Hot March, Melting Sea Ice, Record High CO2, and a Weak El Nino 

Good afternoon everyone. It’s April 15 of 2019. And it’s high time I provided another update on the present global climate state.

(Indicators explained.)

Yes, I’ve been off this cart for a bit due to my personal climate action that I’m calling extreme clean. And I’ve got to say that this action is in solidarity with the tens of thousands of young people who continue to demonstrate for a more responsible political response to climate change around the world.

Action of all kinds is very important. But political action is where the rubber is really going to meet the solar and wind powered EV road of the future. It’s what’s going to help us navigate a necessarily fast clean energy transition away from the carbon spewing fuels of the present. And the fossil fueled politicians like Trump are going to have to be kicked out for that to happen.

(Human forced climate change loads the dice for stronger storms like Idai which devastated parts of Africa during March of 2019. Image source: NASA Worldview.)

At present, fossil fuel burning has really put us in a tough spot. That is the subject of today’s writing. Where we are today according to some major climate indicators — atmospheric CO2 (the primary greenhouse gas driving climate change), global surface temperature, Arctic sea ice, and the near term ENSO climate variability factor.

Atmospheric CO2 likely to hit between 413 and 415 ppm in May (monthly average)

For the first factor, atmospheric CO2 during recent days has risen to between 411 and 416 parts per million. This level is likely higher than at any time in at least the last 5 million years and is probably closer to ranges seen during the Middle Miocene around 15 million years ago. That’s pretty bad — implying about 2-3 C or more of global warming over the long term if those values aren’t somehow brought down.

(Present atmospheric CO2 levels are ranging between 411 and 416 parts per million on a daily basis at the Mauna Loa Observatory. These are the highest levels seen in at least 5 million years, possibly more. Image source: NOAA.)

Of course, due to the present pace of fossil fuel burning, atmospheric CO2 just keeps rising. Which is why a clean energy transition to get us to net zero and net negative carbon emissions is so, so important for our future.

CO2 isn’t the only greenhouse gas related to human activity. But according to agencies like NASA, it is the most important. Adding in other greenhouse gasses like Methane, NOx, and various other manufactured chemicals that trap heat, you end up with an atmospheric CO2 equivalent of approximately 497 ppm during 2019 (extrapolated from NOAA’s greenhouse gas index). This is a bit of a scary number for me as it implies that the top end indicator of all greenhouse gasses combined is about to move outside the Middle Miocene context soon.

Going back to the only slightly less scary CO2 figure, it appears likely that this primary greenhouse gas will top out at around 413 to 415 parts per million monthly average values during May of 2019. This indicator for annual peak values puts the present climate state increasingly out of the range of Pliocene past climates that many scientists are now researching as a corollary for present day climate impacts — at least on a greenhouse gas forcing basis.

March of 2019 was third hottest on record

It takes many decades and centuries for climates to balance out in response to a particular forcing. So present atmospheric warming driven by the greenhouse gasses mentioned above lag behind the initial global forcing. For this reason, on an annual basis, global temperatures are presently ranging between 1 and 1.2 degrees Celsius above 1880s averages as they continue to climb higher.

(The globe substantially heated up again during March — as seen in the above map provided by NASA. Image source: NASA GISS.)

These present departures roughly compare to temperatures during the Eemian climate epoch of about 120,000 years ago in which readings were 1 to 2 C warmer than 1880s averages. So we’re not yet in the Pliocene with regards to temperatures (2-3 C), but what we get long-term is probably the Miocene (3-4 C) if present greenhouse gas values remain stable. And we head for even more warming (4 C+) if we keep burning fossil fuels.

It’s in this rising temperature context that we are now experiencing more rapidly melting glaciers, ramping sea level rise, increasingly intense storms, wildfires and droughts, rising damage to corals, worsening heatwaves, more extinction pressure on plants and animals, and declining ocean health. It’s also worth pointing out that present temperatures are just a passing milestone on the way up if we keep burning fossil fuels and don’t learn how to pull down that excess atmospheric carbon.

(This graph of zonal temperature anomalies since 1880 is a visual representation of warming across the globe. These zones show various latitudes and their anomaly values vs mid 20th century averages over time. The long term warming trend is quite clear. Image source: NASA.)

According to NASA GISS, March of 2019 set its own benchmark as the third hottest such month on record. Temperatures for the month hit around 1.33 C above 1880s averages (1.11 C above NASA’s 20th Century baseline). This is pretty amazingly warm.

It was in this environment that the globe experienced a hyper-charged cyclone striking Africa, extensive damage due to flooding in the Central U.S., and recent very severe storms from the U.S. south through New England.

Arctic Sea Ice at Record Low for Recent Days

All this added heat has had its own impact on the Arctic where sea ice during recent days has plunged into new record low territory. According to information provided by the National Snow and Ice Data Center, Arctic sea ice yesterday measured just 13.518 million square kilometers. The lowest on record for today.

(Graph of Arctic sea ice measures for January through May of 2003 to present compared to the 1981 to 2010 average [gray line]. The orange line dipping below the pack is the measure for 2019. These are record lows for this time of year. Image source: NSIDC.)

That’s about 300,000 square kilometers below the previous record low set in 2017 and about 1.4 million square kilometers below the 1981 to 2010 average. A period in which major sea ice melt was already ongoing.

Sea ice melt doesn’t have a significant direct impact on sea level rise. You need land ice melt and ocean thermal expansion for that. But sea ice is a big ocean based heat reflector that helps to keep the Arctic environment stable and to prevent the world’s waters from sucking up an even greater amount of warming than they already do. That heat reflector is in decline and it’s one of the reasons why the Arctic is warming up at a faster rate than the rest of the globe.

(Early season sea ice melt is progressing through the Bering and Chukchi seas as overall Arctic sea ice extent hits record daily lows for this time of year. Image source: NASA Worldview.)

Major media appears to have recently had a bit of an epiphany about sea ice as recent reports from sources such as PBS note startling losses for the Bering region during 2019. It’s worth noting that individual seas tend to experience higher rates of ice variance. But the trend for the overall Arctic, which is the combination of all its incorporated seas, is one of consistent decadal sea ice decline.

Weak El Nino Means Uncertain Challenge to 2016 Record

While the world is heating up overall and experiencing many of the changes noted above, a shorter term variability feature of global temperature is the ENSO cycle. This periodic warming and cooling of Pacific Ocean surface waters relative to the globe sets down the rough markers of 3-5 year global temperature variability. During the Pacific cool phase, or La Nina, the global surface tends to cool off a bit. During the Pacific warm phase or El Nino, the global surface tends to warm.

This is not to be confused with total global heat gain — which is still occuring on a practically constant basis as oceans warm and glaciers melt in addition to atmospheric warming. It’s just a major factor in what we tend to see over the shorter term at the Earth’s surface.

(Present warmer than normal sea surface temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific indicate a weak El Nino. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

For 2019, we are again tipping into the warmer side of this natural variability based trend. And combining that with the larger influence of human-forced warming, it appears that the dice are loaded for a challenge to the new record hot surface temperatures set in 2016.

But not so fast! 2019’s El Nino — or Pacific Ocean surface warming event — is, according to NOAA, likely to be rather weak. This compares to the Super El Nino event of 2016. So the swing toward warm side will tend to be relatively weaker. As a result, it’s less certain that 2019 will beat 2016 as hottest on record. And overall, it’s more likely that 2019 will place in the top 3 as 1st, 2nd or 3rd hottest (You may want to ask Dr Gavin Schmidt over at NASA GISS to see what he thinks. He’s been putting out some pretty accurate predictions over the past few years.).

So far, according to NASA GISS, December, January and February of climate year 2019 came in as 3rd hottest. With the weak El Nino ramping up, it does appear that March, April, May could heat up as well. We shall see!

Living in a rapidly warming world

Looking at all of these shorter term indicators, it’s easy to miss the bigger context. That being — we are living in a world in which atmospheric greenhouse gasses are rapidly increasing. These gasses, in turn, are causing the world to rapidly warm resulting in surprising changes and increasing damage. And it’s in this context that climate action on the part of individuals, businesses and governments becomes all the more necessary.

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44 Comments

  1. We are again close to record temperatures. And of coarse the warming can’t start to be come cooling until the earth gets hot enough that it radiates more heat away it captures from the sun each year. How hot is that? There is such a lag, and yet it still all happens so quickly on the heating side. The ice cores showed us this.
    https://squashpractice.com/2011/01/08/dynamic-climate-is-lesson-of-ice-core-records/
    I know what I expect in the coming years will be miserable in many areas of the country. Here in Oregon we are moving from forested hills and mountains to grass shrub hills like California. We have to burn off millions of acres every year to get there. Most localities have seen some extreme weather effects, but few are willing to admit that those extreme events are about to become normal. Where to you run?

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  2. Madeline Peruse

     /  April 15, 2019

    I am missing Ronald Reagan, I had very little regard for him politically, however, he listened to scientist and worked with Margarate Thatcher to close the ozone hole. What hope do we have with the IDIOT in office today?

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    • I think we are all missing the basic rationality and common sense that, in the past, was displayed by both parties. Rational parties would embrace climate policies and work to fit them to their ideological views. The dems have brought forward a Green New Deal — which was a good start. The republicans have replied with attacks on science and climate change denial. This is not an acceptable response.

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    • wharf rat

       /  April 19, 2019

      California is a climate leader in large part because Raygun gave us the Calif. Air Resources Board and the Calif. Energy Commission. He also obtained a waiver from the EPA so that we can have our own, more stringent CAFE standards.

      California Air Resources Board
      https://www.arb.ca.gov/homepage.htm

      California Energy Commission
      http://www.energy.ca.gov/

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  3. Keith Antonysen

     /  April 15, 2019

    Australia is having an election on 18th May, climate change is a very major issue.The current conservative LNP government has no real policies in relation to climate change; whereas, the Labor Party has set goals for the future. The Greens Party has the best policies, though can expect about 10%-12% of the vote. The Greens may have some influence in the Senate in providing stronger climate change policies.

    The proposed Adani coal mine in Queensland is still a major issue being fought over. An assessment of Adani’s submission in relation to using ground waters from the Great Artesian Basin by CSIRO has stated that Adani has not provided a satisfactory submission. Yet, the Environment Minister has signed off on Adani’s submission in relation to ground water.

    Despite the LNP government claiming Australia will meet its Paris goal at a “canter”, the evidence from official sources says otherwise. As with the US, fake news is very troublesome.

    From a climate change point of view, it will be a disaster if the conservative LNP are elected.

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  4. Welcome back Robert. I read with interest the steps you and your family have taken to reduce your carbon footprint. Keep up the great work. Greetings from Australia where we’ve just had the hottest summer on record.

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  5. godfrey

     /  April 16, 2019

    Hi Robert,
    I would be glad for your analysis of the insect and earthworm losses. It looks like the sober scientific papers and studies are recording very great losses of both. If so, I would expect a very deleterious impact on food production soon. Do you think this is the case? Thank you

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    • I think the impacts to earthworms in particular are due to pesticide/non-organic farming issues.

      Some recent reports:

      file:///C:/Users/Rob%20Fanney/Downloads/soilsystems-02-00033.pdf

      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140325113232.htm

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    • eleggua

       /  April 17, 2019

      Here’re a couple of very good articles re: the Insect Apocalypse.

      ‘Is the Insect Apocalypse Really Upon Us?’
      Feb 19, 2019
      https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/insect-apocalypse-really-upon-us/583018/

      “Doing something is hard, though, because insect declines have so many factors, and most studies struggle to tease them apart. In their review, Sánchez-Bayo and Wyckhuys point the finger at habitat loss above all else, followed by pesticides and other pollutants, introduced species, and climate change, in that order. “If it was one thing, we’d know what to do,” says Moreau from Cornell. Instead, we are stuck trying to tend to 1 million smaller cuts…

      …The loss of even a small percent of insects might also be disproportionately consequential. They sit at the base of the food web; if they go down, so will many birds, bats, spiders, and other predators. They aerate soils, pollinate plants, and remove dung and cadavers; if they disappear, entire landscapes will change….”

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    • eleggua

       /  April 17, 2019

      …The insects in the forest that Lister studied haven’t been contending with pesticides or habitat loss, the two problems to which the Krefeld paper pointed. Instead, Lister chalks up their decline to climate change, which has already increased temperatures in Luquillo by two degrees Celsius since Lister first sampled there. Previous research suggested that tropical bugs will be unusually sensitive to temperature changes; in November, scientists who subjected laboratory beetles to a heat wave reported that the increased temperatures made them significantly less fertile. Other scientists wonder if it might be climate-induced drought or possibly invasive rats or simply “death by a thousand cuts” — a confluence of many kinds of changes to the places where insects once thrived.

      Like other species, insects are responding to what Chris Thomas, an insect ecologist at the University of York, has called “the transformation of the world”: not just a changing climate but also the widespread conversion, via urbanization, agricultural intensification and so on, of natural spaces into human ones, with fewer and fewer resources “left over” for nonhuman creatures to live on….

      …Scientists have tried to calculate the benefits that insects provide simply by going about their business in large numbers. Trillions of bugs flitting from flower to flower pollinate some three-quarters of our food crops, a service worth as much as $500 billion every year. (This doesn’t count the 80 percent of wild flowering plants, the foundation blocks of life everywhere, that rely on insects for pollination.) If monetary calculations like that sound strange, consider the Maoxian Valley in China, where shortages of insect pollinators have led farmers to hire human workers, at a cost of up to $19 per worker per day, to replace bees. Each person covers five to 10 trees a day, pollinating apple blossoms by hand.

      By eating and being eaten, insects turn plants into protein and power the growth of all the uncountable species — including freshwater fish and a majority of birds — that rely on them for food, not to mention all the creatures that eat those creatures. We worry about saving the grizzly bear, says the insect ecologist Scott Hoffman Black, but where is the grizzly without the bee that pollinates the berries it eats or the flies that sustain baby salmon?

      Where, for that matter, are we?”

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    • eleggua

       /  April 17, 2019

      ‘The Forgotten Pollinators’ by Stephen L. Buchmann and Gary Paul Nabhan details the effects on crop production and food supply due to loss of the pool of pollinators: four ‘B’s”
      birds, bats, butterflies and bees. Though now over 20 years old, it’s a valid, worthwhile read.

      https://islandpress.org/books/forgotten-pollinators

      “Consider this: Without interaction between animals and flowering plants, the seeds and fruits that make up nearly eighty percent of the human diet would not exist.

      In The Forgotten Pollinators, Stephen L. Buchmann, one of the world’s leading authorities on bees and pollination, and Gary Paul Nabhan, award-winning writer and renowned crop ecologist, explore the vital but little-appreciated relationship between plants and the animals they depend on for reproduction — bees, beetles, butterflies, hummingbirds, moths, bats, and countless other animals, some widely recognized and other almost unknown.

      Scenes from around the globe — examining island flora and fauna on the Galapagos, counting bees in the Panamanian rain forest, witnessing an ancient honey-hunting ritual in Malaysia — bring to life the hidden relationships between plants and animals, and demonstrate the ways in which human society affects and is affected by those relationships. Buchmann and Nabhan combine vignettes from the field with expository discussions of ecology, botany, and crop science to present a lively and fascinating account of the ecological and cultural context of plant-pollinator relationships.

      More than any other natural process, plant-pollinator relationships offer vivid examples of the connections between endangered species and threatened habitats. The authors explain how human-induced changes in pollinator populations — caused by overuse of chemical pesticides, unbridled development, and conversion of natural areas into monocultural cropland-can have a ripple effect on disparate species, ultimately leading to a “cascade of linked extinctions.””

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  6. Erik Frederiksen

     /  April 17, 2019

    Nice to see a post by you again, although I’ve appreciated your video presentations, I’ve missed your articles.

    Polar amplifying feedbacks are a worry: e.g. albedo loss from sea ice melt and loss of seasonal snow cover, and the beginning of methane release from the permafrost region.

    These unstoppable feedbacks overwhelm any possible natural cooling influences, so I think we need to figure out how to mechanically draw down CO2 or we are up the proverbial creek.

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  7. Victor Schwanberg

     /  April 17, 2019

    I was one of the Extinction Rebellion demonstrators in Parliament Square London, a friend of mine was arrested but the event was good natured. I think we are seeing the beginning of more awareness about climate change throughout the world. Lets hope it’s not too late!

    Liked by 2 people

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  8. eleggua

     /  April 17, 2019

    “Investors are finally paying attention to climate change — though not in the way you might hope.”

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  9. eleggua

     /  April 17, 2019

    “The Pinkertons wanted me to picture myself in a scene of absolute devastation. “A hurricane just wipes out everything, and you need to feed your children,” Andres Paz Larach said. The power grid is down, shipments of food are cut off, the water is no longer potable — how do you get what you need to survive? What risks do you take?…

    Over the last decade or so, Pinkerton began noticing a growing set of anxieties among its corporate clients about distinctly contemporary plagues — active shooters, political unrest, climate disasters — and in response began offering data-driven risk analysis, in addition to what they’re more traditionally known for. Dressed in an untucked powder blue oxford and round, rimless sunglasses, Paz Larach, the firm’s senior vice president in charge of the Americas, paused before affecting a look of brutal candor. “You’re going to turn to desperate measures,” he said. Everybody will. The other Pinkertons nodded….”

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    • eleggua

       /  April 17, 2019

      “Throughout my visit, I wondered whether I had caught Pinkerton in the midst of an awkward organizational transition, or if the company stood merely to capitalize on the world’s growing panic — and if the difference really mattered. They had, after all, taken me to fire automatic weapons, ostensibly as a training exercise against desperate, disaster-ravaged people. It was impossible to experience that and not project it into a future in which, in the absence of true climate policy or mitigation, capital felt free to protect itself from outside risks — whatever form they may take….”

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      • Robert in New Orleans

         /  April 17, 2019

        If the one percent and other elites believe that rent a cops can and will protect them from starving and desperate hordes, they are truly delusional. It is more likely that the people they have hired to protect them, will turn on them in the end.

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        • eleggua

           /  April 17, 2019

          Important to live and promote a non-violent, peaceful global revolution.

          Extinction Rebellion, which Victor Schwanberg up above participated in, is non-violent and fun!

          Their code:

          “1. We show respect to everyone – to each other, the general public and to the government and police.

          2. We engage in no violence, physical or verbal and carry no weapons.

          3. We wear no masks – we hold ourselves accountable for our actions.

          4. We bring no alcohol or illegal drugs.

          5. We take responsibility for ourselves, we are all crew.

          We are here together until the Government acts on our three demands for necessary action on the climate and ecological crisis. This code enables us to attract the many people we need to make this possible. Anyone breaking these agreements will be asked to leave.”

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  10. Robert in New Orleans

     /  April 17, 2019

    New climate models predict a warming surge

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/04/new-climate-models-predict-warming-surge?utm_campaign=news_daily_2019-04-16&et_rid=345368148&et_cid=2771173

    For nearly 40 years, the massive computer models used to simulate global climate have delivered a fairly consistent picture of how fast human carbon emissions might warm the world. But a host of global climate models developed for the United Nations’s next major assessment of global warming, due in 2021, are now showing a puzzling but undeniable trend. They are running hotter than they have in the past. Soon the world could be, too.

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  11. Here is one thing I don’t get. Vostok ice cores saw about 100 ppm CO2 change and about 8C temperature change. We are already at +100 ppm from before industrialization. Is there a good reason NOT to expect 8C for what we’ve done already? I’m not a climate scientist, and I can think of a couple of reasons why maybe not (polar region versus global average, CO2 not as big driver as a response to warming, etc.), but I don’t think we should be surprised that the climate models have been overly optimistic.

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    • mlp in nc

       /  April 18, 2019

      Gary,
      Add one more to the head scratching.

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    • Abel Adamski

       /  April 22, 2019

      But was that 8C Global or Arctic, how much has the Arctic warmed.?
      How long ago was it, as there was a major meteor impact in Greenland around 12,800 years ago that wiped out Megafauna and the Clovis people in the America’s, located by investigating an apparent impact crater being exposed by melting ice.
      I read an article some years ago I must try to locate on my old computer about carvings on a stele in the Middle East interpreted to depict TWO meteors and decimation of human population approx 12,000 years , the interpretation was disputed as no evidence of such, until recently

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      • eleggua

         /  April 22, 2019

        No science to substantiate that myth. Read the papers by the on-site researchers and avoid the mumbo jumbo speculation.
        I posted links to the actual research in a comment here before, on different post. Will dig it up later and re-post here, unless you locate it first.

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  12. eleggua

     /  April 17, 2019

    Keeling Curve’s been down for over a week. 411.91, last reading registered on April 5th.

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  13. eleggua

     /  April 18, 2019

    ‘Key Indicators of Arctic Climate Change 1971 to 2017 – video abstract’ – Jason Box, Apr 3, 2019

    This work is developed in support of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) and under the framework of the Network on Arctic Glaciology (NAG) of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC).
    Financing for this study is primarily by DANCEA (Danish Cooperation for Environment in the Arctic) under the Danish Ministry of Energy, Buildings and Climate.

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  14. eleggua

     /  April 18, 2019

    “In spring 2018, news of the water crisis in South Africa ricocheted around the world—then the story disappeared. So what happened?”

    Cape Town’s ‘Day Zero’ Water Crisis, One Year Later
    Apr 12, 2019
    https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/04/cape-town-water-conservation-south-africa-drought/587011/

    “…Labelled “Day Zero” by local officials and brought on by three consecutive years of anemic rainfall, April 12, 2018, was to be the date of the largest drought-induced municipal water failure in modern history….

    Then April 12th came and went, and news of the crisis evaporated….

    One year on, Cape Town has apparently made it through the worst of a historic drought without turning off the taps, although the water supply is still tenuous. How the city managed to evade disaster—a combination of water conservation and efficiency measures, smarter use of data, and a little help from Mother Nature—serves as a largely hopeful precedent for cities globally facing increasing risk of extreme environmental events. Still, serious challenges in establishing a resilient and sustainable water supply system for Cape Town remain….”

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    • eleggua

       /  April 18, 2019

      ‘What Cape Town’s drought can teach other cities about climate adaptation’
      April 3, 2019
      https://theconversation.com/what-cape-towns-drought-can-teach-other-cities-about-climate-adaptation-114379

      “…Cities need to build their capacity to adapt to this range of impacts. One of the best ways to do this is to learn from other cities’ experiences. Drawing lessons from other places that have gone through climate crises is a good way to guard against future shocks and stresses.

      One very recent case that cities around the world are watching is Cape Town’s severe drought and the threat of “Day Zero” – when the city’s taps were due to run dry. Although the city came close to having to turn off the taps, they managed to avoid it. After better rains in 2018 and significant reduction in water use across the city, the dams are now reassuringly fuller than they were in 2017 and 2018, although caution is still needed ahead of the winter rains.

      A lot has changed and it’s important to reflect on and share…

      …Not only is collaboration within government important, it needs to extend beyond government. During a crisis, all of society needs to be engaged, including citizens and the business sector. Technical expertise need to be balanced with opportunities for a broader group to share its perspectives and concerns. Partnerships can help gather the range of perspectives and support needed to respond to complex problems…

      …Yes, cities need to pay more attention to how climate variability impacts on their resources, particularly water. But just as important is strengthening the governance of the water system. A well-adapted city is one that understands who is responsible for what and has strong trust and partnerships between and within government.

      In order to build capacity to adapt, new types of skills are needed. Local government needs to pay more attention to how to build partnerships, enable flexibility and support learning. These are the types of skills needed for a well-adapted city, but still often lacking in local governments.”

      by Gina Ziervogel
      Associate Professor, Department of Environmental and Geographical Science and African Climate and Development Initiative Research Chair, University of Cape Town

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  15. eleggua

     /  April 18, 2019

    ‘International Rebellion Update #3 – The Empire Strikes Back’
    April 18, 2019 by Douglas
    https://rebellion.earth/2019/04/18/international-rebellion-update-3-the-empire-strikes-back/

    “…what might escape observation, despite being so much more important, is the way we do such things.

    Non-violence and consideration are not just abstract ethical commitments – they’re a constant practice which must be renewed and maintained, and they’re essential to the success of our movement. Despite very little sleep and great emotional exertion on the part of so many rebels, we’re absolutely (non-violently) smashing this practice. This can’t be overvalued!

    …today being the day of International Peasant Struggle, it’s only fitting that we’ve got another round of awe-inspiring actions on the international scene. Special credit must surely go to XR NYC for blocking Brooklyn Bridge and protesting outside City Hall, incurring/accruing 62 arrests in the process. XR New Zealand, on the other hand, wins a whole load of points for creativity!

    Other incredible actions include roadblocks in Sweden, occupations in Australia and Canada, and die-ins in Canada, Germany and France – many of the actions highlighting the theme of food security, in solidarity with farmers and peasants all over the world.

    One reason cited for today’s imposing police actions in London is the approaching Easter bank holiday: just as it takes officers out of their helmets, so will it swell our rebellious ranks. We’re now just one day from this watershed moment. Better yet, XR Scotland is reaching the UK capital this morning, bringing fresh and experienced rebels to help bolster the ranks of our now long-held sites.

    Our tactics are working. Our values are holding. Have no doubt: even if we all go home tomorrow, the world as we know it has changed.

    And we’re not going anywhere….”

    (lots of details on specific actions in the full piece at the link up above^^^)

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    • eleggua

       /  April 18, 2019

      “Waterloo Bridge

      Just as hope began shining in Parliament Square, a shadow was falling on Waterloo Bridge. Since Monday night’s incredibly close call (down to the last 15 arrestable rebels) the ‘real garden bridge’ has blossomed into a hub of high spirits. Sporadic waves of arrests throughout today were met with singing, clapping and cheering – and this writer can testify to the quality of WB’s kitchen.

      The upbeat, loving atmosphere was jolted by the ominous news coming from Parliament Square; bridge-based rebels were sent to reinforce the square. Not long after this, the police declared their intention to clear the bridge wholly that night, announcing they had orders to make indefinite arrests until the job was done.

      Calling for courage and solidarity, an announcer reasoned that the police’s urgency was likely due to the coming bank holiday, which is expected to swell rebel ranks even as it takes officers off the streets. An impassioned and determined crowd drew up its seated ranks, waiting for the first wave of arrests. Musicians led solidaristic songs and held a vigil.

      And very few arrests were made. As for PS, the reasons aren’t yet clear. The crowd’s high morale (again rooted firmly in music) and big numbers (around 100 sitting down in the road) were likely factors, together with the remarkably high concentration of media; a related speculation involves the police running out of vans!

      Whatever the reason – at 2:30am Waterloo Bridge remains, as the chants went, “everyone’s bridge”. Around 11:00pm, the stalwart crowd was rewarded with a serenade from Nick Mulvey.”

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    • eleggua

       /  April 18, 2019

      “Oxford Circus

      The endless party continues in Oxford Circus. There were three waves of arrests over the course of the day, with police now taking more of a mingling approach: weaving through the crowd to hone in on individuals, and for the first time approaching those at the foot of the iconic pink boat (from which vessel Chris Packham gave a heartfelt speech).

      …”

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  16. eleggua

     /  April 20, 2019

    Lil Dicky – Earth (Official Music Video)
    Premiered Apr 18, 2019
    13,355,748 views

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  17. eleggua

     /  April 20, 2019

    Space for US: Together for a Better Earth
    NASA
    Published on Apr 19, 2019

    “Space for U.S.” highlights some of the many ways that NASA’s Earth observations help people strengthen communities across the United States and make informed decisions about public health, disaster response and recovery, and environmental protection. For six decades, NASA has used the vantage point of space to better understand our home planet and improve lives. By highlighting advanced technology from a global perspective, our data helps provide people achieve groundbreaking insights. “Space for U.S.” features 56 stories illustrating how our science has made an impact in every state in the nation as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and regions along the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, and the Great Lakes. NASA freely and openly provides its Earth-observing data to those seeking answers to important global issues. The Applied Sciences Program in NASA’s Earth Science Division funds projects that enable innovative uses of NASA Earth science data, resulting in informed decision making to strengthen America’s economy and improve the quality of life worldwide.

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  18. Josh

     /  April 21, 2019

    Now over 830(!) arrests in the Extinction Rebellion protests in central London. I watched some of them being arrested, and they really are amazing people. This has been an inspiration right from the start, and has got a LOT of media coverage here!

    https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/greta-thunberg-climate-protests-london-extinction-rebellion-latest-a8879821.html

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