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Tesla Model 3 Production Keeps Ramping — Hitting Near 2,400 Per Week in Early April

Past behavior can often be predictive of future results. Sometimes, however, we are pleasantly surprised. Such is the case with Tesla’s Model 3 production ramp this week.

Tesla’s Big Surge Continues

According to reports from both Electrek and Bloomberg, Tesla appears to have sustained weekly rates of Model 3 production above 2,000 for more than 14 days. Indicators for this continued surge come in the form of record VIN number releases. For since late March, the number of Model 3 VINs ordered from the U.S. government has doubled from approximately 14,000 to around 28,000. Meanwhile, Bloomberg’s Model 3 production tracker has surged to 2,394 all-electric vehicles per week. A new record.

(Bloomberg’s Model 3 tracker has captured a big surge in Model 3 production translating through to early Q2. Image source: Bloomberg.)

The big jump in VINs comes along with Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s announcement that he planned to continue Model 3 production rates of over 2,000 vehicles per week into early April. This higher production rate is contrary to past production behavior by Tesla — which typically surges late in a financial quarter and then backs off at the start of a new quarter.

5,000 Per Week Model 3 Production Goal in Sight

And though it is still possible that we could see all-electric, zero-tailpipe emissions Model 3 production slackening a bit following this most recent, apparent much longer-running surge, there are indications that Tesla’s capability is rapidly expanding. First, it appears that two lines are now running for Tesla Model 3 and related battery production. Second, it appears that many of the Model 3 bottlenecks have been addressed. And, third, it looks like new Model 3 production infrastructure continues to spring up in the form of dedicated facilities at Tesla’s Fremont plant and Nevada Gigafactory.

(A drone fly-over of the Tesla Fremont factory shows new buildings that appear to be dedicated to Model 3 production efforts. Video source: Tesla Factory Flyover Drone.)

Tesla’s production legs are, therefore, growing longer. And, in light of this fact, it appears that our earlier estimate that Model 3 would produce between 17,000 and 27,000 during Q2 may fall a bit short. As a result, that estimate is now adjusted upward to 18,000-30,000. This steepening ramp is increasingly possible especially if Tesla is able to maintain production rates in excess of 2,000 Model 3s per week through April and May even as it attempts a surge to 5,000 Model 3s per week by June.

Diversification of Model Line Planned For July

Tesla presently still has around 470,000 reservation holders for the Model 3. However, it’s uncertain how many of these are waiting for the long-range, rear-wheel drive version that is now in production. Past indicators are that the number is around 100 to 120K. Most of the rest either appear to be holding out for the dual motor version or for the lower price version. A 5,000 vehicle per week production rate will quickly eat through remaining long range, rear wheel reservation holders. And it is likely for this reason that Elon Musk is planning to start looking at producing the dual motor Model 3 during July of 2018.

So not only is the pace of Model 3 production quickening, the advent of new Model 3 versions is on the horizon. All-in-all this is good news for Model 3 reservation holders and for renewable energy/climate change response backers in general. We’ll have to watch Tesla indicators closely. But it appears, more and more, that the company is able to put Model 3 production hell behind it. To step it out as an all clean energy mass producer.

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156 Comments

  1. In other news — Wall Street ‘gurus’ short shares of Jesus Christ due to reports that he ‘can’t walk on water fast enough…’ /sarc.

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    • Bloomberg is says 2866 per week now. Elon Musk apparently can walk on water…and he’s starting to run.

      I wasn’t sure that the boss sleeping at the factory was a good idea…this guy keeps proving me wrong. I thought SpaceX was kind of a wild idea…until those boosters turned around and flew back to the Kennedy Space Center and landed simultaneously.

      He talks glibly about resolving production bottlenecks…and then does it.

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  2. wili

     /  April 10, 2018

    In yet other news, FBI raids trump’s personal lawyer’s office and apartment. Things seem to be starting to seriously unwind for the turnip in chief

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  3. Somewhat off topic but very relevant. The heatwave affecting much of Australia is unprecedented for April. Adelaide, the capital of South Australia had a record high for April yesterday, only to beat it again today. Usually one would expect such a record to be a one off and in the very early days of April. To show how widespread the heat is Sydney yesterday had its hottest April day on record and many regional centers have also been experiencing record heat. http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/autumn-heatwave-to-continue-throughout-this-week/news-story/c3445a00b2f686b2cb7cac4b35b57e7e

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    • Thanks for this. I’ve spread the word.

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    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 11, 2018

      I refuse to subscribe to any Murdoch rag, so I don’t get to see what they are writing. Before the cast Iron firewall went up, the comments could have been Daily Caller or Breitbart commentators. Waste of time (that is if they actually publish your comment, you have to be sneaky and appear to follow the party line, just digressing a little to get posted.) Couldn’t be bothered

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      • This particular article was a good one. The Murdoch influence isn’t as strongly apparent in this pub, IMO, as the likes of Fox News.

        Worth noting that the EU just raided Fox for anti-trust violations. I’m somewhat hopeful that Murdoch’s media empire gets broken up. It has generated far too broad a negative impact.

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  4. Abel Adamski

     /  April 10, 2018

    Worth a read, it is just too much for most to comprehend, we are not built that way
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/books/ct-william-vollmann-climate-change-20180409-story.html

    Why we can’t comprehend climate change

    Liked by 1 person

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  5. Abel Adamski

     /  April 10, 2018

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2018/04/09/how-a-small-start-up-firm-wants-to-revitalize-climate-change-research/?utm_term=.0c69172c7a29

    How a small start-up firm wants to revitalize climate change research

    “Columbia is the first of many planned collaborations between Jupiter and academic institutions at the vanguard of understanding climate change science and its impacts,” said Rich Sorkin, CEO of Jupiter. “Collaboration between these partners and our staff … will foster productivity and innovation. Perhaps most importantly, we are accelerating the practical adoption of research.”

    Sorkin designed Jupiter’s community science program to identify and fund science that is close to ready for commercial application and can be integrated into its cloud-based computing framework, on which its climate simulations operate.

    Sorkin said research that might take 10 to 20 years to be applied in government could be put to use in as little as six months at his company. “We have a strong interest in seeing the best available science and technology reach maturity as soon as possible,” he said.

    The partnership is win-win-win for research, business and society, says Columbia’s dean of science, Peter de Menocal. “It’s a new science-delivery model,” he said in an interview. “We win by supporting scientists and making markets and society more resilient to climate change.”
    De Menocal expressed no concern about working with a partner that has a financial stake in its findings. “You don’t want to pollute the discovery process, and to [Sorkin’s] credit, he understands, respects and enforces that,” he said. “The science is going to unfold how it’s going to unfold. Then it’s up to [Sorkin] to see if there’s a market for that knowledge.”

    In all, Jupiter said it will invest more than $1 million at Columbia, including contributions from a network of philanthropic partners that it is cultivating. “Many of [Sorkin’s] investors are private individuals who have philanthropic foundations,” de Menocal said. “He’s made it clear to those investors he’d be very happy if they invested in science.”

    “We think by a taking leadership position we can catalyze philanthropic community to do much more,” Sorkin said. “We have commitment as a company to public, private and academic collaboration. That commitment is core to the culture of our company.”

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  6. At maybe $40,000 per vehicle times 470,000 reservation holders, that equals $18.8 billion. Of course, likely Tesla will sell many more Model 3 vehicles than that.

    Tesla has won, I think, and will be a major global automobile manufacturer.

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    • I think Tesla’s winning at present. I think that’s a primary reason why the bears have been so shrill lately. The Model 3 ramp was one of their last chances to generate uncertainty over Tesla’s future and ability to achieve goals. But what I think the bears and so many other folks in the financial community miss is the fact that Tesla sets high goals that pretty much no-one else in the West would dream of attempting. Missing those by a little bit at first is still a major win.

      Think about it this way — who else is currently producing north of 2,000 copies of a single electrical vehicle model per week? Maybe Nissan Leaf at present. Now, which major automaker is producing a combined total of more than 150,000 EVs per year? Not Nissan. Maybe BYD or BAIC. Which among them produces quality, range, recharging speed, and charging infrastructure support that’s comparable to Tesla’s? The answer to that question is — no-one. Which major automaker is a fully integrated renewable energy company that sells both solar and battery storage on a mass scale? Again — no-one.

      That’s a snapshot of the present. By end Q2, we will likely see Tesla total EV production between 160K and 200K per year (likely the world leader). Model 3 production north of 3K to 5K per week (highest rate of production for any EV in the world) and the Tesla Semi poised to break out during 2019.

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      • Robert McLachlan

         /  April 10, 2018

        I agree, terrific progress here. In 2017, BYD, BAIC, Tesla, and BMW delivered 100K vehicles each; Chevrolet, Nissan, and Toyota 50K each. These could all double in 2018. Perhaps the Chinese can break out into the world market.

        In other news, the GHG agreement from the shipping meeting now underway in London was reported on public radio in New Zealand this morning! I couldn’t believe my ears. It was on the business news.

        Liked by 1 person

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        • Amazing stuff here. I think that Nissan and Tesla will double or more. Less clear on BAIC and BYD — but I’m thinking that both will increase by at least 50 percent. BMW growth tracking appears to be slower for 2018 at around 20 percent, but they could surprise us. This brings us to 1.5 million EVs per year in 2018 even without account for growth from other players. I think we’ll be north of 1.7 million and might hit close to 2 million if we really see producers start to break out.

          2 million per year rates are when EVs start to impact marginal oil consumption. 5 million per year is where you start to end up with stranded assets and big price drops. We’re going to see pressure on E&P projects in the 2018-2020 timeframe, I think. Post 2020, I think high price marginal production that’s already operating will start to get shut in.

          Liked by 2 people

        • RE the London shipping GHG meeting:

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      • Abel Adamski

         /  April 11, 2018

        Just a query.
        Where are the Semi, Truck and Roadster being built. ?
        Could that new production building be for those lines.
        Great drone video – I was looking at that and the sheer logistics of shipping in materials and batteries and shipping out over 5,000 vehicles per week, especially adding in the Semi and Truck. (They may want to get a move on on the Semi for their own use)

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        • To my knowledge all final assembly is still at the Fremont plant. Battery packs are being shifted to the Gigafactory. I think the limit for the Fremont plant is somewhere near 500,000 per year. After which Tesla will be looking at additional factories.

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      • Yes, what’s wrong with our so called free press, that is affected so massively and apparently systematically by existing powerful commercial interests?

        Free press? No, more like bought and paid for press, I think.

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        • We once had a fairness doctrine — which Reagan repealed. Helpful regulations like these helped ensure that the press provided coverage in the public interest. We now have a watered down free press in which monopolies and trusts hold far too broad a sway on the information the public receives. Activities RE Fox and Sinclair are a symptom of a larger systemic problem. That said, the press in the U.S. is far better than in a number of countries. It’s just that we lost a key regulation that ensured a more equitable playing field. The emergence of so-called ‘state media’ that supports a demagogue like Trump is a real danger now.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FCC_fairness_doctrine

          In order to counter the present weaknesses, I think we need to break up some of the politically motivated media empires (FOX, Sinclair) and reinstate the fairness doctrine.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. wharf rat

     /  April 10, 2018

    The US had 3 billion-dollar climate and weather disasters in the first 3 months of 2018
    Winter storms are getting more costly.
    https://thinkprogress.org/first-three-months-in-2018-had-3-billion-dollar-disasters-af9a3fcfda94/

    Liked by 1 person

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    • March Nor’easters were a 1 billion dollar climate disaster. Links to climate change.

      We’re going to have weird cool April weather in the U.S. due to continued weird warmer than normal conditions in the Arctic. And a weird deep persistent trough centered over Central-Eastern Canada. We’ll tend to see some pretty amazing temperature swings as a result. This is an odd pattern to extend so late in the year. Overall, global temperatures remain warmer than normal. We will probably be 6th to 4th warmest March on Record. Worth noting that we are in a La Nina period at present — which is tending to draw us back from the extreme warmth seen during 2016. 2018’s La Nina is deeper than 2017s. So unless we flip to El Nino later in the year, it appears that 2018 might be a bit cooler. Possibly closer to 1 C warmer than 1880s. If this is the bottom year, it spells some trouble for the early 2020s.

      Liked by 4 people

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  8. Abel Adamski

     /  April 11, 2018

    https://phys.org/news/2018-04-hotter-longer-frequentmarine-heatwaves.html
    Marine heat waves are becoming more common and lasting longer (a total duration increase of 54%) with major ramifications for marine biology

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  9. Shawn Redmond

     /  April 11, 2018

    The high-level findings from the report reveal that the 36 banks analyzed funneled $115 billion into extreme fossil fuels in 2017, an increase of 11% over 2016’s figures. Leading this increase in financing came in the tar sands sector, where financing grew by an obscene 111% between 2016 to 2017, resulting in nearly $47 billion fed towards tar sands support, and overtaking coal power as the most heavily funded extreme energy sector.

    https://cleantechnica.com/2018/03/29/worlds-banks-increased-fossil-fuel-financing-to-115-billion-in-2017/

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    • Well, coal worked out so well for them, I guess they just had to dump money into the next set of fossil fuels that was most likely to see major demand reductions. /sarc.

      Liked by 3 people

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  10. kassy

     /  April 11, 2018

    AGW is “Stressing Nemo”

    A team of researchers with the University of Glasgow in Scotland and Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement, French Polynesia, has found that orange-fin anemonefish (aka clownfish) living among bleached anemones exhibit signs of stress—namely a higher-than-normal metabolic rate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the fish and what it shows about the impact of global warming.

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-anemones-stress-fish.html

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  11. Kiwi Griff

     /  April 11, 2018

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/11/critical-gulf-stream-current-weakest-for-1600-years-research-finds
    Gulf Stream current at its weakest in 1,600 years, studies show

    Warm current that has historically caused dramatic changes in climate is experiencing an unprecedented slowdown and may be less stable than thought – with potentially severe consequences

    Papers
    Historic perspective.
    Anomalously weak Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning during the past 150 years
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0007-4
    Attribution To AGW.
    Observed fingerprint of a weakening Atlantic Ocean overturning circulation
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0006-5

    Reminds me of the AAAS statement.
    We are at risk of pushing our climate system toward abrupt, unpredictable, and potentially irreversible changes with highly damaging impacts. Earth’s climate is on a path to warm beyond the range of what has been experienced over the past millions of years.[ii] The range of uncertainty for the warming along the current emissions path is wide enough to encompass massively disruptive consequences to societies and ecosystems: as global temperatures rise, there is a real risk, however small, that one or more critical parts of the Earth’s climate system will experience abrupt, unpredictable and potentially irreversible changes. Disturbingly, scientists do not know how much warming is required to trigger such changes to the climate system.

    Liked by 1 person

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    • Robert McLachlan

       /  April 11, 2018

      Good catch. Gulf Stream brought me here in the first place.

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    • Think Progress has an article: Dangerous climate tipping point is ‘about a century ahead of schedule’ warns scientist [Michael Mann]

      New research provides strong evidence that one of the long-predicted worst-case impacts of climate change — a severe slow-down of the Gulf Stream system — has already started.

      The system, also known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), brings warmer water northward while pumping cooler water southward.

      “I think we’re close to a tipping point,” climatologist Michael Mann told ThinkProgress in an email. The AMOC slow down “is without precedent” in more than a millennium he said, adding, “It’s happening about a century ahead of schedule relative to what the models predict.”

      The impacts of such a slowdown include much faster sea level rise — and much warmer sea surface temperatures — for much of the U.S. East Coast. Both of those effects are already being observed and together they make devastating storm surges of the kind we saw with Superstorm Sandy far more likely.

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  12. Robert McLachlan

     /  April 11, 2018

    New Zealand announces an end to off-shore drilling! Comments in the Fairfax press running 99:1 against.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/103031705/ardern-to-end-to-offshore-oil-exploration-with-short-reprieve-for-taranaki

    Liked by 3 people

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    • Robert McLachlan

       /  April 11, 2018

      Just to clarify, this is an end to new exploration permits only, not existing drilling. New Zealand has a smallish oil and gas sector, worth about $2b annually, but the 4th largest oceanic exclusive economic zone in the world, so this is still a significant decision.

      Liked by 1 person

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    • redskylite

       /  April 14, 2018

      Not sure how many of the negative comments are from genuine readers, or hustlers and trolls. Just seen comments in a “Z” Paris Agreement support ad in Facebbok. Looks like professional trolls at work. Most people can’t be that ignorant, can they ?

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      • I think mostly professional trolls but there are a few real ones too – I often come across total deniers, mainly in the older florid male caucasian category. This is also another problem of anonymous commenting – it’s easy to sow abuse like this – that said I go to a lot of public meetings and there is usually a single denier who will stand up and rant in most districts, but their arguments are week.

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  13. 0000

     /  April 11, 2018

    More on the Pacific-Arctic connection.

    Melting of Arctic mountain glaciers unprecedented in the past 400 years.
    Am. Geophysical Union.https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180410132837.htm
    New ice cores taken from the summit of Mt. Hunter in Denali National Park show summers there are least 1.2-2 degrees Celsius (2.2-3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than summers were during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The warming at Mt. Hunter is about double the amount of warming that has occurred during the summer at areas at sea level in Alaska over the same time period, according to the new research.

    They found melt events occur 57 times more frequently today than they did 150 years ago. In fact, they counted only four years with melt events prior to 1850. They also found the total amount of annual meltwater in the cores has increased 60-fold over the past 150 years.

    They found during years with more melt events on Mt. Hunter, tropical Pacific temperatures were higher. The researchers suspect warmer temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean amplify warming at high elevations in the Arctic by changing air circulation patterns. Warmer tropics lead to higher atmospheric pressures and more sunny days over the Alaska Range, which contribute to more glacial melting in the summer, Winski said.

    “This adds to the growing body of research showing that changes in the tropical Pacific can manifest in changes across the globe,” said Luke Trusel, a glaciologist at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey who was not connected to the study. “It’s adding to the growing picture that what we’re seeing today is unusual.”

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  14. Abel Adamski

     /  April 11, 2018

    Absolutely excellent article. The comment by Peter is worth reading.
    Perennial grain and other crops, massive soil and ecological benefit.
    However will be vigorously fought by Monsanto-Bayer as massively reduced need for their harmful agrochemical products, and a huge challenge for the Corporate Annual Cropping model
    https://climatecrocks.com/2018/04/11/for-drawing-carbon-down-perennial-grains/

    Liked by 2 people

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  15. Abel Adamski

     /  April 12, 2018

    Completely OT,. but maybe changed hair color to Orange, IMO a certain visual similarity
    http://metro.co.uk/2018/04/12/mary-river-turtle-green-hair-breathes-genitals-tragically-endangered-7460852/

    Naughty Abel

    Liked by 1 person

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  16. Abel Adamski

     /  April 12, 2018

    Another piece of EV history – The Tama
    VIDEO: Nissan brings together its newest and first EVs
    Before the Nissan Leaf, there was the Tama electric vehicle prototype in 1947 developed by the Tachikawa Aircraft Company. This was the forerunner to Prince Motors, which would later on become part of Nissan. The Tama was a two-seater, battery-powered truck which contributed to serving the needs of the then oil-scarce Japan in the post-war era.

    Its 4.5 hp electric motor drew power from two 40-volt lead acid batteries that could be quickly exchanged with freshly charged ones, offering a range of 65 km and a top speed of 35 km/h. Languid performance by today’s standards, however it also had its battery located in the floor of the vehicle for a lower centre of gravity, much like how the Tesla Model S and other modern day EVs do too.

    Prince knocked out some really nice machines., they had the predecessor to the 240Z the Prince 2000 – 2L , soft top, handled like a dream and went like a bat out of hell. (Back in the 70’s, I wanted one)
    https://paultan.org/2018/04/12/video-nissan-brings-together-its-newest-and-first-evs/

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  17. Abel Adamski

     /  April 12, 2018

    Model Y ?
    http://www.alphr.com/cars/1009045/tesla-model-y-release
    Tesla Model Y production pencilled for November 2019

    Sources have told Reuters the company is accepting preliminary bids from suppliers

    Tesla is aiming to start production of its Model Y SUV from November 2019, according to Reuters.

    Two sources reportedly told the international news agency that Elon Musk’s firm is accepting preliminary bids for contracts, despite offering suppliers few details about the program.

    According to Reuters, production will begin in Tesla’s plant in Fremont, California, in November next year, with more cars being made in China two years after that.

    Suppliers can reportedly expect annual production of 500,000 vehicles in the US, and a much smaller number – probably in the tens of thousands – in China, the report claims.

    In February, Musk said Tesla would aim to produce one million Model Y cars a year, but didn’t give a predicted timeframe.

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  18. kassy

     /  April 12, 2018

    The next article is off topic but a number of senators drafted a letter about all kinds of illegal actions by Scott Pruitt. None of it is climate change related but it is about Pruitt flying first class or ordering his staff to find some business to do in a place he wants to fly too for personal reasons.

    So mainly wasting tax payer money.

    And he fired his deputy chief of staff Kevin Chmielewski because he objected to this.

    https://thinkprogress.org/stunning-letter-from-top-democrats-reveal-potentially-illegal-actions-by-epas-pruitt-68f67f37f9bc/

    Basically this should be embarrassing for a president but not this one of course.

    And since we are at it another one about Pruitt, his paranoia and his rather expensive security detail.
    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/scott-pruitt-epa-security-w518866

    US tax payers from all sides should be livid about this. Even if you think Trump is the best thing since sliced bread this is a huge waste of money…we will see what happens.

    Liked by 1 person

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  19. JPL

     /  April 12, 2018

    Interesting video here regarding shale gas contribution to global warming by Anthony Ingraffea:

    Around minute 8:45 he adds the latest air temp anomaly data from this data set to try and present an updated graph based on observed readings:
    https://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs_v3/Fig.A.txt

    His conclusion is it is possible to hit 2 c in 10 to 15 years.

    Liked by 3 people

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    • kassy

       /  April 13, 2018

      Good if somewhat depressing video. Well worth sharing especially in places where politicians still want to make fracking possible (for example in the Netherlands, UK).

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    • Bill H

       /  April 14, 2018

      The data he gives for global temperature between 2010 and 2017 are not correct: they should be about 0.2 deg lower.

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  20. kassy

     /  April 13, 2018

    More on the AMOC slowdown:

    “I think we’re close to a tipping point,” climatologist Michael Mann told ThinkProgress in an email. The AMOC slow down “is without precedent” in more than a millennium he said, adding, “It’s happening about a century ahead of schedule relative to what the models predict.”

    ….

    A slow-down in deepwater ocean circulation “would accelerate sea level rise off the northeastern United States, while a full collapse could result in as much as approximately 1.6 feet of regional sea level rise,” as the authors of the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA) explained in November.

    https://thinkprogress.org/climate-tipping-point-century-ahead-of-schedule-warns-scientist-06d633f968fc/

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  21. Whachamacallit

     /  April 13, 2018

    Somewhat off topic, but very interesting none of the less:

    In the late 1800s, geologist and explorer John Wesley Powell first described a clear boundary running longitudinally through North America along the 100th meridian west that visibly separated the humid eastern part of the continent from the more arid western plains. Now, 140 years later, scientists have confirmed that such a sharp climatic boundary exists and that it is slowly shifting east due to climate change — a change that scientists say could have significant implications on farming in the region.
    …………
    The divide cuts through eastern Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, the Dakotas, and the Canadian province of Manitoba. West of the 100th meridian, population density declines and development is sparse, and farms are larger and primarily depend on arid-resistant crops like wheat. To the more humid east, more people and infrastructure exist. Farms are smaller and 70 percent of the harvested crop is moisture-loving corn.

    https://e360.yale.edu/digest/a-north-american-climate-boundary-has-shifted-140-miles-east-due-to-global-warming

    Liked by 1 person

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    • Great article thanks, fascinating, it’s like a graph line, we could call it The first graph of the Apocalypse.

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  22. wharf rat

     /  April 13, 2018

    These huge new wind turbines are a marvel. They’re also the future.
    The latest model has blades longer than football fields.

    https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/3/8/17084158/wind-turbine-power-energy-blades

    Liked by 1 person

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  23. Jacque in southern Utah

     /  April 13, 2018

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-13/three-reasons-california-is-trump-s-worst-nightmare-in-clean-car-fight

    CALIFORNIA, “…America’s biggest car market has just as much pull as the feds…As much as California cherishes its image as the greenest and most environmentally conscious state, drivers burn through more gasoline there than anywhere else in America. It’s the curse of being a massive place with a lot of mileage to cover…Given California’s enduring thirst for gasoline, it shouldn’t come as a complete surprise that the most cars in the U.S. are registered there, beating out even truck-loving Texas…If there’s anyone who embodies the fight that California is willing to put up to defends it fuel standard, it’s Mary Nichols, the state’s top air-quality regulator. On Twitter Thursday, she proclaimed that California will not be “benched… we’ll do whatever it takes.”…If the state’s going to meet its goal of reducing emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, it needs to target the car industry head-on.

    So get ready for a fight, Trump. This is one that California isn’t expecting to lose.”

    This Bloomberg article is chock full of charts and statistics, showing that we should have optimism regarding the electric car market and Drumph’s reducing emissions standards.

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    • Just going to post that.
      I guess the issue becomes one of operating under extreme pressure time wise due to the critics and media, supplier checking, in this case a major Chinese manufacturer has been a bit of a let down and one of the reasons for the delays. Tesla never had the luxury of years of evaluation and testing that the established auto makers have built up

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  24. bearingwitness

     /  April 14, 2018

    Hi Robert,
    Are you aware of reneweconomy.com.au ?
    There’s lots of current news articles and analysis about clean energy/ climate change/ policy in Australia… definitely worth checking out.
    On the right sidebar there is a real-time widget which shows electricity generation & consumption, plus the types of energy sources.
    I don’t know if there is a global widget like this, but it would be neat if there was one!
    Best regards
    BW

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  25. Mike S

     /  April 14, 2018

    Just spotted a Tesla in Arizona for the first time- and a Model 3 at that. It was at a charging station outside a Whole Foods mart. They must be popping up everywhere now.

    Like

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  26. Tom Jerome

     /  April 15, 2018

    Missing Colorado Bob – especially on Friday nights.
    Just saying.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 15, 2018

      A Bob did comment not long ago, but didn’t identify as C.B. Miss him also. He picked up some off the beaten track important information

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • Shawn Redmond

         /  April 16, 2018

        CB still posts semi regularly at cat6 under Colorado Bob1.
        This from yesterday (April15th).
        Avatar
        coloradobob1 • a day ago
        The troll army –
        Trust me these folks have been hard at work for years. They know what they are doing.
        1
        •Reply•Share ›
        Avatar
        GateKeeper Moderator coloradobob1 • a day ago
        i have been fighting the troll army for like forever
        4
        •Reply•Share ›
        Avatar
        coloradobob1 GateKeeper • a day ago
        No, you have been fighting bozos the army is coming

        The link should put in the relevent comment section
        https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/wildfire-blizzards-severe-weather-take-your-pick-massive-spring-storm

        Like

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        • Shawn Redmond

           /  April 16, 2018

          Nope didn’t work!

          Like

        • Misanthroptimist

           /  April 21, 2018

          Last night, on WeatherUnderground’s Category 6 blog, Colorado Bob posted something like, “I cannot read.” I believe that was his last most. Many of us are very concerned about Bob. I’m not sure anyone over there knows how to get in contact with CB. If anyone here knows, or better yet can physically check on him to make sure he’s alright, it will be appreciated by a pretty good number of people over there on Cat 6 blog. Thanks.

          Like

  27. Kiwi Griff

     /  April 15, 2018

    Report from the Australian energy market operator on the hornsdale power reserve and how it has preformed
    Familiar to most of us as the big Tesla battery system.
    The gist of the report is the system preforms frequncy regulation faster and more accurately than legacy equipment can.
    So well in fact that they see a need to rewrite the energy market rules to allow them to recognize this valuable service and encourage the instillation of more battery/ inverter systems to help regulate the grid.
    energylive.aemo.com.au/Innovation-and-Tech/-/media/45ACDCBA73CE46A585ACBFFB132EF9B0.ashx

    Makes me proud to be a Musk and Tesla fanboy.
    The man is doing more to change our energy future than hundred of politicians have managed in decades of talk.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  28. Connecticut Gordon

     /  April 15, 2018

    Bloomberg showing over 3,000 for last week. Astonishing if true

    Like

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    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 17, 2018

      Since adjusted back to just over 2000 since that figure was quoted by Elon in an interview

      Like

      Reply
  29. Genomik

     /  April 15, 2018

    A climate martyr!

    A lawyer nationally known for being a champion of gay rights died after setting himself on fire in Prospect Park in Brooklyn early Saturday morning and leaving a note exhorting people to lead less selfish lives as a way to protect the planet, the police said.

    Like

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    • kassy

       /  April 15, 2018

      We have enough climate martyrs as it is (if you need a bunch quick look for murdered climate activists in South and Middle America).

      I think it’s too extreme. It is more shocking than communicating a great idea. I can’t see how this helps.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  30. kassy

     /  April 15, 2018

    Rome has a lot of sinkholes:
    there have been an average of 90 sinkholes a year in Rome since 2010. In 2013, there were 104 and 2018 will surely surpass even that record. The problem is clearly getting worse: the streets are beginning to look like black emmenthal and everyone in Italy is wondering why the earth seems, in the words of the Jewish prophet Isaiah, “to stagger like a drunken man”.

    Some blame the rain. Romans are used to wearing sunglasses all winter, but this has been the wettest six months in living memory. There have been plenty of what are melodramatically called bombe d’acqua, water bombs.

    In September last year, flooded subways were closed as rivers cascaded down the escalators and stations became huge shower rooms with water gushing through ceiling cracks. Thousands of cars were in water up to their wing mirrors.

    but what’s clear from Rome’s craters and torrential rains is that events that used to seem extraordinary are now normal. Last September, in Livorno, 256mm of rain fell in one night, more than in the previous eight months; eight people lost their lives in the resulting floods. Thirty seven people died in floods in Messina in 2009; 13 in Liguria two years later; 18 in Sardinia in 2013.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/14/rome-extreme-weather-events-italy

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  31. kassy

     /  April 15, 2018

    British farmers in turmoil as delayed spring plays havoc with growing season

    Some quotes from the article:

    “We farm in north-east Essex, in the driest spot in the British Isles, and so we’re keen observers of the British weather. More often now we seem to be stuck in long periods of wet months and then long periods of dry months, which is more challenging for farmers.”

    Like Smith, Lockwood thinks that the climate is changing. “We’re getting more rain in a shorter period rather than evenly distributed across the year – that’s what I’m noticing. And you’re getting more intense dry periods. It’s more extreme.”

    It’s the familiar stuck weather pattern which will only get worse over time.

    One last quote: “We need to remember that it’s reckless to take food production for granted,” he said.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/14/farmers-crops-livestock-turmoil-beast-from-east-climate-change

    Like

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    • bill h

       /  April 15, 2018

      Yep, the weakening of the jet stream as a result of polar amplification can be expected to cause weather systems to get stuck more often over the UK and over other places at similar latitudes.

      Like

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  32. wharf rat

     /  April 15, 2018

    Rome wasn’t built in a day but these days it feels as if it may collapse in one
    Tobias Jones

    Blame the rain, the government or just geology, but extreme weather events are on the rise in Italy

    So far this year, Rome has suffered an astonishing 44 sinkholes. Every two or three days, a new crater appears in the Italian capital’s asphalt. They’re normally the size of a small room, a few metres wide and a few metres deep. In February, though, six cars were sucked down into the bowels of the earth when 50 metres of via Livio Andronico fell away, causing entire buildings to be evacuated.

    It’s not a new phenomenon: there have been an average of 90 sinkholes a year in Rome since 2010. In 2013, there were 104 and 2018 will surely surpass even that record. The problem is clearly getting worse: the streets are beginning to look like black emmenthal and everyone in Italy is wondering why the earth seems, in the words of the Jewish prophet Isaiah, “to stagger like a drunken man”.

    Some blame the rain. Romans are used to wearing sunglasses all winter, but this has been the wettest six months in living memory. There have been plenty of what are melodramatically called bombe d’acqua, water bombs. In September last year, flooded subways were closed as rivers cascaded down the escalators and stations became huge shower rooms with water gushing through ceiling cracks. Thousands of cars were in water up to their wing mirrors.

    Like

    Reply
  33. bill h

     /  April 15, 2018

    Yep, the weakening of the jet stream as a result of polar amplification can be expected to cause weather systems to get stuck more often over the UK and over other places at similar latitudes.

    Like

    Reply
  34. wharf rat

     /  April 16, 2018

    Like

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    • Shawn Redmond

       /  April 16, 2018

      Last week alone:
      http://floodlist.com/
      Spain – Major Flooding After Rivers Overflow in North East
      Spain – Major Flooding After Rivers Overflow in North East

      Flooding has hit parts of Navarre and Aragon regions in north-eastern Spain after snow-melt in…
      Fiji – Thousands Displaced by Tropical Cyclone Keni

      12 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
      Indonesia – 1 Dead, Homes Damaged After Flash Flood and Landslides in West Java

      10 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
      Dominican Republic – Thousands Evacuated After Floods in La Vega Province

      10 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
      Colombia – Over 4,500 Affected by Floods in Nariño Department

      10 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT

      When I started watching the following link it was 30 minutes once a month, and now it’s 30 minutes+/- every 4 or 5 days:

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  35. Abel Adamski

     /  April 16, 2018

    Tesla has set the pace and the market is rising to the challenge
    https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/04/taiwanese-automaker-xing-claims-its-building-an-off-road-electric-supercar-thats-quicker-than-a-tesla-roadster/

    Taiwanese Automaker Xing Claims It’s Building An Off-Road Electric Supercar That’s Quicker Than A Tesla Roadster
    The car’s battery is a 52 kWh lithium-ion pack, and the company plans to engineer a way to swap out the battery in around five minutes – a concept Tesla once teased and subsequently abandoned. Xing’s intentions for battery swapping are more motorsports oriented, rather than for consumer convenience, though.

    The Miss R is said to be designed for both on-and-off-road performance, and the company’s latest testing was a simple “shakedown” at tame speeds over various surfaces, with a full-performance test promised to be conducted sometime soon.
    The company is also developing an electric light-duty commercial truck concept nicknamed “Mr. T” which also showcases the modular battery powertrain technology. The company hopes to partner with other automakers looking to outsource electrification of their lineups.

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  36. Abel Adamski

     /  April 16, 2018

    Not what you would think from the Title, an excellent summation and perspective on the polarised opinions about Elon and Tesla in the actual article

    https://www.tvovermind.com/tv-news/video-accurately-breaks-insanity-elon-musk

    Like

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  37. Abel Adamski

     /  April 16, 2018

    Good news for the pre loved market
    https://electrek.co/2018/04/14/tesla-battery-degradation-data/

    Tesla battery degradation at less than 10% after over 160,000 miles, according to latest data

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  38. Abel Adamski

     /  April 17, 2018

    Softly Softly – risk of unintended consequences, but still a major breakthrough
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/16/scientists-accidentally-create-mutant-enzyme-that-eats-plastic-bottles

    Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles

    The breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis
    The new research was spurred by the discovery in 2016 of the first bacterium that had naturally evolved to eat plastic, at a waste dump in Japan. Scientists have now revealed the detailed structure of the crucial enzyme produced by the bug.

    The international team then tweaked the enzyme to see how it had evolved, but tests showed they had inadvertently made the molecule even better at breaking down the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic used for soft drink bottles. “What actually turned out was we improved the enzyme, which was a bit of a shock,” said Prof John McGeehan, at the University of Portsmouth, UK, who led the research. “It’s great and a real finding.”

    The mutant enzyme takes a few days to start breaking down the plastic – far faster than the centuries it takes in the oceans. But the researchers are optimistic this can be speeded up even further and become a viable large-scale process.

    “What we are hoping to do is use this enzyme to turn this plastic back into its original components, so we can literally recycle it back to plastic,” said McGeehan. “It means we won’t need to dig up any more oil and, fundamentally, it should reduce the amount of plastic in the environment.”

    However, currently even those bottles that are recycled can only be turned into opaque fibres for clothing or carpets. The new enzyme indicates a way to recycle clear plastic bottles back into clear plastic bottles, which could slash the need to produce new plastic.

    “You are always up against the fact that oil is cheap, so virgin PET is cheap,” said McGeehan. “It is so easy for manufacturers to generate more of that stuff, rather than even try to recycle. But I believe there is a public driver here: perception is changing so much that companies are starting to look at how they can properly recycle these.”
    Industrial enzymes are widely used in, for example, washing powders and biofuel production, They have been made to work up to 1,000 times faster in a few years, the same timescale McGeehan envisages for the plastic-eating enzyme. A patent has been filed on the specific mutant enzyme by the Portsmouth researchers and those from the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado.
    “Enzymes are non-toxic, biodegradable and can be produced in large amounts by microorganisms,” he said. “There is still a way to go before you could recycle large amounts of plastic with enzymes, and reducing the amount of plastic produced in the first place might, perhaps, be preferable. [But] this is certainly a step in a positive direction.”

    Prof Adisa Azapagic, at the University of Manchester in the UK, agreed the enzyme could be useful but added: “A full life-cycle assessment would be needed to ensure the technology does not solve one environmental problem – waste – at the expense of others, including additional greenhouse gas emissions.”

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  39. kassy

     /  April 17, 2018

    I forgot to post this friday as a slightly OT relaxing read. I see the story is republished (often with headlines butchered by editors) in other publications but i suggest you read this version as it is by one of the actual authers. Enjoy!

    Was There a Civilization On Earth Before Humans?

    It only took five minutes for Gavin Schmidt to out-speculate me.

    Schmidt is the director of nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (a.k.a. GISS) a world-class climate-science facility. One day last year, I came to GISS with a far-out proposal. In my work as an astrophysicist, I’d begun researching global warming from an “astrobiological perspective.” That meant asking whether any industrial civilization that rises on any planet will, through their own activity, trigger their own version of a climate shift. I was visiting GISS that day hoping to gain some climate science insights and, perhaps, collaborators. That’s how I ended up in Gavin’s office.

    Just as I was revving up my pitch, Gavin stopped me in my tracks.

    “Wait a second,” he said. “How do you know we’re the only time there’s been a civilization on our own planet?”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/04/are-we-earths-only-civilization/557180/

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    • entropicman

       /  April 17, 2018

      There are other indications that we are the only ones.

      We mine iron ores, copper ores, uranium ores and other minerals laid down billions of years ago. When we started, all those deposits were pristine, showing no signs of previous mining.

      If any previous civilisations existed, they never reached an Industrial Revolution.

      Like

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      • Abel Adamski

         /  April 18, 2018

        I will raise a point or two there
        1) Continents have changed, the earths crust circulates through the magma over 100’s of millions of years, some continents some are now under water such as the recently designated Zealandia, during glacial periods habitation and civilization would have been as per now centered around the coastal areas which with current land configuration is well under water.
        2) Worth looking at the oldest written histories, the Sumerian and Indic.
        Our understanding and archaeology is very much based on the Hebrew biblical writings.
        Remember the part of the world they were in was part of Sumer which consisted of several city states and their original knowledge pre Noah (who was a resident of a Sumerian city) would have been that of Sumer, but as Oral and prone to the Chinese whisper effect

        The Sumerian King list (there are different versions depending on city), but pre flood there were 10 kings listed along with length of rule – here is where the fun starts as the first few apparently ruled for something like 270,000 years pre flood.

        Their creation story is very interesting, includes the creation of our solar system and a rogue alien planet that destroyed a planet the remnants of which is the Asteroid belt (why all the metals rained on earth in asteroids from it’s shattered core 3.5-4 Billion tears ago – in planet formation as originally a molten mass, all the heavier elements gravitate to the core), the impact that created the moon, and why Venus is different in more ways than temperature and atmosphere.

        The Sumerian Civilization was based around Persia (now Iraq and Iran) , suspected to be part of the reason for US interest in those two countries – many antiquities, especially written vanished during US occupation

        Then in Crimea are claimed to be 30 odd pyramids deeply buried, dating back over 1 Billion years – proof needed for those claims.

        So as Gavin say’s maybe unlikely but we don’t know.
        For example the Denisovan DNA is spread around much of the world, yet the only physical evidence is a finger joint , and there is DNA of an as yet unidentified Home variant prevalent in the Pacific region. Earth is a big place and old evidence is deeply buried in most cases

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        • kassy

           /  April 18, 2018

          The Sumerians are interesting but they are our modern “homo sapiens” civilization so they don’t count.

          PS: The Daily Mail being the quality rag that it is gave the story above the clickbait headline “Global Warming 56m years ago may have been manmade, experts suggest” (it is not the actual article title but what it is called on NewsNow)…

          Like

        • Speak a devil’s name (sorta); the guardian has this today: Diamonds in Sudan meteorite ‘are remnants of lost planet’.

          Diamonds found in a meteorite that exploded over the Nubian desert in Sudan a decade ago were formed deep inside a “lost planet” that once circled the sun in the early solar system, scientists say.

          Microscopic analyses of the meteorite’s tiny diamonds revealed they contain compounds that are produced under intense pressure, suggesting the diamonds formed far beneath the surface of a planet.

          In this case, the mysterious world was calculated to be somewhere between Mercury and Mars in size.

          Overall, though, I’m with entropicman; while there were other civilizations (e.g. in the Americas; Olmec, Inca, etc.) none rivals our own in complexity and scale.

          Like

  40. Shawn Redmond

     /  April 17, 2018

    This is an interesting site it covers ongoing disasters globally here is an excerpt:
    In 2017, a prolonged period of severe dry weather between mid-May and end of July, intensified by extreme high temperatures in June, damaged large swatches of cropped areas and caused a severe deterioration of pastures and rangeland conditions. An estimated 80 percent of the country was affected by drought conditions. This resulted in severe yield and area losses of the 2017 crops…The 2017 wheat production is estimated at about 231 000 tonnes, almost half of last year’s high level and over 40 percent less than the five-year average…Drought also caused a severe deterioration of pasture conditions, which prevented livestock to gain fat stores and strengthen core muscle strength, critical to overcome the normally harsh winter/spring months. According to MoFALI data, as of November 2017, overall livestock body condition is 14 percent below average… Harsh winters following summer droughts significantly increase risks for herders to lose their animals. (FAO/WFP, 22 Dec 2017).

    As of 20 December 2017, the dzud risk map for winter 2017-2018, published by National Agency of Meteorology and the Environmental Monitoring shows that about 40 percent of the country is at the extreme risk of dzud and about 20 percent of the country is at high risk of dzud. In order to reflect the evolving needs of affected population, to address the recommendation from the final evaluation of previous emergency appeal operation and with the additional funding from donors, MRCS and IFRC revised the operational plan and extended the timeframe. In addition to relief activities, the operation is now supporting Dzud preparedness and National society capacity building by taking account of close consultation with the affected population and relevant authorities. (IFRC, 24 Jan 2018).

    On 15 February 2018, IFRC released US$ 277,000 from its Disaster Relief Emergency Fund to assist 2,500 herder families facing very severe winter conditions in seven provinces with cash grants or emergency supplies. The emergency helpwill target the hardest-hit households, those with young children, or five or more children, an older person, or someone with a disability. A national total of 141 out of 330 soums and a city are in “dzud condition”; temperatures approaching minus 50 Celsius were expected to continue through February. (Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Change, 15 Feb 2018)

    https://reliefweb.int/disasters

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  41. rayduray

     /  April 17, 2018

    Bloomberg News reporting “Model 3 Production Line Skids to a Halt for Tesla”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-17/tesla-temporarily-pauses-production-of-the-model-3-sedan-again

    Like

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    • Very bizarre coverage,I think. Bloomberg takes a scheduled shutdown for an upgrade and makes it into an anxiety fest, complete with a chorus of gloom and doom.

      I guess their Model 3 production tracker was reporting too much good news for Tesla, and they felt like they had to “balance” that out?

      Like

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 19, 2018

      CNN has another take, battery production for the new battery format and chemistry, of course now flogging the idea that Tesla needs a partner to help with that – They have Panasonic, none of the US auto majors have any expertise in that area.
      New Chemistry and format meaning rejigging of production lines – to be expected. Major auto Co’s had the same issues, but were not focussed on to the same extent and they had the time and did the hard yards to resolve those issues, I see no different here. Just Tesla is never given the time and space. How many Decades did it take for GM and Ford to build the facilities and production rate.?

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  42. Syd Bridges

     /  April 18, 2018

    A bit OT perhaps, but rare earths are vital for many forms of renewable energy and EVs. The mining operation might be an ecological nightmare, if it comes to pass.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/12/japan-rare-earths-huge-deposit-of-metals-found-in-pacific.html

    Researchers have found hundreds of years’ worth of rare-earth materials underneath Japanese waters — enough to supply to the world on a “semi-infinite basis,” according to a study published in Nature Publishing Group’s Scientific Reports.

    “The materials sit in a roughly 965-square-mile Pacific Ocean seabed near Minamitorishima Island, which is located 1,150 miles southeast of Tokyo, according to the study published in Nature Publishing Group’s Scientific Reports.

    Rare-earth metals are crucial in the making of high-tech products such as electric vehicles, mobile phones and batteries, and the world has relied on China for almost all of its rare-earth material.

    The seabed contains more than 16 million tons of rare-earth oxides, according to the study. That’s equivalent to 780 years’ worth of yttrium supply, 620 years of europium, 420 years of terbium and 730 years of dysprosium, it added.

    The discovery “has the potential to supply these metals on a semi-infinite basis to the world,” the study said.”

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    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 18, 2018

      Not needed, massive deposits in Australia.
      I am invested in a company NTU that now has a pilot plant producing Dysprosium, they are just dumping the Yttrium as not worth processing – too common and cheap, there are other Australian companies doing other rare earths, so all of those are covered with many centuries of supply,. and there are discoveries and new operations in the US also.

      The point with these rare earths and metals is that they are present planet wide in substantial quantities, it is just the concentration has to be great enough to actually justify the operation.

      The Japanese Silt discoveries advantage is the relatively high concentration,. there are actually balls of almost pure metals down in the deep ocean, just the cost of locating and bringing to the surface.

      The environmental disaster in mining is the Copper mine in the ocean off New Guinea.
      It is a very high grade deposit
      Copper is the big problem for metal shortage of the present and future – especially an electric one. The high grade known deposits have been mined out and now they are mining the sites that were once considered uneconomic as too low grade. (component in Bronze)
      That is why the mining exploration Boom in Africa and South America and Asia

      Like

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  43. redskylite

     /  April 18, 2018

    I bought my current car around 20 years ago and it has around 150,000 miles on the odometer, admittedly it is getting rather cranky now, with some systems only working intermittently others not at all. I was impressed with the durability of the Tesla battery as described in the following article.

    “Way back at the dawn of the electric car era — about 10 years ago now — the knock on electric cars was that their batteries wouldn’t last 100,000 miles. Owners would be forced to pay many thousands of dollars to replace them every few years. What’s the point of saving a little bit of money on gasoline if you have spend megabucks to buy a new battery on a regular basis?”

    https://cleantechnica.com/2018/04/16/tesla-batteries-have-90-capacity-after-160000-miles-may-last-for-500000-miles/

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  44. wharf rat

     /  April 18, 2018

    RGGI Shows Tackling Climate Change Pays Major Dividends

    The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, more commonly known as RGGI—a multi-state program that since 2009 has helped cut carbon pollution from power plants in half in nine Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states—continues to provide a gold standard for tackling climate change. A report released today by economic experts at the Analysis Group concludes the market-based RGGI has not only been a major climate success, but in the last three years alone has helped grow participating states’ economies by $1.4 billion while adding 14,500 years of full-time employment in the region.

    https://www.nrdc.org/experts/bruce-ho/rggi-shows-tackling-climate-change-pays-major-dividends

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  45. entropicman

     /  April 18, 2018

    We are probably the world’s first global industrial civilization.

    We are also probably its last, having comsumed or dispersed most of our planet’s resources to get here.

    With those resources gone, it will be much more difficult to build a successor civilization after we go down.

    This ability to build only one(1) industrial civilization per planet may be one of the Great Filters proposed to answer Enrico Fermi’s question “Where is everybody?”

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 19, 2018

      Agreed, easily accessed coal and oil – gone
      Easily accessed high grade copper, tin, lead, zinc. ( Lower temp smelting making bronze, pewter etc)
      back to charcoal burning for pottery ovens and metal ore smelters. much of our knowledge is on paper and especially digitally stored. 1,000 years time that will be just a myth.
      At least the Sumerians committed to fired clay and rock which has tended to last.

      Like

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    • Oh, I have a different view.

      Solar energy is essentially infinite, in the next few hundred years, especially once we get out into space. In the asteroids enough material is close to the surface to run an industrial civilization for thousands, if not millions of years. Here on earth, most of the resources are locked up in the core and mantle, but out in the asteroids most of the material is accessible.

      We have an narrow window of opportunity to kill ourselves by destabilizing the climate, and we’re doing everything wrong, by tripping a sensitive trigger mechanism in the atmosphere (CO2 concentration).

      All we have to do is stop doing that, and we’ll be fine. We can do fine with solar energy and partially recycled materials on the surface of the planet. If we start tapping into the supply of solar energy and lunar and asteroid materials in space, we’ll be fabulously wealthy.

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      • entropicman

         /  April 19, 2018

        We have to get ourselves established off Earth, but we have a deadline.

        It took three hundred years to turn the United States from discovery to an independant country.

        My nightmare is that we run out of resources before we get over that hump. If we don’t get ourselves established in space while the terrestrial resource are avalilable we end up stuck on a depleted planet until the Sun expands.

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        • Mineral resources generally are not a concern, IMO. As the grade of ore drops, extraction and refining technology increases. If one material starts getting expensive due to low supply, another material is substituted.

          On the surface of the earth, we’ll have glass, silicon, aluminum, and ceramics in abundant supply for the next few hundred years. The supply of solar energy is very large, compared to present energy use. With solar energy and just the elements in common dirt we can get by, at this point.

          Even though most of the materials of the earth are locked up in the mantle and core, the surface of the earth is still a very big place. Take a drive though the Mojave Desert sometime, or a car trip through Oregon or most of the Western United States to see how much space there is still available.

          Destabilizing the climate is by far our most important environmental issue, I think. Resource concerns are far down on my personal list of concerns.

          Like

  46. Bob

     /  April 18, 2018

    Ocean acidification has decreased photoplankton levels by 40% since 1950. Fifty to eighty five percent of O2 is produced by photoplankton.
    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/4/18/1758017/-Phytoplankton-Population-Drops-40-Percent-Since-1950-Key-biological-mechanism-disrupted
    The production of carbonate ion determines iron metabolism ability in phytoplankton.As oceans acidify carbonate ions decrease. Virtually all organisms in the ocean depend on phytoplankton in their food chain.

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    • Well, the atmosphere is 20 percent oxygen, so we have thousands of years supply of oxygen. Unless there is a hundred trillion tons of carbon as methane in the methane hydrates and we destabilize it all, and then it oxidizes into CO2 and water, we’ll be fine at least for a while. But global warming from the methane would likely kill us long before we suffocate.

      Of course it’s a bad thing if the phytoplankton levels drop, and we may look back on our past highly oxygenated oceans with a great deal of longing. Phytoplankton are at the base of our current food chain. We need to slow and stop the loss of phytoplankton and in fact draw down CO2 levels to past levels, ASAP. But basic oxygen supply is not a short term concern, I think.

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      • Leland Palmer

         /  April 20, 2018

        Thinking about it, loss of atmospheric oxygen may not be an immediate concern, but oceanic anoxia is. If the oceans go hypoxic and start producing large amounts of hydrogen sulfide, that in itself can damage the hydroxyl radical, slow oxidation of methane and atmospheric contaminants, and add to global warming.

        Nobody knows how all these things are going to interplay, I think, although the scientists who do the global warming models have a better idea than we do. So, I was being too brave with the only planet we have. We should all be very alarmed at the decline of the phytoplankton.

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        • Paul

           /  April 20, 2018

          Not just plankton. Insects are having a hard time, too. Soils, also.
          Repairing the damage to our foundations will not be easy.

          Like

        • kassy

           /  April 20, 2018

          And all these things are bad for us but worse for our children and even worse for our grandchildren.

          Global warming stresses the animals but that compounds with the poisons we use in agriculture and the run off of our anti depressants and thousands of other things.

          Similar for the seas. We warm them and dump tons of fertilizer in selected spots then overfish the rest.

          I guess it is hard to really act responsible (as people at large because we get distracted by human tribalism and consuming crap).

          Liked by 1 person

    • Related article today in Science Daily. Comparing our situation with the Permian can’t be good.

      Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinction.
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180417132829.htm

      . . . The resulting variations of uranium isotopes gave the team the answers they were looking for. They were able to show that episodes of extinction coincided with pulses of ocean anoxia, driven by changes in ocean circulation and nutrient levels.

      “This finding,” says Zhang, “provides important insights into patterns of oceanic environmental change and their underlying causes, which were ultimately linked to intense climate warming during the Early Triassic.”

      This team’s discovery also calls attention to the possible effects of modern climate change, because global warming was the ultimate driver of marine anoxia in the Early Triassic period.

      “One of the most interesting and worrying things about the Permian-Triassic extinction is how similar those events are to what is happening today,” says co-author Stephen Romaniello. “Similar to what happened during the Permian period, the Earth’s modern oceans are facing rapid climate warming and enhanced nutrient fluxes.”

      Point in fact, scientists have discovered more than 400 marine dead zones in the modern oceans. These are mostly linked to elevated nutrient fluxes in coastal areas, and global warming is likely to cause these zones to expand dramatically in the future.

      “Our work shows that if we continue on our present course, there is a good chance that oxygen depletion will exacerbate the challenges marine organisms are already facing,” co-author Thomas Algeo added.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  47. Abel Adamski

     /  April 19, 2018

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180418141520.htm
    Study reveals new Antarctic process contributing to sea level rise and climate change

    Date:
    April 18, 2018
    Source:
    University of Tasmania
    Summary:
    A new study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise. The research found that glacial meltwater makes the ocean’s surface layer less salty and more buoyant, preventing deep mixing in winter and allowing warm water at depth to retain its heat and further melt glaciers from below.
    A new IMAS-led study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise.
    “In combination, the two processes we identified feed off each other to further accelerate climate change.”

    Mr Silvano said a similar mechanism has been proposed to explain rapid sea level rise of up to five metres per century at the end of the last glacial period around 15,000 years ago.

    “Our study shows that this feedback process is not only possible but is in fact already underway, and may drive further acceleration of the rate of sea level rise in the future.

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  48. Abel Adamski

     /  April 19, 2018

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2018/apr/18/glacier-loss-is-accelerating-because-of-global-warming#comment-114883664

    Glacier loss is accelerating because of global warming

    As climate scientists predicted, glaciers are vanishing due to rapidly warming temperatures.

    So basically, the authors used these annual ice-core bands to deduce temperatures as far back as 400 years ago. They found that the frequency of melting events increased by 57-fold from the 1650–1850 time period compared with 1980–2011. They also measured a 60-fold increase in total melt. These are staggering numbers. I asked the lead author, Dominic Winski to summarize his findings and he told me,

    This research shows that peaks in the Alaska Range sustain additional summertime warming through links with rising ocean temperatures in the tropics. Not only have we learned that summers are much warmer on Mt. Hunter than they were hundreds of years ago, but our research also demonstrates how connected the climate system is, with changes in certain parts of the world affecting places thousands of miles away.

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  49. wharf rat

     /  April 19, 2018

    DRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY
    Surprising, even beautiful things can happen when it feels as if the world is about to end.
    A dispatch from Cape Town by
    Eve Fairbanks

    https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/articles/en/cape-town-drought/

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  50. Kiwi Griff

     /  April 20, 2018

    Sales of electric cars in the UK have risen 11% on last year, putting the country in the premier league of those ditching petrol and diesel engines, though it is still miles behind Norway and China.

    An analysis of the latest global sales of electric vehicles found that nearly half the vehicles registered in Norway in the first three months of 2018 were electric (48%), compared to just over a third (35%) during the same period in 2017. The vehicles are run almost exclusively off the nation’s hydropower resource, underlining Norway’s claim as the world leader.

    China’s raw numbers were the most impressive, even if the total market share of e-vehicles was only 2% of new registrations.

    In the first quarter of 2018, 142,445 electric vehicles – private cars, lorries, trucks and buses – were sold in China, a 154% increase on the previous year…..
    /……
    Globally, new registrations of e-cars are expected to increase moderately by 2020, and will range between 2.5% and 6% of market share, according to CAM.

    By 2025, about 25m newly registered electric cars are expected in the most optimistic scenario, which would equate to a 25% market share; this could potentially rise to a 40% share by 2030.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/19/e-vehicles-electric-cars-uk-sales-rise-norway-china

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  51. 0000

     /  April 20, 2018

    Let’s hope this article puts paid to a supposed controversy that was never really a controversy at all. It is a very different world coming.
    Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to prehistoric humans. Apr 19, 2018. U of Nebraska-Lincoln. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180419141536.htm

    Summary:
    Homo sapiens, Neanderthals and other recent human relatives may have begun hunting large mammal species down to size — by way of extinction — at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a new study. The magnitude and scale of the extinction wave surpassed any other recorded during the last 66 million years, according to the study.
    By contrast, the research team found little support for the idea that climate change drove size-biased extinctions during the last 66 million years. Large and small mammals seemed equally vulnerable to temperature shifts throughout that span, the authors reported.

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    • Slipped from me. Trying to complete –
      The team also looked ahead to examine how potential mammal extinctions could affect the world’s biodiversity. To do so, it posed a question: What would happen if the mammals currently listed as vulnerable or endangered were to go extinct within the next 200 years?

      In that scenario, Lyons said, the largest remaining mammal would be the domestic cow. The average body mass would plummet to less than six pounds — roughly the size of a Yorkshire terrier.

      “If this trend continues, and all the currently threatened (mammals) are lost, then energy flow and taxonomic composition will be entirely restructured,” said Smith, professor of biology at New Mexico. “In fact, mammalian body size around the globe will revert to what the world looked like 40 million years ago.”

      Lyons said that restructuring could have “profound implications” for the world’s ecosystems. Large mammals tend to be herbivores, devouring large quantities of vegetation and effectively transporting the associated nutrients around an ecosystem. If they continue to disappear, she said, the remaining mammals would prove poor stand-ins for important ecological roles.

      “The kinds of ecosystem services that are provided by large mammals are very different than what you get from small mammals,” Lyons said. “Ecosystems are going to be very, very different in the future. The last time mammal communities looked like that and had a mean body size that small was after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

      “What we’re doing is potentially erasing 40 to 45 million years of mammal body-size evolution in a very short period of time.”

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      • kassy

         /  April 21, 2018

        At least when that happens i can claim i was once chased by the largest mammal on earth…cows can be pretty intimidating when you are small. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  52. miles h

     /  April 20, 2018

    The Great Barrier Reef has lost an astonishing 50% of its corals since 2016, and it isn’t just down to the usual theories about how bleaching happens…, “About 50 percent of all the coral that perished in the 2016 bleaching event died in the autumn and winter, long after temperatures had returned to normal. Those corals never regained their algae after evicting them, and they slowly starved to death.

    “But about half of the corals that died did so in March, at the peak of summer temperatures,” Hughes told me. “We were surprised that about half of that mortality occurred very quickly.”

    In other words, some corals did not even survive long enough to starve. “They died instantly, of heat stress,” Hughes said. “They cooked.” https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/04/since-2016-half-the-coral-in-the-great-barrier-reef-has-perished/558302/?single_page=true

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  53. Shawn Redmond

     /  April 21, 2018

    Good canoeing weather in some places! (sarc)

    USA – Snowmelt Flooding in Montana Prompts State of Emergency

    Snowmelt has triggered flooding in parts of northern Montana, prompting Governor Steve Bullock to declare…
    Colombia – 2 Dead After Month’s Worth of Rain in 2 Hours Hits Cali, Valle Del Cauca

    18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
    Martinique – Severe Flooding After 250mm of Rain in 6 Hours

    18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
    Kenya – Thousands Displaced as Flooding Continues

    18 APRIL, 2018 0 COMMENT
    Updated: Tanzania – 9 Dead as Flooding Hits Dar Es Salaam

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  54. John McCormick

     /  April 21, 2018

    Colorado Bob, I hope you are well. Please comment. We miss you.

    Can anyone provide info on Bob?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • entropicman

       /  April 21, 2018

      Put in “Colorado Bob” and you get a Facebook page and a blogspot which fits the interests he described here.
      I don’t know if they are still active.

      Like

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    • Suzanne

       /  April 23, 2018

      He comments quite often at Weather Underground.

      Like

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  55. Paul in WI

     /  April 21, 2018

    The Trump administration is at it again. They are trying hard to find ways of keeping their pals in the coal industry in business. See this article in Ars Technica: “White House reportedly exploring wartime rule to help coal, nuclear”

    Here’s an excerpt from the article:

    According to reports from Bloomberg and E&E News, the Trump Administration has been exploring another way to help coal and nuclear generators: the Defense Production Act of 1950.

    The Act was passed under President Truman. Motivated by the Korean War, it allows the president broad authority to boost US industries that are considered a priority for national security. On Thursday, E&E News cited sources that said “an interagency process is underway” at the White House to examine possible application of the act to the energy industry. The goal would be to give some form of preference to coal and nuclear plants that are struggling to compete with cheap natural gas.

    Third time’s the charm?

    This appears to be the third attempt to use policy to keep coal and nuclear operators afloat. The main focus is coal generators, which Trump promised to rescue during his campaign. Although Trump’s campaign rhetoric often blamed environmental regulations, the problem has been economic more than regulatory; cheap natural gas has been the biggest threat to coal and nuclear.

    In office, the Trump Administration has tried a number of arguments to justify intervening in electricity markets to the benefit of coal and nuclear. In early 2017, Energy Secretary Rick Perry released a memo calling for a study of “baseload energy” in the US, meaning power that could be delivered consistently around the clock. Although the memo never explicitly targeted renewable energy, Perry wrote that Obama-era policies had unfairly threatened coal-burning plants and had therefore threatened the existence of continuous and reliable energy in the US.

    But the study that resulted from Perry’s memo bucked the political message, instead asserting that the decline in coal has resulted from the US’ boom in natural gas.

    Undeterred, Perry used the study to justify a proposed rule that would have required grid managers to compensate coal and nuclear generation over and above current electricity prices. The proposal was based on the idea that these sources of generation could keep 90 days of fuel onsite in case of an emergency, whereas natural gas cannot in most cases. (This 90-day logic turned out to be specious when Hurricane Harvey flooded out coal piles in Houston, causing at least two coal-burning units in the area to have to switch to burning natural gas.)

    However, Perry’s proposed rule could not go into effect without approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). In January, FERC denied Perry’s proposed rule, saying that the Department of Energy (DOE) never showed that current pricing mechanisms for coal and nuclear power were “unjust and unreasonable.”

    Section 202(c)

    Since FERC’s January action, the Trump Administration has been looking at other legal means to boost the flagging coal industry, according to E&E News. One potential avenue was proposed in late March by a power company called FirstEnergy, which petitioned the DOE to use Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act to mandate that its coal and nuclear generators stay open despite their financial issues. However, Section 202(c) is generally reserved for emergencies, like natural disasters or California’s 2001 energy crisis.”

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/04/white-house-reportedly-exploring-yet-another-wartime-rule-to-help-coal-nuclear/?&comments=1

    Liked by 1 person

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  56. wharf rat

     /  April 22, 2018

    BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS RECORDED FOR THE FIRST TIME IN CANADIAN PACIFIC WATERS

    Both common bottlenose dolphins and false killer whales typically live in warm temperate waters further south in the eastern North Pacific, but this sighting suggests that they will naturally range into British Columbia, Canada when conditions are suitable. There has been a warming trend in eastern North Pacific waters from 2013-2016 and the authors hypothesize that the trend may be the reason behind this unusual sighting.

    Halpin adds: “Since 2014 I have documented several warm-water species: common bottlenose dolphins, a swordfish and a loggerhead turtle in British Columbian waters. With marine waters increasingly warming up we can expect to see more typically warm-water species in the northeastern Pacific.”

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180419233828.htm

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  57. redskylite

     /  April 22, 2018

    Good news from Volvo:More electrification

    Volvo Trucks will be launching its first commercial electric truck offering, the 16-tonne GVW Volvo FL Electric, within the near future. Production and sales are slated to begin in 2019.

    Owing to the reality that the offering is electric, it can be used indoors in facilities where such vehicles would otherwise not be granted access — representing perhaps an initial niche application. Noise levels are of course much lower than with a comparable diesel powered vehicle as well, further extending potential niche applications (late-night shifts that would no longer be so offensiveness to residents).

    https://cleantechnica.com/2018/04/16/volvo-trucks-to-launch-first-commercial-electric-truck-production-beginning-in-2019/

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    • kassy

       /  April 22, 2018

      And it offers the other niche application of killing less people with pollutants from the emitted fuels.

      We know that statistically a number of people die of this each year but no individual gets “lived to close to a busy road for too long (or worked there)” on his or her death certificate so it never registers. Nobody thinks about them and they are taken for granted as some collateral damage.

      (btw this minor rant is dedicated to DT Lange)

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      • Concur. It is all incredibly dangerous. Nothing minor about any of it. Nobody in my range of family or acquaintance listens to me, or wants to.

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  58. kassy

     /  April 22, 2018

    Here’s how fast a glacier can slip into the sea once it’s destabilized

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  59. kassy

     /  April 22, 2018

    Oops….so that was the headline. Some quotes:

    [B]y 1980, an increase in summer air temperature in the region by an average of 1°C (1.8°F) over pre-industrial levels had thinned the glacier just enough to slip its moraine, destabilizing it completely.

    by 1980, an increase in summer air temperature in the region by an average of 1°C (1.8°F) over pre-industrial levels had thinned the glacier just enough to slip its moraine, destabilizing it completely.

    The Columbia Glacier is losing an average of 4 billion metric tons of ice per year, making it a major contributor to the roughly 75 billion metric tons of ice that Alaskan glaciers have lost annually for the past two decades, and which are responsible for 0.2 millimeters of global sea level rise per year.

    That sounds like a negligible amount, but seas are rising globally an average of 3.2 mm per year. That means melting Alaskan glaciers are responsible for 6.25% of the total sea level rise per year, despite holding just 1% of the planet’s total glacial ice.

    https://qz.com/1257090/heres-how-fast-a-glacier-can-slip-into-the-sea-once-its-destabilized/

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  60. kassy

     /  April 22, 2018

    California’s Trees Are Dying At A Catastrophic Rate

    John Muir, naturalist and cofounder of the Sierra Club, wrote of the forests in the Sierra Nevada, “Going to the woods is going home.” Unfortunately, since 2014 that home has seen unprecedented levels of tree mortality with as many as 129 million trees across 8.9 million acres lost. Where once stood a lush, green forest, there are now trees turning yellow and brown.

    long article with lots of photo’s:
    https://www.buzzfeed.com/laurageiser/california-trees-dying-at-catastrophic-rate?utm_term=.etRDA4Vov#.klbg5ZxvD

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  61. kassy

     /  April 22, 2018

    Intense Ocean Currents Could Be Created by Ridiculously Tiny Marine ‘Insects’

    “Swimming animals could play a significant role in ocean mixing – an idea that has been almost heretical in oceanography,” explains fluid mechanics engineer John Dabiri from Stanford University.

    “Right now a lot of our ocean climate models don’t include the effect of animals, or if they do it’s as passive participants in the process.”

    How could these insignificant zooplankton churn the ocean blue?

    Strength in numbers, it turns out, as swarms of the creatures migrate daily in vertical columns, feeding at the ocean surface by night, before retreating hundreds of metres deep by day.

    “You have this massive migration vertically every day of literally trillions of organisms,” Dabiri told NPR.

    “As they start swimming upward, each of them kicks a little bit of fluid backward… pretty soon you have this vertical stampede upward of these shrimp, and [the water is] getting rushed downward by this successive series of kicks.”
    ..

    To measure the effects of this snowball effect, the team placed brine shrimp in vertical tanks filled with salt water, and induced the animals’ day/night migrations up and down via lights mimicking the rise and fall of sunlight.

    “They weren’t just displacing fluid that then returned to its original location,” one of the team, Isabel Houghton, explains.

    “Everything mixed irreversibly.”

    For the details see:
    https://www.sciencealert.com/how-giant-swarms-of-tiny-marine-creatures-could-be-creating-powerful-ocean-currents

    I think this really cool. This mechanism will work where there are a lot of them.

    I don’t buy what the article says at the end:
    So far, these effects have only been demonstrated in the lab, but if the same thing is taking place out in the real world, biologists and oceanographers will need to rethink how marine life contributes to ocean turbulence – especially since the same thing could be happening with bigger animals, such as jellyfish, squid, fish, and even large mammals.

    The zooplankton migrate in place. They act as a daily vertical pump whereas the bigger animals move around.

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  62. Paul in WI

     /  April 23, 2018

    Good article in the Miami Herald about the EPA’s attempts to justify axing the higher fuel efficiency standards that Obama was able to implement and to bully California and like-minded states into accepting a lower nation-wide fuel efficiency standard:

    Trump’s EPA argues that more people will die in car accidents unless California fuel rules are weakened

    Here’s an excerpt from the article:

    The Trump administration is embracing a curious – and some would say dated – argument as it builds its case to weaken federal rules championed by California that require cars and SUVs to average 55 miles per gallon by 2025.

    It is warning that the fuel-efficiency targets, seen by most as key to meeting climate and air quality goals in California and nationwide, could actually end up killing people.

    Taking a cue from auto dealers and free-market think tanks skeptical of mainstream global-warming science, Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt is tossing aside reams of federal and California data showing the fuel economy standards are perfectly safe. Instead, Pruitt’s directive this month to potentially scale back the fuel standard says “an important factor” is the need to re-examine safety issues.

    The agency is preparing to make the case that tough fuel economy rules could effectively force automakers to sell smaller, lighter and thus less crash-worthy vehicles. That, in turn, would lead to more crash-related deaths. And it warns the rules could drive up the cost of cars to the point that consumers will put off buying new, safer models equipped with life-saving technology improvements.

    It’s a decades-old debate, and one the administration is not particularly well positioned to win. But it is scrambling for leverage in an intensifying confrontation with California, which has considerable power to derail the administration’s plan to give automakers a break.

    The EPA and National Highway Transportation Safety Agency will unveil in the coming months how much they plan to water down the mileage targets, and their supporting evidence for such changes.

    “They are trying to see what they can run with,” said Dan Becker, director of the Safe Climate Campaign of the Center for Auto Safety, an advocacy group in Washington. “They are constructing out of whole cloth a web of arguments for why these standards that are backed by thousands of pages of evidence need to be set aside and weakened.”

    Under the Clean Air Act, California has its own authority to set mileage standards stricter than those of the federal government. A dozen other states currently embrace California’s rules, as federal law allows, and if they refuse to go along with the weaker targets the administration settles on, automakers are in a bind.

    Anything other than a single national standard destabilizes their business model of building one fleet of cars suitable for the entire country. Although the law set the target at 55 miles per gallon, it was based on outdated testing methods. So it is widely accepted that the actual 2025 goal, as reflected by real-world driving conditions, is closer to 44 miles per gallon.

    California and its allies say they will not yield.

    “The idea that we’re going to roll back the auto standards is absurd,” California Gov. Jerry Brown told reporters in Washington on Tuesday. “It’s not going to happen, and the attempts to do this are going to be bogged down in litigation long after we have a new president.”

    The defiance has moved the administration to send threatening signals to the state. Pruitt is making clear he may try to revoke the state’s decades-old authority to set its own rules, an unprecedented move. Pruitt would have to persuade the courts that he has compelling reasons.

    One of them – he hopes – would be that California’s crusade for aggressive mileage targets carries a death toll.

    It is an argument long advanced by Pruitt’s allies at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a group funded by the network of donors led by industrialists Charles and David Koch. The institute and other Koch-funded groups recently sent Pruitt a letter, pushing him to revoke the waiver allowing California to set its own rules. They accused the state of pursuing a radical national agenda against gas-powered vehicles.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article209571199.html

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  63. redskylite

     /  April 23, 2018

    My son has no interest in learning to drive, he has just graduated and moved to a pad near his first job , so he can walk to work. While I always loved riding/driving on bicycles, motorbikes and cars. A sobering perspective from a Senior Lecturer in Sustainability at Murdoch University, maybe he has a point.

    Not so fast: why the electric vehicle revolution will bring problems of its own

    Electric cars are a quick-to-deploy technology fix that helps tackle climate change and improve urban air quality – at least to a point. But the sustainability endgame is to eliminate many of our daily travel needs altogether through smart design, while improving the parts of our lives we lost sight of during our decades-long dependence on cars.

    https://theconversation.com/not-so-fast-why-the-electric-vehicle-revolution-will-bring-problems-of-its-own-94980

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    • wili

       /  April 23, 2018

      Good points here. As important as this technology is to help us move quickly off of fossil-death-fuels (and transportation now outranks electricity generation as the #1 source of CO2 pollution in the US, iirc), we need to also be looking at the other necessary steps. Most urban travel should be done by mass transit and of course walking and biking.

      Most long distance travel should be carefully looked at to see if it is really necessary and can’t be done through skipe or other means. Most materials should be locally sourced, wherever possible. And generally, we should be doing a lot less consuming, including ‘consumption’ of travel.

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  64. Ridley Jack

     /  April 23, 2018

    C02 ppm has hit 411 ppm?

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  65. wili

     /  April 23, 2018

    U.K.

    Storm Desmond: Thousands of people flooded out of homes

    ” Thousands of people have been flooded out of their homes or left without power after Storm Desmond wreaked havoc in parts of the UK.
    In Cumbria and Lancashire more than 43,000 homes are suffering from power cuts, while an estimated 5,200 homes have been affected by flooding.
    The weather has claimed two lives – in Cumbria and the Republic of Ireland.
    David Cameron said the flood defences in Cumbria “were not enough” and some people might not be home for Christmas.
    Storm Desmond lashed parts of Northern Ireland, north Wales, southern Scotland and especially north-west England over the weekend, and more heavy rain is expected this week.
    Record-breaking amounts of rain fell in Cumbria, the worst-hit county – prompting the county to declare a major incident.

    ‘Absolutely horrific’
    The devastation has resulted in criticism of the government after multimillion-pound defences built following floods in Cumbria in 2005 failed to keep the deluge out from people’s homes. …”

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35023558

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  66. wili

     /  April 23, 2018

    “Pulitzer-winning reporter David Cay Johnston: “The evidence suggests Trump is a traitor””

    https://www.salon.com/2018/04/23/pulitzer-winning-reporter-david-cay-johnston-the-evidence-suggests-trump-is-a-traitor/

    Extract: “Investigative reporter who has covered Trump for 30 years dares to imagine impeachment — and President Nancy Pelosi

    Here are the key things people should know about Donald Trump. He comes from a family of criminals: His grandfather made his fortune running whorehouses in Seattle and in the Yukon Territory. His father, Fred, had a business partner named Willie Tomasello, who was an associate of the Gambino crime family. Trump’s father was also investigated by the U.S. Senate for ripping off the government for what would be the equivalent of $36 million in today’s money. Donald got his showmanship from his dad, as well as his comfort with organized criminals.

    The job of a prosecutor is not to bring the perfect case, it’s not to bring the case that should be brought for political reasons. It’s to bring the easiest, most solid case that wins. Mueller will do that. There is nothing that prevents indicting a sitting president, but it is an untested issue. Mueller is going to have to decide whether to indict him or to go to Congress.

    There is no good ending to the story. America will survive this, we’ll get past it, but whenever Trump leaves, there’s no good ending. If Trump is removed by impeachment or by the voters, whether in a Republican primary or a general election, I know what he will do. He’s already told us what he will do by his actions. Trump will spend the rest of his days fomenting violence and revolution in this country.

    At an absolute minimum, Donald Trump has divided loyalties, and the evidence we already have suggests that Donald Trump is a traitor. In fact, I would say that the evidence we already have, the public materials such as emails for example, strongly indicate that Donald Trump is a traitor.”

    (Thanks to aslr at asif for this, and to sig for the previous one)

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    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 24, 2018

      Now let us talk about the perfect lawyer for Trump the associate of criminals
      https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/4/18/1758063/-Explosive-The-Russian-mafia-ran-U-S-operations-out-of-a-club-partially-owned-by-Trump-s-lawyer

      Explosive: The Russian mafia ran U.S. operations out of a club partially owned by Trump’s ‘lawyer’
      The Donald Trump-Russia connections just keep cropping up. Now there are explosive new details about his so-called attorney, Michael Cohen, who just so happened to grow up in a rather exclusive NYC club that was known as the preferred meeting spot of the Russian mob in the U.S. You cannot make this stuff up. From Talking Points Memo:
      What I didn’t realize until now is that both Agron and his successor Balagula ran their operations out of an office in the El Caribe social club. So the El Caribe wasn’t just a mob hangout. From the 70s through the 90s at least, the bosses of the Russian mafia in the U.S. literally ran their crime organization out of the El Caribe.

      So Michael Cohen’s uncle Morton Levine’s social club was the headquarters of Russian organized crime in the U.S.
      Balagula maintained an office at the El Caribe Country Club, a Brooklyn catering hall and event space owned by the uncle of President Donald Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

      The uncle, Dr. Morton Levine, said that all his nieces and nephews have an ownership in the company, but that Cohen “gave up his stake,” after Trump was elected.

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      • kassy

         /  April 24, 2018

        Apparently Cohen also taped lots of conversations (because Trump claimed to be doing that). Hoped he taped some interesting ones.

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  67. wili

     /  April 23, 2018

    “Paris just had 5 straight days of 80-degree (27+°C) weather in April, unprecedented in weather records dating back to 1874. ”

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  68. wili

     /  April 23, 2018

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-23/ferrari-quietly-very-quietly-tests-electric-car

    ” Ferrari Quietly—Very Quietly—Tests Electric Car
    Hybrid engines will be offered on all new models from next year

    Two years ago, Sergio Marchionne dubbed the notion of a Ferrari that can run without the aggressive growl of its 12-cylinder engines ‘obscene.”

    Today, it’s a reality.”

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  69. kassy

     /  April 24, 2018

    Good! Seeing Ferrari go electric was one of my personal signs that things are really changing.

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