Advertisements

From Ice Apocalypse to Mega-Thunderstorms, Continuing to Burn Fossil Fuels Makes the World Scary as all Hell

So I’ve got to say I feel for Eric Holthaus.

Here’s a smart guy. Probably a few years younger than me. A meteorologist by degree and a climate journalist by trade. A guy with two kids that, as is clear from his twitter comments, mean all the world to him. And he’s finally gotten to that point in his study of climate change where he’s thrown his hands up and said — this stuff scares the crap out of me, can we please all just do something about it?

(The calving front of the Pine Island Glacier as seen by a NASA DC-8 aircraft. Image source: Commons.)

For him, as with any of us, the point of existential realization can come through overexposure to a wide range of worsening climate problems. Declining ocean health, rising extreme weather, how much faster we are warming the world up than during the worst hothouse extinction, can all weigh heavily on the heart and mind of any compassionate, feeling person who takes these subjects seriously enough to actually read the science. For Eric, the big deal, and it is a very, very big deal, was sea level rise.

Ice Apocalypse

Yesterday, Eric penned this seminal article on the issue of ice cliff stability as explored by glacier scientist Robert DeConto entitled Ice Apocalypse.

Ice cliff stability is a pretty technical term. One that may make the eyes of your typical reader gloss over. But when we consider that the glaciers of Greenland and Antarctica can be upwards of two miles high, then the question of whether or not the cliffs of those great ice mountains are stable may start to generate a flicker of warning. May conjure up a phantom of the titanic roar set off when such ice giants tumble away into the sea as has happened throughout the deep history of Earth whenever the world warmed up by a certain amount.

When I think of the words ice cliff stability, my mind’s eye pictures a vast wall of numbing white-blue stretching hundreds of feet high. It expands both left and right as far as I can see. And it looms over an endless warming ocean. Waiting for a colossal fall if just that right amount of extra heat is applied.

Ice is fragile. It’s not like stone. It doesn’t flex much. It doesn’t give much. And even minor stresses are enough to make it shatter. We see this with ice cubes in a cup of water at home. Put an ice cube into relatively warmer water, and that little 1×2 inch block will snap and crack. Now just compound that fragility. Set it on the massive scale of a mile-high glacier. Not too hard to image what can happen.

(2012 filming of massive calving event at Jakobshavn Glacier.)

It’s happened already at Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland. The ocean warmed. The ice shelf protecting the glacier dissolved. And the front of the gigantic glacier fell like great, enormous, white dominoes. We’ve seen it happening in films like Chasing Ice. And we’ve struggled to grasp the enormous scale of it.

Our burning of fossil fuels did this.

Jakobshavn is, even now, contributing to a more rapid rate of global sea level rise. But the amount of ice held back by Jakobshavn is small when compared to the vast volumes kept in check by the Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers of West Antarctica. What Robert DeConto did, and what has apparently scared Eric Holthaus so much, was apply a computer model based on observations of Jakobshavn ice sheet collapse to these larger Antarctic ice masses.

The DeConto study unearthed results that, indeed, looked apocalyptic. From Grist:

A wholesale collapse of Pine Island and Thwaites would set off a catastrophe. Giant icebergs would stream away from Antarctica like a parade of frozen soldiers. All over the world, high tides would creep higher, slowly burying every shoreline on the planet, flooding coastal cities and creating hundreds of millions of climate refugees.

All this could play out in a mere 20 to 50 years — much too quickly for humanity to adapt…

Instead of a three-foot increase in ocean levels by the end of the century, six feet was more likely, according to DeConto and Pollard’s findings. But if carbon emissions continue to track on something resembling a worst-case scenario, the full 11 feet of ice locked in West Antarctica might be freed up, their study showed.

The DeConto study is just one scientific exploration of what could happen in West Antarctica this Century. And, already, reassurances to a worried Eric Holthaus are forthcoming.

But the problem with the DeConto study, as with any other form of serious climate risk, is that there are plausible scenarios in which terrible catastrophic events are possible even if their degree of likelihood is still somewhat debatable. And reasonable precaution would dictate that even if there were just a 10-20 percent chance of DeConto like events coming to pass, we would do everything we could to avoid them. The risk of this scenario emerging, however, is probably a bit higher. As numerous studies have identified the potential for 6, 8, or even 12 feet of sea level rise by as early as 2100.

The Future of Mega-Thunderstorms Looks Grim if We Continue to Burn Fossil Fuels

Eric’s appeals to his Twitter friends related to his article were touching to me in that I feel like I go through similar shocks with each passing week. And what should be a time of national thanksgiving even as more than half of Puerto Rico’s population is still in the dark 63 days after the climate change amplified blow of Hurricane Maria is no exception.

For a model study recently produced by Nature Climate Change and explored by Bob Henson at Weather Underground has found that the rate of rainfall in large thunderstorm clusters could increase by 80 percent this Century if fossil fuel burning proceeds along a business as usual pathway.

To put this in context, an 80 percent increase in the amount of rain that fell in the Ellicott City Flood in Maryland last year would have produced nearly ten inches of rain in an hour and a half.

(The rainfall intensity in large thunderstorm clusters was found to be greatly enhanced under worst case fossil fuel burning scenarios [RCP 8.5] according to a recent Nature Study. Image source: NCAR, Nature, and Weather Underground.)

As with ice cliff instability, we find ourselves faced with another scientific term in the new study — mesoscale convective systems (MCS). And to translate this term we can simply say that MCSs are gigantic clusters of thunderstorms. The study found that rainfall amounts in the largest of thunderstorm complexes were greatly enhanced as warming proceeded along a business as usual track.

From the Study author’s statement to Weather Underground:

“These new simulations of future MCS rainfall are concerning, because they show very large increases in the amount of rain that a given MCS is likely to produce. The MCSs that we would today consider to be ‘extreme’ in terms of precipitation would become more commonplace in the future. There are also some regions that currently don’t see a lot of MCS activity that might start seeing some of these heavily raining MCSs in the future.”

These increases are on top of already elevated rates of rainfall intensity we presently see today in destructive events that our infrastructure and disaster planning is clearly not prepared for (as seen during Harvey). So as we take the time to give thanks for the great bounty that many of us still have, perhaps we should also take the time to think of the things we can do to keep safe what we have worked so hard for and care so much about and to do our best to help those who are less fortunate. Who have already fallen casualty to a time of troubles.

Advertisements
Leave a comment

131 Comments

  1. The MCS is already a reality, my farmer clients tell me events are swamping normal rainfall. We seem to have lots more fog and drizzle and then 120mm in a day. All seems to get smoothed out on govt weather site (niwa) as there are so few weather stations.

    We need to shift to <<<CO2 yesterday. But nothing legal is working. Meanwhile I'll go back to plantings trees.

    Reply
    • He, thanks for the planting trees mention, that washes a bit of the feeling that this is too offtopic.
      Some time ago, Mulga suggested to me to add Chrysophilum cainito to my personal reflorestation project. After a long acclimatation (I was waiting for the end of the drought here, and for the saplings to get ok again) they’re finally in their definitive spots. Thanks, Mulga!
      Chrysophyllum_imperiale-Fruta_do_Imperador

      Reply
      • I wrote the wrong scientific name, it´s Chrysophyllum imperiale.

        Reply
        • mulga mumblebrain

           /  November 26, 2017

          Instantly recognisable. It used to be Martiusiella imperialis, or something similar. There is a beautiful specimen in the Sydney Botanic Gardens planted in 1868 by the visiting Duke of Edinburgh (not the present one-really) just before he was shot in Clontarf by a Fenian. I got the seeds that I grew a couple from off the footpath, where they were copious and looked just like cockroaches. Keep up the good work Umbrios.

  2. Greg

     /  November 22, 2017

    Robert,

    Thank you for this piece on Thankgiving’s eve. I have been frustrated with climate messaging for some time now, and your effectiveness is so important in that regard. The oft cited statistic that a one degree increase in temperature translates into a possible 7% increase in atmospheric moisture has bugged me. It doesn’t capture the significance to a layman. This study helps to translate. If you, going forward, were to cite this study when discussing the 7% guide and use the example of as much as 80% increase in rainfall and how many inches/cm that means for a previously huge event, then readers and the public may begin to get a firmer grasp of what the added moisture does –the concentration of all that water into these mesoscale epic flooding events. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Allan Barr

       /  November 23, 2017

      I wish it was only 7% increase per degree increase temp, unfortunately its exponential. For those able, move out of floodplains.

      Reply
    • Hey Greg.

      Just let me say that I have always found your comments here both multifaceted and refreshing. Bringing sanity and balance to otherwise difficult to frame issues. The understanding you display — both of risk and necessary hopeful responses is one that others should strive to emulate, in my view. So I just want to take the time to thank you for enriching this forum.

      RE the 7 percent per degree C figure… I’d just like to add a little history to the discussion in that regard. Back in 2014, we began to highlight alterations in atmospheric moisture content due to human caused warming in an effort to generate interest in provable mechanisms for climate change/extreme weather attribution. The issue was that changes in evaporation, precipitation, and atmospheric moisture were direct evidence that climate change was changing the weather.

      At the time, science was somewhat reticent to highlight this issue, despite unrefutable evidence that rates of evaporation and precipitation were being altered. So we owned it for a time. Now the issue has hit break out in that it’s widely referenced. Now we don’t have to own it as much — which is a good thing. Sources with more weight and reach have carried it forward.

      It’s obvious in retrospect that altering atmospheric moisture content would change the weather. So the question now is — how much? The new Nature Study, as you pointed out, shows that rainfall in some of the most intense storms (MCSs) would jump by 80 percent at 4-5 C warming. Net change in atmospheric moisture content being 21-28 percent, the amplification factor for these storms vs net moisture change in a simplified comparison is x3 to x4 approx.

      The study acknowledges that upper level wind pattern changes may also further impact extreme storm rainfall beyond simple atmospheric moisture loading changes, which was the primary focus of the study.

      Jim Henson deserves Kudos for his work in this respect as do the study authors who are carrying the science forward.

      Reply
      • Mblanc

         /  November 25, 2017

        That 7% is an average, with some places seeing more and others less, so if you are in the wrong place it is going to be higher.

        ‘The authors also looked at how we characterize the temperature/precipitation relationship. Traditionally, we have related precipitation events to the local average temperature. However, it’s clear that there’s a strong relationship between the peak temperature and the precipitation rates. In fact, relations reveal that precipitation rates are increasing between 5 and 10% for every degree C increase. The expected rate of increase, just based on thermodynamics is 7%.
        The authors find that in some parts of the globe, the relationship is even stronger. For instance, in the tropics, there’s more than a 10% increase in precipitation for a degree Celsius increase in temperature. This is not unexpected because precipitation releases latent heat, which can in turn invigorate storms.’

        https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2017/mar/22/global-warming-is-increasing-rainfall-rates

        Reply
  3. Spike

     /  November 22, 2017

    I lost a lot of respect for Holthaus when he joined in the verbal kicking of Wallace-Wells over his magnificent article earlier in the year I’m afraid. Now he’s finally waking up to reality I guess it’s time to cut him some slack. The situation is too dire for friendly fire, so better late than never.

    Reply
    • Holthaus may have given Wallace-Wells flack elsewhere, but in this post Holthaus did everyone a service by encouraging journalists in this way:

      “My advice for climate journalists going forward:

      1. Don’t hold back. Readers can take it. (As long as it’s rigorously grounded in the science, of course.)
      2. The weird shit that climate change could cause—the tail risks, the megastorms, the blinking out of entire ecosystems—is compelling.
      3. Climate journalists should find those stories—things scientists wouldn’t bother with b/c they’re unlikely—& report the hell out of them.
      4. AND THEN (this is the most important part) you plant the seed of possibility at the end & invite the reader to become part of the story.

      “Because that’s the reality: We are all part of this story. This is our story, we are shaping it every day.”

      https://tinyletter.com/sciencebyericholthaus/letters/today-in-weather-climate-final-thoughts-that-nymag-story-edition-monday-july-17th

      Reply
      • I think the Wallace-Wells piece generated a point of reflection for people like Holthaus and Mann. I think that it has enabled both the look at the subject in a more realistic and complex light. To acknowledge both risk and uncertainty. To not treat adults like children. I think this is an important shift in the conversation.

        Reply
  4. Greg

     /  November 22, 2017

    For some perspective on that Jakobshavn calving event here it is with Manhattan superimposed:
    http://static1.businessinsider.com/image/543d72076bb3f7525082c87f-1417-695/screen shot 2014-10-14 at 2.47.05 pm.png

    Reply
  5. FYI

    I checked your source for up to 12 feet of sea level rise and it says 2200 not 2100.

    “Excluding the possible effects of still emerging science regarding ice cliffs and ice shelves, it is very likely that by 2200 GMSL will have risen by 0.3–2.4 meters (1.0–7.9 feet) under an even lower scenario (RCP2.6), 0.4–2.7 meters (1.3–8.9 feet) under a lower scenario (RCP4.5), and 1.0–3.7 meters (3.3–12 feet) under the higher scenario (RCP8.5).”

    Reply
    • rhymeswithgoalie

       /  November 23, 2017

      A mere 12′ by 2200 is the stuff of fantasies.

      Reply
      • So TDG’s comment was a good one in that the statement needed more clarification. Might still need further work as the first study referenced includes multiple scenarios.

        I think what we can say is that there is a general drift that exposes earlier than expected impacts to Antarctica starting to emerge.

        As for 12 feet by 2200, I think we will have to work very hard to avoid that. There is probably still a pathway to avoidance under more aggressive carbon emission reduction scenarios. But I think there is also a chance that we’ve already crossed that line and moving back behind it would require both atmospheric carbon capture and a more forgiving Earth System. Long term, even in the best case, we may have already locked in about 15+ feet beyond the two century timeframe.

        In my view, rates of sea level rise will be linked to rates of warming. My opinion is that the 1.5 to 2.5 C range risks rapid sea level rise in short timeframes (6+ feet by 2100). Due to the fact that we will almost certainly enter the middle of this range, rapid sea level rise beyond that expected by IPCC is at least a moderate risk, IMO.

        The unidentified aspects, both amplifiers and limiters to future SLR, is where the science needs to focus to develop viable physical models for potential future SLR scenarios. But, for me, the backstop of large melt pulses at the end of the last ice age in the 2C warming range and 10-20 feet SLR at temperatures of 1.3 to 2C during the Eemian loom pretty large. To be clear, present pathways put us at 3 C warming by 2100, rising to as high as 5C + if we backslide to BAU and likely not avoiding 2C under the plausible better case scenarios. Even including all good news to all bad news scenarios, we are looking at a 1.7 to 7C by 2100. In that range of contexts, given the paleoclimate, and given the news of recent movements in Antarctica, I think the issue of rapid sea level rise is one we should take seriously.

        That we should realize that we are going to have to work very hard to avoid some tough impacts and that, in the best case, we are probably working to slow down releases that are ultimately likely to exceed 10 feet beyond the 2 century timeframe. That, in the worst case, if we don’t do the work, pretty much all coastal cities and low lying regions will be inundated starting now and running over a rather short multi decade period (2020 to 2300). The finer points simply determine sooner or later. And our response determines the difference between 15 feet later, six+ feet sooner and up to 200+ feet later.

        Reply
    • If you dig into that study it produces multiple scenarios for different timeframes. One scenario identified the potential for 8.5 feet by 2120. However, there was a second link embedded referencing this NOAA study that I have now broken out in text for more easy reference:

      https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2017/04/27/water-water-everywhere-your-neighborhood-underwater-2100/100987622/

      Thanks for the query. I appreciate the opportunity to tighten up the language and meta analysis.

      Reply
  6. Vic

     /  November 23, 2017

    Who said Tesla couldn’t meet a deadline ?

    The world’s largest Li-ion battery installation in South Australia has been completed on time and on budget, one week ahead of its December 1 deadline.

    http://reneweconomy.com.au/tesla-big-battery-on-track-to-be-energised-in-coming-days-74676/

    Reply
    • bill h

       /  November 25, 2017

      South Australia is clearly attractive for energy storage projects. Here is a fascinating one, still at early stages of development:

      https://reneweconomy.com.au/1414-plans-two-gigawatt-hour-silicon-storage-plants-s-75504/

      This involves melting silicon and then using its huge latent heat of fusion to provide a huge energy store (gigawatts and giga watt hour scale). One gets the impression that the campaign by anti-greens to present S. Australia as an example of why renewables are bad might be backfiring. It seems to have given renewables entrepreneurs like Musk and the founders of 1414 extra impetus to demonstrate their effectiveness and value for money.

      Reply
  7. wili

     /  November 23, 2017

    “I go through similar shocks with each passing week”

    Sometimes every day, for me.

    But let me be miss sunshine today and point out: “WRI data suggests emissions have already ‘peaked’ in 49 countries”

    https://www.skepticalscience.com/WRI-emissions-peak-49-countries.html

    May everyones’ Thanksgivings be as joyful as possible.

    Reply
    • wili

       /  November 23, 2017

      Other relevant bits posted in earlier comments on this blog (and elsewhere):

      Richard Alley, the glaciologist who the MIT atmospheric physicist Kerry Emanuel described as the world’s foremost expert on the relationship of ice and climate, discussing recent ice sheet model results in 2016: At Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica,

      “once you get off of the stabilizing sill, whenever that is in West Antarctica, the time scale of getting rid of the West Antarctic [3.3m GMSLR, 4m in the Northern Hemisphere], it’s not centuries, it’s multi-decadal. This is not maybe the best case, it’s not the worst case.”

      At 31:40 in this presentation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7MNA44RMNA

      Reply
  8. Spike

     /  November 23, 2017

    Looks as if the methane from lakes is mainly produced near the surface not from sediments.

    “Ninety per cent of methane emissions from Lake Hallwil – about 25 tons a year – are thought to be produced in the top five metres of the water column, and the research results suggest that the same phenomenon occurs in other lakes with similar characteristics.”

    https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/environment_lakes-could-be-significant-producers-of-methane/43692846

    Reply
  9. Spike

     /  November 23, 2017

    And lakes will increase methane production as temperatures rise in a positive feedback. “The biologists predict that a temperature rise of 1 degree Celsius leads to 6 to 20 percent higher emissions of methane bubbles, which in turn leads to additional greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and to an additional temperature increase”.

    http://www.ru.nl/english/news-agenda/news/vm/iwwr/2017/methane-bubbles-effect-cause-rise-temperature/

    Reply
  10. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 23, 2017

    The only place in the world where you can see ice-cliff instability in action today is at Jakobshavn glacier in Greenland, one of the fastest-collapsing glaciers in the world. DeConto says that to construct their model, they took the collapse rate of Jakobshavn, cut it in half to be extra conservative, then applied it to Thwaites and Pine Island.

    But there’s reason to think Thwaites and Pine Island could go even faster than Jakobshavn.

    Right now, there’s a floating ice shelf protecting the two glaciers, helping to hold back the flow of ice into the sea. But recent examples from other regions, like the rapidly collapsing Larsen B ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula, show that once ice shelves break apart as a result of warming, their parent glaciers start to flow faster toward the sea, an effect that can weaken the stability of ice further inland, too.
    https://grist.org/article/antarctica-doomsday-glaciers-could-flood-coastal-cities/

    Reply
  11. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 23, 2017

    COP 15 2009:
    At the historic press conference which took place on November 11, 2009 in Copenhagen, Di-Aping addressed the international NGO community. The conference room was packed with representatives of the non-profit industrial complex and corporate media complex, which includes the so-called progressive media. In a most direct approach, Di-Aping asked NGOs to support the demand that developed countries cut emissions 52% by 2017; 65% by 2020; and 80% by 2030 (based on a 1990 baseline). Further, Di-Aping asked the NGOs to demand GHG emission cuts well above 100% by 2050, which would (perhaps) keep the global temperature from exceeding a rise of no more than 1.5ºC. These targets, if met, would perhaps allow Africa to merely stay alive.

    A 2ºC rise in global temperature, which the non-profit industrial complex campaigned upon, would mean a 3.5ºC rise for Africa. This temperature is certain death for the African peoples – certain death for billions. In addition, a 2ºC global temperature rise guarantees a minimum 4ºC+ global temperature for future generations. In the film footage provided below, one bears witness to Di-Aping speaking directly to the Climate Action Network (International) representatives.

    ahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOEG3M7dlDo#action=share

    Reply
  12. Kassy

     /  November 23, 2017

    An article about the Kuzbass coal region in Russia which switched to opencast mining in the last 10-15 years or so.
    What they say & what it actually means:

    In an interview with TASS on the eve of Miners’ Day in August, the governor said that “We have all had to make a colossal effort to turn Kuzbas from a jobless hole into Russia’s industrial backbone. For the last 20 years, our coal industry has gone through a complete cycle of rejuvenation, and has changed from a failing sector subsidised by the government to an economically effective one and become the first wholly privately owned sector of the Russian economy.”

    Anton Lementuyev believes the local mining corporations are aware of the situation, but continue to operate with impunity thanks to sweeteners from the regional government: “they have no social responsibilities, which avoids a huge amount of outlay: they have abandoned any responsibility for rehousing, environmental obligations or just observing the law. Everything has been rigged to allow them to avoid paying for anything.” Thus, legal requirements are ignored so that firms can open mines near population centres, and the land is never cultivated afterwards. According to Lemetuyev, this is because opencast mining is cheaper, and by excavating near towns and villages they save a fortune on infrastructure. “Everything comes down to mining company profits,” concludes Slivyak.

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/od-russia/elizaveta-pestova/russias-kuzbass-coal-region

    Reply
    • So this looks like more stranded assets in the context of competition coming from renewable energy. Movement by China and India away from coal makes projects like these less viable. Unless that trend changes, mines like these will struggle to find customers. In the context of preventing worst case climate change, this is a process that must happen. However, there is likely to continue to be serious political friction as countries like Russia and allied agencies dependent on fossil fuel revenues fight to keep markets for coal, oil and gas open by capturing consumer bases. We should be honest in that opposing these harmful economic interests may result in zero-sum decisions, increasing risk of global conflict. However, we are at a point now where direct confrontation to keep safe the future and prevent harm on a mass scale may be necessary. I hope not. But the economic realities presented by doubling down on fossil fuel dependence are stark.

      Reply
  13. Suzanne

     /  November 23, 2017

    Happy Thanksgiving everyone!
    I wish all Evangelicals were more like Katharine Hayhoe….

    Reply
  14. Greg

     /  November 23, 2017

    Tesla truck pricing looks extraordinarily lower than expectations.
    Tesla announced tentative pricing for its electric semi.

    The 300-mile (480 km) range version starts at $150,000, while the 500-mile (800 km) range version starts at $180,000. The prices are “expected“, which means some changes are still possible.

    Very intriguing. This means possibly that their battery production costs have dropped, or are expected to drop, further than current estimates. It also means they will have huge demand for these vehicles in an otherwise heavily polluting diesel industry.
    https://insideevs.com/tesla-semi-starts-from-150000-300-miles-range-180000-500-miles-range/

    Reply
    • Greg

       /  November 23, 2017

      A cornerstone of a renewable future is inexpensive batteries/storage.

      Reply
    • 12volt dan

       /  November 23, 2017

      That is about equal to ice trucks now. With cheaper batteries they might undercut the diesel,impressive

      Reply
  15. Shawn Redmond

     /  November 23, 2017

    This from Flassbeck:
    http://www.flassbeck-economics.com/the-doomsday-glacier-problem/
    That, then, is the bottom line: the melt will go fast and we are not preparing. Incredibly, we continue to race towards disaster. Globally, our emissions are rising. Temperature is rising (see here – thousands on articles, hundreds of thousands of pages of text, blogs, attacks, ‘scepticism’ and denying notwithstanding, there has never been a recent ‘pause’ in global warming). Radically insane as it is, the world continues to slash out enormous subsidies for fossil fuel companies. All the COPs and other conferences, ingenious talk about carbon markets, divestment, resilience and nice intentions take nothing away from the essential fact that the G20 countries subsidise fossil fuels by over $ 1.000 per citizen – a figure from the IMF (see here). Globally, fossil fuels are subsidised by $ 10 million every minute. In 2015, the subsidies to the fossil fuel companies were bigger than the health spending of all governments combined (see here), the total amounts to $ 5.3 trillion a year.
    The basic question is whether the world as a whole is worth more or less than the profits the companies make for their shareholders. It is a fantastically stupid question. So far the answer has been the wrong one. James Hansen, who was not allowed to address the COP23 meeting in Bonn, wants to prosecute all of the companies that are historically responsible for the CO2 problem. It is well-known that, historically, 67 multinationals are responsible for almost two thirds of all CO2 emissions. So, let’s prosecute them, say the litigation proponents. The polluters have to pay for the damage they caused. I wish Hansen good luck. At the same, it is just ridiculously naïve to think that this will solve the problem. Without fast and structural changes in the political economy of the world system, some of humanity (or all of it) has little future left.

    Reply
  16. coloradobob

     /  November 23, 2017

    Good one RS , as usual.
    Hurricane Maria Damage Estimate of $102 Billion Surpassed Only by Katrina
    Dr. Jeff Masters
    https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/hurricane-maria-damages-102-billion-surpassed-only-katrina

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 23, 2017

      Masters has a chart up with this post, of the 11 – 30 plus Billion dollar disasters since 1980.
      8 have occurred since 2000.
      And 5 have occurred since 2010.

      Reply
  17. coloradobob

     /  November 23, 2017

    One of the greedy academic street walkers we’ve heard so much about.

    Willie Soon brought to you and funded by Exxon

    Reply
  18. coloradobob

     /  November 23, 2017

    THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

    Reply
  19. coloradobob

     /  November 23, 2017

    From Yale Environment 360 (Nov 20) – As Oceans Warm, the World’s Kelp Forests Begin to Disappear:

    http://e360.yale.edu/features/as-oceans-warm-the-worlds-giant-kelp-forests-begin-to-disappear

    Reply
  20. coloradobob

     /  November 23, 2017

    AIRED NOVEMBER 24, 2015
    The Pilgrims
    Film Description
    Arguably one of the most fateful and resonant events of the last half millennium, the Pilgrims journey west across the Atlantic in the early 17th century is a seminal, if often misunderstood episode of American and world history. The Pilgrims explores the forces, circumstances, personalities and events that converged to exile the English group in Holland and eventually propel their crossing to the New World; a story universally familiar in broad outline, but almost entirely unfamiliar to a general audience in its rich and compelling historical actuality.

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/pilgrims/

    Reply
  21. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    This entire founding of America myth is wrong.

    My kin came in by the Chesapeake , when the Mayflower landed there were 8,000 souls in Virginia. Free whites , indentured servants, and black slaves.

    They all had been at work for 13 years , long before William Bradford showed up.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 24, 2017

      This entire founding of America myth is wrong.

      My kin came in by the Chesapeake , ( later 1738 ) , when the Mayflower landed there were 8,000 souls in Virginia. Free whites , indentured servants, and black slaves.

      They all had been at work for 13 years , long before William Bradford showed up.

      And that is the heart of our world today. We are not fighting about statues of dead separatists, from the 17th century. Who fled the Netherlands . We are fighting about lost money ,
      In 1860 the largest pool of money in the US wore a black skin, and it was not the railroad, or any other measure of wealth.
      It was human beings.
      We murdered over 600,000 human beings to solve this .

      And still we stumble to an answer.

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  November 24, 2017

      A Story not told

      Reply
  22. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    Sorry for being so far off the beam . But I spent my entire life there.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 24, 2017

      If makes a difference . I am a cold old man who wakes up with rat traps on his toes.

      Reply
  23. utoutback

     /  November 24, 2017

    This is a Holiday about Thanks. And, I am thankful for the world I live in and the people who care enough to fight for it.
    That said, my present scenario sounds like a dystopian future plot line.
    1. Continued Climate stress leads to failing crops, sea level rise, increasingly violent storms and
    climate regions which will no longer support Human life.
    2. Multi-millions of refugees moving into already inhabited spaces.
    3. Countries and regions becoming more nationalistic and isolationist.
    4. Small & large scale warfare.
    5. A breakdown of nation states with militias & warlords taking over.
    And if we avoid extinction, a thousand(s) year long dark age, while the planet and the surviving species try to recover.
    So, although I’m thankful…. Hope is a bit of a luxury right now.
    Move forward with resolve.

    Reply
  24. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    6 tabs in the world

    I got 6 tabs open in the world tonight
    I got a world fear tonight
    I got no answer tonight
    I an lost tonight,

    Well that’s what being old means.

    Reply
  25. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    Long ago I placed my toes at the edge of the world. Now my toes are in a rat trap.

    Reply
  26. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    We pay good money to sing into a can.

    Reply
  27. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    Reply
  28. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    Howlin’ Wolf – Back Door Man

    Reply
  29. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    Let;s run Mr. Wolf’s past .

    Reply
  30. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    The world is a turnip of lies, and fools.

    Reply
  31. coloradobob

     /  November 24, 2017

    To say I am lost, bankrupt , spent, hopeless, old, helpless , depressed. Is to understate , what I am.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 24, 2017

      In the real world, this is some sort of rope.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 24, 2017

        RS , So sorry I failed you .
        Life has over run me.

        Reply
        • Vaughn Anderson

           /  November 24, 2017

          CB, I have read your musings and writings for years….I feel I have so much to learn from you still. You have a cryptic way of saying things…causes me to think and consider the possibilities.

        • redskylite

           /  November 24, 2017

          Me too – who else combines science with philosophy and has an impeccable music taste. Thanks R.S for keeping out attention tuned/

        • Bob —

          Everything I’ve done here is aimed at empowering people like you with both information and choice.

          The future is wonderful. The future is terrible.

          There are a million paths between these poles. Which path will you take? Which path will we take together?

        • The fact that you are seen as a leader here should say something.

          In other words. You are loved for who you are. Cherished for the contributions you give.

  32. Vaughn Anderson

     /  November 24, 2017

    At about 6:30 Eric Rignot discusses the melting glaciers in West Antarctica. This is not good news.

    Reply
  33. redskylite

     /  November 24, 2017

    NOAA commenting on Rick Thoman of Alaska’s National Weather Service’s alert: Record low sea ice in Alaska waters in fall 2017.

    “ice conditions are unlikely to reverse course any time soon. Predicted storminess in the near-term means that waves and winds will be churning up the surface waters, breaking up and dispersing ice that does form and bringing more unseasonably warm air into the region.

    The presence of so much open water during what has historically been a relatively icy time of year has complicated impacts on Alaska marine life and people. Since late September, several coastal floods and significant episodes of erosion have occurred along the western Alaska coast. Utqiaġvik (Barrow) sustained an estimated $10 million dollars in damage from a storm at the end of September. In early October, minor flooding occurred at several Kuskokwim delta communities. November 6-9 brought high water to parts of Norton Sound, and on November 11-12, Shishmaref suffered considerable erosion from a storm, prompting officials to declare a local disaster.

    Thoman also wrote, “As I write this, on November 21, another round of flooding—potentially the most impactful of the many storms this season—is underway over NW Alaska.”

    In addition to physical damage and stress to communities, the mild weather and lack of ice creates severe challenges for people in places with a significant subsistence-based hunting economy. Sea ice and river ice are necessary features for traditional Alaska Native activities, and the absence of ice creates considerable hardships. The impacts from the lack of ice now will be felt the rest of the winter, as ice that does eventually form is likely to be thin and easily mobile, challenging hunters the entire season and greatly increasing the chances for an early melt out of the ice in spring 2018.”

    Reply
  34. redskylite

     /  November 24, 2017

    Polar bears crowd on Russian island in sign of Arctic change

    MOSCOW: A boatload of tourists in the far eastern Russian Arctic thought they were seeing clumps of ice on the shore, before the jaw-dropping realisation that about 200 polar bears were roaming on the mountain slope.
    “It was a completely unique situation,” said Alexander Gruzdev, director of the Wrangel Island nature reserve where the encounter in September happened. “We were all gobsmacked, to be honest.”
    The bears had come to feast on the carcass of a bowhead whale that washed ashore, later resting around the food source. The crowd included many families, including two mothers trailed by a rare four cubs each, Gruzdev told AFP.
    Climate change means ice, where polar bears are most at home, is melting earlier in the year and so polar bears have to spend longer on land, scientists say.
    This might wow tourists, but means the bears, more crammed together on coasts and islands, will eventually face greater competition for the little food there is on land.

    http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/polar-bears-crowd-on-russian-island-in-sign-of-arctic-change-9431934

    Reply
  35. redskylite

     /  November 24, 2017

    Reply
    • jean

       /  November 26, 2017

      Yeaterday I watched a PBS/Global3000 video of Johnny Cash..Steve Earle was featured discussing aJohnny Cash album,”Bittter Tears” about how American indigenous people and the land were destroyed..Steve Earle spoke forcefully,explaining Cash’s songs I had no Idea Johnny Cash had done these great songs about earlier destruction/despair..Johnny Cash was a great human..Steve Eale is pretty good himself

      Reply
  36. For years I’ve walked along Lake Michigan. I see young parents playing with their toddlers in the parks along the lake. It crushes me to think of the horror that will come for them.
    I’ve fought ecocide for decades; more recently, raged for years, feeling like a trapped animal.

    Now, I’m trying to accept our demise, accept that I am a trapped animal. And place this phenomenon in a larger context. Periodic collapse, i.e., the large and relatively rapid restructuring of a network’s relationships, is when-not-if physics. It’s called critical-state universality or self-organized criticality. (“Ubiquity” by theoretical physicist Mark Buchanan is an excellent reference.)
    Here’s a somewhat aberrant “trapped work” from 2011 that cites self-organized criticality in more detail: (~ 4 minute read)
    Collapse Sensing: http://ow.ly/DNkY306ZYEP

    This recent work: Passing Natural Selection Tests http://ow.ly/b3lH30gFUUJ (3 minute read) places climate change in the context of what I think is the dominant phenom of our era: exponentially accelerating complexity.

    Loved your loved ones …

    Reply
    • Paul

       /  November 24, 2017

      Postgenetic – Yes, times are tough and getting tougher. Things will probably get a lot tougher in the future. There will probably be a lot of damage done to our natural world. That may be unavoidable at this point. However, don’t underestimate the ingenuity of humanity to solve problems once the public understands the implications of a problem. Look at the focus the allies had for solving the problems of Nazi Germany and imperial Japan during World War II. The public may not be there yet, but with more experiences of climate change disasters and explanations of what is causing them in forums such as this, we are making progress.

      Don’t give up hope.

      Reply
  37. I am grateful for all the comments and international viewpoints (not to mention Robert!), but sometimes the information is clearly locational, and place is not specified. I am familiar with many, but cannot keep up with everyone when they may have mentioned where they were two years ago or never. So this is plea. Perhaps everyone could follow the lead established by coloradobob, Robert in New Orleans and others, and put your location (state or country) in the ID. I will change mine to ML in NC

    Reply
  38. Paul

     /  November 24, 2017

    Here’s a good read I saw this morning from NPR’s web site that sheds more light on sea level rise:

    https://www.npr.org/2017/11/24/566280048/the-sea-level-threat-to-cities-depends-on-where-the-ice-melts-not-just-how-fast

    Although a day late, I would like to offer the following thought regarding the U.S. holiday of Thanksgiving: Be thankful for all of the climate scientists who are working on improving our understanding of the climate crisis. Some of them are working thankless, depressing jobs under difficult circumstances. Many in the U.S and other countries are working for governments that are currently openly hostile to their work

    They need our appreciation.

    Reply
    • Paul

       /  November 24, 2017

      Also, I should add that we should be thankful for this forum and for all of Robert’s work in making this one of the best out there.

      Reply
  39. Greg in Virginia

     /  November 25, 2017

    Picture of school in Copenhagen. This is entirely covered in solar panels. Sea glass green color with no loss of efficiency! Many years of research to develop this. This is further innovation in the solar space. Increased choices mean increased adoption.

    https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/24/sea-green-solar-covers-25000-square-meter-school-denmark-12000-solar-panels/

    Reply
  40. John S in Qld-Aus

     /  November 25, 2017

    There was a state election today in Queensland Australia. 93 seats, so far (11pm) Labour 41 and Liberal National Party 37.

    Labour unlikely to get to outright 47 but LNP appear to have no chance.

    One Nation, local Trump equivalent party, probably get 1 seat (and denier Malcom Roberts recently booted out of Federal Senate for dual-citizenship violation of constitutuon has lost attempt to enter State parliment – yeah! – although he denies it! Ha!)

    Labour has recently rejected State support for Adani mega coalmine. LNP & One Nation both support Adani and want to state sponsor more coal mines (and land clearing etc etc). This has cost Labour votes in north Qld and probably not enough wins in populous SE Qld to compensate hence no majority.
    Greens may get 1 seat.

    Preferential voting system will take days to get final numbers. 360,000 postal votes to be counted yet. Even without outright majority Labour may form goverment – tba.

    Anyway good news, Adani is going nowhere for now, renewables get the best of a bad lot

    Reply
    • Thanks for this John and welcome.

      My apologies for the delay in moderation. But I hold all first posts in reserve now due to an attempt to keep a handle on trolls/misinformation.

      I’d like to welcome you to the site and I’m looking forward to seeing more from you.

      Must say that I’m very happy to see what’s happened in Queensland. This is very positive movement. And the fact that Adani was such a key issue is also very reassuring to me.

      Warmest regards and good luck to you!

      Reply
    • John S
      Thank you for the update, and for your location!

      Reply
  41. Greg in Virginia

     /  November 25, 2017

    What other industry has costs drop 15% between announcement of construction and completion?
    402 Megawatt Dudgeon Offshore Wind Farm Opens After 15% Drop In Construction Costs

    https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/24/402-mw-dudgeon-offshore-wind-farm-opens-15-drop-construction-costs/

    (Robert previous comment stuck in moderation)

    Reply
  42. Andy_in_SD

     /  November 25, 2017

    A curious thing about H. sapiens is that we are clever enough to document — in exquisite detail — various trends that portend the collapse of modern civilization, yet not nearly smart enough to extricate ourselves from our self-induced predicament.

    Biodiversity loss may turn out to be the sleeper issue of the century.

    https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2017/11/16/humans-blind-imminent-environmental-collapse/

    Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  November 25, 2017

      This article is chalk full of very interesting information. Well worth the read.

      Reply
      • Paul in WI

         /  November 25, 2017

        I agree. This should be required reading for everyone. Thanks for sharing.

        Reply
  43. Andy_in_SD

     /  November 25, 2017

    Generating three centimeters of top soil takes 1,000 years, and if current rates of degradation continue all of the world’s top soil could be gone within 60 years

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/only-60-years-of-farming-left-if-soil-degradation-continues/

    Reply
  44. coloradobob

     /  November 25, 2017

    Australia is home to a global hot spot for sea-surface temperatures, with a record burst of prolonged heat in the country’s south-east helping to make conditions several degrees warmer than average.

    Daily weather charts generated by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show the unusual warmth is almost unmatched around the world, compared with normal temperatures.
    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/global-hot-spot-exceptional-heat-pushes-up-ocean-temperatures-off-australia-20171125-gzsrey.html

    Average sea-surface temperatures around the nation have not posted a cooler-than-average year for more than two decades, and in 2016 set a new annual record.

    Reply
  45. coloradobob

     /  November 25, 2017

    Frozen volcanoes in Iceland could start erupting more—especially as glaciers continue to melt.

    Scientists examined volcanic ash preserved in peat deposits and lake sediments and discovered a period with less volcanic activity around 5,000 years ago. The volcanoes were much quieter during this time period, and it happened to coincide with a drop in global temperature. The study, published last week in Geology, concluded that the slowdown in volcanic activity thousands of years ago was likely due to the extensive glacier cover. Now, as Iceland’s glaciers are melting due to climate change, volcanoes may start waking up.

    http://www.newsweek.com/volcanoes-iceland-could-start-erupting-more-often-and-it-might-be-because-721371

    Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  November 25, 2017

      I’ve wondered about the mantle back pressure at Greenland being reduced to melt, thus allowing the mantle to spread easier from Iceland. Greenland is bouncing up at an incredible rate, and that lost weight must have an impact on the subduction zone.

      Reply
    • bill h

       /  November 26, 2017

      Bob, very interesting (and troubling). This reinforces observations published a few months back of increasing volcanic activity in Antarctica correlating with melting ice sheets. IIRC it was occurring in the West Antarctic peninsula, which lies along the same plate boundary as the Andes. The ridicululous thing is that Watts and his acolytes have decided to reverse the chain of causality and blame the increased volcanic activity for the glacier retreat, even though ice melt is correlated with proximity to an active volcano.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  November 26, 2017

        This is a topic I’ve long been interested in, it’s also linked to an increase in rockfalls in high mountains . In the sense we are , melting the the corks, and the glue of these once cold places , and the geology is responding. Andy touched on Greenland , and the unloading of it’s mass as well as the direct mass over Iceland. There was paper a few weeks back on SLR . Very interesting in that sea levels go down near large melting ice sheets. So that is is working to unload the pressure around Iceland.
        As for Watts , and that tribe morons , “They couldn’t hit a bull in the butt with a bass fiddle.”

        Reply
        • 12volt dan

           /  November 27, 2017

          It would seem we are in for more earthquakes starting next year.

          “The link between Earth’s rotation and seismic activity was highlighted last month in a paper by Roger Bilham of the University of Colorado in Boulder and Rebecca Bendick of the University of Montana in Missoula presented at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.

          “The correlation between Earth’s rotation and earthquake activity is strong and suggests there is going to be an increase in numbers of intense earthquakes next year,” Bilham told the Observer last week.”

          If this holds up then ice loss on top of a slowing rotation could make things nasty in the future.

          from the guardian

          https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/nov/18/2018-set-to-be-year-of-big-earthquakes

  46. Robert in New Orleans

     /  November 26, 2017

    Utah’s Pando aspen grove is the most massive living thing known on Earth. It may die soon.
    http://www.sltrib.com/news/2017/11/11/utahs-pando-aspen-grove-is-the-most-massive-living-thing-known-on-earth-it-may-die-soon/#gallery-carousel-8002763
    Climate change may not be the direct factor of the groves condition, but it has to be considered as an environmental stressor that has some bearing on this situation.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 26, 2017

      Thanks for this one RiNO, once upon a time I drilled in the Fish Lake National Forest.

      Reply
  47. kassy

     /  November 26, 2017

    Energy from electric cars could power our lives — but only if we improve the system
    Two apparently contradictory studies come together with recommendations

    :
    Power stored in electric cars could be sent back to the grid — thereby supporting the grid and acting as a potential storage for clean energy — but it will only be economically viable if we upgrade the system first. Scientists now show how their seemingly contradictory findings actually point to the same outcome and recommendations.

    Electric cars store excess energy when they are idle. Vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology makes it possible to transfer that energy back to the grid when the car is not being used. This energy could help regulate the frequency of the electricity supply, reduce the amount of electricity purchased at peak times and increase the power output of the system.
    Two recent studies, one by Dr. Kotub Uddin at the University of Warwick in the UK and the other by Dr. Matthieu Dubarry at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, seem contradictory, with one suggesting that V2G degrades car batteries and the other that it improves battery life. But the two scientists worked together to look at how their studies overlap, showing that they actually come to the same conclusion.
    “Although both our papers seem contradictory, they are actually complementary,” said Dr. Dubarry. “V2G is not going to be easy, but, if done properly, it has a chance to make a difference for both utilities and electric vehicle owners. We need more research to understand the process better and benefit from the technology.”

    Dr. Uddin says funding is needed to develop new testing standards and control strategies to guide policies that support V2G. One key element to improving the system, he says, will be the measurement of battery degradation.
    “The metrics used to define battery degradation may also impact the optimization process,” he explained. “A critical component is who is responsible for estimating battery degradation? Utilities are currently taking the lead in the EU, but it might be more economical for the battery manufacturers or car manufacturers to do it. In this case, standards need to be written which define what we mean by ‘state of health’ when it comes to batteries, and the metrics that are used to determine it.”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171122114032.htm

    Reply
  48. coloradobob

     /  November 26, 2017

    Bean counting –

    Hurricane victims are headed for homelessness

    An affordable housing crisis is deepening in Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Even before the storms, each community had severe shortages of affordable rental homes.

    Houston and Orlando had fewer than 18 affordable and available rental homes for every 100 of the lowest income seniors, people with disabilities and families struggling to get by. In Puerto Rico 45 percent, and the Virgin Island 30 percent, of the population lived below the poverty level – far higher than the 15 percent national average.

    The vast majority of the poorest families in each location were paying at least half of their limited incomes on rent, leaving few resources for their other basic needs, like food, healthcare, transportation, or for savings for when disasters hit.

    http://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/361546-hurricane-victims-are-headed-for-homelessness

    Reply
    • Genomik

       /  November 27, 2017

      The default short term is weather events destroy value hence the hurricanes lower local GDP etc. What happens ext is dependent on especially politics. Rebuild or close our eyes?

      Reply
  49. coloradobob

     /  November 26, 2017

    Bean counting –
    The Number Of People Who Think Puerto Rico Isn’t In America Is Alarming

    The startling results were laid bare in polls conducted both last year, and earlier this year. In 2016, a poll from The Economist/YouGov found that fewer than half of all Americans (based on a sample of 1,933 people) knew that children born in Puerto Rico, to Puerto Rican parents, were American citizens. That’s just 43 percent of the poll’s respondents. Conversely, 41 percent claimed such people were simply “Puerto Rican,” while 15 percent replied “not sure.”

    https://www.bustle.com/p/the-number-of-people-who-think-puerto-rico-isnt-in-america-is-alarming-5550198

    Reply
    • Brian

       /  November 27, 2017

      I honestly didn’t know until Hurricane Maria that all Puerto Ricans were American Citizens. To be fair though, I’m not an American Citizen either.

      Reply
  50. wharf rat

     /  November 26, 2017

    The California Effect
    Winter 2017

    With the U.S. government backing away from climate commitments, states are now taking the lead—none more profoundly than the Golden State. California’s pioneering carbon market is reforming industry while fueling conservation across the nation.

    https://www.nature.org/magazine/archives/the-california-effect.xml

    “When I started working on this, California was the eighth-largest economy in the world and the 12th-largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Today California is the sixth-largest economy and the 19th-largest emitter.”

    Reply
  51. Methane madness

     /  November 26, 2017

    I’ be been talking for 10 years about the rapid collapse of Antarctica as opposed to slow melting, of course the collapse of the Ross ice shelf is a big un

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  November 26, 2017

      Mm –
      You are now in front of the choir. Please begin your sermon.
      Insert Smiley Face Here.

      Reply
  52. Perhaps this is slightly off the thread, but it seems as though the fact some 450 nuclear power plants exists around this planet appears to be a stark problem when discussing rising oceans and inundated coast lines, as the maps I have found dot them right next to some body of water. The discussions on this are practically null, and if no comment is made with this attempt, I will subside to the silence and take it as I perceive it to be, the unthinkable, unsolvable and the pile of poop in the room no one has a reply for, because it stinks so damn bad… 30 years to decommission one, and typically all waste is buried on site.

    Reply
    • It’s a problem. However, it’s also worth noting that with nuclear’s negative learning curve, we’re unlikely to see many new plants built apart from places like China. Unfortunately, waste management has always been a problem with these sites. If we’re going to deal with it effectively, we’ll have to move waste to other places (Yucca Mountain etc). Unfortunately there’s no really great choice. But just leaving it would be the worst choice.

      Worth noting, though that decomissioned reactor waste is not nearly as much of a problem as meltdown waste (Fukushima/Chernobyl). The thing that we should be working on, RE nuclear and in addition to working to shut down both coal and gas, is making sure that near coastline sites are decommissioned and cleaned ahead of the sea level rise issue. We should be working on the lowest elevation sites now.

      This is not an unmanageable problem — as some have suggested. It’s just a problem that few politicians want to address at present.

      In any case, we should be clear that reducing fossil fuel emissions as rapidly as possible buys more time to effectively deal with near coast waste issues like nuclear plants.

      Reply
  53. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Everyone watch this –
    James Burke, Connections², Episode 5 Something For Nothing
    Trust me , you will love it .

    Reply
  54. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 7 Photo Finish

    Reply
  55. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 8 Separate Ways

    Reply
  56. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 9 Separate Ways

    Reply
  57. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 10 Deja Vu

    Reply
  58. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 11 New Harmony

    Reply
  59. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 12 Hot Pickle

    Reply
  60. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 13 The Big Spin

    Reply
  61. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    The garden of knowledge.

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 14 Bright Ideas

    Reply
  62. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 15 Making Waves

    Reply
  63. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 18 Sign Here

    Reply
  64. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 19 Better Than the Real Thing

    Reply
  65. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    James Burke, Connections², Episode 20 Flexible Response

    Reply
    • Vaughn Anderson

       /  November 27, 2017

      CB, thanks for the reminders about James Burke: Connections. I have watched many or all of them at some point. All the episodes for me were truly a learning experience. I am trusting that James Burke and his crew fully researched the material because they are all truly fascinating. So now I “need” to watch them again. I really appreciate the links and the reminder. Wow!

      Reply
    • Yes,Thanks Colo Bob

      Reply
  66. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Oasis – Wonderwall –

    Reply
  67. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Well Trump , just cut my ties with my oldest friend.

    8th grade 1963. 54 years.

    Reply
  68. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Bob Marley – Get up, stand up 1980

    Reply
  69. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Reply
  70. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    Steppenwolf – Monster

    Reply
  71. coloradobob

     /  November 27, 2017

    J.D Souther – Midnight Prowl HQ Sound

    Reply
  72. redskylite

     /  November 27, 2017

    A poison in our island

    US Army engineers sealed it up with a half-metre thick concrete cap almost the size of an Australian football ground, then left the island.

    Now with sea levels rising, water has begun to penetrate the dome.

    A report commissioned by the US Department of Energy in 2013 found that radioactive materials were leeching out, threatening the already tenuous existence of Enewetak locals.

    “It’ll be a very devastating event if it really leaks. We’re not just talking the Marshall Islands, we’re talking the whole Pacific.”

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-27/the-dome-runit-island-nuclear-test-leaking-due-to-climate-change/9161442

    Reply
  73. Greg

     /  November 27, 2017

    Another innovation in the solar space. Greenhouses with solar power integrated and ability to still grow plants underneath at lower costs and even increased productivity.

    See details:
    https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/26/smart-solar-greenhouse-generates-electricity-grows-food/

    Reply
    • Yeah. This kind of stuff is very helpful. Multiple forms of sustainability combined.

      Also noticed that a new study found that solar + farming actually makes farmland more productive from a food production standpoint. Going to dig into that further. But if validated, that’s a pretty interesting find. May have something to do with diffuse light being more helpful for food growing plants.

      Reply
  74. Arctic forecast for the next 10 days is showing around 4.5 to 5+ C anomaly more or less across then entire Arctic ocean. It’s been a pretty regular occurrence over the past few years, but I still always find it disturbing.

    Reply
    • We’re on a similar track to 2016 so far with the exception that Fall/Winter 2016 was a bit warmer. The larger heat spikes are cropping up pretty regularly, though.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: