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Stronger Storms in a Record Warm World — Looking Ahead to the Atlantic Hurricane Season, 2018

No holds barred, 2017 featured the most devastating hurricane season on record for the North Atlantic basin. More than 282 billion dollars in damages were inflicted. The season produced the strongest storm ever to form in the Atlantic — Irma. And another very strong storm — Maria — resulted in the loss of an estimated 5,000 lives in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico.

With human-caused climate change making the strongest storms more and more powerful, we ask the pertinent question — how bad will the 2018 hurricane season be?

(Analysis of climatological factors leading up to the 2018 hurricane season.)

Already, we have seen sub-tropical storm Alberto form in the Caribbean and track northward into the U.S. Gulf Coast prior to official hurricane season start. This storm brought with it heavy rains to the Eastern U.S. A region already reeling from historic flooding. One locked beneath a seemingly never-ending Matrix-esque pall of dark clouds. Alberto is one of many recent early season storms. And it may be a harbinger of more intense storms to follow.

Much warmer than normal sea surfaces are quite pervasive across the Gulf of Mexico and off the U.S. East Coast. In these regions temperatures range between 1 C and up to 7 C above average in the most extreme instances. These near-shore much warmer than normal waters will tend to fuel any storm that does approach the U.S. In addition, a fading La Nina could enable storm formation by reducing wind shear over the Atlantic. Lastly, combined high atmospheric water vapor levels and instability over the Eastern U.S. and parts of the North Atlantic may aid in storm formation and help to fuel the storms that do gather.

(Odd Alberto tracking toward Lake Michigan yesterday. Alberto, as with many recent storms, maintained strength over land while dumping heavy rainfall. While not comparable to Harvey’s all-time record inundation, Alberto is contributing to very severe rainfall over the Eastern U.S. during late spring of 2018. Image source: University of Miami and Brian McNoldy.)

NOAA, however, is presently predicting a storm season that is about average when compared to past years. And sea surface temperatures presently over the key storm formation zones running from the Cape Verde Islands through the Caribbean are cooler than normal. These cooler waters could persist into August and September, which would help to take the edge off of any storms that do form.

Though climate change is producing a very clear trend of increasing peak storm intensity, it is less likely that extreme seasons like 2017 will occur back-to-back. However, human-caused climate change does have a tendency to produce unpleasant surprises. And the early formation of Alberto is no reassurance for even a temporary return to normalcy.

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58 Comments

  1. Erik Frederiksen

     /  May 31, 2018

    Not only do stronger storms have higher storm surges, but they are riding in on higher sea levels.

    The foot of sea level rise on the East coast caused Hurricane Sandy to flood an additional 25 square miles.

    Additionally, changes in the Northern polar jet stream, linked to Arctic ice decline, caused Sandy to follow an unusual, and unusually damaging track, directly into land with the dangerous semicircle funneling water up Long Island Sound.

    The problem with sea level rise is that the closer sea levels approach the top of a coastal defense the greater the risk of a storm surge breaching the defense and the damage occurs like in New Orleans with 1,836 dead.

    So many coastal areas face more abrupt destruction than what one think would be associated with the drip, drip, drip of SLR.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  2. wili

     /  June 1, 2018

    “The new analysis shows that while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions.”

    ” “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth, not just greenhouse gases, but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use,” said Joseph Poore, at the University of Oxford, UK, who led the research. “It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car,” he said, as these only cut greenhouse gas emissions. ”

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/may/31/avoiding-meat-and-dairy-is-single-biggest-way-to-reduce-your-impact-on-earth

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • Paul

       /  June 1, 2018

      Meat has always been part of the human diet. It’s only recently that it’s become a problem.
      Imagine the amounts of land plus associated herbicide/pesticides that would needed to feed the projected human population of 10billiion, or whatever it may be?
      We simply need to consume drastically lower amounts of everything. Energy, food, water, minerals, soils, other species and so on.
      The best way to do that is to globally lower income or have less or no children. Neither of which is going to happen voluntarily.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • wili

         /  June 1, 2018

        Rape has always been a part of human experience…it doesn’t mean we should accept it.

        The next bit is even more of a non-sequitur.

        Yes, less of everything, but the science says that less meat and dairy can go a lot farther in addressing the problem than less use of straws or disposable cups. If you have numbers and studies to contradict the claims made in the paper, please do present them.

        (Fertility rates, by the way, are in fact decreasing nearly everywhere, especially where women are given educations and rights over their own bodies. So it is actually where women are forced involuntarily to have more kids than they want that you have a problem with too high of birth rates. Allowing women to actually voluntarily have the number of children they want is exactly what is needed.)

        Liked by 3 people

        Reply
        • Excellent! Slavery has also been a part of the human experience for practically ever. It still is! Doesn’t mean we should accept it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • wili

           /  June 3, 2018

          A good breakdown of many assumptions around this topic

          Liked by 1 person

        • wili

           /  June 4, 2018

          For some reason this link didn’t show up in my post again, so I’m trying again:

          Liked by 1 person

        • wili

           /  June 4, 2018

          Oops, now they there’s a double post. Please delete the second, robert. And sorry about that.

          Like

      • Connecticut Gordon

         /  June 2, 2018

        What I would like to see calculated into the equations is the cost of having pets. .Although I cannot comment on cats except that they presumably eat a lot of seafood, I can comment on dogs. They not only eat a huge amount of meat, but they expel huge portions of CO2 and methane as well. I have read a review that states an ‘average’ large dog that weighs 80-90 lbs produces as much earth warming per year as driving an average SUV for 10,000 miles a year. It is clear that pets exacerbate the problem. Why is it OK for vegetarians or vegans to moralize about what everyone else does when they own cats and dogs that are potentially far worse. It is easier to get a reduction in pets than children. The ‘pet’ situation is the USA is never discussed as often pets are considered as pseudo children. I find it nauseating.

        Like

        Reply
        • Jeremy in Wales

           /  June 2, 2018

          Having pets, dogs or cats, is often a substitute for human companionship or as you say pseudo children. They have their own characters and are deeply loved. What I do not understand is why people have to own multiple dogs or cats. Why is one not enough?
          Cats in particular are a problem as while they have a kitten personality around people they are minature lions when out, killing far too much local wildlife.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Abel Adamski

     /  June 1, 2018

    An excellent item on Climate Crocks.
    Trenberth et al have done the math, the energy transfer from the record hot ocean in the Gulf of Mexico equals the energy dissipated by hurricane Harvey.
    QED
    https://climatecrocks.com/2018/05/31/new-video-hot-ocean-hurricanes-houston-and-harvey/

    Kevin Trenberth has a new paper, measuring the change in ocean heat content in the Gulf of Mexico as Hurricane Harvey passed over. Turns out the heat-loss just matches the energy of precipitation that made Harvey an unprecedented catastrophe.

    Dr. Trenberth’s co-authors Lijing Cheng of China’s Institute of Atmospheric Physics, and Peter Jacobs of George Mason University round out this explainer. Short and powerful demonstration of how scientists more and more understand the link between a warming planet and specific extreme events.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  4. Does global warming make tropical cyclones stronger?
    By Stefan Rahmstorf, Kerry Emanuel, Mike Mann and Jim Kossin

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  5. Connecticut Gordon

     /  June 1, 2018

    Hi Robert

    You might recall that I posted a couple of weeks ago on your article “Warm Oceans, Displaced Polar Air: Why the Eastern U.S. is Likely to See Very Severe Rainfall During May”.

    I had mentioned a severe thunderstorm we had experienced that day in New Fairfield, CT that was brutal, and extremely scary for a Brit such as me who used to think 30mph winds were worrying!

    Apparently The National Weather Service is now confirming that what we experienced were three tornadoes and then what is called a macroburst which caused winds in our small town to touch 120mph for a few minutes, which is bizarre for the northeast to say the least. Our local energy provider, Eversource, said that the devastation in New Fairfield was the worst they had witnessed anywhere in Connecticut for at least 40 years.

    My question is whether climate change has any impact on events such as frequency and severity of macrobursts and if so why and how? Also does that mean we are likely to see more unusual and severe weather events in places such as ours that has never had them before.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  6. wharf rat

     /  June 1, 2018

    We’re keeping our Paris climate change commitments and our economies are booming: Governors
    Jerry Brown, Andrew Cuomo and Jay Inslee
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/06/01/climate-change-work-continues-trumps-paris-retreat-governors-column/661059002/

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  7. Suzanne

     /  June 1, 2018

    Former NYC mayor Bloomberg, CBS interview this morning and his initiatives to fight Climate Change :

    Like

    Reply
    • hatrack

       /  June 5, 2018

      $70 million divided among 20 cities? Oh, and you “hope (Trump) will change his mind”? I don’t think this even rises to the level of greenwash. Truly pathetic.

      Like

      Reply
  8. Bill McKibben states that the amount of extra heat accumulating in the atmosphere is the equivalent of 400,000 Hiroshima sized atom bombs per day. This translates to about 1.3 x 10E14 tons of TNT per year. My question is this: What percentage of this energy goes into the annual incremental melting of Arctic sea ice each year? If it some number like 10,000 bombs per day, the an Arctic blue ocean event will not be a dramatic change, as it would be if 200,000 bombs per day of energy were thus used. Obviously when there is no more ice to melt, the energy previously used to melt ice would then be available directly as additional heat to further screw up a civilization friendly climate. The answer to this question could provide a way to talk about the immediate impact of a blue ocean event. The albedo effect, while also extremely important, wouldn’t necessarily have a sudden impact on the advent of a blue ocean event unless the collapse of the sea ice turned out to be very quick. Has anyone any calculations concerning this question? I imagine that once someone has calculated the amount for Arctic sea ice, that amounts for Greenland ice, Antarctic ice, and other glaciers could also be calculated.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  9. JPL

     /  June 1, 2018

    “Trump administration officials are making plans to order grid operators to buy electricity from struggling coal and nuclear plants in an effort to extend their life, a move that could represent an unprecedented intervention into U.S. energy markets.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-06-01/trump-said-to-grant-lifeline-to-money-losing-coal-power-plants-jhv94ghl

    The Farce is strong with this one…

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  June 1, 2018

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  June 2, 2018

      But are they going to use the “clean beautiful coal”?

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  10. Abel Adamski

     /  June 2, 2018

    One that is most relevant to the Subject
    https://climatecrocks.com/2018/06/01/developer-to-children-youre-on-your-own-suckas-for-sea-level-rise-ill-be-dead-is-not-a-plan/
    In addition to the headline article is a ray of intelligence with the story of Mr Boutros and the Miami architect Rene Gonzales
    >>A 21st-century Atlantis-in-the-making is how many scientists think of Miami Beach. With a projected sea-level rise of three to four feet by the century’s end, huge chunks of the barrier-island city are expected to lie beneath the Atlantic Ocean. But Hany Boutros is staying.

    In fact, Mr. Boutros, 43, a Detroit-area health care executive and real estate developer, has built a new 3,500-square-foot home in South Beach, the city’s most threatened neighborhood.
    “I would be foolish if I didn’t take sea-level rise into consideration, but it’s not going to stop me from living the life I want,” he said, standing inside his Prairie Avenue home’s entryway. “I found a solution,” he added, motioning to the retractable automated stairway that connects a 9,400-square-foot open-air gated tropical garden and parking area with the three-bedroom house above it.
    Designed by the Miami architect Rene Gonzalez as the first in a series of luxury “elevated houses” around South Florida, it has been built to allow up to 10 feet of storm surge to safely flow underneath it.<<
    “The house already went through a test when Irma hit,”
    “I saw a nearby neighbor posting pictures of flooding and tree damage as she walked around,” he said.
    Boutros messaged her, gave her the access codes to the control panels that essentially run his home and asked her to step inside it. The rest of the street had lost power, but his front gate opened, and the retractable staircase smoothly descended 10 feet on its system of pulleys and cables.

    “Because I have a generator that turns on automatically, the house ended up being a shelter. I said, ‘Bring your friends, bring your kids, there’s hot water for showers — please use it!’ I had zero damages. It was as if Irma went around my house,” he said.

    That was no accident, Mr. Gonzalez said. “Rather than fighting the situation, we have to create spaces that allow us to live in a way that is closer to the environment, closer to the way the Seminole Indians in Florida lived,” with their Chickee huts up off the ground on stilts, protecting against water and allowing ventilating breezes to blow through.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  11. wili

     /  June 2, 2018

    In Sweden they are halting train traffic this weekend. Between the main cities. Because the rails are bending from heat.

    https://www.hln.be/nieuws/buitenland/in-zweden-is-het-zo-abnormaal-heet-dat-de-sporen-kromtrekken-en-treinen-dreigen-te-ontsporen~a5021e48/

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 2, 2018

      Thanks, I read in a comment on an article in The Conversation that Sweden has had weeks of extreme heat for the time of year, maybe where the heat that was anticipated for the Arctic diverted to.
      It is an issue we have at times in Aust, forces a slowdown of trains. – The reason why in warm climates there is a calculated space between lengths of track, so Sweden would have had skinny gaps – but now the climate is changing

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  12. Jeremy in Wales

     /  June 2, 2018

    May 2018 was sunniest and warmest on record in UK. Nearly 250 hours of sunshine were recorded across country last month, according to Met Office

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jun/02/uk-weather-may-2018-sunniest-warmest-on-record-met-office

    After what seemed to us in the UK as a cold winter we have just had a glorius May, which we obviously believe we deserved, and personally I hope the good spell continues all summer although I doubt that will happen.

    Trouble is I know it represents another step along the road to a warmer world but for the moment I have put it to the back of my mind and will enjoy a beer in the garden.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  13. Andy_in_SD

     /  June 2, 2018

    An excellent report on trends within the Taiga in northern Canada. If you simply blast through and look at the visuals (graphs) you will see the trend. With reconstruction, the date range is pushed pretty far back, thus allowing trends to be quite apparent.

    http://www.biodivcanada.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=99361C1A-1&offset=5&toc=show

    National key finding
    High loss of wetlands has occurred in southern Canada; loss and degradation continue due to a wide range of stressors. Some wetlands have been or are being restored.

    Declining extent and thickness of sea ice, warming and thawing of permafrost, accelerating loss of glacier mass, and shortening of lake-ice seasons are detected across Canada’s biomes. Impacts, apparent now in some areas and likely to spread, include effects on species and food webs.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • Andy_in_SD

       /  June 2, 2018

      This is one of the graphs showing the trend. This shows the growing season for vegetation.

      Like

      Reply
  14. Andy_in_SD

     /  June 2, 2018

    Fires in Siberia are kicking up for the burn season.

    http://www.arctic.io/explorer/8/2018-06-01/8-N54.23637-E118.91156

    Like

    Reply
  15. Andy_in_SD

     /  June 2, 2018

    Temperature anomaly with 10 year moving average for Australia. I don’t know if it is noise, coincidence or what the specific cause is, however in the various temperature deviation plots and temperature plots I have observed from various parts of the globe (which is a lot) there is always the same dip. That dip sits at WW2, and leaves me wondering if the true global trend was masked (like when Pinetubo erupted). Perhaps the war, and it’s various contributions (ie: air particulates from explosions) had a similar effect? A human group effort to create the atmospheric conditions of a volcano. And if so, where would we be now had the trend been contiguous.

    Like

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  16. If the Arctic ice is only absorbing 0.9% of global warming, then a blue ocean event wouldn’t directly increase world temps much at all. The effect will be indirect in that the Arctic Ocean will be able to warm faster, contribute to destabilizing the methane hydrates, which would then increase warming.

    Towards the end of the Permian extinction, methane was released in massive quantities and increased temps another 5 deg C, as I understand the story. So the argument goes that methane isn’t too much of a threat because in that extinction event, temps were starting from a higher point than temps are today. However, I would think the amount of methane in the seas would equilibrate to the then current temps. That might imply that we have much more methane in the seas than existed at that time since the lower temps would imply a lot more methane could be stable. Thus a methane event could even be a bigger problem from a low temp going up, than from a high temp going up. Comments?

    Like

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  17. For those that may have been concerned about my previous comments about the truckters strike in Brasil, fortunally I was too pessimistic. The strike has waned (I can’t say without casualities, as one truckter was stoned and died as he tried to work when the strike’s break-down was beggining), and things are somewhat normal again here in Brasil.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  18. Widespread methane seeps off Oregon coast. May 31, 2018. Oregon State University
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180531102812.htm

    Since the first evidence of underwater methane was discovered in the late 1980s, only about 100 “seep sites” had been identified along the Northwest coast through 2015.
    But over the past two years the scientists — aided by new sonar technology on the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus, owned and operated by the Ocean Exploration Trust — have purposefully gone seeking evidence of underwater methane and have expanded the total number of offshore seep emission sites to a whopping 1,000 locations.

    Just how much methane is off the Northwest coast is uncertain, the researchers say. But it appears to be a lot and it could cause potential environmental problems.
    Some of the methane samples included traces of helium, which is only found in the mantle, the researchers noted.
    “This research has raised some interesting questions,” Baumberger said. “How common is mantle gas in the Cascadia Margin methane seeps? How stable is the system during an earthquake? Will a warming ocean lead to an increase in the release of methane? What we’re trying to do is identify how much is out there and establish a baseline. Then we can address these and other scientific questions.”

    Like

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  19. kassy

     /  June 3, 2018

    Eerie silence falls on Shetland cliffs that once echoed to seabirds’ cries

    In 2000, there were more than 33,000 puffins on the island in early spring. That figure dropped to 570 last year and there are no signs of any recovery this year, although it is still early in the season.

    Similarly, Shetland’s kittiwake population plummeted from over 55,000 in 1981 to 5,000 in 2011, and observers believe those numbers have declined even further in the past few years. Only the lack of a properly funded census has prevented ornithologists from putting precise numbers on the devastation that is occurring.

    “I went to check our sites at Dalsetter and Troswick last week to compare numbers of Arctic terns with those we counted during Seabird 2000, the last national seabird census carried out across Britain and Ireland,” added Moncrieff. “I found there were around 110 Arctic terns there last week compared with around 9,000 that were counted in the same area in 2000. That is the kind of loss we have sustained here.”

    much more on:
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/03/shetland-seabirds-climate-change-catastrophe-terns-kittiwakes-puffins

    Like

    Reply
    • Hilary

       /  June 4, 2018

      Very sad reading indeed, Kassy.
      I spend a magical summer (’79) working on Fair Isle as a cook/housekeeper at the Bird Observatory.
      http://www.fairislebirdobs.co.uk/index.html
      The sounds of the sea birds breeding on the cliffs there was deafening. Spent all my free time out bird watching there.
      Hilary in NZ

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  20. Scary FYI from Earth Nullschool

    The North Atlantic Hot Blob has cooled from SSTA of 4.2C to 2.9 C. This appears at least partly due to a storm that has drifted down from the tip of Greenland and has been hovering over it for the last six days, dragging part of the jet stream with it. It is shuttling air from the tropical Atlantic around and on toward northern Scandinavia.
    https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/850hPa/orthographic=-40.98,46.17,548/loc=-48.845,40.481

    Meanwhile

    The Baltic Sea SSTA is clocking in at 7.7C. It’s only early June.
    Earth Nullschool: 2018-06-01 20:00 Local.

    Like

    Reply
    • Jeremy in Wales

       /  June 3, 2018

      The Norwegian Arctic islands have also just experienced there hottest May ever, several degrees centigrade above normal, almost tropical
      https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ecology/2018/06/warmest-may-ever-arctic-islands#.WxQ35H8i3G4.twitter

      Like

      Reply
      • Oh, my. Here are the actual figures:

        Not since December 2010 has Norway’s Meteorological Institute measured normal temperatures at its northernmost locations. It should still be freezing, below zero. Not so this May. Measurements at Longyearbyen airport on Svalbard could tell a story about global warming not seen before with a mean temperature of 1,8°C, which is 6°C above normal.

        Bjørnøya in the Barents Sea was the warmest with a mean temperature of 3,7°C. That is 5,1°C above normal. Hopen was 5°C above normal, while Jan Mayen had 5,1°C warmer than normal for May. Ny-Ålesund, further north on Spitsbergen, had a mean temperature of 1,6°C, which is 5,6°C above normal for the month.

        On mainland Norway, temperatures in the last few days of May were warmer than most holliday resorts around the Mediterranean. Warmest was Etne outside Bergen with 32,7°C on May 30th. Mean temperature for Norway was 4,2 degrees above normal. Since mean values were registered first time in 1900, 2018 is by far the warmest ever measured the Meteorological Institute informs.

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  21. wili

     /  June 4, 2018

    Perhaps the destruction of good wine grapes will finally get the ruling .1% to take GW seriously??
    https://weather.com/photos/news/2018-06-01-hail-damages-bordeaux-champagne-wine-region-france

    Like

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 5, 2018

      In Australia Tasmania was always a tad cool for grapes, no longer the case as there is a boom in viticulture for the cool climate grapes that used to be grown in mountains in Northern Victoria and Southern NSW, even the French are interested (p.s the French are moving into areas in the UK in a big way as France, Spain, Austria,Italy warm up

      Like

      Reply
  22. wili

     /  June 4, 2018

    And the storms just keep coming, again, in the environs of robert’s neck of the woods:

    “Washington, DC is experiencing heavy rain this Sunday. Details on the rain and #flood risk here: (link: http://bit.ly/2Hh8r3s) l

    Like

    Reply
    • wili

       /  June 4, 2018

      “Just sheets of water cascading down on NW DC right now ”

      Image below; video clip at the link.

      Like

      Reply
      • wili

         /  June 4, 2018

        “NEW: Flood warning in the District, S Mont Co, central & E Fairfax co. NWS: “Stream gauges indicate Cameron Run near Alexandria, Rock Creek in the northwest District of Columbia, and Sligo Creek near Takoma Park may being flooding soon.” More info: (link: https://wapo.st/2kLp3I5)”

        Thanks to sig at asif for these

        Like

        Reply
  23. wharf rat

     /  June 4, 2018

    Has lithium-battery genius John Goodenough done it again? Colleagues are skeptical

    Researchers have struggled for decades to safely use powerful—but flammable—lithium metal in a battery. Now John Goodenough, the 94-year-old father of the lithium-ion battery, is claiming a novel solution as a blockbuster advance.

    If it proves out, the invention could allow electric cars to compete with conventional vehicles on sticker price. The improbable solution, described in a new paper from Goodenough and three co-authors, has drawn intense interest from leading science and technology publications. He estimates that the solution could store five to ten times as much energy as current standard lithium-ion batteries. That’s enough to have Google’s Eric Schmidt tweeting about it.

    However, other leading battery researchers are skeptical, even mystified, by Goodenough’s claim. For his invention to work as described, they say, it would probably have to abandon the laws of thermodynamics, which say perpetual motion is not possible. The law has been a fundamental of batteries for more than a century and a half.,,,,,

    https://qz.com/929794/has-lithium-battery-genius-john-goodenough-done-it-again-colleagues-are-skeptical/

    Like

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 4, 2018

      Thought I had read that before – March 2017.
      However Progress is being made on “Solid State” Batteries (No liquid electrolyte) which is what it is called. Currently looking at 2023 at the earliest, still not production ready so once commercial manufacture ironed out, then build the factories

      Like

      Reply
  24. Abel Adamski

     /  June 4, 2018

    Are we as smart as the single celled slime mold

    Like

    Reply
  25. wharf rat

     /  June 4, 2018

    Dispatches from the United Federation of Awesomeness…

    California gets more power from solar than gas in May

    During May utility-scale solar provided 17% of generation on California’s grid, outpacing gas for the first time on a monthly basis.

    California was one of only three states in 2017 to get more than 10% of its power from solar, but has not stopped there. According to an analysis of data from California’s grid operator compiled by pv magazine collaborator and self-described data geek Joe Deely, in May solar generation in the area managed by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) rose to a new record of 3.02 terawatt-hours (TWh), representing nearly 17% of in-state generation. With gas falling to only 2.67 TWh, or around 15%, this means that solar provided more electricity for Californians than gas – for the first time ever on a monthly basis.

    It is important to note that as CAISO does not track rooftop solar or other solar generation behind a customer meter, all of the solar projects in the state actually generated as much as 50% more electricity than the CAISO figures show.

    https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2018/06/04/california-gets-more-power-from-solar-than-gas-in-may/
    =
    Strata Solar to build largest solar power plant in Washington

    The 28 MW-DC plant is part of an upcoming commercial and industrial solar program – Solar Solect – being offered by local power company Avista Utilities. The state expects to triple total solar capacity by the end of 2020.

    Strata Solar will break ground on what will be the largest solar power plant in Washington State on May 24th. The company expects to complete commissioning in late October, and the utility is planning for the project to begin delivering electricity December 1st.

    The Lind County facility will be a 19.2 MW-AC/28 MW-DC single axis tracker plant. Currently the largest plant in Washington State is only 500 kW, and was commissioned in 2009.

    https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2018/04/09/strata-solar-to-build-largest-solar-power-plant-in-washington/

    Liked by 1 person

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