Advertisements

How Arctic Sea Ice Loss Could Make the Hot Pacific Blob Permanent 

From the North Pacific to the tropics, loss of sea ice will result in a vastly heated Pacific Ocean in which events like the recent Hot Blob become far more common. Those were the conclusions of a new model study conducted by Wang, Deser, Sun and Tomas and recently published in Geophysical Research Letters.

(Understanding how sea ice loss in the Arctic can result in large-scale Pacific warming.)

An ocean heating event called the Blob resulted in mass loss of sea life during the period of 2013-2014. It was associated with a towering high pressure ridge in which the upper level winds ran far to the north and into the Arctic. Beneath the ridge, temperatures both at the land and ocean surface grew to be much warmer than normal.

Though viewed as a fluke by some, many began to draw connections between the powerful ridge feature, the related Pacific warming, and sea ice loss in the Arctic. Now, a new scientific study using climate models has produced some rather telling findings. First, the study found that Arctic sea ice loss results in large scale Pacific Ocean warming within just 10-20 years of widespread Arctic Ocean ice reductions. Second, the study models indicated that warming occurred first and strongest in the North Pacific, but then rapidly translated toward the Equator.

(Sea surface temperatures across the North Pacific were much warmer than normal during the hot Blob event of 2013-2014. A new model study finds that sea ice loss will make such extreme events common.)

The reason for this change in planetary and Pacific Ocean energy balance is scientifically described as a teleconnection. In very basic terms, loss of sea ice at the Arctic Ocean surface produces changes in local wind patterns that ripple through the global atmosphere. After a rather short period of time, wind patterns in the upper levels of the atmosphere and at the surface in the Pacific Ocean become involved.

Winds are often the vehicle by which energy is transferred throughout the atmosphere and at the surface. So a change in winds, from the top of the atmosphere to the bottom, can swiftly translate to a change in surface temperatures.

(A new model study shows radical changes in Pacific sea surface temperatures in response to Arctic Ocean sea ice loss.)

Looking at the study, it appears more likely now that the Northern Pacific Hot Blob of 2013-2014 was not a fluke, but instead an early knock-on effect of Arctic sea ice loss. A kind of event that will tend to become commonplace as the Arctic Ocean ice continues to melt. And that eventually, sooner rather than later, the heat build-up in the North Pacific will translate south to the Equator. First warming the Eastern Pacific in a more persistent El Nino type pattern and then spreading west (see image above).

As with the Blob, everything from the health of sea life to the intensity of extreme weather would be substantially impacted by such large scale changes. In other words, it looks like large scale losses of Arctic sea ice are enough to affect a broad and disruptive change in the global climate regime.

Advertisements
Leave a comment

59 Comments

  1. Aaron Franklin

     /  June 21, 2018

    This is happening much faster than they’re predictions. And not just in the north Pacific. In southern hemisphere spring these hot blobs formed in the south Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian ocean southwest, and moved south in the summer. Now in the North Atlantic and Pacific Also.

    Like

    Reply
    • Actually, I’d call this an area that was murky that has been somewhat clarified by the study. There was debate about how the Pacific and El Nino would respond to warming and polar amplification. However, this new model study does seem to confirm that risks for a number of impacts such as drying in the Amazon are rather high under RCP 8.5 and probably under RCP 4.5. The study confirms earlier predictions that ITCZs would move northward away from the Equator. We should also note that the implied impacts to ocean life, circulation, and oxygen content are writ rather large in this study.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    • I’d generally like to nudge the discussion away from the ‘faster than expected’ narrative due to the fact that it’s a blanket statement that doesn’t really delve into underlying impacts. We have a problem with the ‘inevitables’ here in discussion. I think it’s a general problem culturally and probably has something to do with a knee jerk reaction that tries to pin down future events to conform to one’s world view (confirmation bias). But we need to resist that tendency with all our might right now. The other thing that we need to do is look strongly toward solutions. To not cast dark aspersions on human nature and to instead look at how all systems and ideologies can be transformed to act more positively in the present climate of creeping crisis.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Robert Chapman

     /  June 21, 2018

    Hubu • 26 minutes ago
    The fish die a little everywhere on the coasts of Martinique all the oxygen of the sea is sucked by the rotten sargassums and the sea becomes progressively anoxic…

    An ecological disaster against which we are totally powerless
    A testimony:

    “That’s it, the deadly gas kills down at my house, on Anse Azerot beach. The infamous plate of the last few days has been diluted in water, and its inhabitants, the fish, have died………hundreds of fish float along the beach and wash up…. They come in all shapes, sizes and colors…but they all smell the same…that of death……………………………………………………………

    15,000 fish from an aquaculture farm died

    Water contains only 1% oxygen according to the aquaculturist

    http://www.martinique.franc

    The dead fish will in turn consume the oxygen which feeds the phenomenon
    Hydrogen sulfide levels are much higher (13 ppm) than the official reading of the sensor installed at Pointe Savane 0.15 ppm
    http://disq.us/p/1teuie4

    Like

    Reply
    • I’m approving this now with a caveat — there is no confirmation at this time for this unsolicited report of 13 ppm H2S on coastal Martinique. In other words, it’s probably not wise to draw conclusions at this point. That said, we do have a number of expanding ocean anoxic zones and the Caribbean has seen a number of fish kills recently due to various ocean impacts related to climate change.

      Like

      Reply
    • Related:

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. It’s still early yet but the Alaskan salmon season is setting up to be a total disaster. They might not even hit the low end in Kodiak or Copper River on reds. If some of the best managed fisheries are failing, we’re in serious trouble.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    • Erik Frederiksen

       /  June 22, 2018

      According to the Professor emeritus of the Scripps Oceanographic Institute, Jeremy Jackson, Atlantic fish stocks are between 1/1,000 and 1/10,000 of what they were just 150 years ago.

      From a TED Talk of his:

      “It’s not just the fish, though, that are disappearing. Industrial fishing uses big stuff, big machinery. We use nets that are 20 miles long. We use longlines that have one million or two million hooks. And we trawl, which means to take something the size of a tractor trailer truck that weighs thousands and thousands of pounds, put it on a big chain, and drag it across the sea floor to stir up the bottom and catch the fish.

      Think of it as being kind of the bulldozing of a city or of a forest, because it clears it away. And the habitat destruction is unbelievable. This is a photograph, a typical photograph, of what the continental shelves of the world look like. You can see the rows in the bottom, the way you can see the rows in a field that has just been plowed to plant corn. What that was, was a forest of sponges and coral, which is a critical habitat for the development of fish.

      it is now is mud, and the area of the ocean floor that has been transformed from forest to level mud, to parking lot, is equivalent to the entire area of all the forests that have ever been cut down on all of the earth in the history of humanity. We’ve managed to do that in the last 100 to 150 years.”

      Liked by 7 people

      Reply
  4. Ronald

     /  June 22, 2018

    From the study: “This leads to anomalous surface wind divergence (…), consistent with reduced precipitation in the latitude band 5°S–30°S and enhanced precipitation in the band 5°S to 30°N. This dipole pattern represents a broad northward shift of the climatological double ITCZ”.
    If I am not mistaken, this is a confirmation of previous studies, mentioning a shifting northward of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, and the risk of a drying and die-off of a large (particularly eastern, southern, even into central) part of the Amazon.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  5. Greyson Smythe

     /  June 22, 2018

    Phys.org: Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rate

    The earth is rising in one part of Antarctica at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, as ice rapidly disappears and weight is lifted off the bedrock, a new international study has found.

    The findings, reported in the journal Science, have surprising and positive implications for the survival of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which scientists had previously thought could be doomed because of the effects of climate change.

    The unexpectedly fast rate of the rising earth may markedly increase the stability of the ice sheet against catastrophic collapse due to ice loss, scientists say.

    Moreover, the rapid rise of the earth in this area also affects gravity measurements, which implies that up to 10 percent more ice has disappeared in this part of Antarctica than previously assumed.

    Like

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 22, 2018

      As Icelandic studies showed that uplift increases viscosity of the mantle especially where compressed magma channels and vents may exist, and that is an active part of the world, so I would suggest a caveat on being beneficial until we know how that pans out

      Like

      Reply
    • bill h

       /  June 22, 2018

      This “isostatic rebound” in one place lead to a concomitant lowering of continents elsewhere as magma flows away, so there could be bad consequences elsewhere.

      Like

      Reply
      • kassy

         /  June 22, 2018

        It’s rising quite fast as isostatic rebound goes but that is too slow to stop things.

        So it is up to us to do that.

        There are millions, probably even billions of reasons to stop serious Antarctic melt and they live on the coasts.

        Liked by 2 people

        Reply
    • Pretty clear indicator that the loss of mass at the surface is quite large. In other words, the final sentence is the real ringer.

      Under present rates of warming, isostatic rebound cannot keep up with the pace of ice loss. So fingering this as a mitigating factor is unlikely to be fruitful in reality. In any case, if WAIS is going up, then EAIS is going down.

      Like

      Reply
  6. Tom Jerome

     /  June 22, 2018

    More EPA lies.
    Methane leaks from the US fossil fuel industry is significantly higher that estimated by the EPA.

    “The study led by the Environmental Defense Fund researchers and 19 co-authors from 15 institutions, estimated the leak rate from US oil and gas operations is,2.3%, significantly higher than the EPA’s 1.4%.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/methane-leaks-offset-much-of-the-benefits-of-natural-gas-new-study-says/2018/06/21/e381654a-7590-11e8-b4b7-308400242c2e_story.html?utm_term=.a2aa448ff8d4

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • Just a word here about messaging —

      This is what happens to EPA when republicans run it. During at least the past two decades they have put irresponsible people at the head of EPA who have gutted its ability to protect air, water, and the environment and have advanced fossil fuel industry policy. When we talk about this situation, we should be clear why it’s happening. And the reason why is that republicans, not democrats, are in power.

      Like

      Reply
  7. Suzanne

     /  June 22, 2018

    This may have already been posted, but I have been so overwhelmed by the separation of children from parents, that I am just seeing it.

    “Trump just erased an Obama-era policy to protect the oceans”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2018/06/20/trump-just-erased-an-obama-era-policy-to-protect-the-oceans/?utm_term=.0596d265867e

    In a statement, National Ocean Industries Association President Randall Luthi praised the new executive order as a “renewed broad vision” to foster energy security and create jobs. Luthi called the Obama policy “an uber-bureaucratic solution to a government self-imposed problem.”
    _________________________________________

    This constant, daily barrage of assaults on everything decent…is truly getting hard to take. Every single weekend now for 6 months I am out there with a group of people canvassing voters in my district to GOTV. But I got to tell you this EVIL REGIME…is breaking me down.

    I keep telling my husband, “we just have to get to November 6th”…but after a week like this one, where I cry every day…I just wonder if “decency will prevail”.
    My husband and I are already talking about getting out of this country if we don’t Flip the Congress in November. I am not sure we will have elections in 2020 if we don’t flip the Congress.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    • bill h

       /  June 22, 2018

      I sympathise, Suzanne, but where would you go. Things are looking grim in Europe as well, with xenophobic governments springing up in Italy, Hungary, Austria, Slovenia, to say nothing of Russia. or my own country, Brexit Britain, where the idea of threatening alien hordes that must be kept at bay has gained a lot of traction.

      It doesn’t augur well for the struggle for a sustainable future, which by necessity must involve international co-operation and trust.

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
      • I think we need to fight xenophobia and isolationism where it emerges. However, if a state goes really dark and starts incarcerating and/or killing people for political purposes, then leaving starts to become a survival choice. We contemplate that possibility under Trump. Given his tendencies, it is not irrational to do so. They tried to do it at the border with those seeking asylum. And given their treatment of citizens in Puerto Rico, there is no assurance that such violence wouldn’t be turned on citizens of the U.S. that oppose this republican attempt at totalitarianism.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
    • mlp in nc

       /  June 23, 2018

      Absolutely. Trump has to go now, as in now, and I hope our other leaders understand that. An America that harms children has no excuse for existence.

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
    • Jean Swan

       /  June 23, 2018

      Thank you for your work Suzanne!

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 23, 2018

      Just for some historical background and how the US having sowed the wind is reaping the whirlwind
      https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/us-building-blocks-of-the-border-crisis

      So much of the rhetoric surrounding those attempting to cross U.S. borders has sought to criminalize them rather than contextualize what is happening in the countries — El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua — from which they are seeking asylum. This isn’t an accident.
      Subscribe to the Quarterly now and get this tote for free! An ode to determination. A paean to pain. The 10-ounce black cotton Trying tote is suitable for lugging most things luggable, including…

      Corporate interest in the continued expansion of the privatized prison system has given us a voracious appetite for consuming our own and others. Somehow, though, we find it easier to metabolize a steady diet of narratives absolving us from complicity and responsibility than to face the truth. When it comes to the present border crisis, this country can’t claim innocence. In fact, we’re the reason many of these immigrants are here.

      Like

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  June 23, 2018

        Sorry i didn’t read the p[aste and an ad slipped in, please edit Robert, slap on wrist

        Like

        Reply
      • Dave McGinnis

         /  June 23, 2018

        There is a weather-connection to the migration problem — hurricane Mitch 1998, one of the 20th century’s great natural disasters. San Pedro Sula in Honduras was wiped out and became the locus of the focus for migrating north. It still is.

        Like

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 23, 2018

      And then of course there is the consequences of Global Warming and it’s resultant climate change on subsistance farming families.
      https://www.thedailybeast.com/climate-change-sparked-the-border-migration-crisis

      Like

      Reply
    • wharf rat

       /  June 24, 2018

      Hang in, Suze. We need more outrage and fewer internment camps.

      “There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part! You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels…upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop! And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!”

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      • wharf rat

         /  June 24, 2018

        4 Rats Gump was an FSM supporter, but didn’t sit in. My brother and I had many discussions (fights) with our folks over this. Mario worried Mom; “He’s able to move crowds like Hitler did.”
        Guess what, Ma? I’m so glad you’re not here to see Drumpf; he’s your worst nightmare.

        Rat ’66

        Liked by 2 people

        Reply
    • We are all standing behind you Suzanne.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  8. oldmoses

     /  June 23, 2018

    Excellent work, Robert; thank you. Don’t shoot the messenger, people.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
  9. Abel Adamski

     /  June 23, 2018

    Not as bad it is looks at first glance – The subsidy bill is getting out of hand for the central government so trying to shift it to the local “Counties”, but will still have a serious impact in the short term locally – however the consequence is the manufacturers and installers are looking to do projects in developing countries instead to keep the wheels of the Solar Industry turning
    https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/chinas-bombshell-solar-policy-could-cut-capacity-20-gigawatts#gs.4NCcJQA

    The policy changes are an effort to stem the country’s ballooning subsidy costs, which rang in at RMB 100 billion (about $15.6 billion) last year. China hasn’t been able to pay out those sums. Wood Mackenzie projected they may reach RMB 250 billion (about $39 billion) by 2020.

    “As well as the demand-side effects, there’ll be an impact on module costs and tariffs emerging from PV auctions, too, with large volumes of modules that had been destined for the Chinese market now looking for a home elsewhere,” said Tom Heggarty, a senior solar analyst at GTM Research.

    But that drop in demand could help the industry, especially in emerging markets, because of a subsequent fall in costs and Chinese developers looking for international investment.

    “We’re also likely to see an increase in the number of Chinese PV developers participating in other global markets as their home market slows,” said Heggarty.

    “We’re already seeing interest from Chinese industrial firms in in-progress tenders in Kuwait and Oman, including firms from the mining, real estate, and defense sectors bidding for 500-megawatt or 1.2-gigawatt projects without much solar project development experience,” he said.

    Heggarty said increased competition, along with lower module costs, could push auction prices down. Attia said record-low solar bids may dip below $20 per megawatt-hour in the next 12 months.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • I think China will probably temporarily back off to 35-40 GW solar in 2018 as they try to bring their grid up to speed. But acceleration in other countries likely means we hit above 100 GW global despite foot dragging in the west. The primary driver appears to be rapidly falling costs. We have cells at as low as 12 cents per watt at this time and modules in the range of 25-30 cents per watt at the lowest levels. These economics are stunning and they just keep improving. Fossil fuel industries are relying more and more on protectionist based policies. But they can’t defend all markets. There’s a lot of pressure behind the dam holding back the renewables flood. Eventually it’s going to break.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  10. kassy

     /  June 23, 2018

    Some snippits:

    Satellites track vanishing Antarctic ice

    In West Antarctica, ice shelves are being eaten away by warm ocean water, and those in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas are up to 18 per cent thinner than in the early 1990s. At the Antarctic Peninsula, where air temperatures have risen sharply, ice shelves have collapsed as their surfaces have melted. Altogether, 34,000 km2 of ice shelf area has been lost since the 1950s.

    In the Amundsen Sea, for example, ice shelf thinning of up to six metres per year has triggered a 1.5 km per year acceleration of the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. These glaciers have the potential to raise sea levels by more than a metre, and are now widely considered to be unstable.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-06-satellites-track-antarctic-ice.html

    Back in the nineties of last century things were projected to go much slower. Arctic ice problems around 2040. Greenland would be a problem after that and well Antarctica would be safe for a while after that.

    But here we are in 2018 with Antarctica actively melting already.

    And we know that even if we go to 0 CO2 tomorrow this effect will still linger on.

    I really miss a sense of urgency in the world… a lot of people thinking about the next election cycle and missing the big picture. Somehow it is not in their world while it is very much happening to their world.

    We wanted the 1.5 or 2 C target to prevent things like Antarctica melting at all.

    And did they ever formulate a goal to save the Arctic ice? Nope. While that is our first barrier of protection and when that fails the whole planets system changes in a way we can’t turn back. As you can read above it will amp up the heat and then that will eventually push Antarctica into higher gear.

    There are all these numbers and they are vague and there is such a big problem relating them to the real problem we are facing.

    You can not just pick a target and see what happens because physics will decide which state you end up with. Once you figured out it is the wrong one you are in deep (eventually).

    There is such a good case for avoiding the worst case scenario but they can’t see it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  11. The following is a good and readable article about the pioneer scientist James Hansen 30 years after bringing awareness of climate change to the world, how his predictions have been spot on, and how we are failing to fulfil our responsibilities:

    “Thirty years after a former NASA scientist sounded the alarm for the general public about climate change and human activity, the expert issued a fresh warning that the world is failing “miserably” to deal with the worsening dangers….
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/19/james-hansen-nasa-scientist-climate-change-warning

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    • Greyson Smythe

       /  June 23, 2018

      RealClimate has something similar: 30 years after Hansen’s testimony

      The first transient climate projections using GCMs are 30 years old this year, and they have stood up remarkably well.

      We’ve looked at the skill in the Hansen et al (1988) (pdf) simulations before (back in 2008), and we said at the time that the simulations were skillful and that differences from observations would be clearer with a decade or two’s more data. Well, another decade has passed!

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 24, 2018

      You have all been subjected to the meme that Hansen stated that in NY, the West Side Highway would be under water in 20 years, actually incorrect, he did not state that at all.
      Worth a follow up just for your knowledge
      https://www.skepticalscience.com/Hansen-West-Side-Highway.htm.

      What was actually stated
      James Hansen reports the conversation as follows:
      “Reiss asked me to speculate on changes that might happen in New York City in 40 years assuming CO2 doubled in amount.”

      P.S in 24 years with Hurricane Sandy it was under substantial water

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  June 24, 2018

      Per the quote in the article, there really is something Cassandra-like to Hansen’s life work and to that of all people who understand the gravity of the situation. I tend to agree with those who propose that from an evolutionary perspective we just aren’t equipped very well to grasp a problem as long-term and diffuse as climate change.

      Liked by 5 people

      Reply
    • Paul in WI

       /  June 25, 2018

      Here’s an article in the New Yorker from 2009 about James Hansen: The Catastrophist

      Here’s an excerpt from the article:

      Hansen has now concluded, partly on the basis of his latest modelling efforts and partly on the basis of observations made by other scientists, that the threat of global warming is far greater than even he had suspected. Carbon dioxide isn’t just approaching dangerous levels; it is already there. Unless immediate action is taken—including the shutdown of all the world’s coal plants within the next two decades—the planet will be committed to change on a scale society won’t be able to cope with. “This particular problem has become an emergency,” Hansen said.
      Hansen’s revised calculations have prompted him to engage in activities—like marching on Washington—that aging government scientists don’t usually go in for. Last September, he travelled to England to testify on behalf of anti-coal activists who were arrested while climbing the smokestack of a power station to spray-paint a message to the Prime Minister. (They were acquitted.) Speaking before a congressional special committee last year, Hansen asserted that fossil-fuel companies were knowingly spreading misinformation about global warming and that their chairmen “should be tried for high crimes against humanity and nature.” He has compared freight trains carrying coal to “death trains,” and wrote to the head of the National Mining Association, who sent him a letter of complaint, that if the comparison “makes you uncomfortable, well, perhaps it should.”
      Hansen insists that his intent is not to be provocative but conservative: his only aim is to preserve the world as we know it. “The science is clear,” he said, when it was his turn to address the protesters blocking the entrance to the Capitol Power Plant. “This is our one chance.”

      https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/06/29/the-catastrophist

      Liked by 4 people

      Reply
      • Well, it’s clear that CO2 and equivalent GHG in the range of 493 ppm CO2e is not safe. Hansen was absolutely right about that.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  June 26, 2018

        The article is badly named, I think. Instead of being named The Catastrophist,, it should have been named The Realist, or The Great Scientist. Like all scientists, Hansen typically is conservative in his language, and tends to issue conservative estimates.

        I hate it when pro-business media outlets try to influence us by putting conceptual frames around people and things. To me, this appears to be what the New Yorker is doing here. Hansen is not some wild haired nut spouting nonsense. Unfortunately, he makes way too much sense.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        • Leland Palmer

           /  June 26, 2018

          The article appears to be a mixture of positive quotes by fellow scientists and anecdotes about his mannerisms that make Hansen appear to be borderline unstable. Much of the positive stuff is buried deep in the article, while many people will read the title and the first paragraph or two.

          Liberals and scientists reading the whole article, will notice the positive quotes from fellow scientists. But low information voters reading only the first paragraph or two would likely have their preconceptions about Hansen’s supposed instability reinforced, I think.

          He was right. What more do they want?

          Liked by 1 person

  12. mlp in nc

     /  June 23, 2018

    Estimate of 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas’ Eagle Ford Group. US Geological Survey
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180622174733.htm
    Summary:
    The Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment.

    Like

    Reply
  13. bobinspain

     /  June 24, 2018

    Note the date and note also the hammering that central Europe has witnessed since these early warnings. Why is there no popular news footage?
    https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/2018-europe-spring-forecast-severe-weather-to-target-eastern-and-central-europe-shift-to-drier-warmer-weather-from-uk-to-france-and-spain/70004191

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  14. Tom Jerome

     /  June 24, 2018

    In the face of it all….

    Like

    Reply
  15. Abel Adamski

     /  June 24, 2018

    Completely OT, but something special to consider
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/oct/31/steve-jobs-last-words

    After making it through one final night, wrote Simpson, her brother began to slip away. “His breath indicated an arduous journey, some steep path, altitude. He seemed to be climbing.
    “But with that will, that work ethic, that strength, there was also sweet Steve’s capacity for wonderment, the artist’s belief in the ideal, the still more beautiful later.

    “Steve’s final words, hours earlier, were monosyllables, repeated three times.

    “Before embarking, he’d looked at his sister Patty, then for a long time at his children, then at his life’s partner, Laurene, and then over their shoulders past them.

    “Steve’s final words were: ‘Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow.'”

    Don’t give up, fight on for what is good and right

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  16. The Steve Jobs letter was fake news and cannot be substantiated.A good letter nevertheless.

    Like

    Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 25, 2018

      Details of his final moments came from his sister Mona Simpson, who has allowed the New York Times to publish the eulogy she delivered at his memorial service on 16 October. In it, she explains how she rushed to Jobs’s bedside after he asked her to come to see him as soon as possible.

      Like

      Reply
  17. kassy

     /  June 24, 2018

    Something beautiful for sunday:
    http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2018/06/ice-cave-beauty.html

    hat tip to pikaia at ASIF

    Like

    Reply
  18. kassy

     /  June 24, 2018

    And something remarkable:

    Unprecedented Change From Cold April To Hot May

    Did you freeze your a– off in April? Did you sweat your a– off in May? Well, you are not alone. In fact, a record number of stations observed a record cold April followed by a record warm May. This is the largest area on Earth to experience a record cold to record warm flip (or vice versa) of temperatures in consecutive months in the last 100 years!

    If the whiplash from cold to hot seemed unusual, it was. In fact, it was unprecedented for any time of year. Using the NASA GISS temperature gridded data set, approximately 130,000 square miles went from record cool to record warm from April to May in 2018. The next largest “event” was the transition from record cold to record warm from December 1946 to January 1947, in the tropical Pacific Ocean southeast of Hawai’i (107,000 square miles). Given that it occurred over the ocean, I find this a little dubious.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/brianbrettschneider/2018/06/20/unprecedented-change-from-cold-april-to-hot-may/#62c06a081d47

    Lots more detail + the graphs on the link. Hat tip bbr2314.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • bostonblorp

       /  June 25, 2018

      Given the absolutely beating the oceans are getting coupled with these ever increasing weather swings and extremes, it’s really hard to see how we’re not, at some point, going to experience multiple crop failures in different parts of the world to the extent that global food demand will majorly outstrip food supply.

      Like

      Reply
    • Interesting details. Thanks for this.

      Like

      Reply
  19. Andy_in_SD

     /  June 25, 2018

    REE’s (Rare Earth Elements)
    ======================

    We truly are in a pickle, and are the source of the problems, even those that tout “green” solutions (as they exist at this time).

    This is a giant lake at Baotou in Mongolia. The lake is now a trailing pond where toxic effluent by the millions of gallons is dumped. For every ton of REEs taken from the ground, there are 340,000 to 420,000 cubic feet of waste gas containing dust concentrate, hydrofluoric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfuric acid released. Additionally, approximately 2,600 cubic feet of acidic waste-water and about a ton of radioactive waste residue are also produced. What is not vented into the atmosphere, goes into this lake.

    REE’s are used in the smart phone you have in your pocket, the computer on your desk, the TV in your house, the “green” technology in your house and your Prius. It is used to create the magnets for wind turbines, electric cars (yes, Tesla is included here), hybrid cars and other “clean” energy technology.

    The reason we call them “clean energy” is because we have outsourced this kind of environmental catastrophe to places in the world we don’t look at, and don’t care about. Whether it is Mongolia (this footage) for cerium and neodymium to Democratic Republic of Congo for cobalt to Bolivia for lithium since we do not live in the consequences, don’t see the massive poisoning, we can all be smug and pretend that we are not the consumer driving the need.

    Do I have a solution? Hell no. But at times our hippocracy deserves being pointed out. If not to spur us into some great action, rather just to make us uncomfortable for a moment and ground ourselves, realize how much of the issue is caused by our desire for the latest smart phone (since last years is well…last years). We have caused this, all of us.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    • Leland Palmer

       /  June 25, 2018

      The U.S. EPA is actually a success story…currently being dismantled. I suspect that other countries could follow our environmental protection model, and that toxic wastes from rare earth element mining and processing are not inevitable.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
    • The rare earth minerals scarcity story is overblown. Tesla, for example, is now eliminating cobalt from its batteries. The renewable energy industry is moving and adapting ahead of these trends. The result is that the scarcity narrative has struggled to catch up.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • Abel Adamski

         /  June 26, 2018

        Just as world wide there is a boom in Cobalt production (usually found in Gold/Copper/Silver/Tin/lead mines – now worth extracting from the ore and the slag heaps) and with ethical supply and environmental management. Canada has a very large swathe of Cobalt rich old mining areas which are re opening as the Silver and Cobalt prices are rising

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
    • Abel Adamski

       /  June 26, 2018

      In Australia we have very stringent environmental requirements for all mining and we have several Rare Earth companies that use Patented IP techniques to not only achieve negligeable pollution and the Indigenous land holders are very stringent on the sanctity of their land, but also increases productivity. For example the slag/waste is stored and it contains other rare earths and minerals that are less commercial at the time, but as the pile builds easy to then extract the now concentrated other rare earths as demand picks up. We have a bit of a boom in rare earths as China has actually shut down most of the polluting producers and is implementing much tighter environmental controls, creating a slight shortfall leading to solid investment and offtake contracts for the Aussie miners from Massive Chinese companies.
      Clean Teq for example started as a very high tech water filtration company with a growing world wide client base for municipal and industrial water purification which has expanded into mining non ferrous such as Tantalum, Vanadium etc using their filtration techniques to maximise recovery whilst minimising pollutants,also applicable to Li extraction and they have licensed their technology. Pilbara mining has patented IP also for Lithium and Titanium and is a major ranked source.
      So yes there are challenges, but we are rising to the challenge

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • Leland Palmer

         /  June 26, 2018

        Maybe what we need is a better way of recycling, with things like neodymium boron iron magnets tagged somehow electronically. In Denmark the government goes around picking up toxic waste, and then incinerates it – a relatively clean way of disposing of it. Perhaps we could follow a similar model for recycling. So, if garbage was sorted at a central location, and the tagged stuff sorted out, maybe that would minimize rare earth usage.

        Interesting quote from Wikipedia:

        “Despite their name, rare-earth elements are – with the exception of the radioactive promethium – relatively plentiful in Earth’s crust, with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper. They are not especially rare, but they tend to occur together in nature and are difficult to separate from one another. However, because of their geochemical properties, rare-earth elements are typically dispersed and not often found concentrated as rare-earth minerals in economically exploitable ore deposits.]”

        So rare earth elements are not particularly rare, and the talk about their scarcity is overblown, as Robert said, considering that our ability to find economically exploitable deposits is continually improving. Of course, if there is a scarcity (unlikely) relative to today, the price will just rise, and so a graceful transition to alternatives would occur. Technology, as you mention in Australia, is continually improving, both to minimize the use of expensive materials and locate and refine rare earths.

        Very happy to hear that there are actually sane people running some things in Australia, as opposed to our current leadership here in the USA.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: