whales Keep Carbon out of the Atmosphere
          If conservation efforts pay off, whales could help islands meet their emissions reductions’
          April 11, 2017
          https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/whales-keep-carbon-out-of-the-atmosphere/

          “…….Whales are crucial to ocean carbon absorption. As whale numbers dwindle, it could lead to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, scientists say. But if conservation efforts pay off, whales could play a role in helping the islands meet the reductions to their nationally determined contributions (NDCs) of greenhouse gases framed in the Paris Agreement.

          “The main takeaway here is that whales eat carbon, not fish,” said Angela Martin, project lead with Blue Climate Solutions and co-author of a recent report produced for the secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme that looked into the species’ role in carbon absorption.

          “The deep ocean stores a lot of carbon, so it’s worth looking at the contribution of animals and help in conservation efforts,” she added.

          Whales facilitate carbon absorption in two ways. On the one hand, their movements — especially when diving — tend to push nutrients from the bottom of the ocean to the surface, where they feed the phytoplankton and other marine flora that suck in carbon, as well as fish and other smaller animals. The other, explained Natalie Barefoot, executive director of Cet Law and co-author of the report, is by producing fecal plumes.

          “In other words, pooing,” she said. “That also introduces nutrients that create marine plants in the area. These plants use photosynthesis, which absorbs carbon, thus enhancing the carbon capture process.”…….”

        • eleggua

           /  November 19, 2017

          and

          “Dr. Mahadevan explains (with demos) the relationship between the mixing of warm and cold ocean water and the spectacular phytoplankton blooms. The phytoplankton are essential to the cycle of CO2 absorption that occurs in the world’s oceans. This is a fascinating explanation of a complex relationship between ocean physics, chemistry and biology.”

        • Great phytoplankton follow up!

  46. eleggua

     /  November 18, 2017

    ‘ If we act on climate change now, the economic prize will be immense’
    Felipe Calderón – Friday 17 November 2017
    President Felipe Calderón is the former president of Mexico. He is the honorary chair of the Global Commission on the Economy & Climate

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/17/economic-prize-climate-change-action

    “Climate negotiators are meeting in Bonn. Beyond the intricacies of the negotiations, here is one key thing to remember instead: about $1tn is already being invested in climate solutions, ranging from renewables and energy efficiency to public transport.

    To put it simply: for those that act on climate now, the size of the economic prize will be immense.

    What is especially exciting is not just the unprecedented coming together of almost every single country in the world around the Paris Agreement, it is that others –cities, states, regions and businesses– are all stepping up to the challenge ahead.

    Nearly 7,500 cities worldwide have already come together to promote and support climate action. They know that sustainable cities are successful cities. In fact, investing in low-carbon cities could be a $17tn opportunity worldwide by 2050, based on energy savings alone.

    We should be watching what actions cities will be announcing: in particular, efforts that enhance coordination between local and national governments, significant moves to capitalise on mobility innovations, and on promoting solutions that have already proven to work.

    States and regions have also stepped up their efforts. In the US, for instance, a broad coalition of actors representing more than half the US economy, including a number of state governments, declared efforts on green infrastructure investments, renewable energy targets, and efforts to reduce carbon pollution.

    State action can also be key to drive efforts around carbon pricing. Today, 42 national and 25 sub-national jurisdictions are covered by carbon pricing initiatives that are either already in place or imminent: a fourfold increase over the past decade. This includes my own country, Mexico.

    Even in the US, despite the current administration’s step away from the Paris Agreement, more and more states are actively exploring carbon pricing, building on existing schemes in California and the north-eastern US. We should demand – and welcome – more efforts from state governments.

    Regional efforts, coordinating across national borders, to accelerate action on climate change are also gathering speed. Take for instance the International Solar Alliance launched two years ago at the Paris climate negotiations, bringing together more than 121 countries –most of them sunshine countries – to work together on solar energy, thereby reducing dependence on fossil fuels.

    Earlier this month, in record time, less than two years since its launch, it became a full-fledged international legal body. It is also the first such international intergovernmental treaty-based organization based in India, an important signal that developing countries are taking climate action seriously and will continue to do so.

    Where business is concerned, it is good to remind ourselves of the role that they played in supporting – and in continuing to support – the Paris Agreement. What is the extent of the benefits for them? An estimated $12tn by 2030 in savings and revenues by pursuing sustainable, low-carbon business models.

    Now 300 companies representing $6.5tn in market value have set or committed to setting science-based climate targets, and more than 100 companies have committed to running their global operations with 100% renewable power.

    How does this work in practice? Take a leaf out of Unilever’s book: in 2010 it set out the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan, which is fully proving that there is no trade-off between sustainability and profitable growth, with these brands growing 30% faster than the rest of the company. I am confident that we will see more signals that businesses recognise the profitability of doing the right thing regarding climate.

    Much has changed since the Paris Agreement was struck, and despite all the positive momentum the new political landscape is far from ideal. From those who are gathered in Bonn – representatives from businesses, states, cities, and civil society – not only do we need real leadership, we also need them to carve out a new vision for climate action in a politically divided world.

    Acting on climate can certainly be driven by pure pragmatism: the economics of it are clear. However, I believe that when 195 countries held hands in Paris and committed to beat climate change together, it also went beyond self-interest. We did it because the poorest and most vulnerable among us don’t deserve to lose their lives and livelihoods to an increasingly hostile environment.

    We did it because we know that a more sustainable, prosperous and inclusive future is within our grasp. And we did it because leaving the world safer and healthier for our children’s children is simply the right thing to do.”

    Reply
  47. coloradobob

     /  November 18, 2017

    Reply
  48. Vic

     /  November 18, 2017

    The storm system that flooded the Athens region earlier this week has since intensified into a ‘Medicane’ (short for Mediterranean Hurricane). The system is expected to track back into Greece over the next day or so.

    Here’s some more footage of the recent flooding in Athens.

    Reply
    • Vic

       /  November 18, 2017

      Amy Goodman from Democracy Now did a great piece on Trump’s Bonn delegation. Particularly pleasing was from 10:25 onwards, where she expertly applies fire to the feet of each of the delegates. No wonder she’s earned so many awards.

      She’s like a dog with a bone. The next day she catches up with Trump’s climate adviser David Banks and puts his head in a vice. It’s Journalism Jiu-jitsu.

      What a worm. Watch him squirm.

      Reply
      • Jim

         /  November 18, 2017

        Thanks for posting this Vic. I’ve always admired Amy Goodman’s tenacity and breadth while interviewing. She’s especially good at getting to the crux of the matter – “why weren’t wind and solar part of the US delegation”? – being a prime example.

        Reply
        • Suzanne

           /  November 20, 2017

          +1 Amy Goodman and Democracy Now..what the news should look like. Thanks for sharing,

      • Amy needs to change her opening line on the” War and Peace report” to the “Global Warming and War and Peace Report” The media is the problem of brainwashed people

        Reply
        • Jim

           /  November 19, 2017

          Good point Jean, I think you should send Amy an email. Amy has covered many of COP meetings, so she’s definitely receptive.

          Come to think of it, I don’t recall seeing much in the mainstream media on COP23…

    • Josh

       /  November 19, 2017

      From the article:
      “Then, on Tuesday, the International Energy Agency, which is based in Paris, released its annual “World Energy Outlook.” One of the agency’s key findings is that global energy demand will continue to rise through 2040.”

      It is probably worth considering why this is the case. Where are plans for energy demand reduction? Even in COP23 itself the lights and computers were on at night when nobody was using them:

      The panel Prof Anderson spoke on a bit later covered similar issues – the predicted increase in emissions and Anderson’s own refreshingly direct opinions on the action needed if the Paris targets are to be met:

      http://www.tyndall.ac.uk/budget2017

      Reply
  49. kassy

     /  November 18, 2017

    Groundwater depletion could be significant source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Humans may be adding large amounts of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere by using groundwater faster than it is replenished, according to new research. This process, known as groundwater depletion, releases a significant amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that has until now been overlooked by scientists in calculating carbon sources, according to the new study.
    The study’s authors estimate groundwater depletion in the United States could be responsible for releasing 1.7 million metric tons (3.8 billion pounds) of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere every year.
    Based on these figures, groundwater depletion should rank among the top 20 sources of carbon emissions documented by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). This would mean the carbon dioxide emitted through groundwater depletion is comparable to the carbon generated from aluminum, glass, and zinc production in the United States, according to the study’s authors.
    “We were somewhat surprised that this hasn’t been accounted for in the literature and in the [EPA and IPCC] evaluations,” said David Hyndman, a hydrogeologist at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan and co-author of the new study accepted for publication in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.
    Groundwater depletion’s impact on carbon emissions is significant yet relatively small compared to the leading contributors, according to the authors. For example, scientists estimate fossil fuel combustion in the United States is responsible for releasing more than 5 billion metric tons (11 trillion pounds) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, close to 3,000 times the amount released from groundwater depletion. Still, the study authors argue that understanding all sources of carbon dioxide emissions is important for making accurate climate change projections and finding solutions.
    “It’s not going to change the way we think about global climate change. It’s just another factor involved that we need to consider,” said Warren Wood, a hydrogeologist at Michigan State University and co-author of the new study.
    “This is an idea that a number of us have knocked around a little bit, but I think the approach here is really novel,” said Bill Simpkins, a hydrogeologist at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa who was not involved in the study. “[Groundwater depletion] is certainly not a documented source that people feel obligated to put in their climate estimates.”
    Groundwater’s carbon cycle
    Rain falling from the sky contains the same amount of carbon dioxide as is present in the atmosphere. But soil carbon dioxide levels are up to 100 times greater than carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, because soil microbes degrade organic carbon into carbon dioxide. When rainwater hits the ground and percolates through Earth’s rocks and sediments, the water dissolves extra carbon produced by these microbes.
    If left to its own devices, this carbon-rich water remains below ground for hundreds to thousands of years before surfacing in oceans or freshwater bodies. But humans are now extracting groundwater at an unprecedented pace to sustain a growing population. The United States alone sucks up nearly 80 billion gallons (303 billion liters) of water from the earth every day to supply drinking water and irrigate crops, enough water to fill Utah’s Great Salt Lake five times every year.
    Analyzing depletion’s impact
    Wood’s research has largely focused on the hydrogeology of arid areas, but he recalls suddenly coming up with the concept for the new study one morning after coffee. “It came to me at about 9:30 a.m. and by 11:30 a.m. I had the first draft of the manuscript done,” Wood said.
    In the new study, Wood and Hyndman analyzed groundwater depletion and groundwater carbon chemistry data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to calculate how much carbon dioxide is likely transferred from groundwater to the atmosphere each year.
    USGS scientists estimate that the United States annually depletes 25 square kilometers (9.7 square miles) of groundwater, which contains roughly 2.4 million metric tons (5.2 billion pounds) of bicarbonate. Wood and Hyndman then conservatively assumed that half of the released bicarbonate is converted to atmospheric carbon dioxide.
    From this information, Hyndman and Wood estimated the U.S. releases approximately 1.7 million metric tons (3.8 billion pounds) of carbon dioxide a year into the atmosphere from groundwater depletion. This is more than the amount of carbon dioxide produced by the generation of electricity used to power 250,000 households in the United States each year.
    Scientists know less about groundwater depletion on a global scale, but Wood and Hyndman predict groundwater depletion releases 9.7 to 13.5 million metric tons (21.4 to 29.8 billion pounds) of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere each year globally.
    “This linkage between subsurface water and the atmosphere is a very creative and original synthesis. I’m not aware of anyone who has even suggested this in the past,” said Lenny Konikow, a scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey who was not involved with the study.
    The researchers note that this study is still just a preliminary step, but they hope their study will provoke in-depth research on the role of carbon dioxide from groundwater depletion.
    “If we can understand how humans are having an effect, hopefully we can take that next step and try to mitigate some of these effects,” said Hyndman.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171116132655.htm

    Reply
    • Another of those small additions. Every little bit counts.
      Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected. Nov17, 2017
      Centre for Ecology & Hydrology..https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171117103800.htm

      Merging these data with existing computer models of global land carbon cycling shows that plant respiration has been a potentially underestimated source of carbon dioxide release to the atmosphere. The study shows that across the world, carbon release by plant respiration may be around 30% higher than previously predicted. As mean global temperature increases, the researchers also estimate that respiration will increase significantly. Such increases may lower the future ability of global vegetation to offset carbon dioxide emissions caused by burning of fossil fuels.

      Lead author, Professor Chris Huntingford, of the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology says: “Plants both capture carbon dioxide and then release it by respiration. Changes to either of these processes in response to climate change have profound implications for how much ecosystems soak up carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels.

      “We find that respiration losses of carbon dioxide by plant respiration is 30% higher than previous estimates, and is expected to increase more than expected under global warming.

      “For too long, plant respiration loses of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere have been the Cinderella of ecosystem computer modelling, with carbon dioxide gains via photosynthesis stealing the attention.

      Reply
    • Jim

       /  November 20, 2017

      Thanks for this Kassy. It never occurred to me that there would be a link between groundwater and atmospheric CO2. It’s shows how little we really know about this beautiful planet we’re screwing up at an phenomenal pace.

      Reply
  50. wili

     /  November 18, 2017

    World’s largest building integrated ‘organic’ solar power installation completed

    Heliatek installed the ‘world’s largest building integrated organic photovoltaic’ (BIOPV) system on top of a school in La Rochelle, France. 22kW of their ‘HeliaSol’ product was installed in one day by six people.

    The ultra-environmentalist solar installation is seemingly 7-8% efficient, weighs 1/10th the weight of a standard solar panel and is held to the roof via an adhesive sticker on the backside of the panel.

    Heliatek touts HeliaSol’s benefits due to it’s environmentally friendly ease of manufacturing. When producing the product: no clean room is required, very little energy is consumed, no extreme temperatures are needed, no toxic materials are used, and minimal use of raw materials are actually consumed. The resulting product is cheap, with almost infinitely available material needs and needs no expensive recycling processes through end of life. …

    https://electrek.co/2017/11/17/worlds-largest-building-integrated-organic-solar-power-installation-completed/

    Reply
  51. John McCormick

     /  November 18, 2017

    Off topic

    On Dec 12, Alabama will put a face on Trump’s base. Jones is ahead by 6 to 8 percent. Gov. Kay Ivey believes the accusers but will vote for Moore. She and his supporters will vote for a pedophile to defeat a Democrat to protect the Supreme Court and pray for repeal of Roe v Wade and the rest of the base’ agenda. We will see their faces decrying the outcome….Trump’s people.

    Reply
  52. utoutback

     /  November 18, 2017

    Manufacturing Consent. How living in an “open society” is no protection from the manipulation of opinion by owned media.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/matt-taibbi-on-the-death-of-edward-herman-w511766

    Reply
    • Jim

       /  November 18, 2017

      So true. I had no idea Edward Herman had passed. RIP.
      Manufacturing Consent, co-written with Noam Chomsky, should be required reading for all independent thinkers.

      Reply
    • John S

       /  November 19, 2017

      We may dream a little….

      A decade after he took office and ended 11 years of Coalition rule, former prime minister Kevin Rudd has launched a full-throttle attack on the global power of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, which backed his rise.

      Accusing other media of being too frightened of retribution to air his arguments, Rudd has labelled News Corp a “cancer” on democracy and called for a royal commission into its relationship with the federal Coalition.

      “They go after people who have the audacity to raise a question about their behaviour,” Rudd told The Saturday Paper.

      “… It’s one of the reasons I’m speaking out directly, so that people can have a normal national conversation rather than a continued national embarrassed silence about this.”

      Rudd accuses the media conglomerate of persistently working for the election of Coalition governments and against Labor in Australia, insisting it only endorsed his own elevation into government almost 10 years ago when it became clear that’s how Australians planned to vote.

      He believes the relationship between the current Coalition government and News Corp should face official scrutiny in the way he says Labor governments have over the past four decades.

      “The Liberal Party has seen fit to call a series of opportunistic royal commissions into the Labor Party over many decades now,” Rudd says. “They did it against me, they did it against Gillard, they’ve done it against Shorten. They did it against previous Labor governments going back to Gough Whitlam.”

      https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2017/11/18/exclusive-rudd-calls-news-corp-inquiry/15109236005520

      Reply
      • Jim

         /  November 20, 2017

        I like how he refers to News Corp as a “cancer” on democracy. Certainly applies here in the US.

        Reply
  53. Abel Adamski

     /  November 19, 2017

    An excellent read from a link in the comments at Climate Crocks
    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017/11/17/1716536/-Further-thoughts-on-Tesla-s-EV-Truck-announcement-from-a-former-fleet-owner

    Tesla’s truck announcement is hugely important. I wrote a comment that turned into a diary… So here’s my view as a former owner of a medium-sized regional distribution business and fleet owner:

    Reply
  54. Last leg of Keystone pipeline from Canada to refineries can go thru despite large oil spill in South Dakota..http://newsok.com/keystone-pipeline-leak-wont-affect-last-regulatory-hurdle/article/feed/1516569

    Reply
  55. wili

     /  November 19, 2017

    Growing number of global insurance firms divesting from fossil fuels
    Report shows around £15bn of assets worldwide have been shifted away from coal companies in the past two years as concern over climate risk rises

    A growing number of insurance companies increasingly affected by the consequences of climate change are selling holdings in coal companies and refusing to underwrite their operations.

    About £15bn has been divested in the past two years, according to a new report that rates the world’s leading insurers’ efforts to distance themselves from the fossil fuel industry that is most responsible for carbon emissions. …

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/15/growing-number-of-global-insurance-firms-divesting-from-fossil-fuels

    Reply
  56. wili

     /  November 19, 2017

    China and India climate change actions more than offset US Paris Agreement retreat

    …three independent European research groups have released a new report that states emissions policies and actions at a national level, heavily influenced by China and India, have visibly reduced end of century temperature estimates. The newest projections suggest the world is headed for a warming of 3.4°C (6.1° F) by 2100, down from 3.6°C (6.5°F) predicted a year ago, as per the The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) report.

    Concurrently, by dropping out of the Paris Agreement, the USA has lowered the overall effect that the Paris Agreement could have had by about .32°C. …

    https://electrek.co/2017/11/17/china-and-india-climate-change-actions-more-than-offset-us-paris-agreement-retreat/

    Reply
  57. OT again. I keep an informal eye on cross-equator jetting, which usually guesstimates about 20 degrees longitude globally on Earth Nullschool. But last two days, quite impressive jet mixing over the Pacific at 45-60 degrees, again my guesstimate, but an obvious major escalation. Too much of this can’t be good.

    https://earth.nullschool.net/#2017/11/19/1200Z/wind/isobaric/250hPa/orthographic=237.45,6.16,366/loc=-58.031,-13.503

    Reply
  58. eleggua

     /  November 20, 2017

    Not climate-related but of interest anyway.

    ‘Upsurge in big earthquakes predicted for 2018 as Earth rotation slows ‘
    18 November 2017
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/nov/18/2018-set-to-be-year-of-big-earthquakes

    “….The link between Earth’s rotation and seismic activity was highlighted last month in a paper by Roger Bilham of the University of Colorado in Boulder and Rebecca Bendick of the University of Montana in Missoula presented at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.

    “The correlation between Earth’s rotation and earthquake activity is strong and suggests there is going to be an increase in numbers of intense earthquakes next year,” Bilham told the Observer last week.

    In their study, Bilham and Bendick looked at earthquakes of magnitude 7 and greater that had occurred since 1900. “Major earthquakes have been well recorded for more than a century and that gives us a good record to study,” said Bilham.

    They found five periods when there had been significantly higher numbers of large earthquakes compared with other times. “In these periods, there were between 25 to 30 intense earthquakes a year,” said Bilham. “The rest of the time the average figure was around 15 major earthquakes a year.”

    The researchers searched to find correlations between these periods of intense seismic activity and other factors and discovered that when Earth’s rotation decreased slightly it was followed by periods of increased numbers of intense earthquakes. “The rotation of the Earth does change slightly – by a millisecond a day sometimes – and that can be measured very accurately by atomic clocks,” said Bilham.

    It is straightforward. The Earth is offering us a five-year heads-up on future earthquakes
    Roger Bilham of the University of Colorado in Boulder

    Bilham and Bendick found that there had been periods of around five years when Earth’s rotation slowed by such an amount several times over the past century and a half. Crucially, these periods were followed by periods when the numbers of intense earthquakes increased.

    “It is straightforward,” said Bilham. “The Earth is offering us a five-year heads-up on future earthquakes.”…….”

    Reply
  59. Jim

     /  November 20, 2017

    James Hanson from COP23, talking about Scientific Reticence.

    Reply
  60. Abel Adamski

     /  November 20, 2017

    Filling out the Tesla story
    https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/secret-tesla-gets-cars-look-065511594.html

    The secret to how Tesla gets its cars to look so good

    Reply
  61. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    More than 15 people killed in Morocca as villagers rush for food aid
    More than 15 people have been killed in drought-affected Morocco after they were crushed trying to get food.

    http://www.news.com.au/world/more-than-15-people-killed-in-morocca-as-villagers-rush-for-food-aid/news-story/dfccd59dd0c534243203b8eb89dae6da

    Reply
  62. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    The Keeper asked me about gifts. That’s not the question It’s about mindless combustion. Where we burn up the world. In an endless quest to be happy.

    Reply
  63. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    Where we burn up the world. In an endless quest to be happy

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 20, 2017

      Here’s a gift, walk up to someone you have fallin’ out with , and tell then you were wrong. Because wrong is a two way street.

      And it’s a lot cheaper, and far better than a plasma TV.

      Reply
  64. Jim

     /  November 20, 2017

    I figured out my sporadic posting problem! WordPress assumes posts with more than three links are spam. Too much research = bad, I guess.

    For those of you who deal with climate deniers on a daily basis, especially those readers who have EV’s or hybrids, one of the arguments most often heard is that you are simply moving the CO2 and pollution generation from your car to the power generating station. Well, here’s some hard data that says otherwise. You only need to look at the excellent graphs to grasp the concept.

    The MIT report shows the CO2 intensity of an EV (including vehicle manufacture) can drop to about 25gCO2/km (assuming a life span of 14 years and 169,000 miles – average for an ICE car) when 100% of electricity comes from renewable sources. Even in the most disadvantaged cases – where much of the electricity come from coal – most EV’s do much better in CO2/mile than their ICE counterparts. That compares to about 345g CO2.mile for the average US fleet on the road.

    Unfortunately the article came to my attention from a letter MIT wrote to the Financial Times chastising them for publishing an article titled ” Electric cars’ green image blackens beneath the bonnet” in which they found that a Mitsubishi Mirage driven in the midwest (with high percentage of electricity generated by coal) was “cleaner” than a Tesla Model S. You only have to glance at the graphics in the study to see how much the FT author had to stretch the truth to publish this highly misleading article.

    Deeply disingenuous article and sad to see from the Financial Times. Jessika Trancik wrote a rebuttal letter which the FT did publish.

    Bad behavior by the FT.

    ~ Jim

    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00177

    Reply
  65. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    The endless quest for happiness , vs the endless quest for things.

    Reply
  66. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    Chris Rea – The road to hell (long version CD) HD

    Reply
  67. coloradobob

     /  November 20, 2017

    2000 Light Years From Home

    Reply
  68. Suzanne

     /  November 20, 2017

    Bill McKibben on Real Time…Friday night.

    Reply
  69. Kassy

     /  November 20, 2017

    A bit more on groundwater. Nothing surprising here:

    Groundwater recharge in the Western U.S. will change as the climate warms — the dry southern regions will have less and the northern regions will have more, a University of Arizona-led research team reports.

    ….

    “The portions of the West that are already stretched in terms of water resources — Arizona, New Mexico, the High Plains of Texas, the southern Central Valley — for those places that are already having problems, climate change is going to tighten the screws,” Meixner said.

    Niraula said, “2021 is pretty close, so we need to start acting now. At the individual level and water-manager level there are many things we can do.”

    Groundwater represents a bank. We can store water from decade to decade, and arguably millennium to millennium — but when we take a withdrawal from that bank, we have to hope there are deposits making up for our withdrawal,” Meixner said. “If there aren’t deposits making up for the withdrawals, we have less water in the future to face water resource challenges with.”

    Managing groundwater now and in the future is the role of management and policy, Meixner said.

    “The future is saying there’s going to be less recharge. That doesn’t mean you drain the aquifers dry,” Meixner said. “Whether we drain the aquifers dry is a management decision.”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171116114216.htm

    Reply
  70. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 20, 2017

    This from before the invisible hand of the market was allowed free reign.

    The 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change makes staying withinecological limits its central objective. Its ultimate objective is to stabilize greenhousegas concentrations at a level that would prevent dangerous human interference with theclimate. And further, it requires that this be done fast enough so that ecosystems canadapt naturally to climate change and food production is not threatened.In 1990 a United Nations Advisory Group on Greenhouse Gases recommended globaltargets for the maximum rates and total amounts of temperature and sea-level rise as aconsequence of the emissions of greenhouse gases. In other words, what level of change nature can tolerate, or “ecological limits”. Temperature increases above 1.0C above pre-industrial levels could bring about rapid and unpredictable changes toecosystems, leading to large damages. In addition, the rate of increase of global meantemperature was found to be a major determinant of damage. A rate of increase above0.1C/decade could lead to major ecosystem damage as well as an increasing risk of climate instabilities.A sea-level rise of 20 centimetres (cm) above 1990 levels was found to be a thresholdof significant damage. Further, it was found that whilst a 50 cm sea-level rise limitabove 1990 levels may possibly prevent the complete destruction of many island nations itwould lead to large increases in the damage caused by storms.
    __________________________________________________________________________
    The climate effects of this budget, based on the climate sensitivity adopted in thisreport, are such that the global mean temperature is calculated to peak at 1.4C abovepre-industrial levels and then decline reaching around an increase of 1.2C by 2100. Inthe absence of climatic surprises the temperature would continue to decline slowly and fall below the long term limit of 1C in the 22nd century. Sea-level would rise by about20 cm by 2100 (based on IPCC best estimates of sea-level rise parameters).
    http://www.academia.edu/3880272/Greenpeace_International_Cites_Maximum_1C_UNAGGG_October_1_1997

    Reply
  71. Suzanne

     /  November 20, 2017

    Well, this news just broke..and on the heels of a large oil leak just days ago..
    “Keystone XL pipeline gets Nebraska’s approval, Trump to claim a win”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/11/20/keystone-xl-pipeline-gets-nebraskas-approval-clearing-a-key-hurdle-in-9-year-effort-and-allowing-trump-to-claim-a-win/?tidr=a_breakingnews&hpid=hp_no-name_no-name%3Apage%2Fbreaking-news-bar

    TransCanada’s $8 billion Keystone XL pipeline got the go-ahead from the Nebraska Public Service Commission on Monday, clearing the last regulatory hurdle in a nine-year effort to build a line needed the carry thick crude oil from Alberta’s tar sands region to refineries on the Texas gulf coast.

    But the five-member commission rejected TransCanada’s preferred route and voted to approve an alternative route that would move the pipeline further east. The new pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of crude.

    The 3-2 decision comes just four days after a rupture in the existing Keystone pipeline also owned by TransCanada leaked an estimated 5,000 barrels of crude oil in a rural part of northeast South Dakota. The spill, the latest in a series of leaks on the existing pipeline, raised concerns about other potential spills, economic impact, and climate change.

    Reply

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