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Rise of the Fimbul Fires: Climate Change Enhanced Jets of Flame Rage Across Southern California

Some say the world will end in fire. Some say in ice. From what I’ve tasted of desire. I hold with those who favor fire… — Robert Frost

I am Lorn Sparkfell, guardian of First Frost, without which the world will burn. — Luthiel’s Song, The Death of Winter

*****

Fimbul is an old icelandic word for mighty, giant, great. It is an archaic word that has fallen out of modern use. But considering the fact that the fires now ripping through Southern California are both out of the context of recent milder climates and have explosively expanded to gigantic proportion, it is perhaps time that we should re-introduce the term.

(Photograph of Southern California Fires taken from the International Space Station on December 7 of 2017.)

Sections of Southern California are now experiencing never-before-seen levels of fire hazard as winds gusting to near 80 mph across the region are fanning five out of control blazes. The fires are burning during what should be the cooler month of December. But cool conditions have eluded that part of the state. And the blow-torch like Santa Ana winds that are fanning the flames are being enhanced by conditions consistent with human-caused climate change.

Today, the fire index for Southern California is 296. The threshold for an extreme fire index is 165. And 296 is the highest fire index So Cal has ever experienced according to local firefighters. Fire index is a measure of fire risk. So, if these reports are correct, this region has never seen fire danger hit such an extreme intensity.

(Hurricane Force Winds Fuel Massive Wildfires in Southern California from ClimateState.)

Five fires now burning across Southern California have consumed upwards of 120,000 acres — or a region larger than Atlanta. The Thomas Fire in Ventura County is the largest at approximately 96,000 acres. The Rye Fire, Creek Fire, and Skirball fire all continue to burn. And a new fire — the Horizon Fire in Malibu — has recently ignited. None of these fires are more than 15 percent contained. So all are effectively still out of control.

In total, approximately 20,000 buildings are threatened by fire with more than 300 homes and businesses burned already. 200,000 people are under evacuation orders — enough to fill a relatively large city. Thankfully, there have been no reports of loss of human life so far. But animals, including these horses, haven’t been so lucky.

(Average temperatures across the U.S. West were around 4 C above normal for the entire past 30 day period. This is not at all typical. Image source: Global and Regional Climate Anomalies.)

Climate change skeptics and deniers will try to say that such events are normal for California. That fires always happen. That weather is variable. And tell you five or six or seven other kinds of hogwash.

But the fact is that these conditions are not normal. That California has just experienced its worst fire year on record. That the incidence of large fires in the West has risen fourfold since the mid 1980s. And that report after report after report are linking presently worsening fire conditions in the region to climate change.

Other politically motivated individuals will tell you that now is not the time to discuss climate change — by stating that responding to the disaster itself is more important that examining causes. This is also a red herring — as any effective disaster response will include a responsible review of causes.

To this point, if we are to be effective in both responding to this disaster and in reducing future harm, we should look seriously at the underlying causes that are making fires in places like California worse. And if we are exploring why these Fimbul Fires are happening now, then the big issue is climate change — writ large.

CREDITS:

Hat tip to Colorado Bob

Hat tip to Andy in San Diego

Hat tip to ClimateState

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128 Comments

  1. wili

     /  December 7, 2017

    Thanks for all your coverage. The numbers and pictures are truly stunning. And…we’ve only just begun!

    Reply
  2. eleggua

     /  December 7, 2017

    ‘The most accurate climate change models predict the most alarming consequences, study finds’
    By Chris Mooney December 6, 2017

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/12/06/the-most-accurate-climate-change-models-predict-the-most-alarming-consequences-study-claims/

    “….The climate change simulations that best capture current planetary conditions are also the ones that predict the most dire levels of human-driven warming, according to a statistical study released in the journal Nature Wednesday…..

    The research found the models that do the best job capturing the Earth’s actual “energy imbalance,” as the authors put it, are also the ones that simulate more warming in the planet’s future.

    Under a high warming scenario in which large emissions continue throughout the century, the models as a whole give a mean warming of 4.3 degrees Celsius (or 7.74 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.7 degrees Celsius, for the period between 2081 and 2100, the study noted. But the best models, according to this test, gave an answer of 4.8 degrees Celsius (8.64 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.4 degrees Celsius.

    Overall, the change amounted to bumping up the projected warming by about 15 percent…..”

    Reply
  3. eleggua

     /  December 7, 2017

    Reply
    • eleggua

       /  December 7, 2017

      Sorry for the small image; didn’t embed as intended. Full-size image at the Post article linked just above.

      Reply
  4. eleggua

     /  December 7, 2017

    ‘It’s been 10 weeks since Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico. Here’s where recovery stands’
    Nation Nov 30, 2017

    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/its-been-10-weeks-since-hurricane-maria-hit-puerto-rico-heres-where-recovery-stands

    6 percent of power on the island has been restored
    93 percent of the island has access to water, but it remains on a boil advisory
    73 percent of cell sites are up and running
    982 survivors remain in 41 shelters across the island

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reported it has removed more than 639,000 cubic yards of debris. But it is still tasked with removing at least 2.7 million remaining cubic yards.

    …Democratic Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren unveiled a bill that would provide $114 billion in aid to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Their bill includes:

    The creation of a “credit facility” within the treasury that would approve grants for disaster-related cash shortfalls of up to $57.2 billion
    $27 billion for infrastructure building, including renewable energy sources
    Debt relief
    $51 billion for economic development
    An extended deadline for people to apply for FEMA assistance to 240 days after the disaster occurred

    San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz, who has been critical of the federal response in Puerto Rico, lauded the legislation.

    “The bill that Senator Sanders has introduced in the United States Congress is a comprehensive plan that provides the blueprint for the transformation of Puerto Rico,” Cruz said in a statement.

    The package is unlikely to get a vote, analysts say. “

    Reply
  5. Witchee

     /  December 7, 2017

    Nice allusion to the Fimbul winter that ends the world in the Norse legends. We have a future of fire, not ice.

    Reply
  6. coloradobob

     /  December 7, 2017

    Another ISS picture –

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 7, 2017

      Looks like Iceland without the ice.

      Reply
    • Yeah. Definitely has a volcanic look to it.

      Reply
    • Apneaman

       /  December 9, 2017

      Picture of what/where specifically?

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  December 10, 2017

        Thomas Fire, Skirball Fire and others in the Los Angeles/SoCal area. That picture was taken on the 6th. Thomas Fire still going, picking up and spreading again today.

        ‘Fire crews fighting to defend Carpinteria from re-energized Thomas fire’
        12.10.2017 11:25am

        http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-thomas-fire-santa-barbara-fire-20171210-story.html

        “The Santa Barbara County town of Carpinteria was under siege from the Thomas fire Sunday as fire crews fought to keep the destructive blaze from the picturesque beach community.

        With the 170,000-acre fire burning out of control, authorities issued evacuation orders for portions of Carpinteria and nearby Montecito and urged residents outside the designated areas to begin preparing to leave.

        Santa Ana winds, aided by extremely low humidity, pushed the Ventura County fire over the Santa Barbara County line Saturday night. The winds that bedeviled fire crews from San Diego to Ojai last week were gusting at speeds of up to 35 mph, fire officials said.

        Their greatest concern was for Carpinteria. The fire was moving west above the city in an area of very dry vegetation that hasn’t burned in about 100 years, said Steve Swindle, spokesman for the Ventura County Fire Department.

        “The fuels in there are thick and they’re dead so they’re very receptive to fire,” Swindle said…..

        Even as the Thomas fire surged, the approximately 8,500 firefighters battling the six wildfires across Southern California were making progress.

        Firefighters had a successful day Saturday battling flames on the southern edge of the Thomas fire — working toward the coast as well as parts of Ojai — thanks to wind conditions and crews’ ability to improve the fire lines they had established, according to Bill Murphy, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire…..

        In Los Angeles County, firefighters made progress on blazes in Sylmar, Santa Clarita and Bel-Air. The Creek fire was 90% contained, and the Rye fire was 90% contained as of Sunday morning. The Skirball fire was 75% contained.

        In northern San Diego County, the Lilac fire, which was 60% contained, had burned 4,100 acres and destroyed 182 structures along the Highway 76 corridor that stretches west from the 15 Freeway through Bonsall and Fallbrook. Officials cautioned that dry, swirling Santa Ana winds could kick up embers that might start new fires.”

        Reply
  7. coloradobob

     /  December 7, 2017

    Stressed-Out Narwhals Don’t Know Whether to Freeze or Flee, Scientists Find

    Narwhals — the unicorns of the sea — show a weird fear response after being entangled in nets. Scientists say this unusual reaction to human-induced stress might restrict blood flow to the brain and leave the whales addled.

    The narwhals swim hard and dive deep to escape after being released from a net, but at the same time their heart rates dramatically plummet, according to a newly published report in Science. It’s almost like they are simultaneously trying to freeze and flee.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/12/07/569160429/stressed-out-narwhals-dont-know-whether-to-freeze-or-flee-scientists-find

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 7, 2017

      There’s an excellent NOVA program about the Icelandic Ocras going into Northern Canadian waters to hunt the Narwhals. The opening of the Arctic has made this possible

      They were absolutely terrified, The Orcas drove the entire pod against the beach, and killed the entire pod. The Narwhals were screaming at each other, the Orcas were dead silent.

      Reply
      • Yeah, watched that. Always knew Orcas were great hunters, but wow. There was even on narwhal that got away and one of the Orcas chased it down. Whale’s gotta eat.

        Reply
  8. coloradobob

     /  December 7, 2017

    West of the jet , Alberta, Canada –

    Reply
    • 20-30 C positive anomaly in that region right now.

      Reply
    • Syd Bridges

       /  December 8, 2017

      I remember a few “Alberta clippers” from when I lived in Michigan. They could be so cold with very strong winds. The air was so dry that it still sublimed the snow on a couple of occasions, something I had never seen before. According to this article, they often result in a warming in Alberta.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberta_clipper

      Reply
      • Except that these conditions aren’t being caused by a Chinook at the moment (Alberta Clipper to you.) These warm conditions are almost continual throughout the winter now for the past ten years in Alberta, and result from being on the west side of the wavy jet stream and under the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge (which results from the polar amplification that’s brought on by climate change.)

        A Chinook (an Alberta Clipper) is just a very short term weather event and one that happens when it rains hard on the west coast. The temperatures Bob posted are not a Chinook (a Clipper) and are just the new Alberta winters we’ve been experiencing now for the past ten years, and they are caused by the same jet stream ridging that’s also brought 6C temps (43F) to Whitehorse in the Yukon Territories this past week. The end of Bob’s forecast drops off only because at 10 days out, they start to filter historical averages into the forecast. In recent years though, as that ten days grows closer, the forecasters often wind up adjusting the forecast upwards as the ten days draws nearer … over and over again, as the cold never actually winds up actually materializing under the new resilient ridge pattern.

        I wanted to clarify this distinction, because many climate deniers in Alberta will try and attribute the new mild Alberta winter temperatures to just being simple Chinooks (Alberta Clippers.) However, Chinooks are just short term passing weather events, and one’s that only occur a few times over a winter. Chinooks are also associated with dangerously high winds here, and there is no such wind here at the moment. This is definitely the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge at work here, which has become almost a permanent feature over the past ten winters here in Alberta. So, this isn’t just some five day “weather event,” this is actually Alberta’s new winter climate due to the western ridge that develops every year over North America during the winter, due to changes in the Arctic.

        The distinction is important, because a five day “normal” weather event would mean nothing much at all, and would not mean climate change. No, this is actually the new persistent Alberta winters we get, all winter long, and not some short term weather event from of the past. Yes, we still get Chinooks … and then it REALLY warms up, even more, and the dangerous winds are also always present with a Chinook pattern. There’s no wind here at the moment, because this isn’t a Chinook causing these temperatures, it’s the resilient ridge (being on the west side of the jet stream.)

        I just wanted to make that clear, because there’s a big difference there. This isn’t any temporary Clipper “weather event” causing these temperatures … this is the work of the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge. We’ll likely spend most of the winter under these mild conditions again too, just like we have over the past ten winters already with the new realities of climate change, and with the effect it’s had on the winter jet stream in North America.

        Not a Chinook!

        http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/373/2045/20140170

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171205092142.htm

        Reply
      • 12volt dan

         /  December 11, 2017

        The clippers are rolling through here now, one after the other.

        that’s in Muskoka Ontario

        Reply
        • 12volt dan

           /  December 11, 2017

          I should add that they bring lots of snow to this area.
          https://weather.gc.ca/city/pages/on-9_metric_e.html

        • Dobby

           /  December 11, 2017

          So you’re implying that that’s where Alberta’s five weeks of heat have come from then?

          Nobody said the clippers aren’t still rolling through, as they always have and always will. All I was pointing out is that it’s not what’s causing the absence of winter in Alberta or the extreme heat at the moment, which is happening because of a different climate change phenomenon called a ridiculously resilient ridge, which results from arctic amplification and its subsequent slowing of the jet stream.

          You’re observations are incredibly misleading when they’re posted in the context of someone pointing to the continued unseasonably warm temperatures in Alberta, and that’s what this conversation was about. It amounts to spreading misinformation and creating a false narrative that supports the “it’s only a clipper” narrative that the oil companies in the area promote.

          Those temperatures … are not from a chinook, clipper or no clipper.

        • Yes. The ridge has been quite persistent there lately and is the primary cause of the warmth Alberta is presently experiencing.

        • Dobby

           /  December 11, 2017

          Thanks Robert. I tried to post a graphic of the phenomenon showing the ridge and its extent, but was unable to. Again, it’s a big thing here in Alberta with oil people denying the ridge created by the arctic warming, and instead blaming it all on an unrelated local weather phenomenon, so thanks for being on board with the better information.

        • Cheers, Dobby. Thanks for staying sharp.

          Posted this general thread about the issue on twitter. Thinking about posting a focus article on the extreme warmth experienced in Alberta recently.

        • Dobby

           /  December 11, 2017

          It’s difficult when combinations of things get turned around and turned into just being ‘one’ thing. Yes, two days of a very mild chinook shot our temps up from 10C to the noted record breaking 15C in the past two days. However, it’s important to not loose sight of the baseline heat from that ridge that was present before and after the temporary chinook … the unusual 10C temps that were already present because of the ridge.

          When all of the heat justl gets attributed to being the result of the two day chinook … then we have confusion, and climate change gets reduced to being just some ordinary two day weather event in the minds of people who don’t live here. I’ve been watching the effects of those ridges for years now as the jet stream has slowed and become more wavy. We get stuck under that ridge a lot now during winter here, for long periods of time.

          I look forward to your posts, as always.

        • Exactly this. Everyone should read this comment.

  9. coloradobob

     /  December 7, 2017

    RS way off topic , if you want to delete I understand, but given your history you may find this interesting –

    Gun sales and accidental deaths from guns spiked in the months following the mass murder at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, new research says. The study suggests that the more people are exposed to firearms, the more likely it is that someone will die.

    Using Google trends data, researchers at Wellesley College spotted an increase in searches for phrases including “buy gun” and “clean gun” in the five months after a shooter at an elementary school murdered 20 children and six adults. Based on a spike in background checks, the researchers estimate that 3 million more guns than average were sold during this five-month period. That corresponded with an increase of 60 accidental gun deaths — including 20 children, the authors report today in the journal Science.

    https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/7/16748124/gun-sales-deaths-violence-sandy-hook-shooting-newtown-google-searches

    Reply
    • bobinspain

       /  December 7, 2017

      It might be a bit off topic Bob, but it’s noteworthy for its profound sadness. One can’t help but ask ‘why, why, why…?’ I’ll never get all the violence, but I guess we’re just supposed to live with it.

      Reply
      • Brian

         /  December 8, 2017

        “I’ll never get all the violence, but I guess we’re just supposed to live with it.”

        Wow. What a defeatist attitude and a ridiculous statement. You disagree that it’s ridiculous? Let me prove my point by applying it to the environmental challenges we have today:

        Well climate change sucks, but I guess we’re just supposed to live with it.

        Now do you see how ridiculous that is?

        Sometimes, when you want the world to change, you actually have to do something about it.

        Reply
        • I took Bob’s statement to mean that gun advocates just expect us to live with the violence. But this is a very good point, Brian. We should absolutely be looking at ways to reduce gun violence. We shouldn’t just be expected to live, or in many cases to die, with it.

          The same is true with climate change.

          We have the means to reduce the damage from these problems, to potentially solve them in the long term. If we care about human life and well being, we should use the means that we have available.

        • From Chapter 23 of “The Localization Reader.”
          (Lester W. Milbrath – Promoting a Partnership Society)

          Occasionally, we all hear aphorisms that purportedly express truth about human nature and human society. For example, I have often heard these phrases: “We have always had wars and we always will have”; “People are naturally selfish and competitive.” Probably the personal philosophy and worldview of many people is a mere collection of such aphorisms. Aphorisms have a surface truth quality that may not survive a close analysis, but they persist as part of the myth structure of society because they are not clearly falsifiable. They also serve as excuses for not acting to make a better society.

          The analysis presented above provides a basis for falsifying some of these aphorisms, and it presents an opportunity for each of us to make a contribution to social learning by challenging their presumed validity when they are brought up in conversation. Let us examine the validity of a few of the more common aphorisms:

          1. “We have always had wars and we always will have.” A variation on this is, “Human nature being what it is, we will always have war and conflict.” These statements erroneously assume that wars have been present throughout human history and that being warlike is rooted in human nature. Eisler’s evidence discloses that civilizations existed for thousands of years with few wars. Schmookler helps us to see that war is more rooted in the structure of the dominator civilization than in the essence of being human. Humans have a strong desire and need for peace that far outweighs their urgings toward war. If we desire to reduce the probability of war, we should try to change our beliefs and our social structure so that humans are not pressed into going to war.

          2. People are naturally aggressive and competitive. This statement also implies that aggression is rooted in our biological makeup. Is this so? As much evidence is found that people are naturally loving and cooperative as that they are aggressive and competitive. Social structures and sex roles put people into positions where the only posture that makes sense is to be aggressive and competitive. The behavior demanded of people in business competition is a good example of structurally fostered aggression; failing to be aggressive results in being eliminated from the competition. But, we should keep in mind that much of life does not require aggression and that we can be successful in achieving what we want by acting cooperatively and lovingly. As a matter of fact, recent research shows that cooperation is more likely to be successful over a long time than aggressive competition (for example, Axelrod, 1984). Some societies emphasize competition on the presumption that it will lead to a better society, while other societies emphasize cooperation for the same reason. The one emphasis is just as compatible with human nature as the other. It is difficult to imagine any society being totally competitive or totally cooperative, but we can play some role in tilting the emphasis toward cooperation.

          3. Men will always dominate women. Again Eisler’s and Schmookler’s reviews of history show that partnership societies existed for thousands of years before male domination became the norm. Continued domination of men over women mainly results from a belief on the part of both men and women that domination is justified. Those beliefs and their supporting social structure can be changed.

          4. People first look out for themselves. The implication is that people are basically selfish and will always put their own interests first; that asking people to subordinate their personal interests to those of the group or community is contrary to human nature. The economic theory of modern competitive capitalism is based on this premise. While it holds for much economic behavior, this premise certainly does not explain the following kinds of human behavior: parents sacrificing for their children; citizens giving time and money to group or community endeavors; taking the trouble to vote in elections when you know your vote cannot affect the outcome; working to restore and maintain a clean environment when everyone benefits from your efforts, even those who do nothing; soldiers sacrificing their lives in war; terrorists gladly sacrificing their lives for their cause. Social scientists have conducted extensive experiments based on the “prisoner’s dilemma” game, which assumes that people will act in their personal self-interest. These experiments have repeatedly shown that people will sacrifice their personal interest for the good of the group, especially if the opportunity is provided for knowing and understanding what the group interest is (for an example see Van de Kragt, Orbell, and Dawes, 1983).

          5. The System is so big, powerful, and unyielding that there is no use trying to change it. This belief is widely held and based on considerable evidence; it also is supported by Schmookler’s analysis of power. Yet, as indicated above, history provides many examples of social systems that changed: feudalism, slavery, and colonialism have virtually disappeared; in recent decades, several societies peacefully moved from dictatorships to democracy. Much of this book is devoted to examining the possibility for system change and to suggesting ways for ordinary people to help further that change. Finally, our analysis shows that we have no choice but to change. Facing that prospect, it is wiser to believe that ordinary people can help bring about change than to deny cynically that change is possible.

        • Excellent discussion. Very pertinent to the present problem at hand.

        • That said, I wouldn’t necessarily say that aphorisms themselves are to blame. You can craft an aphorism to project the desired impression. The problem comes, all the more so, from the internal drive not to act to address harms and wrongs and the mythology that surrounds it.

          What do we appeal to — entropy, narcissistic chaos, and dissolution? Or preservation, rational, benevolent order, and progress?

        • With regards to the above blog post, I added both Frost’s quote and my own to the header.

          Frost’s quote could be used to imply that some kind of doom is inevitable. It certainly has been by some. But if we are wise, we would take that particular phrase as a warning.

          The use of the term Fimbul fires, was also designed to imply the more dire nature of the present situation. But that said, the implication of inevitability is up to the reader. What do you chose? Fimbul fires as a cause to act, or Fimbul fires as a cause to give up?

          The hint comes from ‘I am Lorn Sparkfell, guardian of First Frost…’

          In other words, if the hero in this regard acts to protect winter, then isn’t it a call for action?

          The machinery for our salvation or destruction is within us. It’s this internal function. But it’s also a choice we have. How do we communicate to unlock our better angels? I think the truth in fiction of just action plays a part in this.

        • And when it comes to systemic problems like climate change and gun violence, the action required is also systemic and on a mass scale. An individual can no more solve a crisis caused by the proliferation of weapons capable of mass murder alone than she or he can solve the problem of climate change alone. In order to solve these problems, individuals need to work together to form social systems, enact laws, change how government functions in order to address causes, and to enable mass social and economic trends that address those same underlying causes.

    • Data RE guns is pretty clear. More guns = more deaths by guns. Arming up the population following a mass shooting is a serious safety issue.

      Reply
      • Robert E Prue

         /  December 7, 2017

        Guns don’t kill people, however, guns make it too easy for the mentally unstable to kill people

        Reply
        • Scott

           /  December 7, 2017

          They also make it easy for the mentally stable to kill people.

        • The statistics are pretty clear, Robert. The more guns are available, the more gun deaths result. The number of gun deaths in the U.S. now around 34,000. Number injured is now 73,000. This is the most for an advanced society by a considerable margin.

          So from a statistical standpoint guns do kill more people. They make it very easy to kill people — both intentionally and accidentally.

      • coloradobob

         /  December 8, 2017

        So sorry this entire idea that more guns means less death I really crazy.

        Reply
      • eleggua

         /  December 8, 2017

        This great piece by Negativland is a culture-jammed autopsy of the influence of American pop culture’s ecstatic celebration of the use of guns as a form of inter-species communication: shoot first, ask questions later.

        Reply
        • Bobinspain

           /  December 9, 2017

          @ Brian. Re my perhaps cryptic but also innocuous attempt at gallows humour all I can say is that not everyone gets my irony 😊

        • eleggua

           /  December 12, 2017

          I got it; seemed obvious here.

    • bobinspain

       /  December 9, 2017

      @ Brian. ‘What a defeatist attitude and a ridiculous statement. You disagree that it’s ridiculous? Let me prove my point by applying it to the environmental challenges we have today’ Brian it’s called irony. I’m sorry that you didn’t get the gallows humour. I won’t insult you back by making some pithy remark about the connection between wit and intelligence.
      In short, it’s best not to use loaded adjectives like ‘defeatist’ and ‘ridiculous’, when ‘world-weary’ and ‘somewhat cynical’ are probably more accurate. It’s also illogical to assume that my cynicism regarding gun control in the USA and, by extension, violence in general has any connection to my opinion regarding environmental challenges.
      ‘If you can’t say something nice – don’t say anything’ (Bambi’s Mom)

      Reply
  10. Syd Bridges

     /  December 7, 2017

    Fimbul is an appropriate word for what we are now seeing. However, it seems that our doom will be because of the Fimbul Summer rather than the Fimbul Winter. But the other afflictions, murder, robbery, disease, and death will be the same.

    In the Norse legends, Ragnarok became inevitable after the death of Baldur. who represented the innocence of the gods. Even the chaining of Loki and Fenris-at the cost of Tyr’s hand-could not stop, but could only delay, the inevitable. We have allowed greed and fear to overcome decency and truth, and the results are now appearing.

    It was only after Ragnarok that the Fire Giant, Surt, having killed Frey, set fire to the world. However, we are doing his job for him now.

    We can only hope that the events we have seen this year will awaken enough people to the danger before it is too late. There are still paths out of this mire, as your posts have shown, but we need enough people to realize the danger and move us away from the abyss.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 7, 2017

      I know zip about the myths , but have always loved the history. These folks laid the very bedrocks of our world. My number one example ……. trail by jury of your peers.

      Reply
    • I hear Surt was a republican funder with heavy investments in Exxon.

      Reply
      • Syd Bridges

         /  December 8, 2017

        If you spell Surt backwards , you get TRUS, which is getting close to someone or another.

        Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 7, 2017

      God do I hate Twitter –

      In the entire CalFire history (from late 1800s), there is only one other #wildfire in SoCal in Dec. >50K acres. That was 1958 Stewart Fire.

      Reply
    • Can be a bit fiddly. Thanks for the info, Bob.

      Reply
  11. Robert E Prue

     /  December 7, 2017

    Always liked Robert Frost. “The woods are lovely, dark, and deep….

    Reply
  12. coloradobob

     /  December 7, 2017

    Facebook avatar –
    I use the the crew of the ” James Caird ” leaving from Elephant Island to cross the Southern Ocean, bound for whaling station on South Georgia, as my avartar , because it is my nature to slip into cynicism, and despair.
    To remind me none of us ever what’s to be in a life boat of cynicism, and despair. I would also remind all here that Winston Churchill suffered from manic depression his entire life. He called it his “Black Dog “. Can you imagine if he had said on September 7, 1940 . ” I don’t see how we get out of this “. After he had said this , ……………..

    “Churchill apparently first used his famous words upon his exit from the Battle of Britain Bunker at RAF Uxbridge on 16 August when visiting the No. 11 Group RAF Operations Room during a day of battle. Afterwards, Churchill told Major General Hastings Ismay, ‘Don’t speak to me, I have never been so moved’.[1] After several minutes of silence he said, ‘Never in the history of mankind has so much been owed by so many to so few’. The sentence would form the basis of his speech to the House of Commons on 20 August.[2]”

    It is my nature to slip into cynicism, and despair. But I want to be in the life boat of hope. Not a bunch of mes, I spent my entire trying to bend this curve.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 7, 2017

      I spent all my life writing what, when I mean want . I have never solved that/

      Reply
    • Thanks Bob, we’re all in that lifeboat with you, seeking a safe shore.

      Reply
      • coloradobob

         /  December 8, 2017

        Oh yes , When they set William Bligh in that boat there were no cry babies , only guts,

        Reply
  13. Robert E Prue

     /  December 7, 2017

    Looked at the drought monitor and I’m surprised that so much of the United States is in abnormally dry to drought conditions! Not just here or there. About half the country!

    Reply
    • Draw a line across the middle U.S. dividing north from south. Over the southern half of the country, drought greatly expanded over the last seven days.

      Reply
  14. Also check out my new video

    Reply
  15. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    One thing one sees the loops in the jet are much more Fimbul. That is more grand , more deep with more muscle. This winter is after the last of the Monarch Butterflies.

    Reply
  16. Seeing these images makes my entire body feel sick. It truly looks like Armageddon.

    Down here people are ‘burning harvested areas and scrap piles before the rains begins.’ It also hurts to witness the deforestation while wondering, ‘how to approach this as a guest in a foreign country?’ In my area they are cutting down trees to sell to the local roadside brick-making areas – working overtime to supply materials for rebuilding after the earthquake…

    I’ll never buy another brick….

    How to approach this is a delicate issue, but ideas are incubating…

    As always, thanks for all that you do…

    Reply
  17. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    I was busy drinking my self to death.
    When she said , come to Ojia, with me.
    I said no way . I am a slave to my old ways.
    She said, don’t move .
    Two weeks later she drives up in a blue Dotson 280 Z.
    I hocked everything .
    Nobody has never had a better trip than that summer.
    She took me to the top of the pass with 35 cents in my pocket. I crossed the West with nothing for the second time.
    She saved my life the girl from Ojia
    To see it all in flames , I was the avocado nudist there , my head was tanned, . my hands were tanned. Otherwise I was bleached as a page of medevil

    Reply
  18. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    It truly looks like Armageddon.

    No it’d hell coming to breakfast . Armageddon. is far worst.

    Reply
  19. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    Southern California may get the Santa Ana winds every year, but — according to recorded history — they’ve never been like this
    LA Times

    Reply
    • Vaughn Anderson

       /  December 8, 2017

      CB, thanks for your insights. Devastating. Look at the mayhem “we” have caused. The fix cannot come too soon because it will probably get much worse before it gets better.

      Reply
  20. Andy_in_SD

     /  December 8, 2017

    Fire now in Fallbrook (at the 76 & 15). Apparently one by Murietta as well. Was watching the smoke from work today. Forecast is 87 for Sunday.

    Came home to wind damage around the house, wind is howling right now. I can hear things moving and getting knocked around outside.

    Reply
    • coloradobob

       /  December 8, 2017

      I bought gourds at Fallbrook , under a huge canopy of very old oak trees.

      Reply
  21. Meanwhile at the other end of the planet, it’s very hot everywhere; problems include human-toxic lake algae – http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/345746/unbelievable-weather-blamed-for-algae-outbreak – the warnings here are more dire than in that article. Also drying everywhere much faster than normal and yes hot “Usually, summer arrives in Wellington and no-one really notices” – https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/345691/i-ve-never-known-a-year-like-it

    Reply
  22. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    Andy, thanks for that ,
    Now we we go to this –

    It`s Not Easy – The Rolling Stones (HQ)

    Reply
    • wili

       /  December 8, 2017

      Thanks, COBob. Here’s a bit darker view of how hard it is just getting by sometimes…

      Reply
  23. coloradobob

     /  December 8, 2017

    Back to that flaming dumpster fire, we once called the leader of the free world.

    I think it’s spread to 52 % of all the voters. If women in the party don’t screw the pooch.

    This is a very big deal. Trump thought he over turned the world. All those pussies he grabbed , are about to bite him in the ass.

    Reply
  24. Abel Adamski

     /  December 8, 2017

    http://tucson.com/news/local/ua-ordered-to-surrender-emails-to-group-that-calls-global/article_8983347d-faff-51b3-9748-f1a83737b637.html
    UA ordered to surrender emails to group that calls global warming a conspiracy

    Time to start collecting names for the forthcoming class action covering loss and damages caused by the growing impact of Global Warming once the insurers and the State can no longer cover the loss and damages

    Reply
  25. kassy

     /  December 8, 2017

    Meanwhile in China:

    China does U-turn on coal ban to avert heating crisis

    China’s government has allowed some northern cities to burn coal in a temporary policy U-turn, as the country faces a heating crisis.
    Beijing had banned the use of coal for heating this winter in an ambitious plan to reduce pollution.
    Recent winters had seen heavy smog blanket China’s northern region.
    But millions are reportedly now left without proper heating, after failing to switch from coal to other fuels in time for winter.
    The coal ban has also reportedly led to a gas shortage as people rushed to switch to the alternative source, which has compounded the problem.

    Chinese media reported on Thursday that the environment ministry had issued a directive to 28 cities across north-east China.
    The statement said the ministry had “discovered that in some areas, works to replace coal with electricity or gas had yet to finish according to plan, and there were anxieties about fuel sources to provide heating”.
    It said that such areas would be allowed to burn coal for heating, adding that in their transition away from coal, they must “continue to ensure that the number one principle should be keeping people warm in winter”.

    Banners put up around the country with slogans like “If the boiler’s coal-fired then get rid of it” and “Anyone who sells or burns coal shall be arrested” constantly remind people of how strict the policy is.

    and more on:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-42266768

    Reply
    • China tends to feel these kinds of growing pains due to the fact that pretty much everything it does, it does big. I’d call this more a temporary set-back than a U turn. China is moving away from coal. It will figure this out.

      Reply
      • kassy

         /  December 8, 2017

        Yeah U-turn is a bad word for it. It would need a reverse in direction which there is clearly not. It’s just that they did not quite finish in time.

        It’s the same as with much popular scientific reporting on the web. Even if the journalist does a great job some editor will butcher the headline or slant it in unhelpful ways.

        I am so used to that that i auto-translated to temporary set-back.

        Now i never wondered how China exactly implements it’s policies but like the second quote shows they are very serious about it. China does things very differently and i would not want to live there but what surprised me (in my dutch bubble) is how non optional it is for individuals. GL secretly burning coal.

        Reply
        • Good points.

          I sometime fill in commentary to help to create a more accurate impression. Phrasing is sometimes pretty key as we are all well aware.

  26. Shawn Redmond

     /  December 8, 2017

    I don’t believe anyone here missed the horror story!
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/07/climate-change-media-coverage-media-matters?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

    Which story did you hear more about this year – how climate change makes disasters like hurricanes worse, or how Donald Trump threwpaper towels at Puerto Ricans?

    If you answered the latter, you have plenty of company. Academic Jennifer Good analyzed two weeks of hurricane coverage during the height of hurricane season on eight major TV networks, and found that about 60% of the stories included the word Trump, and only about 5% mentioned climate change.

    Trump doesn’t just suck the oxygen out of the room; he sucks the carbon dioxide out of the national dialogue. Even in a year when we’ve had string of hurricanes, heatwaves, and wildfires worthy of the Book of Revelation – just what climate scientists have told us to expect – the effect of climate change on extreme weather has been dramatically undercovered. Some of Trump’s tweets generate more national coverage than devastating disasters.

    Reply
  27. kassy

     /  December 8, 2017

    Less visible effects of increased atmospheric carbon include :

    Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region

    BACKGROUND:
    Crops grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) contain less protein. Crops particularly affected include rice and wheat, which are primary sources of dietary protein for many countries.

    RESULTS:
    Under eCO2, rice, wheat, barley, and potato protein contents decreased by 7.6%, 7.8%, 14.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Consequently, 18 countries may lose >5% of their dietary protein, including India (5.3%). By 2050, assuming today’s diets and levels of income inequality, an additional 1.6% or 148.4 million of the world’s population may be placed at risk of protein deficiency because of eCO2. In India, an additional 53 million people may become at risk.
    CONCLUSIONS:
    Anthropogenic CO2 emissions threaten the adequacy of protein intake worldwide. Elevated atmospheric CO2 may widen the disparity in protein intake within countries, with plant-based diets being the most vulnerable. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP41

    https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP41/

    This is also a problem for animals:

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

    Historical data were obtained through the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History archives. These archives contain floral S. canadensis plant samples collected between 1842 and 1998 across a wide range of biogeographic locations throughout the USA and southern Canada. In addition, we supplemented these historical data with S. canadensis samples obtained in situ from Maryland (2008, 2012, 2014) and Texas (2012, 2014). The increase in Ca, from the onset of the industrial revolution to the beginning of the twenty-first century, was highly correlated with the observed decline in pollen protein (r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) with overall pollen protein declining by approximately one-third (from approx. 18 to 12%; figure 2a). Although the entire Ca record is over a 170 year period, the bulk of the Ca increase has, in fact, occurred since the latter half of the twentieth and early twenty-first century (i.e. Ca has risen from approx. 315 ppm in 1960 to 398 ppm in 2014); consequently, the largest decrease in pollen protein for S. canadensis has occurred during that time. The observed decrease in protein is concomitant to a parallel increase in the ratio of carbon to nitrogen (figure 2b). Such an increase is consistent with previous studies and is likely to indicate more substantial increases in carbohydrate to protein ratio as increasing Ca tends to increase the concentration of starch and sugars while reducing the concentration of protein (nitrogen) in plant tissues (e.g. [5,9]).

    http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1828/20160414

    Reply
  28. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    Extremes.

    ‘It’s snowing in south Texas! Yes, you read that right’
    Fri December 8, 2017

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/07/us/south-texas-snow-trnd/index.html

    “Big and fluffy snowflakes fell across parts of south Texas on Thursday, including San Antonio and Austin.
    While snow is common in parts of north Texas, it’s unusual for this region to see snowfall and people shared their delight on social media…

    Renee Santos, a reporter at CNN affiliate KABB, danced in the falling flakes exclaiming, “it was 80 degrees two days ago and now it’s snowing!”….

    This rare snow event isn’t over yet. It’s moving farther south to cities like Corpus Christi and Brownsville. They are expected to get snow throughout the night with 2-3 inches possible around Corpus Christi.
    Corpus Christi has only had eight days on record with measurable snow (0.1″) dating back to 1948. Last time the city saw snow was Christmas eve 2004 and that was their greatest snowfall on record with 2.3 inches….

    …turned into a historic snow night in Houston. The city had not seen more than an inch of snow since 2009, and Thursday’s event was the earliest seasonal snowfall on record, the National Weather Service said.”

    Reply
    • For an explanation of why this is happening, see:

      Read whole thread for full analysis.

      Reply
      • eleggua

         /  December 8, 2017

        Good stuff. Jack Wolf notes:

        Reply
        • Added her to the notes:

        • eleggua

           /  December 8, 2017

          That paper’s is getting some wider attention.

          ‘Arctic ice loss could spell more drought for California, Livermore Lab study finds’
          December 4, 2017

          http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/articleComments/Arctic-ice-loss-could-spell-more-drought-for-12405285.php

          “…Their study outlines a chain of meteorological events that leads to formation of storm-blocking air masses in the North Pacific. The masses are similar to the so-called Ridiculously Resilient Ridge that kept rain from making landfall during California’s five-year drought, forcing widespread water rationing in homes, prompting farmers to fallow fields and causing the Central Valley to sink due to heavy pumping of groundwater.

          The Livermore Lab study, being published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, doesn’t attempt to explain the recent drought, but to help understand future weather patterns. Still, lead author and climate scientist Ivana Cvijanovic said California should expect more arid periods like 2011 to 2016. As such dry spells become more common, the state will average 10 to 15 percent less rain over the long haul, she estimated….”

        • eleggua

           /  December 8, 2017

          “…Dr. Williams said his research suggested another reason that California fires may be getting worse: the vast expansion of urban areas that has taken place in the state over decades. In addition to putting more people at risk, the added heat in those urban areas from human activities — known as the heat-island effect — is reducing summer cloud cover, according to airport records across the state.

          “While people don’t like those clouds, they are probably extremely important for vegetation,” Dr. Williams said, by providing shade and helping the plants retain moisture.

          “We can see that summer clouds are disappearing,” he added. “By the time fall fire season comes around, the fuels probably have less moisture.””

        • Primary driver for present trends is climate change related.

  29. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    “It’s very significant symbolically because it sends a signal that even the people who make money from oil and gas are coming up with divestment plans,” said Michael Webber, deputy director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin. “The Norwegian view is that oil has had a good run and will have a good run for a couple of decades but it’s not the only future that is out there.”

    Reply
  30. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017
    Reply
  31. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    “A 30-year-old photograph taken from a nearby location was placed on the path to the Pastoruri glacier in Áncash, Peru, showing how far the ice has retreated. “

    Reply
  32. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    “….Now scientists are documenting how sequestering carbon in soil can produce a double dividend: It reduces climate change by extracting carbon from the atmosphere, and it restores the health of degraded soil and increases agricultural yields. Many scientists and farmers believe the emerging understanding of soil’s role in climate stability and agricultural productivity will prompt a paradigm shift in agriculture, triggering the abandonment of conventional practices like tillage, crop residue removal, mono-cropping, excessive grazing and blanket use of chemical fertilizer and pesticide. Even cattle, usually considered climate change culprits because they belch at least 25 gallons of methane a day, are being studied as a potential part of the climate change solution because of their role in naturally fertilizing soil and cycling nutrients.

    The climate change crisis is so far advanced that even drastically cutting greenhouse gas emissions won’t prevent a convulsive future by itself — the amount of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere ensures dire trouble ahead. The most plausible way out is to combine emission cuts with “negative-emission” or “drawdown” technologies, which pull greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and into the other pools. Most of these proposed technologies are forms of geoengineering, dubious bets on huge climate manipulations with a high likelihood of disastrous unintended consequences…..”

    Jacques Leslie is a Los Angeles Times contributing opinion writer and the author of “Deep Water: The Epic Struggle Over Dams, Displaced People, and the Environment.”

    Reply
  33. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    ‘California fires: Blazes stretch from Ventura to San Diego County’
    December 8, 2017

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/08/us/california-wildfires/index.html

    “Wildfires roared across Southern California for a fifth day on Friday, with new blazes prompting more evacuations as neighborhoods in San Diego County went up in flames.
    Six large wildfires have scorched 141,000 acres in the state this week, said officials with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire. At least 5,700 firefighters are working to contain the towering walls of flames…..

    New fire: The Lilac Fire in San Diego County started Thursday and grew to 4,100 acres in a few hours, leading to new evacuation orders. Evacuation centers have been set up in affected areas as the fire moves west toward Oceanside and Camp Pendleton….

    Fast winds: Wind gusts in the region will be 35 to 55 mph through Sunday, which can fan the fire, Aissen said…

    The six blazes vary in size and span four counties.
    Thomas Fire: The largest of the fires has scorched 115,000 acres after starting Monday in Ventura County. It’s 5% contained and has destroyed at least 73 residences.
    Creek Fire: The second-largest blaze ignited a day later in neighboring Los Angeles County. It has burned 15,323 acres and is 20% contained.
    Rye Fire: It broke out Tuesday in Los Angeles County and has burned 7,000 acres. Firefighters are making progress, with 25% of the blaze contained.
    Lilac Fire: This fast-moving fire consumed 4,100 acres in a few hours after erupting Thursday in San Diego County. It’s unclear how much of it is contained.
    Skirball Fire: It started Wednesday as a brush fire in Los Angeles County and is now 30% contained.
    Liberty Fire: The blaze in Riverside County has burned 300 acres since it ignited Thursday. It’s 5% contained. “

    Reply
  34. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    Fire in San Diego; ice in San Antonio.

    Reply
  35. Witchee

     /  December 8, 2017

    It’s showtime for dry climes
    And bedlam is dreaming of rain

    When the hills of Los Angeles are burning
    Palm trees are candles in the murder wind
    So many lives on the breeze
    Even the stars are ill at ease
    And Los Angeles is burning

    Bad Religion – Los Angeles Is Burning

    Reply
  36. https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/beyond-data/alaskan-north-slope-climate-change-just-outran-one-our-tools-measure

    Alaskan North Slope climate change just outran one of our tools to measure it, December 6

    On December 4th, the folks in the Climate Monitoring group at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) did what we do pretty much every 4th of the month: we processed the previous month’s data to prepare our initial US climate report. The data from Utqiaġvik, Alaska, was missing, which was odd. It was also missing for all of 2017 and the last few months of 2016. This was even weirder, because we knew we’d kinda marveled at how insanely warm the station had been for several weeks and months during 2017.

    The short version: in an ironic exclamation point to swift regional climate change in and near the Arctic, the average temperature observed at the weather station at Utqiaġvik has now changed so rapidly that it triggered an algorithm designed to detect artificial changes in a station’s instrumentation or environment and disqualified itself from the NCEI Alaskan temperature analysis, leaving northern Alaska analyzed a little cooler than it really was.

    How did that happen? Why is it important? What are the impacts?

    Reply
  37. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    “The threat was so severe that for the first time, state officials used the highest category in their color-coded fire hazard warning system. They painted much of Southern California purple on Thursday, for extreme danger, and many people received warnings to be ready to flee.”

    Reply
  38. islandraider

     /  December 8, 2017

    “Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
    falls drop by drop upon the heart,
    until, in our own despair,
    against our will,
    comes wisdom
    through the awful grace of God.”
    – Aeschylus (c.525-456 BC) as quoted by Bobby Kennedy, April 4th, 1968, when telling a black group he was addressing that Martin Luther King had been shot.

    Reply
  39. eleggua

     /  December 8, 2017

    “Katrin Jakobsdottir, 41, chairwoman of the Left-Green Movement, will lead the government of the North Atlantic island of 340,000 residents after elections in October that were blighted by scandal and voter mistrust….

    Ms. Jakobsdottir, a former education minister, is often cited by opinion polls as being one of the most trusted and well-liked politicians in Iceland, a popularity that far outstrips that of her party. She had campaigned on pledges to restore welfare benefits and to make Iceland carbon neutral by 2040….

    Ms. Jakobsdottir also stressed on Thursday the importance of gender equality, vowed further steps to counter climate change and expressed a willingness to have Iceland take in more refugees.”

    Reply
    • Would she consider moving to the U.S. and running for President? 😉

      Reply
      • Brian

         /  December 8, 2017

        I think if my understanding of your constitution is correct, this would not be allowable.

        Reply
        • eleggua

           /  December 10, 2017

          “I think if my understanding of your constitution is correct, this would not be allowable.”

          That was before the 28th Amendment, aka The Iceland Amendment.

        • Nope. Not allowed. The statement was tongue in cheek.

      • eleggua

         /  December 10, 2017

        Iceland will annex the US in a few years and she’ll be the new, de facto Prez.

        Reply
  40. Keith Antonysen

     /  December 8, 2017

    It is incomprehensible to me that climate change denying politicians are not comprehending the huge amount of damage happening in the US through flood, drought and wildfires; caused through climate being amplified by increasing greenhouse gases.

    Somewhat off topic, but would also relate to areas prone to wildfire, I would expect. A recent paper has stated that houses in areas subject to flooding, house values are lowering.

    Abstract:
    “Homes exposed to sea level rise (SLR) sell at a 7% discount relative to observably equivalent unexposed properties equidistant from the beach. This discount has grown over time and is driven by sophisticated buyers and communities worried about global warming. Consistent with causal identification of long horizon SLR costs, (1) we find no relation between SLR exposure and rental rates, (2) despite decreased remodeling among exposed homeowners, current SLR discounts are not caused by differential investment, (3) results hold controlling for flooded properties and views. Overall, we provide the first evidence on the price of SLR risk and its determinants. These findings contribute to the mixed literature on how investors price long-run risky cash flows and have implications for optimal climate change policy.”
    From:
    https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=739098086122105017064115000103118011123049028029039027085068078111099109126097113094055034030123018059015112073106067096085121038013054059039022125111070089001101002002033088116087029099108026004089031095100102073125121082021121027125015108095000022&EXT=pdf

    Reply
  41. yes, my first thought was how to prevent future fire?, Why is there a Santa Anna wind? After dust bowl, tree wind breaks up to 18,000 miles were planted in U.S.. I heard recently that these are being removed to make way for more farmland income. Can there be a program to plant or reforest areas to the east to “absorb” this blunt force wind current? an inter american rainforest to act as a sponge? Terraforming of sorts. Many stories online of individuals planting groves of trees.

    Reply
    • bobinspain

       /  December 9, 2017

      Thanks for the link daelv. I’ll start following – we need to save the trees! Kind regards

      Reply
  42. Completely out of topic (it´s turning into a bad habit): there´s a quote from “Luthiel’s Song, The Death of Winter” in the beggining of the article… there´s a third book in the series? I have just bought (didn´t receive them yet… I confess to being a luddite that likes real books, not e-ones, so I bought paperbacks) the first two in Amazon, but I didn´t saw a third for sale.

    Reply
  43. Reblogged this on aztex2012.

    Reply
  44. bobinspain

     /  December 9, 2017

    Off topic? Maybe not. They say that they’re not a concern as far as fire is concerned, but I have my doubts:
    http://beta.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-dead-trees-20161118-story.html

    Reply
  45. bobinspain

     /  December 9, 2017

    Food for deep thought:
    “That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs, are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling, can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labours of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the débris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain, that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Only within the scaffolding of these truths, only on the firm foundation of unyielding despair, can the soul’s habitation henceforth be safely built.”
    Author: Bertrand Russell

    Reply

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